OBSERVATIOliJqST Buell Gallagher, New Chy College President,

OBSERVATIOliJqST
VOt Wt NO. ».
UN06RGRADUATE NEWSPAPER OF CONY"
MONDAY. SEPTEMBK 22. I9S2.
Buell Gallagher, New Chy College Presiden
To Address Students in Great Hall Rally
By Hal Cherry
Dr. BueU Gallagher, newly elected president of the College, plans to introduce himself to the student body at a program in Great Hall, tentatively
jMuled for Thursday, October 9th, at 12:30 P.M. The program, suggested by an OP reporter, will be coeponsored by Observation Post, Campos, and
atsdent Council. President Gallagher was elected to the $18,000-a-year post on June 16th by the Board of Higher Education and took office on September
M. He. succeeds Dr. Harry N. Wright, who reached the mandatory retirement age of seventy during the summer.
The election of President Gallagher ended over a year's search by the Board of Higher Education, which had considered more than 100 persons
<*for the position. Among thoce*given tentative offers were Ralph
Bunche and David E. Lillienthal
both of whom declined.
In an interview with Oboervalion Post, President Gallagher
stated that his educational philosophy is one of action rather
than wordy generalities, and that
By Joe Marcus
it :s based upon democratic and
Professor Raymond F. PurceU was appointed new chairman of the Hygiene Department over the ethical values. "I'm much closer
to the ideas, of John Dewey and
Saner, replacing Frank S. Lloyd in one o; the biggest athletic shakeups in the history of City Col- William H. Kilpatrick than any
lege. Betiring President Harry N. Wright \vh<> .-mnnunt .-d -ho removal of Lloyd stated that this change other schools of thought" he
said.
•mm made "in line with our pol-*
icy of revamping and modifying
i years as the College's basketball
Against Loyalty Oaths
Dr. Hairy H. VrighS
oar athletic program".
coach, Nat Holman has been
The new president was asked
Ex CoUef* PreMmt
| granted a year's sabbatical leave. his opinion of loyalty oaths for
tHhwr, developments saw Prof.
teachers.
He
replied
that
"no
one
The formal inauguration of the
. Bobby. Sand ha* be§n dropped
Sqfr Winograd relieved as Fac1
who
is
a
loyal
American
should
[
president
has not yet been planfrom the staff of the Economics
otty Manager of Athletics and
resent
making
a
voluntary
statened.
President
Gallagher dej Department His status in the HyBatty Sand, removed as Assisment
of
loyalty"
but
he
"could
clared
that
he
very
much wants
i giene Department is undecided at
taa* Basketball Coach.
1
see
no
reason
for
singling
out
the
"student
participation
in plannthe present time. He is on the
ftofessor Lloyd was offered a
teaching
profession
for
special
reing
and
carrying
out
the
inauguj payroll but has not been assign < u i r e m s n t s o f
teadung position in the Hygiene
ed. Baseball Coach Sol Mishkin,' l
loyally." Pres. ration."
Department which be accepted.
Soccer Coach Werner Rothschild, | Gallagher doubts the value of
In 1931 he became minister of
ftdfcjum- PurceU has been teachand Assistant Lacross Coach! s u c h o a t h s s i n c e " a dislnyal per- ^ FiTSt Congregational Church
ing at City College for the past
George Baron all received letters s o n w o u I d hardly hesitate to add- i n Pasgai^ New Jersey. He left
4l years. He had been expected
telling them not to expect l e - j t h c c r i m e o f Penunr to the al-i the church in 1933 to become
t» take a leaye of absence but
appointment to their respective ready contemplated crime of; pre$iaent of Talladega College,
waf persuaded to stay on by reTalladega, Alabama, a liberal arts
jobs. The College's reason for this treason."
tnaig President Wright.
The
President
said
that
he
•
college for Negroes,
action was that it could no long"would
not
knowingly
hire
a
per-j
Dr. Gallagher has long been
b dismissing Sam Winograd,
er afford to pay coaching salaries
son
who
was
committed
to
faj
interested
in the problems of NeDr. Wright stated that his decito non-faculty members.
Dr.
scism
or
communism.
In
bothigroes
in
the
United States. He
«at to remove him was based on
In a recent development the
ReKeved of Duties
cases
they
are
persons
whose
j
Yiis
doctorate
thesis at
the "consideration that an offiW
r
o
t
e
Hygiene Department announced
a # whose work was so intim- and we have appreciated the that Werner Rothschild will be minds are closed . . . I regard' Teachers College, Columbia UniaMw associated with the system commendable cooperation which, reappointed as Hesd Soccer them as unfit to tsach in any versity. in 1939 on "American
(CoKtimt** on Pa9e Tfcr««>
*£fc produced the evil in our you have given to the College! Coach. Dave Polansky, Corn- country but a totalitarian one." •
JflPttic record should not con- administration during various j merce Center Basketball Coach,
tiase hi such a position of re- phases of the investigation of the! was selected as Head Varsity
apaisibility, as we inaugurate our basketball scandaL"
Basketball
"*
* '" " Coach,
"
•ew athletic policy built along
II)
(See
After
thirty-three
consecutive
• • M y different lines". Presi-
Purcell Heads Hygiene Department
As Result of Big Athletic Shakeup
Bus Crash Injures Students
Wnght added, "This action
1 based upon any suggestion
f&ctency in the manager's
In fact, we recognize the
record which he had
as an efficient adroinistratbe past" Dr. Wright in
to Dr. Winograd, said,
*egard yoaar entire adminisArmy Hall has been declared unfit for occupancy by city au<* this responsibility as
thorities,
and as a result tbete will be no donnitocy life on the Golbeen motivated by comfer the It5£-S3 academic year. Sleeping quarters are
kyalty to tbe City College.
^available in Manhattanville but
no funds in the City
to ****** them.
Two hundred of the two hundred
and fifty students normally livimg in Army HaB have been
in substitute quarters in
A City College bus cnaitatwtng fourteen
slurp. I the neighborhood by the Depart-! 1* crashed near Donby, Vermont on August
r v * * - ^imente«St«den»LiJereomi«a*- : fieWtriRc«nttm.Tliedhiv«rloundtlmtte
Cp,,e
* ^
mg agency.
; gear shift or the brakes. He
Army HaB has been used byigaing nwr aclifl thirty yart
City CMlese for domirtory and?
Leo Ganx, a graduating senkwv had his
^hrfjH^uni space sance the end «f! prints of the otlwr students who lifted the
m
' World War Two. TW Department* prims of the other
! oC Hensmg and Bnikhngs coma*-? tured arm. Dan Gelher, ndtlor of
i e n the «-year^ld VirtorianlOthaa
GoUic Structw* a fire hazard., front
rorth of j
Some of the boys have angagid 1^ ^
Thrmt
iagainst the College. The Calliji as m»urt -i
Army Hat Dorms Slut Down;
MaabuttQaviUelbtAvQikbk
J«in4»P*;r
taking Geology
the last daqr ef the
unable to week the
Mondsy» Sspranngf 22* IvSS*
IHf OBSERVATION POST
F«fs iwn
Soles Boomisg ot UBI;Start
Fair PrUa Deal k Give*,
Stopped
11th.
Hm MUt 9 t Drill HaB watt
by n
the
track, o^nad bf 1U Elk Trans.
Coiqpanf, up tha
toward Convent Ava.
As ha stopped for a red liflhl
his Mar onto beohe as did hi*
•iiMtgswcr brafen. Start startad
soUiat downhill aud than turnad bis truck towaai tha wall s i
DriU Hal crashiog with such
iosca that a sachou of tha wall
was torn out. Start rseaivad
tMataaant fee shonldar and facia! injuria*.
Sept WCouoaWaetiiis
Addressed by Galkgker
StitfWt Council heW an unprecedented pre-semester
Operation Boot &le Is goirif oh in ftdl swiiit in Mtk reereat»ofr
meeting on Wednesday Sept 10, in order to set up Us varied
uige of Army Halt This is the eighth semester that the Used Book
working branches and to hear the traditional opening re.
• change is in existence. The main function of the organization is
'
"
. nive students a fair price deal-*
marks of the College president.*
the buying and selling of their | conclusion of this semester's work
Dr. Buell H Gallagher.
• xt books. Shelaon Halpern, who < the entire loan will be repaid.
President Gallagher gave a
the manager of this term's During the first week, of this
short address in which he defined
' BE reports that the book sales]term the Used Book Exchange
the functions and aims of student
.-<- going better than was previ-; doors wil! be open from 9:00 AMgovernment and the responsibilnsly expected and this year may j 6:45 PM.
ities of the students toward it and
<«• the best in the history of thef
_ ^ _ _ _ _ ^
their school Dr. Gallagher declared that student government
• •iganization.
is an opportunity to learn citiTemp+rmrg
Demm
During the past two weeks the
zenship,
and that we must learn
Used Book Exchange handled beit
in
order
to be able to practice
tween 8.500 and 9.500 books and ThsohoM has anpoiatad Dr.
it
in
the
outside
world. He stated
an estimated $15,000. Before the Gaorgo B. Spits, Jr. to sarva a*
that
it
is
the
responsibility
of
Kxchange closes it is expected to daaa of students temporarily.
the
students
to
respond
to
their
handle at least $25,000.
Spits, who raplaeas Dr. Harold
opportunities and participate in
Business has been so good that
was Lans's
the important activities of their
> he organization has been able to
college.
When these people parpay one-half of the $300 loan
Laos was damotad to assistK
flagpole
rally
to
be
held
this
ticipate
and
resolve their differanted last year by the Student ant professor of Carman aftar
1
Thursday,
Sept.
25th.
wil!
openjences
by
compromising
not their
ouncil. It is hoped that at the attacks «• his political views
activities for the College's FDR ideals but their stand and agree
Harry Pollak
by the Queens County Ameri- Young Democratic club.
on that which will be for the
H
etc SC Treat.
can Legiou. the Catholic War
The College Council of the (good of the greatest number, we
Veterans, and others.
Harry R. Pollak was elected to
Youth Division of the Democratic! have democracy in action. ReTheohaldL attar interviewing State Committee will sponsor a j spect for minority groups is fun- the vacated post of Treasurer.
thirty candidates and reoehriag Political Institute on Tuesday, j damental as is minority respect Alefn Chabot, Herb Viebrock,
at least three dadensiooa. has Sept. 23rd and Thursday, Sept. j for the common good. Prof. and Manny Solon were elected to
been unable to find a perma- 25th at 7:30 P.M. at the Groverj Buckvar, faculty advisor, also th« Membership Committee, AlCleveland Democratic Club, 21 j spoke, welcoming our new presi- lan Bard to the Executive Corndent and echoing his sentiments.' mittee.
East 75th Street.
College Dems
To Begin With
Flagpole Rally
College Gets
Mhattaavilk
Keys at Last
The keys of Manhattanville
.••••re officially turned ovei to
<'ity College on the afternoon of
Sept. 12, 1952 by the nuns of the
College of the Sacred Heart in
• simple ceremony in front of
the main hall at Manhattanville.
Dr. Harry N. Wright, retired
i-resident of City College, accpted the keys as a synbol of
;>->sses9ion of the eighteen and-ar.ilf acre t-ampus from th* Rev• :<'nd Mother Htrlcn Fitzpatrick
•lather Superior of the religiou-i• i
i.stitution. Dr. Wright then
• tided the keys to Dr. Buell G.
• • illagher, thp new College presint. This ceremony was attendby the leaving nuns, members
the College's faculty, the stunt government and nlurnni.
After the ceremony. Mother
i t/.patrick told Dr. Gallagher.
I hope the neighborhood will be'
' good to you as it has been tu |
Ii
Rooms to Let!
Atinctively Furnished
ROOM for Rent
PRfCR RKASONABLX
PIUVATB HOMC
Vn W««* 14 tut Street - Apt. tO
TANYA SHAPIRO VO. S 1038
99th 4k Riverside Drive
v*ly MMM wrth hot awt cold water
>«» cl<<wt<i. kttdwn prlvitccn, »^Blnvrntt Wtttroooi.
PATRONIZE
Joha^s Citf Gollcse
BnrbrrSbop
4 Bnrfoen
No Waiting]
!l616 AMSTERDAM AVE.
ARMY HALL
CAN1KN
AMI tn IwnB FJnL
S T U D E N T S !
-Write a Lucky Strike jingle!-]
H0 bOX tops! NO ENTRY BLANKS! K'S 635?/
Just write a 4-liiie jinzle based OR the fact that
LUCKIES ARE MADE i E T T E R
¥ 0 TASTE BETTER!*
Here's your chance to make yourself $25.
Just write a 4-line Lucky Strike jiagle,
based on the fact tliat Luddes are madb
better to taste better*
Then, if we select your jingle, well pay
you for the right to use it. together with
your name, in Lucky Strike advertising..,
probably in this paper.
Read the sample jmdes on this pace.
Then get the gang together, Ixeak out the
rhyming dictionary, and start writing. It's
fact And we're buying jincks by the busbd!
Hint—it you can sing your jingk. it's a
food ode?
Hint—OK WOK jiagfcs yon write, the
uoey you have a chance of making.
Hint— besurctoreadalltheimtructkiaat
WPWW
THE OtSOVATlON POST
f llWr—***+*
r««»
NSA Elects New National Officers;
Delegates Opposed to UMT, Batista
Bf Hail DiaaschiU
nr^wJS
J H S ^ .
9k
J^'^a!D^utm
awtlaimatiop, Richard Murphy of the Univereity of North Carolina. was elected aijEth
a
" f J ! * 8 4 * * " "«*»*
SK»dMt» Aiwoeiatinn at N S A s fifth annual student omurvss at the University
of Indiana, August 18th-27th.
•
Alao elected to national office'f
w e » : Leonid. Wileex. U n i v e r , ! ^ j ^ , ^ ^ ^ ^
^ ^
President; Janet Welsch. Smith
for Educational Affairs. The last
Vi
S ^Student
J ! ?Affairs;
^
S V™*"*}
ekcUd an the **'***
second
for
Steven
Voy- n«ned
baUot, was
when Joseph ,
Clancy,,
kovitch, Fordham College. NaSoodak (Physics)i Louis tional Vice President for Stu- CCNY Student Council Presil&ui and Abram Taffal (Bo- dent Government; Avrea Ingram, dent, rejected attempts to draft
I^M* Innguagas); and Arthur of the Harvard Graduate School, him for the office. Speaking to :
those who were supporting the
Ml (Studanl Ufa).
reelected as National Vice Presi- •draft", Clancy slated that he
»dent for International Affairs; felt that his job as president of,
the Student Council was one1
which required all of his time
and energy.
Another City College student
who declined nomination for national office was Hugh Schwartz
of the Evening Session. ChairJ.
Joseph L Clancy. Jr.
man of the Metropolitan New
Delegate* to NSA Cougreee
The Progressive Party-American Labor Party candidate York Region of NSA.
fir the Presidency and the ALP candidate for New York's
Tan-Day Maralhon
nist dominated International try. Concerned with the theory
senatorial seat will speak in Great Hall, Thursday, October Elections climaxed a ten-day Union of Students' invitation to and practice of college newspa- • 2 pending approval by the Stu- "marathon", which resembled an a so-called "Unity Meeting" in pers and the role of the editor as
dent Faculty Committee on international rather than a na- Bucharest, Rumania; affirmation a student leader, the meeting had
tional conference of students; of their support of the principle the support of editors of leading
School Affairs.
The College's Young Progress- youths from Holland, Switzer- of Federal FEPC. and rejection dailies and weeklies of the Asives of America last week an- land, West Germany, India, Iran, of the proposed Universal Mili- sociated Collegiate Press. Outstanding figures in the field of
nounced plans for the appearance the PhiUippines, Cuba, and many tary Training program.
newspaperwork,
including Mr.
Editors' Coafasanc*
of Vincent Hallinan, presidential other nations addressed the conFred
Hackenger,
education
editor
candidate and Corliss Lamont, gress, and participated in dis- The congress was preceded by
of
the
New
York
Herald
Tribune,
cussions.
a four-day College Newspaper
candidate for the Senate.
Editor's
conference and a similar addressed the conference.
The five hundred delegates and
SFCSA would have to hold an alternates, who represented eight Student Body Presidents' confer- The "Editors" conference was
followed by the Second Annual
emergency meeting to consider hundred thousand American col- ence, both sponsored by NSA.
this new request
lege students, were also ad- The College Newspaper Edi- Student Body Presidents meeting.
Halliman, the l a w y e r who dressed by such outstanding per- tors' conference was held in an- This meeting dealt especially
came out of retirement to defend sonalities as: Mr. Pierre Fran- swer to requests for such a meet- with the problems of student
Harry Bridges, west-coast labor cois, Director of UNESCO; Mr. ing by editors all over the coun- body leaders on the campus.
leader, was recently released Patrick M. Murphy, Director of
from prison where he served a the American Civil Liberties
six-month term for contempt of Union; and Phillip Willkie, son
(Cemt*tm*4 from Fu#e Omej
t tenance. He felt that it would
court.
of the late Wendell Willkie and
improvements
before
it
may
be
necessary for these dormitorLamont is a teacher of philos- member of the Indiana State
ies
to be* self-supporting, and
ophy at Columbia University, Legislature. Mr. Willkie was a again be used as a dormitory.
charge
sufficient fees to cover
and is the editor of an anthol- participant in a lively debate on Since the building will be razed
heat,
light
and janitorial services.
To Speak Sere
ogy of poe|ry "Man Answers the coming presidential elections. in the Spring to make way for a
The
Student
Council Affairs
Death".
His opponent was Mr. Dudley
playground,
the
investment
is
not
Committee
has
announced the
Whitecotten, a representative of
considered
worthwhile.
holding
of
open
hearings
on the
the "Young Democrats".
fOmHmmvd frem Pm§e One/
dormitory
question
during
the
The
dorms
in
Manhattanville.
Formal speeches, however,
first
week
of
the
term.
School
Cane and the Negro College."
formerly
used
by
the
female
stuwere wily a minor part of the
~ * a •ktspresident of the Nacongress. The major portion of dents, need overhauling, the mo- Affairs wiU try to determine the
Assodathm for the Adtime at the Congress, whose ney for which is sought by Stu- campus demand for dormitory
of Colored People.
theme was, "The Student and the dent Council as part of the New space, and will then hand the isJ k . Gallagher and his wife are
Crisis in Education", was devoted York City, 1953 capital budget sue over to the SC Legislative
*j"*»fat the gate house in
to framing NSA's policy for the Hearings on the budget will be committee. The Legislative Committee deals with city authori•••"ftattville, near 133rd Street
coming year. Some of the more held in November.
ties,
and wiU represent the stuJJConvent Avenue. He hopes
important resolutions follow: Dean Engler has stated that if
dents
at City HaB when the Col• n Manhattanville will be
condemnation of Gen. Batista for the dorms are set up it wiB be
lege's
request for funds
* * fcr comnlete uss by the
his restriction of student rights virtually impossible to
up
m
the
capital budget
in Cuba; rejection of the commu-' municipal funds for their
tLimz
^^\Z^Z^SvZZZ
htend to Have Hallinan,
lament for Great Rally
Army Hall Slant Dnwn
Callagher...
L&tter*
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#•>!
ADVICE TO FRESHMEN
WMAGM690*!*
i y Irv Cohan.
*.
just
As the passage of time may well prove, the
. hman year is the moat difficult time in col*
-•.-• This is so essentially because, in the majorANBV
Wa aa»
' •• of cases, transition must ha made. It it in the
ftotniw Bdltor
time by
with
•king of this transition that previously acquired,
ASSOCIATE aOAtD
• '<Jdy study habits begin to show at the aaami,
•• .•? an absence of a feeling of personal responsiExtra-curricular activities are an integral and
Casgr
i.iity loads to floundering end lethargy in
indispensable part of college life. They lose their
AdnttAD*
value; however, when they are permitted to ocA4vtft*ac
cupy
a
disproportionate
part
of
your
time.
These
STAFF
I
worthwhile activities, like many wonder drugs,
First, it ia aaeaasary that yon reeo^iae this become toxic when taken to excess. Don't hesi- NEWS STAFP: Pwl 6t«*9«t. Kd O-cry. MeXteSe £•*•*_*«* *J»«Nr. SMy
. nportant fact: the burden of learning is no tonger tate to participate, but at this early stage of the
KohM. 8«md Urgs. UoM«d immer. UoMid ShaeMt. Lz Roau. H*^
"ii the instructor but instead, weighs squarely on collage game it is best to indulge mildly.
St«m.
the shoulders of tha leamar—your shoulders. The
FEATURES STAFF: N«il Oiwdiita. Morrsy Etomtein.
Ma«*r»d Utr.tor. T«d
StM Wackar. Pktt Wotcoff. T«|
If you are confronted with a problem, there
JOMS. J«v 6. S«mtky. ROM* Sfcumsfcy.
instructor expects you to pursue knowledge,
Uewttrnt. 8M Bin>b«i»m.
rather than the opposite practice, which is stand- are people att the college who are interested in
SK>RTS
STAFF: LM D»fler. SUva MsrbvrQ. H««cW NisMMon.
helping
you
solve
it.
whether
it
deals
with
acaard at the elementary and high school levels.*
BUSINESS STAFF: Ingrid Finland.
demic
difficulties,
financial
embarassments,
a
job,
When you thoroughbly assimilate this concept.
FACULTY APVISttS
or even trouble with a boy or girl friend. The
half tha battle will have been wen.
Department of Student Life (120 Main) is connAVMONnr. reacau.
If classworfc is to be of any value to you. you cerned with the activities and problems of all
m. vonauwAM
••:ust keep paee with the instructor. At the abaence students, while the Freshman Advisory CommitBditortaJ PoUcy ie determlmeS 1* the Mandoimo
• : direct pressure, from him it is very easy to fall tee (Army Hall 39A> has been set up to deal with
untti the Board of DirecUrre hoe been eeteeted.
t - hind and, as a result, you may find yourself the problems of freshmen specifically. These are
a frantic struggle to complete the term's work. two places where you can always find a friend
This publication k supported by shtdw* hm.
Kv< n if the work Is completed, it is of little lasting when in need of one.
• iue because not much is retained after oram-,
The keys to success in college, then, are evaluflung for an exam.
ation, planning; and organization. Every phase of
The kay weed in studying is
college life is important and each has its place.
not jus* of your studies bat of
Know the place and importance of each phase
Nothina should be left to chance or
and budget your time and energy accordingly.
vised schadnMng. Too should see to it thai
This is by no meant the only road to sucGoing all out to establiish House Plan as a creative as well as
daily patten is oatahHahed ia which
cess, but rather pari of a path to
.
a
social
institution, David Newton, Director of House Plan anphase of your eellege activity is provided foe.
and effidaacy in solving tha unique
nounced today that the expected 1200 entering freshmen and old
This should iadude a defiaita amount of
of cottage hi*.
'
*house planners would find new
additions to tike Student Houses.
RegtetratioB . • . . « B y
Besides the rejuvenated Rumpus room and the new juke box,
house planners will find a new
face at the Assistant Director's
desk. Miss Lee Kroman, Assistan Director of House Plan since
All males must upon reaching
1947 is leaving and will be suctheir eighteenth birthday register
ceeded
by Mr. Jerome Gold, the
at their nearest draft board. StuDirector of the Evening Session
dents can also apply for the SeHouse Plan. Mr. Newton expressed
lective Service Student Deferment Test at the same time.
regret at the departure of Miss
Korman but also praises Mr.
Shortly after you register for
Gold as a capable and wonderful
the draft, you will receive a
replacement.
Questionnaire. Complete the section on student status and/or
In addition to the regular Frosh
ROTC.
Open House, Sept. 22 to Oct. 20
If you receive a 1-A classificaand the Welcome Back Dance,
tion report within ten days to
Saturday nite, Sept. 27, House
Bm. 208 Main and request that a
Plan with the assistance of the
form 109 be sent to your local
Camp Marion Committee is planboard. If you are in the ROTC
ning a House Plan -Camping
and eligible, ask that form 44 be
Weekend.
sent.
Beginning October 7, the StuThe next step may possibly be
dent Houses will initiate the
Stuart Clarksoa
a physical examination, and if
Vet Admtimietrmtor
House Plan Film Festival featurfound acceptable, you will reing American and foreign films,
ceive an order to report for inincluding hits such as. "The
duction together with a cancellaRoosevelt Story". "The Baker's
tion of such older, and a new
W i f e " (French). " T o r m e n t "
classification of 1-S(C> to the end
(Swedish) and a host of other exof your academic year Tikis decellent films to be shown every
ferment isftiandatory.At the end
Tuesday afternoon.
of this period the board will
review your case. At such time, if
Kcqnomy has come to city col- yon do not receive a further de• • Gone are the days when ferment, you have the right to a
lules of recitations carpeted hearing and appeal,
hall floors and the street outIf you receive a 2-S dassifica>. No more wiU these pamph^tkm,
ts be used as shoe wipers* w i n - | » _ , yon
«» _should
. . * • . write to i . B o w l w , , h m o n e n i
wdeanen,andspitbaUmateri-r***
*th*
**
siHumtma
»«* expiration and request an ex
A new policy went into effect tension until gtaduathm, far gradBy Pawl
t a t y this term. Hereafter, all uate school, or employment m an
is Students returning to DriU
Four ROTC instrnctocs have in US. I Infantry. 1st Lt. Horatio
fees must be paid before the
Ball wiB find that a number of left the college. Capt. Aquehno Hoggard, a Korean vet, wiU teach
student ia awarded a
If you
have been made during has returned to registrar's office, MS. L Another new arrival is
A hole b punched in the
;
The new honor sys- U . Goochnan has been returned Sgt John Bookless, who served
the
Forces
< 3rd making it - i n •ililt ftr
tem
will
ga
into effect; several to inactive duty and has lesumed withTth Army H. Q. in Geraaay.
d.'nts to
»
wiU be
his teaching dutaee in the New
- S.-dulfc
been added
aw anas wffl be
Yertc school system, and two of
According to Mr. Pkayne of the
directive applying to en- the enlisted men have been re- to the
R< gistrae's office; this new patocy
Small wiU be applied.
of
The latter are Sgts.
For the first time in the hisand Curtin. both of
aU
of the coOef* ROIC an
been sent to the Far
cede witt be ecforaed. Tins
Sgt. Mastrierani served
code, af^roved last spring by a overseas during the last war, and
of the members of the ad- has taught at City anwe t*4f.
cocpsv deals with cheating The new faces in the DriU Hall
itions and is similar to include three officers and three
feet at West Point
1st U . Norman
It alatos that a student aiding
a graduate of West*
on an exaonnatMn
who recently returned I
equal gnHt with the per- front Germany win teach MA n j
Infantry. 1st Lt. James Walk, an* (this
man just
watt
ha an
fail to
HoasefilaaGetting Ready
For "Creative"Semester
Detailed Dope Qa Tie Draft;
Deferment Dongs Described
'13c Saved
Is 13c Made
Regbfr
NewFaces, Physicals, & HonorSystem
Featured by ROTC Course This Term
CimbNMem
Sf
OBSERVATIOl&fiiT
K-^y:
SAUAGHet SUttlfiMEMT
A Close-up:
f^d^fBt G a l l a g h e r was
^ ^ to leant about a hade
JJ7 t o the President's office.
Dfcde* leads to a hack stairJ J me and of which leads to
The Freshman President,
Buell Gordon Gallagher
to the sidewalk.
ftm arited whether fids stair(m vs* used aa a means of
iMMb ^tw«gfc** laughingly
tfd aou Ha insistod that the
grifCMe was used to bring
lud ^ to the faculty room
affairs am held
By Jerry Rosea and Jerry Lndwig
Buell Gordon Gallagher, CCNY'S illustrious freshman, can't quite be called a "Jack-of-an-yrades," but
his background is varied enough to qualify him for the titie of "Jack-of-many-trades." His is the background
of a man who has been active both in and out of education. He is a man whose reputation is one of liberal, tolerant thought. He has been called a man of ideals and a man of action.
Stadeat VIPs
Get Behind The President—BueU Gallagher
Gallagher
The eopoimtwtent of Buell O. Gatkf^r to the preeidencg of thia i:
tthfeheeraieed coneiderabte hope \
ni epocnJetion among the student >'
U&. Beprtnted below are the opm- • ]
im of student "leaden" em the; i
, Vice
I tUak it would be very diffi0$ to find a better man. He
noas willing and able to let
dahpts have a share in govemag the College. He has respect
ik the individual. It's a wonderMguag.
Qdme Schwarta, Ex-Ti
. ef Student CoundU
' Btfe a very dynamic person.
Bft charming, eager, and willing
niesra about students at CCNY,
dlof which makes for very good
eat-
Ptesident Gallagher is a very
fnd man. He is bound to do
fMd for the College,
•anan J. Cohan. Mantrnj Edi•WiOP.
Ks obout time this school had
tfiesident who is not ovsrburby age, introversion, preand overbearing adminassistants. Gallagher is
greatest thing to hit City
since Grand Slam.
ent Gallagher impresses
•* as being the student's version
da college president. He seems
•Smg to listen to and weigh
* tbades of student thinking.
Ih. Gallagher is bringing a
^ y refreshing personafity to the
* • of president of Crty Col*^- His frank approach and
to deal with students;,
go far in promoting a'«
relationship between stu-"
faculty, and
Data on Dr. Buel Galoghor's Predecesors
of City CoOege. He foMows a
Dr. BwH a OaUagher is the seventh
have held the past befote IMB.
of diffcrest ootlooks srd
«f the "Free
Oft JaMaiy 27, ttttl Dr.
Ike MS men'of
the first
fintdaon He enOed the
the nary man, Gomel Atenaader & to the very threshold of the depression, when, m ItgT, Dr.
can be givento}Webb, a civil war
rredenfli B.
the masses . • controlled • - .|led the collect
not bv the privfltged few. but by iaing of «henew cenmiy.
Under the John H. Fmley. a New York possibly the
hictocy ef the college. Many
ed Webster.durimt theiTnaas edrtoc, assumed the
fl»cts
ap-(to ISIS.
) Sidney E.
the yean from I S t l
led
He is an ordained minister
of the Congregational Church;
an artful phrasemaker: "I ant
prejudiced against fascism
and against communism, but
beyond that. I am prejudiced
against practically all forms
of prejudice.*' Or "a college
ought not to stand as an academic sentinel defending its
traditions. It ought to be, as
it is increasingly becoming, a
working part of the community, reaching to where the
people are," he said.
President Gallagher, by his
record, has long been a champion of the rights of minorir
ties. He feds so strongly
about n e e intolerance that
for a decade he and his fan*'
ily lived in the heart of (be
deep south refusing to conform to the Jim Crow lawn.
These liberal leanings have
found expression through,
unong other fhannrts, his
wotk as National Vice-prear
lent of the NAACP (Nationtl Association for the Advancement of Colored People). He has written three
books on the subject of race
relations: "Color and Conscience: The Irrepressible
.nflict"; -Portrait of a PU. . im: A Search for the Chrisr; Way in Race Relatione";
: 1 American Caste and the
- -rro Coflege."
Gallagher had a brief whirl
•htics in IMS. He was then
r:ng ethics at the Pacific
•«,] of Religion in California,
•. i was persuaded by the urg.^s of local labor and liberal
• aders to run for Congress. Running as a supporter of the Fair
Deal program, he was defeated
in a close race.
Dr. Gallagher comes now from
Washington Where he recently
resigned his post as Assistant U.
S. CoaaaniMiMwr of
TMt OllilVATION K>$T
at. Mtt
freshman President-Continued
ascending to the Presidency of tional interest American techhis wcceseori, and although only
nical superiority depends on the
City
College.
:• young man of forty when he
maximum use of trained perPresident
Gallagher,
Who
mar.' < ame President of the College,
sonnel, he believes.
ried
a
former
campus
classmate
'...> ten year reign was the moat
He also recognises the vajue of
in
1827,
has
two
children,
IfaryeL
j -rogressive and enlightening that
Federal
scholarshipa to enable
a junior at Oberlin College, and
the College had ever enjoyed up
those
qualified
to have more easy
Barbara, who is a high school
u, that time.
access
to
higher
education.
senior.
There Is every reason to beHe stand* firmly for the tights
: • ve that Dr. Gallagher has the
of teachers to express their poAs President of one of the litical opinions. Those in the
•tine potential that Pinley poslargest colleges in the world. Dr. teaching profession should have
. ssed when he stood on this
Gallagher has some very definite the same rights in such matters
.-.milar threshold of office.
ideas on what a college should as all other voters, he b e l i e v g ^
Gallagher, President at fortyrepresent and what its position
tight, is one of the comparatively
Dr. Gallagher's record seems to
should
be in the community.
younger men to hold that office;
show that he has the background
A great school such as City and experience for thia job.
Finley, at forty, was the youngCollege should, he believes, -have
i st. By coincidence, Fin'ey also
But what do the majority of
tentacles everywhere." It should the students expect from their
•as an author of note, had a vatouch the lives of everyone in the President? What are the require*
: •tly of interests and activities,
community
in some way.
nd held a position similar to
iments they feel must be met?
A school such as ours, with a Perhaps the following are a few
toat which Dr. Gallagher has renon-resident student body, pre- | of the questions they would like
• ntly resigned as Commissioner
sents a special opportunity in Dr. answered:
• • Education. An interesting sideGallagher's opinion. He feels it is j • Will he be popular with stu-:ht is that at age 29, when Galimperative that "each student ; dents and faculty?
I >uher was inaugurated as Presifeel a sense of partkipaMon and j aWill his rulings be .nist?
• :• nt of Talladega College, in
belonging.**
Alabama, it was Finley who
• Will he recognize the rights
Commenting further on college 'of all student groups?
:: ;tde the inaugural speech, at!
(.JHater's request.
j
problems. Dr. Gallagher asserted j • Will he work tor the further
that
he does not plan any drastic enlightenment and advancement
But more important, the simchanges
or revisions in the pres- of the College?
.:ar:ty between the two extends
ent
procedure.
As he phrasfd it:
-If into their respective per• WiU he enhance the reputa"There
may
be
a few colleges tion of the College?
nalities. Dr. Gallagher, as his both college and community. One
During the period of his presirecord clearly indicates, has a entrance opened on the campus, dency at the Alabama school, he with difficult problems where a
• Will he guide us with a
flair for getting things accomp- and the other opened on one of managed to continue his studies, drastic surgical approach would steady, yet unobtrusive hand'
II hed, and as was Finley, he can the main streets of the town. The and in 193d he received a Doctor be helpful. But in most cases I
• Will he be more than a figi>v quite dogmatic at times when Negro student at the college and of Philosophy degree from Co- think an institution must be al- urehead and less than an auhe believes that a certain thing the white townsman used the lumbia University. In 1943, Ober- lowed to develop * naturally in thoritarian?
should be done.
same entrances. There was no lin (Ohio) College awarded him terms of its own past, its unique
• WiU hs be able to gxba the
"back door** which would have the degree of Doctor of Divinity. needs, and its relation to the respect and* cooperation of the
Past Record
As the thesis for his doctorate larger community."
Board of Trustees and the PresiGallagher, hailed in the Metro- meant segregation.
His efforts also at the Pacific at Columbia, Mr. Gallagher wrote Above all. Dr. Gallagher is of dents of the other three Munipolitan press when he was an"American Caste and the Negro the firm opinion that "the disnounced as the Board of Higher School of Religion in California College" based on his experience tinction between town and gown cipal Colleges?
where
he
taught
after
leaving
Can Gallagher come through?
Education's choice for this presiat Talladega, the first of the must be broken down, and the
In his own words: T h i s is the
dency, is a man of personal Talladega, further indicate that three books Dr. Gallagher wrote college must lead the way. Edtiling I've been getting ready for
charm and his colorful back- he is a man of tolerant beliefs. on race relations.
ucation has got to come out of its aU my life."
ground should mors than stir the The Pacific School of Religion in
Berkeley, California, is a post- "Color and Conscience: The Ir- ivory tower and be an active
interest of the students.
graduate
institution for advanced repressible ConfUct," which was force in all parts of community
One respect in which the new
religious
training. Although a previously quoted from, was pub- life."
President's background is very
Congregationdlist
himself. Dr. lished in 1946 by. Harper & Brosw, "I think City College can play {Continued from Preceding Page)
definitely of interest is his earnGallagher's
classes
at the school and went through three print- a great role in making New York ROTC. charges of communism
<st and unceasing fight against
the community it can and should and anti-semitism being hurled
represented
all
religious
sects, ings.
racial bigotry and intolerance. As
be."
from
the
various
Protestant
deat the coUege, and censorship of
In
1946,
Dr.
Gallagher
also
the New York Times said in a
nominations
to
rabbi's
and
Greek
student
publications. It was these
wrote
a
fictional
work
on
the
ap• vcent editorial, he acquired his
Orthodox
clergymen.
President
Gallagher,
since
takcritical
issues that led to the
plication
of
Christian
ideals.
This
color-blind" attitude at TallaDr.
Gallagher's
etforts
and
acing
office,
has
been
questioned
eventual
resignation of Rcbinson
book
was
not
a
novel,
but
rather
dega, a small Negro college in
complishments
both
at
Talladega
on
many
of
the
controversial
isNelson
P. Mead, then chaira
collection
of
simulated
clipAlabama, where Gallagher was
sues
of
the
day.
and
at
the
Pacific
School
show
pings,
editorials,
and
brief
writ
man
of
the
history depertment
President from 1933-1M3.
that
he
is
a
man
of
high
ideals,
a
On
loyalty
oaths,
his
position
is
was
appointed
acting president
ings
woven
together.
"Portrait
of
When Dr. Gallagher accepted
I
man
who
will
stand
up
for
a
that
the
loyal
citizen
should
not
of
the
college
in
1336, but rea
Pilgrim:
A
Search
for
the
the invitation to go to Talladega,
:
principle
and
who
will
practice
hesitate
to
take
such
an
oath,
but
signed
in
1941
to
return to his
Christian
Way
in
Race
Relahi addressed himself to the role
his
own
sermon.
"compulsory
oaths
are
ineffective
teaching
duties.
tions,"
sold
70,000
copies
and
was
which a Negro college had to
The Board of Higher Educawidely used as a study book in because one who already conplay in a segregated rural comtemplates
the
high
crime
of
tion
then appointed a math proProtestant
churches
throughout
munity. Ha came to the conclu- ! Bom in Rankin, Illinois, the
treason
would
scarcely
hesitate
to
fessor,
Harry N. Wright to the
the
country.
sion "that the basic task of an son of a Congregational minister,
add
the
minor
crime
of
perjury."
acting
presidency,
still ponderall-Negro college was to work it- {much of Dr. Gallagher's youth After leaving Talladega in 1943,
ing
a
permanent
man
lor the
Dr.
Gallagher
has
taken
a
self out of exist-'nee by trans- ! was spent in parsonages in Mon- and spending the interim years
job.
stand
opposing
the
use
of
labels
forming the society around it." jtana? North Dakota and Minne- as Professor of Christian Ethics
The rest of the story is known.
Later, Dr. Gallagher, as a re- sota. He attended Carleton Col- at the Pacific School of Religion, for libel and the methods of SenIt
stretches over a period ot world
ator
Joseph
R.
McCarthy,
Repubsult of his added experiences in j leg". Northfield, Minnesota, where Dr. Gallagher joined the United
war.
a quest for unity, and above
lican
of
Wisconsin.
• Xpgro college, and after further i he received his Bachelor of Arts States Office of Education in 1949
aU—peace.
Today President Galand he resigned his most recent He approves of draft deferorving the cancer of bigotry. degree in 1925.
lagher
takes
over the "experifame to further conclusions. As j Dr. Gallagher later studied at position as Assistant U. & Com- ments for college students. caUment"
from
President WrigbL
thefn necessary in the naso forcefully wrote in his \ the Union Theological Seminary, missioner of Education
tSoioc and Conscience: The and in 192t was awarded the
Irrepresfble Conflict":
* Bachelor of Divinity degree from
"The necessity of social at lion
school. He was, upon his
should be clear without argu- graduation from the Seminary,
ment. No matter how much the ordained as a minister in the
individual here and there may Congregational Church, thereby
wish to live by the Christian following in the footsteps of his
ethic, he cannot freely do so in father.
•he present American caste sysHe studied at the London
? m. He is prevented and inhibit- School of Economics in 1930. and
: at every turn by the patterns from 1931-1933 he was minister •
• •:' segregation, the laws and cus- of the Pint Congregational}
•• ms and pressures of his society, Church in Passaic X?w Jersey. \
and the w wit ml ihncr tensions The years between 1933 and
nd tears which fntstrate his ef- , 1943 w r e spent at Talladega, the
forts and weaken his purposes." young minister having left the.
He believes that the "dual job pulpit in order to assume th^j
.>f education and of social engi- presidency of the small Alabnma!
neering is mach more than ser- college. It was at Talladega, as
Ticntatog and preachment and we have mentaon^d, that Dr. Gal>ok writme. It is high minded. lagher took such in increasing innoemk pecscnal commitment. terest in the piobhinjw of the
: :.w wMe and fearless social ac- Negro, and where ha formulated
' .Ml."
*
many of his iiberal ideas.
Dr. GaUagber did mant than When he became president of
A .'3te
in correcting this soda! the all-Negro college, he said: "I <
•v . 1 .
At Talladega, be raised do it becau-e I will have an opAir":
:nds and built a hbtnry to sen— portunity to live what I preach.*" t
WIU if to K e y Fit?
Dmtm . . .
y^frfrp—** t t HH
THE OKERVATION POST
B u d GraBcicik^p
By WaHar R. Porget.
^•f*
PurceU Replaces Lloyd;
Krakower Hew Supervisor
Two men with a total offifty-nixyean of servioe to the CoUege have reeently been ap»
pointed to two of the higheat poaitious in the Department of Hygiene, thoae of Oiainnntf
and Supervisor of Hygiene classes. Professor Raymond P. PuroeU, new Chainwan of tha
j * mm looked soberly out of the window, his pale blue eyes
mti to thought behind his gold rimmed glasses. His thumb
•atlsvly back and forth across his lower lip as his forehead
^ k M i p deep thought
ffear, fatigue, and futility is the prevailing temper of our time.'
Bedded quickly in his chair and leaned forward to emphasize
£ foint
t h e hope for the world is transmuting these words into a
t^Om i* 1 * Ua w o r l d t**0* * n d Pcosperity. The UJf. is far
km pstfsrt it ia to be supported, used, and improved. It ia
gs best agency we have for the job that has to ha done."
He icflected for a moment, offered a cigarette to the reporter,
j^cgatinued.
I f c UN. has given us what the League of Nations should have.
B* ve did at San Francisco is what we should have done at VergBuWe are like the man who is always missing his bus. We must
fcsfaat we have to do now, not what we should have done twenty
If we realize what we have to do in order to insure
ja& there is hope for us. If we think the job is done, there is
4 Department has been teaching
here for forty-one years, while
Processor Hyman Krakower has
been a member of the faculty
since 1930, excepting a six-year
break during which he was affiliated with Townsend Harris
High School. Professor Krakower's new assignment is to the
job previously held by Colonel
PurceU.
The new Chairman has no immediate plans for bettering and
enlarging his department. "Right
now" he said in an interview
with the Observation Post several days ago "I have no plans,
other than getting the department off to a good semester.
Well jurt attend to our knitt" twos our first meeting with the newly appointed President.
ing." The Colonel indicated that
. b€s not stand on ceremony" were his first words as we waited
he would like to enlarge the inbiteroomadjoining bis office. He had come out to greet us and
tramural program at the Colleger
rier«into his office. Before we knew it, we were sitting comas soon as possible. For this, he
tohMy en the sofa, accepting a cigarette. His words soon became
will need more money with
vhich to operate, and therefore
MR art more meaningful. We facetiously asked why he smoked
;he plans are only very tentative
Kotda'king-sized cigarette.
ai this time.
"Yea get more for your money" he answered, a boyish smih
One change that wiU be put
oaaeg his sensitive face. When he smiles, his chin,- square ami
into
effect immediately is the ininvt, stems to jut out even more than it actuaUy does.
stallation of the entire women's
A prepared list of questions was almost forgotten as he easily
Hygiene program in the gymnafKcd hem one topic into another. We were discussing Academic
sium at Manhattanville.
btedoai and freedom of speech.
Professor PurceU began at the
Thsre is no ahsolnto rfeht" ho said. "Every right has with
CoUege as an Assistant Tutor,
it mm rasponsihitity." Ha singlod out Senator McCarthy. "By
receiving $400 for the job. "Even
•Mriaatiag tha character of other people, McCarthy is irrain 1910 it wasn't much money,"
naadhly using tha right of freedom of speech." Each wosd was
laughed the Colonel. "In the sumpondered and dalivesed with candor. "This is a man
mer we used to seD shoes. Some
F. Pnreefl
m thought to oussalves, as ha sat there with ques»
of the boys worked in the wheat
New Department Seed
firad at him. From time to tune his easy smile puncfields of Kawas, while othern
slaved m the coal mines." <E£Note. Now he spends his suaa^
of today live a more complex life than they did twenty
msrs slaving in Colorado.)
he remarked, in answer to our question, "And in that
Professor PurceU attended seretheir Uves are more difficult" He closed his eyes momeneral colleges as an undergradwfa% tbialnng deeply.
ate, among them New York UniTtm wants to possess his own souL He wants peace. Personal
versity, Oswego State Normal
ntniy can come by flight from the complexities of life today."
CoUege, Harvard College, and the
Befawnedfor a second. "That's the coward's way out—an empty
at. Ihe important thing," and here he leaned forward again, "the Dr. Arthur Des Grey, newly color photography, and hopes to United States Army School for
appointed Faculty Manager of get some of his shots printed in Officers. He also studied at
apntrnt thing is to maintain poise in the midst of battle."
Teachers College of Columbia
Be took out his naU-file and concentrated on removing a speck Athletics here at tho college and professional magazines.
Howard
Spohr,
affectionately
University.
He spent two years
(ftrtfrotn his naiL We asked him his first impressions of City
known
as
"Chippy,"
has
been
in
the
army
in World War one,
Wtagfc He was quick to answer, his sincerity manifesting itaelf in
with
the
college
since
1938
rising
from
a
second lieutenancy
<••? wnd be uttered.
an
Administrative
Assistant
to
to
the
rank
of
captain.
He became
"We need all kinds of schools", he said "We need Ivy League
the
Athletic
Association.
Taking
a
fuU
Colonel
during
World
War
"hd* private schools, and municipal coUeges. City CoUege takes
a
five
year
stretch
in
the
army,
IL
hpheenot in competition with other kinds of colleges, but in comhe was a lieutenant colonel from The Colonel and Mrs. Purctfl
with itself—to be its own best."
194! t'. 1945.
are the proud parents of a sen
tobanoitber boastful nor apologetic with respect to
A N vv Yorker, he attended and a daughter.
Wexeoogaisa that
NYU ;..".•-: was a star member of
Associate Professor Hyman
a. We dowt hawa to prove that we
Krakower
has been affiliated
do not jseld to the danro of ottaar
with
the
CoUege
since 193d. In
os JMUBHRB coaaoatwaBB OHSV CSBHBS ©» sflBtisoBtfy*
".36
he
left
for
six
years to be•rkaned bade in his chair, smoothing his slightly enriy brown
ome
Super
visor
ef
Hygiene
Ac* * • » gaae wandered slowly over to the window and the street
t
vitiss
at
tha
Townsend
Harris
^•f- The traditions of high scholarship and integrity here mean
High SchooL He returned in 194t
*»nehasw enough to do at City College if we succeed in canyand
has been a member of the
^f htwanl the traditions of a great inheritance."
Department of
ffeeenally." and a tone of pride gently tempered with humility
since. He is a graduate of New
j y h f e his voice, "pesaonaUy, I wouldn't trade jobs with any other
York
Univenity.
* * * resident in the country." He lit a cigarette. "I wish we all
•» ftrt way—students, faculty and administration."
Pes Grey ami "Chippy'
New Sports Managers
#
•
»
•
•
w
« edsed if he had any immediate, specific plans for the better
• • * * the college.
1 nly on my colleagues among students and faculty to wort
J * • » » t h a t we can best caeiy out the job for which we are here.
r * * 1 * one anm can wreck this college, no one man can, by
^ y da very mucfa. We must all work together."
•edbewsed the many problems that arise during the
. • * Wtoester. DiiVereaces of opinion on important subjects have
students and administration, between faculty
of students.
is'
is not
B ear one
his assistant, Mr. Howard Spohr,
can hardly be called
to the field of sports.
Dr. Des Grey, who has been
teaching Hygiene at City CoUege
for the past twenty-five years
and holds the position of
ant profesaot in the Hygiene Department, competed in trade and the track
swimming while an
ate at New York Univenity.
A hunting enthusiast, the War)
Department anarded ,u— -"*•* - '
War Service Award
in
He recently
entitled -Camping—A G
and enjoys
athletic
Or. Dea Grey dabfees in
Moods*
THE OBSttVAHON POST
22. 1962.
m^mm^^mt
Rvt DejwrtmeBfs Chone Chairmen; NewDeoo of Educotfep
MATH
chairman of the City Philosophy
sen
n
of
eftbeHygiMe
to the
of fhre den new Dean ef
SOCIOLOGY
"I'm delighted to be back at
the college after so many years,
and feel quite proud to return
aa a chairman," declared Professor Charles H. Page, newly appointed head of the Sociology
Department.
Professor Page, who is no
stranger to City CoUege having
taught here twice before, was
bqm in Tonawanda, a small town
m New York State. He received
his BA from the University of
Illinois in 19S1. and his PhD.
from Columbia in 1939.
He had been teaching at
Smith College for the past six
years when he received word of
his appointment as chairman of
the Department of Sociology and
Anthropology at City College.
He r e p l a c e s Professor Burt
Aginsky, who retired at the end
of last semester to begin a sabattieal leave.
PHILOSOPHY
"To develop. broaJen. and clarify the student's thinking on the
fundamental perennial problems
which underlie aU the sciences
and social sciences is the fundamental purpose of philosophy in
a Liberal Arts college such as our
own," said Dr. Jienry Magid, new
ly, no college does better w<*k ig
electrical engineering. This « aU
tested to by the number of grad.
..uate students at MXt who did
their undergradugte wotfc at
City." he said. -
i>;- George W. Gamaoo. who
placed
Prof. Hubert as the new
Or. Magid received hit Bache-|
,i.airman
of the Math Departtor's in Coluadria in 193(0 and bis<
ment,
baa
taught at various
PhD. in 1940, also at Columbia.!
schools
aad^voUeges
throughout
He spent four years in the Army,
the
United
States.
DBAFTING
attaining the rank of Captain.
After
receiving
his
degree
at
Previous to that. Dr. Magid had
Alfred N. Appelby, for thirty
taught at Brooklyn CoUege.
Princeton he taught part time at two years a teacher in tto DraftThe Case School ot Applied Sci- ing Dept., has replaced Prof.
When asked about any advice
ence
and Arts and at Princeton. George C. Awtenreith as Chairhe might have for students inBefore
coming to City College in man of the Department.
terested in Philosophy. Dr. Ma1937,
where
he presently holds A member of the American Asgid pointed out that as a vocathe
position
of
Associate ftrofes- sociation of University Professors,
tion, the field was limited to col><ir,
he
taught
at
De Witt Clinton and the American Society of
lege teaching. "However" he
High
School
and
at Lehigh Uni- Electrical Engineers, he devotes
continued. "Social Science, Hisversity.
much of his spare time to retory, and Literature majors
When asked if any changes wiU search in the field of structural
would do weU to minor in Philosbe made in the Department, Gar- geology.
ophy if they wish to derive maxrison replied, "I don't see any
imum value from their studies.
changes in any of the policies of MECH. ENGINEERING
"Dr. Magid also advised studsnts
the Math Department at the pres- George A. Guerdon. Associate
not to take Philo 1 in their FreshProfessor of Mechanical Engisr
ent time."
man year but to wait a few seSeplaeed . . .
He is married and lives in New eering, has succeeded Professor
mesters until they have the propat
City
College
began
in
1924
York City with his wife and Gustave J. Bischoff as chairman
er educational background to alof the Mechanical Engineering
when
he
became
a
tutor
in
the
daughter.
low them to derive maximum
Dept. Prof Guerdan, who reDepartment
of
Education.
In
1941
value.from the course.
he was aopointed Director of the ELEC. ENGINEERING ceived a Bachelor of Mechanicd
The Electrical Engineering De- Engineering degree "with disCollege's Educational Clinic.
EDUCATION
I
partm»nt
has a new chairman. tinction" from Stevens Institute
In addition to his work here.
Professor Harold H. Abelson Professor Abelson has also taught Prof. Henry Hansteen. He re- of Technology, in 1925, has be .-a
has been named Dean of the in Summer sessions at the Uni- places the old Department head, a member of the department for
School of Education. He succeeds versities of Colorado and Cornell, Harold Wolf. A graduate of the past sixteen years.
Before teaching at CCNY, ProDean Egbert Turner who retired and at Hunter CoUege. For the Brooklyn Polytech. the new EE
last June to begin a sabbatical past four years be has been pre- chairman took his Masters and fessor Guerdan was a member of
leave.
senting a course at the New Doctorate in physics at Columbia. the engineering faculty of his Al"Professionally and scholastic- ima Mater for six years.
Professdk- Abelson's Ion* career I School for Social Research.
,
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1HI OtSitVATIOM IOST
+ Editorial Page of tko Observe tiee Post •
mmM
X
l£»*«l.
Cn Gmttmmher
to coordinate the greatly mmifiad acthotiea of
1952. Dr. i^eU G Gallagher ^ E ? ^ * * * J * r " ^ • ( , d e d • ^
Armg HmU ReqtUem
Army Hall ia closed as a dormitory for CCNY
Students, and frankly we're not sorry to see the
beginning of the abandonment of that Victorian
Gothic eye sore. But where does that leave the
CCNY Community, which is so sorely lacking
in material proof of its own existence? Sleeping
quarters exist in Manhattanville, but the money
to maintain them is yet to be appropriated by the
City of New York. The 250 people who regularly
roomed on the campus are forced to seek private
rooms in the neighborhood or return borne because of high rents. With them go our one answer
to the charge of "subway colleges."
Our attraction for athletes ban been dimmed
enough by the new athletic policy and now shattered by the absence of any place on campus for
a ball player to sleep. It seems strange, that the
Fire Department will allow students to attend
classes in a fire-trap and not room in it It's the
old story of the richest city in the world failing
to provide more than a bare minimum for one
of its most essential services, education.
Dormitory living at Army Hall provided the
core of extra-curricular campus life. Many of the
people who were able to live in the low cost rooms,
and thus avoid long trips from the outskirts of
the city, now have to drop out of school. Manhattanville is still merely a promise and the Student
Union Building exists only as a model decorating
the Alumni House. It is definitely a set back to
the feeling of a home away from home and general school spirit which are unfortunately so
fk president should be a leader, a policy, a man who is looked up to and respected In the wake of the recent shakeup in the Hy- tenuous here.
Our only outlook is a pessimistic one since'
ftk students. He should not bt>a powrless giene Department, in which those men who were
funds
for the overhaul and maintenance of existafigucewithout substance and guts.
closely associated with the formation of athletic,
Jke president should be an impartial judge who ^ partjeulariy basketball, policy have lost their ing Manhattanville dorms is dependent upon
to all areas of student opinion before former positions, it is curious that Nat Holman municipal funds, the majority of which will end
up in faulty sewers. We have no other answer
to a decision. He should not be swayed has seenfitto take a year's leave of absaice.
As basketball coach, and Supervisor of Coaches but nevertheless, we mourn the passing of dormiitgnwp or an individual's reputation, but let
he certainly had something to do with the athletic tory lif e.
rfcrfB decide the case.
\ 3fe president should maintain good public re- situation at the college. Surely, in view of the
tf this to be done by releasing all reports* reassignment of Professors Lloyd and Winograd, f QUtJ^U Rf^t^HMStiTf^lt
inot playing cat and mouse with the press.
and the reliering ofBobby Sand[from his coach^ ^'
mercifully changed,'
m
Ho,m
ade
should insure academic freedom
f ^ L *•: ^ ***%?*<£*'
^|f
its meeting time from Friday to Wednesday. We
tit College. By academic freedom we mean 0^^^t^J0qUUfy\^Le0mSL
*£
hope that along with this innovation, will come
l{i) students should not be discriminated n*m^m^I^
Z^ZJ?* a change in attitude ftom one of piocnistinating
because of political beliefs, (2) profes- way, then it is perfectly permissible for lum to iaameMaeB
t o sincere concern
f o r stud^t
prob.
sboold not be discriminated against because take his leave, and resume his coadung duties ^ ^
beliefs, as long as it does not interfere upon his retura.
Too often in the past we have discovered
^ their elassroom teaching, (3) students
However, a formidable obstacle which c<mfronts ^ ^ i m i n e r e e d te a parfi^entary embroglio
allowed to hear speakers of their choice us in reaching a decision as to the needs for, and dsi^MA t o ^ ^ the 8esgion laat ^ t h e ^ y
•ili»ake up their own minds on the issues. merits^t' ^ f ^ S f S ^ ^ S ^
SI
morning. Too often, also, have we seen agendas
tfesune time he should not let the political facts. Early in 1951 the Board of Higher Educa- f ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ {w ^
*••*» take advantage of these principles.
cation created a committee to »»ves*gate •tW^ entire meeting to run its course.
^presKientahouM bo progressive, in that he tics at the college. This *ovegrew directly out
p e r l i a p 6 Council's languor is a result of the
Itereceptive to new educational theories, of the disclosure that some CCNY players had
^
^ doled ^ ^ iindcp ^ ^ Chartep
"%ds«f instructing .nd student participation •wcepted bribes tofixbaseball games. The com- 1ever
^ B l athe
fromthecumut i o Banswer,
S t ^pertapsit
we thinksuffers
the withering
away of
^tteaflWrs
of
the
iireitution.
He
should
not
be
mittee
issued
a
report
With
the
disclosure
that
^
^
Ukmm
of
past
representatives.
WhatBrooklyn's student government is handwriting
we want a tough, honest and enlight6
iy tradition.
so™
marks
of
certain
athletes
had
been
altered
once
more
asked
toeligibility,
investigate
athletics
at was
the on the wall for us, since nobody there seems to
so
as
to
insure
their
the
committee
of course, that the standards we college. This was in the fall of 1951.
miss it very much.
'«*merated are very high and would be difThings are looking up with this term's body
Almost a year has passed, but the committee's
tteIwe up to, even if someone tried to do so. report is still closed to the public
having already met prior to the start of the
after listening to Dr. Gallagher adFor the first time in the history of CCNY, the semester, something quite unprecedented. OP,
'the Freshman Assembly and later. Student students are paying a compulsory athletic fee. Coancfl's severest critic, wiU be on hand, anxious
and __
having spoken to
In additiontoother interests in the athletic pro- to applaud every move we think worthy of n
representative pariiaaeent of
thatiTwilliiveuptoinis^ifiiotaii; gram, the statorts now have a material owe We
that we have listed. ^ ^
have arighttotawwwhat to been, and agoing
* w * not be disappointed in onr on in the gygiene Dyittmwt^
IT the shakeup mtbe Department» dae to the
we woold like to congratolate Dr. findings of the Miit
This year's crop of
cnl|y
large, as robust and as fresh an ever. We
• k** right to know why
aak that they provide freely of their vitality,
We hope, also, that his fre*~
which is yettohe modified by the ever forward
atlMNBeatOty
ef the Jwiortand Senaov* and the'alight
of the Sophomores. We are
^ ' K4he
T ^presidency
L t a n w of
nf City
Citv College.
crni^*
«»»«l touch whwh won for him the respect of
tie offer our congratulation* and beet the administration and the affection of the students. Prof. PurceU proved to be a friend when
tort, long and snccegsful stay.
one was needed and a capable counselor when
(frUfffba* takes on a job with numerous advice was sought
_ end difficulties. Ths athletic situation,
inherited an athletic situation
jM^Hnieotal shake-ups, the budget—these
.The
. h. Colonel
. b.o t ht mhas
,, ited
^STSmU
the complex problems with T f
*
« * de!icate-one which
? the
! new
imaar
will
have
to
grapple.
demands
a
great
deal
of
foresight and patience.
AMT prexy wiu nave to grapple,
Ia
the
year*
thai
be
baa
been faculty advjuor to
^tflMMredo not know too much about Dr.
What we have heard has been en- the Observation Post, he has shown an abundant
but we have not seen him in action; supply of both these essential qualities. With
IttotTtfter aU, is the only valid criterion on these factors in mind, we know that this situation
will be clearly and honestly resolved. It is not an
to judge & man.
obligation,
but rather a recognition of his perhowever, have our concepts of what a
merit which has prompted the writing of
\ ot a coUege, City College to be exact, sonal
this
editorial.
I aid should not be.
fepraident should be a man who represents If his appointment heralds a new era of above\Cdk&, is a part of it, and fights in its inter- board dealings in athletics, then this phase of
Be should not be a docilefigureheadfor the college life will ceasetobe punctuated with the
painful pangs of past unhappy memories. Under
1 d Higher Education.
Prof.
PuroelTs administration, integrity will be
should be a man who stands on
kiga tso feet, is firm in his opinions and ideas the by-word in the Department of Hygiene.
He comes to this new post armed with the
l^eaks freely—and from the heart We do
tnst a politician, a smooth talker, a fence above, traits and supplemented by a record of
tt'm general, someone who evades the issues. forty-one years of faithful service to the College
Ihefttsident should have his door open to the and to the community behind him.
; and to their problems. He should not be That he is qualified, no one can dispute; that
a figure apart and above from the he will succeed, there is no doubt
dilemmas that beset the College and its
MniormuUion, Plem#e
owthe
Raymond F. Pvcel,
of the Ojgfene De-
af the
a chnnce to
hope they take advaatace of
for
a few
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mt OKHWAIKM tea
1
Along The
Sidelines
109a Bavaa
Polaeskr, VMfeRepk<tNet,B«bbiA
RethsdM ReappoiateJ Setter Head
By Hatschal Missaasan
.WMi Ed Uptoi—
Dave Polansky, fo^ner coach of the Commerce Center hoopsters. has been appointed
to
the
post of vanity baaketbaU conch for the 1952-'53 aeaaon, H wan announced by ProfesHi up i»att in any field is selOom fired. One who has been in
MM* «9t quite consistently must save face at any cost. If he sor Raymond P. PurceU, Chairman of the Hygiene Department.
jT^nnir^ sense, he realizes when the time has come to
•
At the same time, Werner
Rothschild was renamed as soc-—i4 that his presence is no longer deemed desirable by his
cer coach, and George Wolfe was
^ j » is usually asked to submit his resignation. Only if he
given over tha reigns of the
nhe dumped uncerimoniously out into the cold, cruet world
frosch dribblers.
-^Memployed; a very ignoble fate for a man of great stature.
With the exception of Roths4Mr wnfe only as a last resort is he fired.
child, the appointments were
•^%.
•
*
•
made to fill the posts left open
B* lbs graal and near great in the educational field are
by the recent shakeup in the Hy- with still anothar peida-sahraging device, the sabbatigiene Department, by Nat Holman's decision to take a year's
— _ - - Tbe individual leave* the school far six months, or a
•^ j m w n a ^ taking a well earned vacation, and then slip*
leave of absence.
jfcfY ant ef the picture as soon as he is out of the puMic
Rothschild, along with Sol
Mishkin, baseball coach, and
freshman lacrosse mentor George
It»a curious coincidence that at a time when his underlings
Baron, had been advised not to
ilaHMricers are being demoted at a rate faster than that at which
expect reappointment, because
fcDodfns 0 ° dissipate a five game lead, Nat Holman has decided
they are non-faculty personnel.
bake *t|ip to Europe.
No decision will be made on the
1
*
•
*
Mat Holman (above)
reappointment of the latter two*
until sometime nent year.
(Misanly. we would say that Mr. Holman will return after
Dave Polaaaky (sight)
ef absence and once mote lead the hoop team, at the
The posts of assistant basket
011(901119 and incoming Hoop Mentor*
ball and baseball coach, as wel
j*trflbe«»-'S«
as that of leader of the freshmai
hoopsters were vacated by Bobi tie doubt, however, that NM will be back. Not because there
by Sand, who is still 00 the Col•sir stigma attached to his name. For there isn't. He will not
lege Payroll, although he has no
gtpmfara much more heart-rending reason. He would be lonebeen
assigned to any duties.
an at City College, the school with which he has been associated
trtfaBty-three years. Dr. Lloyd and Dr. Winograd are still in the
Rothschild returns to the tean
tpae Department, but no longer hold down their old posts.
that he piloted to the Met ChamMkf Sand's status at CCNY is very much in doubt. At any rate, As adept at drillmg teeth ayfr
pionship last year. His team com-1
piled an 8-1 record last year, bu
kvfll probably not be returned to his coaching duties. How, then,
odd we even think cf returning the old mentor to his former post, he is at handling a foil. Dr. Dan- but this Summer he represented lost several key men, and Roths
K he would be surrounded by a sea of strange faces. No, no!! iel Bukantz was one of the six the United States in the'Fencing i child will have his work cut ou
le cannot do this to him. even though we lose one of the best representatives of City College at Foils event, for the second con- tor him if he hopes to match las
secutive time.
year's mark.
'.
SperviiDr; of Coaches that this school has ever had.
Helsinki this summer.
Dr. Bukantz was able to make i Polansky inherits a team thatj
One of the greatest athletes in many observations while at the!
the history of the Lavender, he is Olympics. With regard to thej won but eight out of ninetee
presently practicing Dentistry, Russians he said, "They were as games last season. However th
team has suffered only one I
friendly as any other group, and during the off-season, Jerry GoldJ
their competitors were very well and has a better chance of devel^j
behaved. I believe that they oping into a well knit unit thi
made a very good record for year:
themselves". Daniel also stated Professor PurceU, newly ap
that the Olympic Games are very pointed chairman of the Hygien
important for world peace. He Department said that there wil
added however that the emphasis be no drastic change in the cur
of the Olympics should be placed! riculum of the Department. Hi
Soccer again marks the open- soley on sports, and not on politi- aim will be to enlarge the intra
ing of a new year here at the cal matters.
—Marcus mural schedule.
college. The team will take on
the Alumni, September 27.
The Beavers can only improve on last years' record in
one way—by having a perfect
record:
In compiling a brilliant
Bobby Sand
D»- Frank S. Lloyd
8-1 mark, (losing only to RutAffected by Hggiene Shakeup
gers) last years* edition of the
Cwws rymnby
soccer
team swept through their
la, we can aae poor, lejecfted Nat Hotaaa walking slowly
Coach
Harold
Anson Bruce is
opposition to win the Metropolivafte wellbMSen uthwav that leads to tbe
very
hopeful
that
this season's
tan Championships.
by a garden of gently
edition of the City College Cross
Winning the title this year, Country team will be one of the
ia the old
however,
should prove slightly most powerful squads ever astbe
more
difficult.
Graduation has sembled here at tbe College. Tbe
Ua
been
a
crippling
factor in reduc- main core of last year's team that
of the
ing
the
team's
offense.
Such star compiled a record of five victories
I tbe
performers as Billy Galan, Uri and three defeats will return.
Simiri, J^e Penabad, and Edozie
Gold, colorful piaymelter
isbQ,
no
matter
what
we
may
think
of
tbe
man,
we
cannot
Ekwunife are ariong those lost
fetsbQ,
s
tea with a few blase phrases. In thirty-three years* he has to the team through graduation.
win have lb*
Ma
1 Johnny Koutsantanou is ineligible
• » * e p impression upon tbe College.
Ike figoes tell only a saaD past of Iba *awy. Ws lemma, •dor varsi^p competition this year.
—at»-i<* ttt j
wba» diuppinj «•» i s m * * " * * J But on the credit side of the
ledge* is the return of last years'
two co-captains. Pinky Pincxower. and Poly Fbnlkandntes, and
jmany other veterans.
& • 4t
• 4 Dp picture and he resigns "voluntarily." If he does not
feUsman Dan Bakaati Tops
At Fencing aad Dental Work
Booters Open
"52 Campaign
This Saturday
SPORTS PREVIEW
* * * * Holman does no*, belong at City CoUege anymore He
y w f c Ibe last vestige of a period in the CoUefe's history that wi
i^** 1 1 * WW to forget. AH tbe others wbe had anythiaff to do |fc
1
"***fccmauon of atMetic policy leading «* to MM have been
jyafcUdi man, wbo spent H&ly-tlnee years of bis 1 * at City
J J y d t o s w * fit m with tbe ih.unpbim of ad
2 l . , k * - K* Holman win always be a big-time
^ • n e p b w e for him at CCNY emymere.
Best i* Sport*
T H i OtSERVATION POCT
Page Twefce
ALLAGARQO AND WE OLYMPICS TOO
Six Beavers in Olympics;
Wittenberg 2nd on Mats
WresHer Honk Wittenberg
Opposed to Team Scormt
City College was well i«presented at the recent Olympic Games
It is a rarity when one can point to an individual and say th*
at Helsinki, Finland. No less than six participants from this College j
he suffered a comedown by ONLY copping four out of five Otympj
made the trip with the United States Olympic Team.
v.-restling matches, to finish second in the individual competiUaa
Five members of the United'*'
it
is rarer still, when this can be*
——
_ "
States Fencing Squad were peted on the United States epee
:«.d about an ex-City College performer in the latter type «
which gained the quarter
man. In fact it can only be said sport must go through a mud
coached by the present varsity squad
finals in the Olympic touma-,
>f one CCNY Grad, Henry Wit- more harrowing grind.
bead of City CoUege, Mr. James meat, while the others were
unberg.
Montague. Ifcey were Dr. Daniel members of the Foils Squad
As for the future. Hank plan,
Bukantz, who competed for City which also reached the quarter
City's only former Olympic to stay in shape, and possibly #
Champion (he won in 1948), Hen- out for the Olympic team in ISM
College in 1938 and won the In- finals. Bukantz was able to reach
ry feels that the stress on the If he does, CCNY can be sure o
4ereolk<giate Title that same sea-1 the quarter finals of the iftdividunationalistic aspect of the Games having one representative wh
son; Albert Axelrod. who cap- al Foil Championship,
is a distortion of their original will do the Lavender proud.
tamed the 1948 squad that cap- Probably no other City College i
purpose. It leads to such things
tured the Eastern and National j competiu>r
b
^
t
f
j
di$tinguished
as subsidization of athletes by inChampionships; N a t L u b e l l .
*u:.Mi$J&m3 \JA,<* &&i
dividual countries, which alters
member of the Beaver team of more than Hank Wittenberg, who
the amateur nature of the games.
1937; Hal Goldsmith, a member gained second place in the Free(right)
Hal Goldsmith, after compst.
of last year's team; and Jimmy style Wrestling Light Heavywith Augusta Eaglas ef the He criticized the ease with ing in tbe 1952 Olympics at
Strauch, winner of the National weight Championship by winning
which Gold Medals may be ob- Helsinki was assigned to the
at HsWnkL
Epee Title in 1943. Strauch comtained by performers in team Sixth Infantry Begiment st
four out of five bouts.
games. Hank said, "A player who turned m Berlin. Hal eatend
may get into a game, only for the service'immediately afbe
ten or twenty aecoods, and who
Soda
may contribute nothing towards
THE REAL
Come In and Oct Acquainted
the victory, can receive the same
ef tbe- HOTC Program at
award,
as
does
the
athlete
who
City.
He ia serving m a PJaLAVENDER FOOD SHOP
In Amy Hal
takes part in a sport which in7 BARBERS
HAlRCUTS-60c
NO WAITING
M-IS AMSrCKOAM AVENITE
volves individual competition. A
* • a K B BC
In, Army
CITY COLLEGE BARBER S H O *
i a a • w •asac
• u n • u u-jj-n.
CHESTERFIELD
FIRST PREMIUM
QUALITY
CIGARETTE
TO OFFER BOTH RfGUMR * Jf/NG-S/Zf
BOTH regular and king-size
Chesterfields are premium quality
cigarettes and come in the smart
white pack.
BOTH contain only those proven ingredients that make Chesterfields
the best possible smoke: the
world's best tobaccos, pure, more
costly moistening agents (to keep
them tasty and fresh), the best
cigarette paper that money can
buy—nothing else.
BOTH are much milder with an ex*
traordinarily good taste and, from
the report of a well-known research
organization - no unpleasant
after-taste.
BOTH «*• «cac^y fkm *mm in a i i*.
CHESTERFIELD-JHUCH
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