Document 428043

Mini-Review submission
Using TurnitinUK to submit assignments and how to avoid
plagiarism and collusion
November 2014
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Turnitin UK
By the end of this short session you will:
1) understand what TurnitinUK is and why it is being
used at King's
2) understand how to access TurnitinUK:
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On KEATS, in the practice Turnitin area, and
On submit.ac.uk to submit your final version of the
coursework
3) understand what an 'Originality Report' shows, and
how it may help you develop your academic writing
skills
4) know where to go if you require further information
about your use of TurnitinUK
What are plagiarism and collusion?
• "Plagiarism is the taking of another person's thoughts, words,
results, judgements, ideas, images etc, and presenting them as your
own."
• "Collusion is when two or more students collaborate, without
permission from the programme of study, to produce individual
assessments that when compared significantly overlap in content,
order, structure and format."
• From the 'College statement on academic honesty and integrity'
• http://www.kcl.ac.uk/college/policyzone/index.php?id=381
Importance of acknowledging your readings /
sources (called ‘citing’)
• The most common types of references are books, book chapters,
journal articles and web pages.
– Other references can be images, illustrations and tables, computer
programmes, conference proceedings, conference posters and
standards and patents.
• By acknowledging your sources in a bibliography you can:
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substantiate any statement you make
show that you have consulted widely
signpost related works and prior publications
enable others to check the evidence and accuracy of your information.
Different types of resource require different information in the reference.
Remember whatever citation style you use you should be consistent.
Book:
• Rang, H. P. and Dale, M. M. (2012) Rang & Dale's pharmacology. 7th edn. Edinburgh:
Elsevier/Churchill Livingstone.
Chapter in a book:
• Protein folding and protein folding diseases, in: Elliott, W.H. and Elliott, D.C. (2009)
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 4th edn. New York: Oxford University Press,
p.397.
Chapter in an edited book:
• Carracedo, A. (2013) Forensic Genetics: History, in Siegel, J.A., Saukko, P.J. & Houck,
M.M. (eds.) Encyclopedia of Forensic Sciences. 2nd edn. Waltham: Academic Press, pp.
206-210.
Ebook:
• Rang, H. P. and Dale, M. M. (2012) Rang and Dale's pharmacology. 7th edn.
Edinburgh: Elsevier/Churchill Livingstone. Available: http://www.elsevieretextbooks.com/reader/rang-dales-pharmacology-7th-edition (Accessed: 26-11-13).
• Choong, C-J. and Mochizuki, H. (2013) Gene Therapy for Parkinson Disease. In: eLS.
Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Available: http://www.els.net [doi:
10.1002/9780470015902.a0025023] (Accessed: 26-11-13).
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Journal article:
• Schrier, S.A. and Falk, M.J. (2011) Mitochondrial disorders and the
eye. Current Opinion in Ophthalmology 22(5): 325-331.
Lecture Notes:
• Jones, S. and PAL Leaders. (2013). Essential Study Skills. 4BBY1050.
Skills for the Biosciences. Lecture 3. London: King's College London,
1 Oct. 2013. Available:
https://virtualcampus.kcl.ac.uk/vc/bms/CYO/Module.aspx?Module
=4BBY1050 (Accessed: 26-11-2013).
Webpage:
• Daiger, Stephen P. and The University of Texas Health Science
Center, Houston, Texas (1996-2013) RetNet – Retinal Information
Network (online). Available: https://sph.uth.edu/retnet/ (Accessed:
26-11-2013).
• NHS Evidence (2013) National Library of Guidelines. Available at:
http://www.library.nhs.uk/guidelinesFinder (Accessed: 26-11-2013).
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Reference list (all resource types in one list):
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Carracedo, A. (2013) Forensic Genetics: History, in Siegel, J.A., Saukko, P.J. & Houck, M.M.
(eds.) Encyclopedia of Forensic Sciences. 2nd edn. Waltham: Academic Press, pp. 206-210.
Choong, C-J. and Mochizuki, H. (2013) Gene Therapy for Parkinson Disease. In: eLS.
Chichester: John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Available: http://www.els.net [doi:
10.1002/9780470015902.a0025023] (Accessed: 26-11-13).
Jones, S. and PAL Leaders. (2013). Essential Study Skills. 4BBY1050. Skills for the Biosciences.
Lecture 3. London: King's College London, 1 Oct. 2013. Available:
https://virtualcampus.kcl.ac.uk/vc/bms/CYO/Module.aspx?Module=4BBY1050 (Accessed: 2611-2013).
NHS Evidence (2013) National Library of Guidelines. Available at:
http://www.library.nhs.uk/guidelinesFinder (Accessed: 26-11-2013).
Protein folding and protein folding diseases, in: Elliott, W.H. and Elliott, D.C. (2009)
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 4th edn. New York: Oxford University Press, p.397.
Rang, H. P. and Dale, M. M. (2012) Rang & Dale's pharmacology. 7th edn. Edinburgh:
Elsevier/Churchill Livingstone.
Schrier, S.A. and Falk, M.J. (2011) Mitochondrial disorders and the eye. Current Opinion in
Ophthalmology 22(5): 325-331.
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Quoting and Paraphrasing – what
should you cite?
• Direct quotes must be cited in quotation marks
but it is more common in the sciences to avoid
this and instead to paraphrase (putting somebody
else's idea in your own words).
• Where you have paraphrased you must also still
cite your sources e.g. at the end of a paragraph.
• If you allude to the work of other people you must
cite those sources and provide a full reference list.
• Statements of fact need to be cited only if they are
not common knowledge.
A School perspective
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" The number of cases of plagiarism reported and subsequently proven is
increasing. Sometimes plagiarism occurs as a result of ignorance or
through students panicking when deadlines for submission of work seem
unlikely to be met. Whatever the cause, the consequences for a student
found guilty of plagiarism can be serious, under extreme cases can result in
expulsion from the College.”
From the School of Biomedical and Health Sciences Undergraduate
Student Handbook 2013-14, (section 4.10 Cheating)
https://virtualcampus.kcl.ac.uk/vc/bms/handbooks/BMS%20UG%20hand
book%202013-14%20FINAL.pdf
Be organised and reference your work
• Lack of time is seen as significant in cases of
plagiarism
– Lack of time often occurs when multiple assignments
occur close together
– Be organised and be aware of scheduling
• Check which citation style you have been asked
to use.
• Keep track of where you got your information
from. This will make referencing much easier
[common mistake to lose this information]
Key considerations
• Ensure you are confident you know what
plagiarism is:
– KEATS Plagiarism Module
http://keats.kcl.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=12505
• Reference your work
• Identify what referencing style you need to apply
(check your module handbook each time).
• Remember: You have nothing to worry about
if your work is your own and you have cited
the sources you have used
What is TurnitinUK?
• Text matching software
• Matches your work against:
– Over 24 billion online documents and web pages
– Material from 'cheat sites', e.g. essays to order
– Over 110,000 scientific publications such as
journal articles and books
– Work by other students at King's and other
universities (over 300 million student papers)
Why is it useful in the context of
plagiarism?
• Educative tool
– originality reports help you to see where you have
copied or paraphrased material and assess
relevant referencing
• Deterrent
– originality reports provide markers with an
indication of copied or paraphrased material
• Remember that there will be times where you will
quite correctly want to quote or, more likely,
paraphrase material – but remember to reference it!
Mini-Review assignment
• Draft version can be submitted multiple times via
the Plagiarism advice KEATS module
• You will need to submit the Final version of your
mini-Review to TurnitinUK at submit.ac.uk (full
guidance on this has been provided).
– Marks will not be affected by results from TurnitinUK
However
– they may be in future assignments; so use this as an
opportunity to learn
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Turnitin Repository
• For your mini-Review (R) assignment, multiple
submissions are allowed to the practice Turnitin area
(work not added to the Turnitin repository) and the final
submission via submit.ac.uk will be added to the
TurnitinUK repository
– Because nothing submitted to the practice area is added to the
repository you do not need to worry that you will get a fake
match with your own work when you do submit for real.
• In future summative assignments it is likely that papers
WILL be added to the TurnitinUK repository when you
submit coursework
Using Turnitin for Peer Review
• The final stage of the mini-Review coursework is to
use the “PeerMark” tool which enables students to
see and comment on each other’s work.
• After all mini-Reviews have been submitted via
submit.ac.uk to TurnitinUK, a PeerMark assignment
will be set up based on all these submissions.
• Each student will then gain access, anonymously and
through a randomized process, to two other students’
mini-Reviews.
• Additional information on the PeerMark process is
available in the Coursework tab on the VC.
– Remember to remove your name from the work you
submit to allow anonymity in the peer review process
Help and support
• Turnitin UK support pages on the Library Webpages:
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/library/help/plagiarism/turniti
nstu/index.aspx
• Support pages on the TurnitinUK site:
https://www.submit.ac.uk/en_gb/support-services
– Select information for students
• Course Leader
• Library Services
www.kcl.ac.uk/library/contact/index.aspx
Questions?
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