Country Club seeks to remove berm, delineate cottages on site plan

Get your flu shot: See Page 24
Thursday, November 6, 2014
Falcons
field hockey
advances in
tournament
The Wilbraham-Hampden
Mailed Thursdays to every home in
Wilbraham and Hampden
Prsrt Std
U.S. Postage
Paid
Palmer, MA
Permit No. 22
Postal
Patron
ECRW SS
Please see page 17
Dedicated to improving the quality of life in the communities we serve
Country Club seeks
to remove berm,
delineate cottages
on site plan
Public hearing
continued
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
A
fter nearly one year of
bickering and with a pending Superior Court hearing scheduled for Monday, Nov.
3, Hampden Country Club, LLC.
(HCC) has asked the Planning
Board for a special permit to delineate cottage locations and the
removal of the berm along Raymond Drive.
During a public hearing Oct.
22, HCC spokesperson Atty. Frank
Fitzgerald said that their proposed
plan complies with the bylaw and
that the country club would plant
trees and evergreens as set forth
in their site plan. “We’re willing
to make (trees in the buffer) more
dense and work with the landowners as a condition of the special
permit,” he said.
Answering a question posed
by Planning Board member Robert Howarth, Fitzgerald said that
work to remove the berm would
begin as soon as possible following the award of the permit.
Regarding
the
cottages,
Fitzgerald noted that should the
Planning Board accept their delineation and should they begin
work on constructing them, they
would serve as temporary accommodations for members and their
guests. He said that their inclusion
on the site plan is the first part of
Please see HCC, page 22
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
Star in a jar…
Using the Farnsworth fusor design, amateur scientists like Wilbraham’s Will Caruana, can create plasma, which is in essence, a star in a jar. Caruana shows off
the Farnsworth fusor he built to create plasma, the fourth and most abundant
state of matter in the Universe, in his own home. (See story on page 10)
Purple Heart focus of
Veterans Day ceremonies
Honor bestowed to
slain WWI soldier
Keene, N.H. basedfirm is chosen
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
WILBRAHAM – It was
among the bloodiest conflicts
the world has ever seen, resulting in roughly 9 million deaths
to soldiers by war’s end, and the
year was 1918. To this day, many
of those brave, young men who
died in service to their country
remain forgotten to all but their
families.
On Veterans Day, Tuesday,
Nov. 11, one such man will receive the recognition he deserved, as the Purple Heart with
Oak Leaf Clusters will be presented to his living relative, Wilbraham resident Daniel Geary.
Geary’s uncle, Cpl. Michael
F. Sullivan of Hudson, Massachusetts, was 25 when he answered
his country’s call for active duty,
enlisting in the National Guard
in 1916. By Sept. 7, 1917 he was
en route to Europe to participate
in some of the deadliest fighting
in history.
On May 30, 1918, Sullivan
was among the battle wounded,
a victim of phosgene (mustard)
gas inhalation. After 13 days in
treatment, he was back into the
Committee votes to
recommend architect for
Wilbraham senior center
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications
Staff Writer
TIMES photo by David Miles
Wilbraham Veterans Agent Richard Prochnow displays the
proclamation of the Purple Heart awarded to Michael F.
Sullivan in WWI at this year’s Memorial Day ceremonies.
fray. He was killed by machine
gun fire Oct. 23, 1918, less than
one month before the end of the
war. Records show he was buried
by Nov. 14, 1918 at Belieu Bois,
north of Verdun, France.
Sullivan left behind a wife
and daughter.
“The family is quite
pleased,” Geary told the Times.
“We’re very proud of him.”
Geary explained that Sullivan was always a topic of con-
versation, especially around the
holidays. “He’s been a big part
of our lives,” he commented. In
fact, Geary’s brother was named
after their uncle, as well as
Geary’s own middle name.
Like their uncle, Geary and
his brother are both veterans.
Geary served in Korea and his
brother is a veteran of World War
II.
The process to receive the
Please see VETERANS, page 28
WILBRAHAM – The
Wilbraham Senior Center
Feasibility Committee unanimously voted to recommend
an architect to conduct a feasibility study Oct. 24, after interviewing three firms.
Keene, New Hampshirebased Catlin & Petrovick was
chosen from a field that included Dietz, Inc., of Springfield,
and Reinhardt Associates, of
Agawam.
Director of Elder Affairs Paula Dubord was most
impressed with the work of
Catlin & Petrovick. “I’ve seen
all the other sites (presented
during the interview process).
(Catlin & Petrovick’s) centers
all have a purpose and a flow,”
Dubord said.
During his presentation,
John Catlin, who designed the
Hampden Senior Center, outlined a number of statistics regarding issues seniors face. He
noted that his designs incorporate layered lighting, since
people “require three times
more light at age 60 than at
age 20.” In addition, his most
recent designs have incorporated open floor plans to eliminate long hallways in order to
allow users to be “a part of the
action.”
Catlin also noted that the
trend is to call such centers
“Community Centers,” since
today’s aging population, as
opposed to those of the past,
fail to see the word “senior” as
an honor. Additionally, many
facilities hold other functions
for the community on weekends and after hours. “It’s not
so popular having “Senior
Center” on your wedding invitation,” he said.
“(Catlin’s”
references
said he came in on budget,”
committee member, resident
and East Longmeadow Council on Aging Director Carolyn
Brennan said. “I didn’t get any
complaints about John (Catlin).”
Function Over Appearance
The town is conducting a
feasibility study to construct
a new senior center in town,
with $30,000 appropriated
from the Annual Town Meeting this past May. Currently,
Please see SENIOR, page 28
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page Recent police
activity in Wilbraham
WilbrahamHampden Times
Obituary
Policy
Turley Publications
offers two types of
obituaries.
One is a free, brief
Death Notice listing
the name of deceased,
date of death and
funeral date and place.
The other is a Paid
Obituary, costing
$75, which allows
families to publish
extended death notice
information of their
own choice and may
include a photograph.
Death Notices &
Paid Obituaries
should be submitted
through a funeral
home to:
[email protected]
Photo from collection of Charles F. Bennett
PICTURE FROM THE PAST
Melodrama at Minnechaug play – From a photo
in the April 26, 1964 Springfield Morning Union.
Members of St. Cecilia’s Church, hamming it up,
performing in a melodrama-variety show called
“Holiday Cruise” at Minnechaug.
JCC to teach ‘life lessons in
chocolate making’
SPRINGFIELD – Parents, children and grandparents
are invited to the Springfield Jewish Community Center’s
chocolate making class on Monday, Nov. 10 at 6:30 p.m.,
at Maureen’s Sweet Shoppe in Center Square in East
Longmeadow, as part of their “Life Lessons” series.
Participants will learn to make candy bars, chocolate covered marshmallows, and more, of which all may
be brought home. The class will be taught by Maureen
Basile, owner of Maureen’s Sweet Shoppe. The minimum age to attend is 5 years.
For more information or to register, call 739-4715.
Exceptions will be
made only when the
family provides a death
certificate and must be
pre-paid.
u’s
f Lo
Che
November 6, 2014
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham
Police Department released information
on recent police activity reported by
Capt. Timothy Kane.
Drug Arrests
On October 25 at 5:10 p.m. Officer
Joseph Brewer assisted Springfield Narcotics Units with the stopping of a motor vehicle on Boston Road. This led to
the subsequent arrest of Stephen Christy
33, of Springfield for Possession of Cocaine.
On October 27 at 12:20 a.m. Officer
Sean Casella stopped a white Nissan for
having a failed inspection status. Further investigation led to the suspicion of
drug use/possession by both the operator and passenger. The driver, Michelle
Hancock 35, of Monson was arrested
for several drug possession violations
including heroin, prescription drugs
and amphetamines. Angelo Abair 30, of
Indian Orchard (the passenger) was arrested for Possession of Heroin, Resisting Arrest and Interfering with a Police
Officer.
Restraining Order Violation
On October 28 at 3:34 p.m. Detective Michael Cygan responded to an area
Red Hats to hold Pot Luck
WILBRAHAM – The Red Hat
Ya Ya Sisterhood will hold their Pot
Luck Lunch and Tea Cup Raffle on
Thursday, Nov. 13 at 12:30 p.m. at
the Gardens of Wilbraham on Boston
Road.
To sign up offering a dish call co-
ABUDANZA
Across from Big Y and Red Robin
(413) 543-2300
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Holiday Meal Packages
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Stuffed pork crown roast or
porketta with all the fixings
& dessert
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$150
Holiday Tenderloin Dinner - Whole roasted tenderloin
with all the fixings & dessert
(serves 10 people)
A la Carte
Side Dishes
9 side dish options to choose from
Homemade
Holiday Pies
Traditional or Decadent
14 Varieties!
$12.00 each
Market Price
Thanksgiving Day
Buffet
Seatings from
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Reservations Suggested!
Full lavish buffet including
a carving station with turkey,
ham and prime rib.
Order by Nov. 25th for Thanksgiving!
Stop in or call 596-5300 or 589-9900
WILBRAHAM SHOPS
2341 BOSTON RD., WILBRAHAM
596-5300
www.abudanza.com
chairs Ellie Griswold at 596-6971 or
Nicole Lussier 599-0184. Lussier will
be accepting raffle prizes at her home
at 41 Ivy Circle.
The program includes a talk by
Mary Manning about Heifer International.
2040 Boston Rd., Wilbraham
RISTORANTE
(serves 6-10)
of Boston Road just west of Post Office
Park for a domestic issue. Further investigation revealed that a 30 year old
male from Monson violated a Restraining Order and was placed under arrest
without incident.
OUI Liquor
On October 30 at 12:20 p.m. Officer Lawrence Rich responded to the
area of Three Rivers Road for a female
who was dropped off after appearing to
be having an argument with the driver.
Subsequent record check revealed that
35 year old Shanna Lafave of Ashburnham, had a warrant for her arrest from
a previous OUI Liquor charge. She was
taken into custody, booked and driven
straight to Palmer District Court.
Assault and Battery
On October 30 at approximately
8:00 p.m. a 27 year old female was
placed into protective custody by Wilbraham Police because of severe alcohol
impairment. Her husband came to take
custody of her and she assaulted him at
her release. She was again taken into
custody and placed under arrest by Officer Alderico Florindo for the Domestic
Assault and Battery.
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page NEWS About Town
Second Place Winner of the 2013 New England Newspaper and Press Association ‘History Reporting’ Competition.
By Tyler Witkop
To submit items for possible inclusion in News About Town or other news columns,
send to Staff Writer, Wilbraham Hampden Times, 2341 Boston Rd., Wilbraham, MA 01095 or e-mail to [email protected] Photos are welcome.
Early Deadline
Because of the Thanksgiving holiday, the Times will
have an early deadline for news and photos submissions
of noon on Friday, Nov. 21. E-mail material to [email protected]
turley.com.
Parking ban in effect
HAMPDEN – The annual winter parking ban for the
town of Hampden is in effect now through Wednesday,
April 1, 2015. Any vehicles left on town roads may be
towed at the owner’s expense. All vehicles that impede
snow removal may be towed by the police department or
at the request of the Highway Department.
www.wilbraham
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times.com
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Children’s
Museum
announces
playgroups to
begin
For an updated
listing of calendar
events logon to
www.wilbrahamtimes.com.
WILBAHAM – The Wilbraham Children’s Museum has announced that Saturday and Sunday
morning playgroups are available
for children five and under. Activities will run from 9:30 a.m. – 11
a.m. both days. For more information or to register email
[email protected]
Positions open on town
committees
HAMPDEN – The Board of Selectmen, Chairman
John D. Flynn, Vincent Villamaino and Norman Charest,
have announced that there are vacant positions on town
committees. Currently, there is a need for a Pioneer Valley Transit Authority representative and for an appointee
PHONE
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Hearing
Test Set
for Senior
Citizens
AnnouncementFree electronic hearing
tests will be given from
Monday-Friday 9am – 5pm
at Avada Hearing Care
Centers at 9 locations in
Western Mass. Call to find
the location nearest to you.
The test has been arranged
for anyone who suspects they
are not hearing clearly.
People who usually say they
can hear but have trouble
with understanding words are
encouraged to come in for the
tests. The testing includes
newly-developed tests that
determine your ability to hear
speech in noisy environments. Everyone, especially
those over 55 who have
trouble hearing words clearly,
should have a test annually.
Demonstrations of the latest
devices to improve clarity of
speech will be available, on
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can HEAR for yourself if the
latest methods of correction
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Call for your Appointment
1-888-798-8528
©2012 HHM, Inc. 304
on the Personnel Committee.
Interested residents should contact the Selectmen’s
Office at 566-2151 ext. 100 or email [email protected]
Art exhibit at Wilbraham
Library
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham Friends of the Library are holding their Annual Art Exhibit in the Brooks
Room of the Library at 25 Crane Drive now through Friday, Nov. 28. A public reception, with refreshments, will
be held Saturday, Nov. 8 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Call 5966141 for more information.
Hiking Club takes on
Beartown State Forest
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham Hiking Club announced their next hike will take place Saturday, Nov. 8
at Beartown State Forest, located at 62 Blue Hill Road
in Monterey, Mass. The hike is easy to moderate in difficulty, navigating through roughly four miles of uneven,
sometimes steep terrain. Hikers should bring food and
water and are encouraged to dress in layers.
The club will carpool in the commuter parking lot at
the Ludlow McDonald’s at 9 a.m. For more information,
call hike leader Ed McCorkindale at 543-3273. Cacellations will be announced on meetup.com.
Student Council to hold Craft
Fair this Saturday
WILBRAHAM – The Minnechaug Regional High
School (MRHS) Student Council is holding a Falcon
Craft Fair Saturday, Nov. 8 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. at MRHS
located at 621 Main St. The council currently seeks crafters and artisans interested in participating, offering handcrafted items such as jewelry, artwork, soaps, candles
and more. For more information, call Heidi Drawec at
413-279-3828 or Tim Scully at [email protected]
in this week’s times
Editorial................................................................ 6
Dining Out........................................................... 14
Arts & Lifestyles. ............................................... 15
Native folklore to be
discussed at Old Meeting
House
WILBRAHAM – The Old Meeting House will discuss “Native American Folklore” during their open house
Sunday, Nov. 9 from 2 – 4 p.m. The event is free and
open to the public. Doug Harris of the Narragansett Tribe
Please see NEWS ABOUT TOWN, page 4
We Cook Everything
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Gluten Free Food Tasting
Celiac Awareness Night
Thursday, November 13
6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
Sports.................................................................. 17
CALL TO REGISTER 589-7071
Health................................................................. 24
Schools. .............................................................. 26
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page November 6, 2014
Wilbraham Garden
Club to meet Nov. 12
NEWS ABOUT TOWN from page 3
will present artifacts, folklore, history and
the local tribes of the 1600s and 1700s.
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham
Garden Club will meet at noon Wednesday, Nov. 12 in the St. Cecilia Parish Center. Lecturer Patricia Carr of New Milford,
Conn. will present “Women Botanical
Artists: 1700 – 1990.” The program will
combine her love of history, gardening
and fine art through paintings and drawings of botanical artists whose works may
be found in museums and collections.
Senior Center to stage
performance Nov. 10
HAMPDEN – The Hampden Senior
Center at 104 Allen St. will stage a performance Monday, Nov. 10 at 10:30 a.m.
The East Village Players will perform
“The Twelve Pound Look” written by
James M. Barrie. The performance is in
the style of a 1920s radio broadcast. For
more information, call 566-5588.
Town seeks proposals
for CPA funding
FCC to facilitate end
of life discussions
TIMES photo by David Miles
HAMPDEN – An important and
often undiscussed topic, the Federated
Community Church will hold two discussions aimed at facilitating end of life discussions with family members. The first
discussion will take place Monday, Nov.
10 at 6:30 p.m., with the aim of exploring
individual needs and recording thoughts.
The second discussion will take
place Monday, Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. and
will assist participants in fine tuning their
thoughts and practice sharing them with
others.
Both discussions will use materials
from theconversationproject.org and are
open to the public. For more information,
call 566-3711.
Veterans Day
Breakfast at FCC
HAMPDEN – The Federated Community Church at 590 Main St. will hold
a free Veterans Day Breakfast Tuesday,
DUV
New priest earns citation…
Fr. Dan Boyle (left) receives a State House citation from State Rep.
Angelo Puppolo Jr. (D-Springfield) (center) alongside Bob St. Martin,
Grand Knight of the St. Cecilia Chapter of the Knights of Columbus.
Nov. 11 from 8 – 9:30 a.m. The breakfast
is for veterans and their families and will
include eggs, sausage, fresh baked goods
from the congregation, and beverages.
Walk-ins are welcome, but advanced notice is recommended by Friday, Nov. 7.
For more information or to register, call
the church at 566-3711.
Women’s Club to
meet Nov. 11
WILBRAHAM – The St. Cecilia’s
Women’s Club will hold their next meeting Tuesday, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. in the Parish Center. Motivational speaker Dr. Steve
Sobel will be the club’s guest speaker. So-
bel authored “The Good Times Handbook
– Your Guide to Positive Living and Exciting Life.” He is the head coach of the
Springfield SLAMM basketball team and
is a part-time college instructor.
Senior Center to
hold Veterans Day
Breakfast
WILBRAHAM – The town’s Community Preservation Committee (CPC) is
seeking proposals for projects addressing
open space preservation, historic preservation, affordable housing, and recreation
for possible funding under the Community Preservation Act.
The application deadline is the close
of business on Jan. 29, 2015. Application
forms are available at the Town Office
Building in the Selectmen’s Office.
The CPC will hold two public meetings to answer questions from applicants
and to receive comments from residents.
The meetings are Nov. 13, Dec. 18 and
Jan. 22, 2015 at 7 p.m. at the Town Office
Building.
Travel historian to
speak
HAMPDEN – The Hampden Senior
Center at 104 Allen St. will hold a Veterans
Day Breakfast Wednesday, Nov. 12 at 9
a.m., the day after the holiday. Veterans eat
free. A representative from Massachusetts
Soldiers Home will be on hand. For more
information or to register, call 566-5588.
WILBRAHAM – Noted travel historian Amy Dane will be speaking at the
Thursday, Nov. 13, noon luncheon meeting of the Wilbraham Women’s Club in
Please see NEWS ABOUT TOWN,
page 5
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
NEWS ABOUT TOWN from page 4
the St. Cecilia’s Social Center. Dane will
present a visual tour of England set to music. Guests are welcome to attend.
Pasta dinner to
benefit Scholarship
Foundation
HAMPDEN – The Minnechaug
Scholarship Foundation will hold the annual Triple Pasta Dinner Monday, Nov.
17 at La Cucina di Hampden House from
6 – 8 p.m. Dinner includes three types of
pasta – or one of a particular variety – salad, bread and dessert.
Cost is $20, the proceeds of which
directly fund scholarships to Minnechaug
Regional High School college-bound seniors. For more information, call Maria
Savoie at 566-5595 or email [email protected]
charter.net.
Choral Group to
perform Nov. 18
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham
Women’s Club announced that their Choral Group will perform Tuesday, Nov. 18
at the Wilbraham Senior Center located in
Post Office Park. The performance, under
the direction of Ruth Carlson, will begin
at 12:20 p.m. Barbara Bennett will provide
musical accompaniment on the piano.
Thanksgiving
luncheon at the senior
center
HAMPDEN – The Hampden Senior Center at 104 Allen St. will hold a
Thanksgiving luncheon Wednesday, Nov.
19 at 11:30 a.m. The meal will include
turkey and “all the fixings.” Harmonica
musical entertainment will be provided
by Ed Chraplak. Cost is $5. For more information, call 566-5588.
‘Angel’ author to visit
St. Cecilia’s
WILBRAHAM – St. Cecilia’s Church
will host a presentation Thursday, Nov. 20
by local author Lori Szepelak as part of its
third Thursday festivities for parishioners.
A social time is planned from 11:30 to
noon, followed by a luncheon from noon
– 12:30 p.m.
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The Wilbraham-Hampden Times is now on Facebook.
Go to www.facebook.com/wilbrahamhampdentimes
and “like” us.
Page Celebrating
a
centennial…
Hampden
Selectman
Chairman John
D. Flynn (left)
reads and delivers
a proclamation
from the town in
honor of Beatrice
Officer Oct. 30,
who celebrated
her 100th birthday
at Centennial
Commons. She
celebrated among
friends, family
and community
members during a
cake and ice cream
social.
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
beginning at 12:30 p.m., will chronicle
her spiritual journey that began in the
Berkshires after her mom came through
in a photograph – a day after her mom’s
funeral. Copies of “An Angel on My
Shoulder” and “Floors of the Forest” will
also be available for purchase following
the presentation.
For more information contact [email protected]
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page Editorial
The earlier the better
Knowledge is everything
W
ith statistics like 2.6 million breast cancer
survivors living in the United States right
now, there is no way women should be forgetting a mammogram for any reason.
The key to continually seeing that number of survivors increase is early detection. Knowledge is everything.
Massachusetts’ mammography screening coverage law requires private insurance companies, public
employee health plans and Medicaid to provide coverage for mammograms beginning with a baseline between the ages of 35 and 39 and annual mammograms
for those 40 years old and above.
But those with a family history of breast cancer
should talk to their doctor about establishing a baseline
through a mammogram earlier.
For those without symptoms of breast cancer but
who have been diagnosed with the disease via a mammogram, the cancer tends to be small and confined to
the breast, according to the American Cancer Society.
And in this case, size matters.
Young adults and those in their 30s are not exempt
from being diagnosed with breast cancer despite the
lessened risk that comes with their age group. Clinical
breast exams should be performed by doctors at least
every three years.
Young women should also ask their doctors to
show them the techniques for performing self-exams.
With these exams, young women can establish what
their breasts feel like and understand what is normal,
giving them the chance to detect when something
doesn’t feel right – at which point they should contact
their doctor.
Again, knowledge is everything. Now that we have
observed National Breast Cancer Awareness Month
and have seen a very successful Rays of Hope Walk
fundraiser in October, it provides an opportunity for
mothers to talk to their daughters about breast cancer
and self-exams, for sisters to remind one another to
schedule an exam, for friends to gently prod one another that it’s time to being what should be an annual
tradition.
But the conversation about prevention should not
be limited to just women. Men, too can be diagnosed
with breast cancer, and they also should be kept in the
know.
Be good to yourself – receive a mammogram to
establish a baseline if you have yet to do so or if you’re
over 40 years old or above and have not had a mammogram. Past that good onto someone else and urge
those you love to talk to their doctors about early prevention.
Knowledge is everything. For more information
about breast cancer and mammograms, visit www.nationalbreastcancer.org or www. Cancer.org.
TALK of the TOWNS
I
said goodbye to the Wilbraham Board of inspiring, especially the last one in June when Joey
Selectmen at my last meeting covering them for Barton, in a wheelchair, made his way across the
our Town Hall Notebook story Oct. 27 before I Symphony Hall stage to a roaring, standing ovation.
retired. When I started 12 years ago Kevin Moriarty, That story and photo was nominated for a New
Jim Thompson and Dave Barry made up the three- England Newspaper and Press Association Award
person board. The current three members are, Bob (NENPA).
Russell, Bob Boilard and Sue Bunnell. In between,
Early in my editorship I was recruited by
them Pat Brady had two terms, one of them doing the Rotary Club where I made lots of friends and
yeoman duty dealing with the 2011 storms. They all covered their activities like the Town Christmas
did a great job.
Tree Lighting and Senior Picnic at Spec Pond. To
Now that I have reached retirement I would this day, Senior Picnic cook Walt Markett still
like to share some of my memories at
won’t let me print his secret recipe for
the Times since we debuted the paper at
chicken BBQ sauce.
the 2002 Peach Festival: We had a booth
We made it a priority to publicize
TALK
in the Brooders at every festival until it
every Thursday night summer concert
columnist
ended a few years ago.
at Fountain Park, countless Boy Scout
I became editor on Nov. 6, 2003
bottle drives, Student Council car
following in the footsteps of my mother
washes, weekly school lunch menus,
Ethel Bennett who was the Wilbraham
Rec Department and Hampden and
reporter for the daily Springfield Morning
Wilbraham library events, senior center
Union in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s.
goings on, garden club meetings, Old
I had been the Eastern Edition
Meeting House open houses and much
Advertising Production Mgr. of the Wall
more.
Street Journal in Chicopee for almost
Being a history buff, I was very
CHARLES F.
BENNETT
20 years when I left to purchase a small
happy when they asked me to serve
weekly in Western Mass. We sold that
on Wilbraham’s 250th Anniversary
paper and I became public relations
Celebration Committee, co-chaired by
director of Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS) of Patti Diotalevi and Kevin Moriarty. Little did I
Hampden County.
know they would make me the emcee at the 250th
While at BBBS I started with the new Times Ball at Chez Josef and co-Grand Marshall with
by covering the Wilbraham Selectmen’s meetings Llewelyn Merrick of the 250th Parade. We led the
watching the antics of Kevin, Jim and Dave, who parade in a car driven by, who else, Don Flannery.
have all moved on. In those days the meetings That year we covered everything from the opening
weren’t televised and were much more informal and burying of the Time Capsule in Crane Park to
than they are now.
the Hill Climb re-enactment organized by Paul
Then, owner Pat Turley, who felt that Maguire and Joan Paris. That year there was a
community journalism could thrive in Wilbraham Scavenger Hunt, the Taste of Wilbraham, a townand Hampden, hired me as full time editor and the wide tag sale.
fun really began. I have lots of good memories of
We had the pleasure of publishing some special
chronicling the town over those years. Fun times, issues like the 250th Anniversary Commemorative
like being a male model in the Wilbraham Women’s Issue, and two editions of Just for Women, created by
Club Fashion Show to serious situations like sitting my office partner Jocelyn Walker, our advertising
in on the Emergency Management Meetings after sales rep.
the tornado, microburst and October snowstorm.
Along our journey the Times won two major
I remember touring the devastation with our NENPA news awards, one sad and one informative.
photographer Dave Miles.
Written by my former intern Jen Wroblewski, she
One stark memory that stands out is when they won an award for covering the funeral of Springfield
tore down the old Minnechaug where I was in the Police Officer Kevin Ambrose, of Wilbraham,
first class to graduate in 1961. Dave Miles’ photo killed in the line of duty. And I won the History
of the smokestack, the last thing standing at the old Reporting Award for the story of the Glendale
school site.
Cemetery Ghost.
Dave and I, and my wife Sue, have attended
So, in leaving you, my favorite readers, I depart
and covered every Minnechaug graduation since with a Yogi Berra saying, which reminds me of all
2004. We always put that story on the front page. the people from Hampden and Wilbraham who I
And, I was honored to be inducted into the Alumni have had the pleasure of meeting. “We have a good
Hall of Fame in 2012. Those graduations were time together, even when we’re not together.”
November 6, 2014
QUOTATIONS
of the Week
“
This is what I do. Nuclear physics as a
hobby. It gives me a better grasp of physics and
the ability to play with (science).
”
Wilbraham resident Will Caruana explaining his
hobby of working with plasma.
“”
“
Churches are the bedrock of the com-
munity.
Rev. Nathaniel Anderson speaking about all local
churches taking part in the CROP Walk to fight hunger.
The cornerstone of my approach to pastoring is the empowerment of others.
”
St. Cecilia’s Parish leader Fr. Daniel Boyle talking
about his ministerial style.
“It’s not so popular having “Senior Center” on
your wedding invitation.”
Architect John Catlin describing the phrase community center over senior center.
“
”
We think this is a good idea.
Hampden Advisory Committee Co-Chair Doug
Boyd recommending favorable action on a vote to reduce the tax rate at Special Town Meeting.
Volunteers of the Week
T
his week’s volunteers of the week are
Janice Bridgeman, Cindy Desrosiers,
Lorraine Brooks, Bill LaFond, John
Mumper, Marin Delapa, and Janice
Pelletier who volunteer at the Hampden Senior
Center.
The state estimates the value of a volunteer in
Massachusetts is worth $27.43 per hour.
The Wilbraham-Hampden Times
is now on Facebook. Go to
www.facebook.com/wilbrahamhampdentimes
and “like” us.
The Wilbraham-Hampden Times
is published every Thursday by
Turley Publications, Inc., 24
Water St., Palmer, Mass. 01069.
Telephone (413) 283-8393, Fax
(413) 289-1977.
PATRICK H. TURLEY Publisher
KEITH TURLEY
Executive Vice President
DOUGLAS L. TURLEY
Vice President of Publications
STAFF WRITER
Tyler S. Witkop
ADVERTISING SALES
Jocelyn Walker
SPORTS EDITOR
Dave Forbes
SOCIAL MEDIA
@ Wilbraham-Hampden Times
WEB
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Editorial
Policy
Letters to the editor
should be 350 words or less
in length. No unsigned or
anonymous opinions will be
published. We require letter
writers to include his or her
town of residence and home
telephone number. We must
authenticate authorship prior
to publication. We reserve the
right to edit or withhold any
submissions deemed to be
libelous or contain unsubstantiated allegations, personal
attacks, defamation of character and offensive language.
All unknown or alleged facts
and quotations offered by the
author need to cite credible,
unbiased sources. Send letters
to: Staff Writer, WilbrahamHampden Times, 2341 Boston
Rd., Wilbraham, MA 01095,
faxed to 413-682-0013 or via
e-mail to [email protected]
The deadline for submissions
is Friday at noon.
Correction Policy
The TIMES will gladly
correct factual errors that appear in this paper and can be
substantiated. Corrections or
clarifications will always appear on the editorial pages.
To request a correction, send
information in an e-mail or
mailed communication to the
editor at the above address
listed above.
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES is published every
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subscriptions are available at
$45, out of state $50 by calling 800-824-6458 Ext. 201.
The deadline for submission
of news material, letters to
the editor and photos is Monday at 12 p.m. The TIMES is
not responsible for submitted
photos.
November 6, 2014
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page Editorial
Erase apathy, participate in the community
By Jennifer Powell
Times Columnist
lic but go even further to complain about
things they have done nothing to help
solve. If I have to stand in line behind anf all of a sudden I turned the color of other person mumbling about the state of
a chili pepper, raised my fists in the the world from anything as far stretched
as massive street pot holes to
air and screamed like a
pot I might go all
banshee you could safely deT i m es legalized
“puppy peed on the floor” on
termine I was only admonishcolumnist
them! There is a time and a
ing the dog for tinkling on the
place to be heard and one of
floor again! I rarely get angry,
them is a polling box on Elecand never do so in public.
tion Day – not the checkout
Until now. For the first time
line at the grocery store.
ever I am officially, publicly,
This week, if you aren’t
to-the-bone angry. I am sick
panicking over Ebola you are
and tired of listening to people
probably anguishing over the
complain who don’t bother to
Common Core. There are two
participate. Apathy.
Jennifer Powell
kinds of people discussing
The apathy towards so
Common Core: They either
many organizations in WilA) go on Facebook and whine
braham makes it hard to keep
up with it all. And don’t get out your about it with other ninnies or B) attend
pencils and start sending me mail just and voice their concerns at a Hampdenyet. Of course there are people who par- Wilbraham Regional School Committee
ticipate. It’s just the same people all the meeting. There are four parents who regtime. Ironically, the people I want to reach ularly attend the school committee meethave probably never opened a newspaper ings. For the entire district!
except to line a litter box but alas, this is
Not Facebook
my venue.
Posting on Facebook does not count
The quintessential representation of at all in the “doing something to solve
apathy, the one to which I can point to the problem” category. Facebook is great
for 90 percent of the ills in our country, is for raising awareness or simply saying
voting. It makes my blood boil that non- what you think but first you have to get
voters even show their faces at all in pub- out there and do things. You have to get
I
off your butt, go to meetings where intelligent people are making decisions and
make your voice heard. Use your voice,
you know … that sound that comes out of
your mouth.
How about taxes? Apathetic people
complain about taxes more than anyone.
Do you receive your property tax bill in
the mail and say, “I can’t believe how
much this has gone up?” There are only
400 or so residents who actually know
how their taxes are being spent. Those are
the townspeople who attended the Annual
Town Meeting or read the Annual Town
Report. Hardly anyone in my age bracket,
let’s lie and say thirty-something’s, attend
the Annual Town Meeting where actual
townspeople raise yellow voting cards in
the air for or against critical decisions affecting our town. Mark your calendars for
the next meeting and get a darn babysitter
people! This is important stuff that affects
you directly. The annual meeting is traditionally held on the Monday night prior to
the third Saturday in May.
But wait, there’s more! The Wilbraham Children’s Museum, a 100 percent
volunteer run and funded community
establishment. Over 200 families use
the museum’s playground every year,
but only four women responded to a request to help with the annual clean up in
October – two of them were six months
pregnant! It’s all I can do to not physically pummel into the ground the people
‘free-loading’ in the playground gathered
in little circles, around the sign that says
“Please Volunteer” and are complaining,
“they should really clean this place up.”
WCM meetings are usually the second
Monday of each month at 7 p.m. If you
use the playground you should be attending meetings too.
It’s really sad how easily this rant is
coming to me. How about 15 parents at
the Mile Tree PTO meeting? There are
317 students attending the school and 15
parents make the time for the monthly
meeting? Only two parents attended the
daytime meeting! Do you think the school
would benefit from more in-classroom
technology or enrichment assemblies?
You can post it on Facebook or raise your
hand at a meeting and help!
Please consider taking the time you
would devote to social media and letting
the world know how displeased you are
with it, and instead make time in your
schedule for participating in the real
world. Raise your hand. Cast your vote.
Attend the meetings. Erase the apathy.
Jennifer Powell lives in Wilbraham
with her husband, two children and new
puppy, Tuxedo. Comments can be directed
to [email protected]
Correction
In last week’s Times, we had the wrong name in the
“Minnechaug teacher of the year” photo. The correct
name is Kristen Miracle.
Hampden
meetings schedule
Monday, Nov. 10
Board of Selectmen
6:30 p.m. Town House
Hampden-Wilbraham Regional School Committee
7 p.m. Minnechaug
Wilbraham
meetings schedule
Thursday, Nov. 6
Parks and Recreation Commission
6 p.m. Senior Center
HAVE YOU LOST
YOUR PERSONAL BANKER?
Monday, Nov. 10
Board of Selectmen
7 p.m. Town Office Building
Hampden-Wilbraham Regional School Committee
7 p.m. Minnechaug
Wednesday, Nov. 12
Finance Committee
7 p.m. Town Office Building
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The Wilbraham-Hampden Times is now on Facebook.
Go to www.facebook.com/wilbrahamhampdentimes
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page November 6, 2014
A Community Gallery of life in
Wilbraham and Hampden:
The Turley staff says good bye to Charlie.
Children make art at the Hampden Library.
A Hampden couple enjoy an Oktoberfest
dinner. Musicians are greeted by Wilbraham
residents at a Polish event. Women’s Club
members enjoy the food at a game party.
A long word in the dictionary. The Times
celebrates with the Minnechaug golf team.
Readers are encouraged to send in medium to high
resolution photos for this page by e-mail to [email protected]
turley.com or mail to TIMES, 2341 Boston Road,
Wilbraham, MA 01095. Please note that if you send
us a photo of the Times in different parts of the world,
please include a recognizable landmark in the background. Examples: Eiffel Tower; castle in Spain.
TIMES photo by David Miles
Bountiful table at Women’s Club party…
There was no shortage of good food at the Wilbraham Women’s Club
Card & Game Party held at St. Cecilia’s Parish Center Sept. 25. Favorite
games included Scrabble, cribbage, whist and bridge.
Make like a leaf…
Children in the Hampden Library’s “Lu
Oct. 22 using leaves gathered from o
Eva Gagliarducci, Youth Services Libr
and Eamon Gurung.
A Commun
Life in Wilbraha
Turley staff says goodby
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
In good company…
Hampden residents Chris and Dave Cesan enjoy the German food and
company offered at the Hampden Senior Center’s Oktoberfest dinner and
beer tasting Oct. 18.
TIMES photo submitted
Musicians featured at Polish ‘Imieniny’…
Pianist Joseph Dior (left) saxophone player David Koala (right) are greeted by Wilbraham members of PNA Lodge (from left) Elaine Wanda Lavoie,
Helen Sabin and Teresa Struziak at the Oct. 10 Polish Center of Discovery
“Imieniny” or “name day” event in Chicopee.
The Turley Publications staff, parent company of the Times, held a retirement lunch Oc
at Dana’s Grillroom Oct. 24. Bennett’s last day was Oct. 31.
This page is brought to you
M I D WAY S H O P S • 2 4 6 0 B O S
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November 6, 2014
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page TIMES photo by David Miles
‘A Window on
the Community’
Editor’s note: Each week we
provide a glimpse at Greg the
Barber’s window. This is the
next in our series of photos.
Greg helps Linda Stanco learn she’s
going to Disney.
CAPTURE
the Moment
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
unch Bunch” display artwork they created
outside. From left to right: Savannah Lee,
rarian Chanda Williams, Lawten Gaboury,
WH
To purchase these
photos go to www.
turley2.smugmug.com.
nity Gallery
am & Hampden
ye to editor…
TIMES photo by David Miles
‘Try finding this word in your new dictionary’…
Wilbraham-Hampden Rotary Club members Dave Graziano and Ann Marie
Ottoson, hold up a banner with the word “hippotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia” at Stony Hill School Oct. 15 when they gave out dictionaries to
every third grader. The word means “fear of long words”.
TIMES photo submitted
Times with the ‘Chaug golf team…
TIMES photo by David Miles
ct. 24 for retiring Editor Charlie Bennett (front left) with owner Pat Turley (front right)
The Minnechaug Regional High School golf team celebrates their Valley
Wheel Title with the Times. (From left) Dave Robinson, Bobby Trembaly,
Matt Diefenderfer, Steve Hunt, Jeff Proulx, Corey Page, Mike Proulx and
Matt Gurski. Missing from photo is Brandon Rheault.
as a c o m m u nity service b y :
STON ROAD, WILBRAHAM, MA
Sales ~ Service ~ Parts ~ Accessories
2460 Boston Road • Wilbraham, MA • 413-599-4900
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 10
A star in a jar
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
ing the belt-driven pump.
“I don’t do golfing,”
said Caruana. “This is what
I do. Nuclear physics as a
WILBRAHAM – Mention
hobby. It gives me a better
the word “plasma” and most
grasp of physics and the
people think high definition teleability to play with (scivision sets. Say the word around
ence).”
one Wilbraham resident and his
Unlike nuclear fission,
face lights up, eager to flip a
which is the splitting of atswitch and show anyone willing
oms, there is no harmful
to see nuclear physics in action.
radiation produced by his
Chairman of the Wilbraham
device. “There’s not a lot of
Broadband Committee and Fipractical uses,” he said of
nance Committee member Will
his creation. At this point,
Caruana was inducted into the
his work is largely research“Plasma Club” on Sept. 25. The
“club,” or collective group of
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop based.
amateur nuclear scientists, is an
Disconnect
online community of amateur Plasma is in essence a star in a jar.
In the future, Caruana
researchers joined by a love of
hopes to gain entrance into
science and who have created
the neutron club. To earn
To create the plasma, Caruana uses
plasma at home. This online
that distinction, an indicommunity is called The Open Source two coils of copper tubing wrapped vidual has to show that nuclear fusion is
inside a large glass jar. One ends in a taking place using deuterium – a stable
Fusor Research Consortium.
Plasma, like gas, solids and liquids, cage-like ball. A positive and negative isotope of hydrogen gas – using photois one of the four natural states of mat- lead protrudes from the sealed jar. For graphic evidence and technical data dister. It is also the most abundant in the power, he uses a neon sign transformer closure. He said that process will take
Universe, though rare on Earth. It is wired into a Variac-brand variable trans- him nearly 10 years.
created when gas is ionized. On earth, former. A section of plastic tubing runs
“There’s a real disconnect between
lightning is the prime example. In the from the jar to a water pump in order to politics and real science,” Caruana, who
solar system, the grandest example is create a vacuum inside the jar and con- aside from his roles in town also serves
the sun. Plasma is also present in static trol the gas present.
as a political consultant, said. He added
The design, based on the Farn- that he likes to know and analyze scishocks and arc welding.
Plasma measures between 1.8 and sworth fusor – named after Philo T. ence himself, not rely on individual sci3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit, Caruana Farnsworth whose work was pivotal in entists to present an answer.
said. He noted that stars exist almost en- developing the television – takes the
To date, there are roughly 100 in120 volts of electricity from the wall dividuals on the list of the Plasma Club.
tirely as plasma.
and amplifies it around 6,500 volts. The Less than 50 have made it on the list of
Stable Plasma
Caruana explains that the plasma he electricity charges nitrogen gas to cre- the neutron club. To find out more about
creates is “stable plasma,” in that it can ate a beautiful display of plasma with a fusion and plasma logon to fusor.net.
be contained and controlled. He gave an purple color that can light a dark room.
Tyler S. Witkop can be reached at
example of “unstable plasma,” by at- Essentially, he creates a star in a jar.
He said that his device cost roughly [email protected]
taching a diode to an electrical power
source and creating an arc, in the same $250-300 to make, the most expensive
and dangerous part of the operation bemanner as an arc welder.
Thank You
November 6, 2014
Citizens Police
Academy to
begin next week
WILBRAHAM - The Wilbraham Police Department is holding their Citizens
Police Academy in the Brooks Room of the
Wilbraham Library on five Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. Nov. 6, 13, 20; Dec.
4 and 11. The Academy is free and open
to all Wilbraham residents and business
people.
Nov. 13 - A Power Point presentation
on the K9 Program with drug information
by School Resource Officer Dan Menard
who will share his experiences.
Nov. 20 – Det. Jeff Rudinksi will talk
about social media issues in law enforcement. He wall also inform about identity
theft and scams common in town. Sgt.
Shawn Baldwin will speak about the Dive
Team and the process behind search warrants. They will both talk about court procedures and detective work.
Dec. 4 – Drug recognition expert Officer Sean Casella will speak about OUI alcohol and drugs including his experiences
and expertise.
Dec. 11 – Officers Brent Noyes and
David Diogo will discuss traffic enforcement accident investigation and the marijuana by-law as well as some of their experiences on the Third Shift. Diogo will share
his expertise about the new cruiser cams,
how they work and how they help with
OUI’s, citizen complaints, pursuits and officer safety.
The Police Academy is intended to
give a general overview of the common
experiences and laws enforce in Wilbraham. There is no obligation to attend all the
classes; it is very information. For more information contact Capt. Tim Kane at 5963837 or email [email protected]
to all our sponsors for making the 2014
Spec Pond 5K RACE and Oktoberfest a success!
Oktoberfest Sponsor
The Garvey Group and Post Office Park
Race Sponsor
Harrington Insurance Agency, Inc.
Shirt Sponsors
Fitzgerald Attorneys at Law
PROSHRED
Hampden Bank
Rocky Mountain Wood Co.
Kitchen Encounters
Scantic Valley YMCA
Ludlow Pediatrics
Scatolini Insurance Agency
Luso Credit Union
TD Bank
Monson Savings Bank
United Bank
Mountain View Landscaping
Urgent Care of Wilbraham
Palmer Paving Corporation
Vartanian Custom Cabinets
Pediatric Services of Springfield
Wilbraham Funeral Home
Professional Paralegal Services
Wilbraham Tire & Auto Services
Prize Sponsors
Abudanza Ristorante
La Nostra Pizzeria & Deli
Anchor House Restaurant
Mandarin Wilbraham
Camile’s Bistro & Bar
Michael’s Pasta in a Pan
Dana’s Grillroom
Pan’e Dolcetti
Fred’s Shoes
PROSHRED
Friendly’s
Tap Room Grill
Gregory’s Restaurant & Pizza Pub
Village Store and Cafe
Horizons Restaurant & Bar
Walgreens
Krazy Jake’s
Wilbraham Pizzeria
Congratulations to our race winners:
Overall Male = Anthony Giacomoni
Overall Female = Eileen Jenkins
Wilbraham Male = Joe Ferraro
Wilbraham Female = Christa Murray
Save the date on your calendar, next year’s
Spec Pond 5K RACE and Oktoberfest
will be held on Saturday, September 26, 2015!
Funds raised by the Wilbraham Friends of Recreation are used in the improvement and maintenance of the
recreational facilities and to support recreational programs in Wilbraham. All funds from the Spec Pond 5K RACE
and Oktoberfest go to support the maintenance of the Spec Pond Recreational Complex.
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page 11
Draft horse rescuer advocates for awareness
Pam Rickenbach:
‘We were a horsepowered country’
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
WILBRAHAM - With the
holidays fast approaching, we
have nostalgic memories and
images of horse-drawn sleigh
and hay rides in our minds eye.
We awe at the Clydesdales at the
Big E and in beer commercials, a
relic of a bygone era.
Just down the road from Wilbraham, on Route 181 in Palmer,
Blue Star Equiculture aims to restore the image of the work horse
in our automated world. Operating at Burgundy Brook Farm,
Blue Star Equiculture maintains
a sustainable organic farm, using horse power as the driving
force.
“Somehow we’ve forgotten
that horses were bred to be partners with us in our work,” Director Pamela Rickenbach said
during a meeting of the Wilbraham-Hampden Rotary Club at
the Country Club of Wilbraham.
Intertwined History
Rickenbach, who founded
the organization six years ago,
spent much of her life in Bolivia
and South America. In America,
she worked as a horse-drawn
carriage tour guide in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where she
developed a passion for the intertwined history of people and
horses. “All of these people (on
tours, from all over the world)
were all horse people,” she said.
“Philadelphia was the most fashionable horse location in the
country.”
Rickenbach noted that when
she learned how the horses were
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treated once they were retired or
sick, she knew she had to make
a difference. She explained that
horses currently are not federally regulated as either livestock or domestic pets – and the
Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) only classifies dogs as
service animals – which means
that many are shipped across international borders, without food
or water, to be slaughtered.
Blue Star helps to advocate
for and raise awareness to the
work and relationship humans
have with their horses. They
house several horses including Clydesdales, Percherons,
and geldings. The work or draft
horse designation encompasses
the breeds that would pull plows,
take men to war, deliver goods
and pull carriages.
“(Horses) were used as
semi-trucks,” said Rickenbach.
“We were a horse-powered
country.”
“In this area we had the
Morgans because not only could
they do the work but they took us
to church,” Rickenbach noted.
At the farm, Blue Star uses
the horses for farming and logging, but
also as a teaching
tool. They strive to
develop relationships
between humans and
horses. In addition to
their advocacy, they
also teach draft horse
husbandry at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.
“They’re like dolphins with four legs,
you have to develop a
relationship,” Richenbach said. “Learn to
do something with a
horse because a horse
will tell you how to
be present.”
Our advertisers make this
publication possible.
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Rickenbach remarked that
in some cases, farming with draft
horses is more cost effective than
using automated labor. She noted that the up-front expense to
purchase a tractor alone is high,
plus the maintenance and accessories. As an added negative, she
explained that tractors allow for
the compacting of the soil and
chemicals from fertilizers, pesticides and the machinery that
leech into the soil “harm the environment.”
“There’s a cost to that later,
in the community,” she said.
According to Rickenbach,
the Blue Star operation costs
roughly $250,000 annually to
run. “We’re not saying that we
should go back to horse power,
we’re inviting the horses back.”
Blue Star Equiculture is located at 3090 Palmer St. (Route
181) in Palmer. For more information, logon to equiculture.
com or call 413-289-9787.
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
Wilbraham-Hampden Rotary Club President Dr. Ed McFarland welcomes guest speaker Pam Rickenbach, of Blue
Star Equiculture in Palmer.
The Artists at Indian Orchard Mills
34 Front Street, Indian Orchard, MA
Saturday & Sunday 12-4pm
Nov. 8th & 9th
www.IndianOrchardMills.com
(413) 543-3321
Refreshments $2 Suggested Donation
Visit the Dane Gallery
See the workings of more than 50 artists
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 12
November 6, 2014
Middle School Task Force underway
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
HAMPDEN – With middle school
enrollment numbers declining in both
Hampden and Wilbraham, the newly
launched Middle School Task Force, a
sub-committee reporting to the HampdenWilbraham Regional School Committee,
officially kicked off their work with a
site tour of Thornton W. Burgess Middle
School (TWB) Oct. 30.
The 13 member committee includes
School Committee members Chairman
Marc Ducey, Vice Chairman Lisa Morace and Peter Salerno, Wilbraham Selectman Sue Bunnell, Hampden Selectman
Chairman John D. Flynn; Hampden residents Nick Fyntrilakis, Marty McQuade
(Hampden Parks and Recreation Department chairman), George Semanie and
Sandra Sheehan; and Wilbraham residents
Allison DiGrande, Karen Grycel, Tricia
Murphy and Tod O’Brien.
Non-voting members include Schools
Supt. M. Martin O’Shea, Assistant Supt.
for Curriculum Timothy O’Connor, Assistant Supt. for Business Beth Regulbuto, TWB Principal Peter Dufresne, Wilbraham Middle School (WMS) Principal
Noel Pixley, WMS teacher representative
Courtney Derosia, TWB teacher representative Eric Panasci, Director of Facilities
and Operations Edward Cenedella and
Secretary Michelle LeDoux.
Absent from the first meeting were
Salerno, Flynn and Dufresne. Flynn had
prior commitments and Dufresne was returning from a conference.
The task force will review current and
historic enrollment figures, assess WMS
and TWB in terms of infrastructure and
operating capacity, and create recommendations based on facility use, educational
programming, staffing and instructional
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
Wilbraham Middle School Principal
Noel Pixley (center) leads the Middle School Task Force on a tour of
Thornton W. Burgess Middle School
in Hampden. Pixley was the TWB
principal for 18 years, as well as
both teacher and student there.
equipment. Currently, middle school enrollment figures are 267 students at TWB
and 537 at WMS. By 2019-2020, those
figures are expected to drop to 164 and
438 respectively, based on current demographics.
Shape the District
“The impact of that recommendation could shape the district for years to
come,” Ducey said, introducing the issues
to the task force.
Much of the meeting was procedural,
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informing the committee members, many
of whom are parents with no prior government experience, about the Open Meeting
Law. Ducey was named chairman and
Morace was named vice chairman of the
task force.
Ducey commented that it his hope
that by Jan. 1 the task force would be able
to give the School Committee some direction.
“Would it make sense to bring in our
own architects to look at the buildings and
build on the [New England School Development Council] recommendations,” Ducey asked.
He explained that Minnechaug Regional High School is collectively owned
by the Hampden-Wilbraham Regional
School District but that TWB and WMS
are owned by their respective towns,
meaning capital improvements are the
responsibility of the individual town. Ducey wondered how receptive either town
would be of bringing in students from the
other school to fill their school, should a
regionalization take place.
O’Shea noted that there are districts
with different levels of regionalization,
from having kindergarten through high
school regionalization to solely high
school regionalization, like HWRSD.
“We have some significant demographic issues,” said O’Shea. “It’s so important that we get a baseline understanding of the buildings.”
No Impact on 2015
“Whatever we do will not impact the
2015 school year,” Ducey said. “If we
do anything that will impact the regional
agreement, it will require Town Meeting
approval.”
A district enrollment study, published in December of 2012 by the New
England School Development Council
(NESDEC) and available on the district’s
website, www.hwrsd.org, noted that enrollment across the district was expected
to decrease within five years of the study.
It noted that from years six through 10,
enrollment may flatten or increase. This
study also reported that the demographics
of both communities shifted, as the population of residents aged 45 or older grew
28 percent in Hampden and 23 percent in
Wilbraham through 2010, while younger
age groups shrunk.
Additionally, the study noted that by
the end of the decade, both towns may experience growth due to home sales. When
and if the turnover occurs, the report states
it has “the potential to increase HWRSD
enrollments above the status quo projections.”
Panasci, who teaches physical education, noted that currently the enrollment is
so small that there are teachers teaching
across grades and disciplines.
“The team concept that works best is
about 100 kids, then you have five teachers,” Pixley said. He noted that a teacher
instructing multiple disciplines works
at the elementary level, but that middle
school teaching requirements call for specialized areas of instruction.
“As enrollment drops off, it gets
harder to maintain the team concept,”
O’Shea said.
According to Cenedella, TWB,
which was constructed in 1967, sits on 23
acres of land and operates out of roughly
76,000 square-feet. WMS sits on 63 acres
by comparison. Outside of the high-efficiency boiler and water heater installed
at TWB in 2004, he said the “balance of
the building” operates on the original controls.
The task force will next meet at 7
p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 13 at WMS.
Tyler S. Witkop can be reached at
[email protected]
November 6, 2014
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Recent HWRSD school
committee meeting covers
a diverse agenda
By Janet Wise
Turley Publications Correspondent
WILBRAHAM – The Oct. 28 meeting of the Hampden-Wilbraham Regional
School Committee covered a sizeable
number of agenda items, including the
Middle School Task Force, a generous
donation, a synopsis of 2013-2014 MCAS
results and a review of the individual accomplishments and action steps of all the
schools in the district.
In his Chairman’s Report, Marc Ducey gratefully described the response in
the community to a call for volunteers to
serve on the Middle School Task Force,
which is chartered with developing a strategic roadmap for the district’s middle
schools. As Ducey reported, 21 people
submitted their names for consideration.
Bill Garbaszze, a representative from
Babson Capital Management, a global asset management firm and subsidiary of
MassMutual, presented the district with
the organization’s donation of 100 desktop
computers, monitors, keyboards and mice.
As School Superintendent Marty O’Shea
pointed out, it would cost approximately
$25,000 to buy this equipment new, so
this represents a significant contribution
to the district, which was appreciatively
accepted by the committee.
MCAS Results
O’Shea gave a presentation of the
2013-2014 MCAS results and individual
school assessments.
“It is our job is to approach the world
of standardized testing that we are in the
middle of with a healthy balance,” O’Shea
said. “That is one of our primary tasks as
educators. Standardized testing should
guide our efforts, but we also need to understand that these tests represent a set
of data points and are not the ‘be all end
all’ of who we are and how we judge our
progress.”
Some of the district results that
O’Shea characterized as encouraging were
the grade three and eight math, grade five
and eight ELA, as well as the high school
ELA, math and science and technology
scores, all of which were significantly
above the state average.
However, O’Shea also indicated that
elementary math has been identified as
an area of focus for the district, pointing
to the grades four, five and seven math
MCAS scores that all suggest a need for
improvement.
Accomplishments and Action Steps
Although the principals from all
grades reported on their accomplishments and action steps, the four elementary school principals, Lisa Curtin, Sherrill Caruana, Joanne Wilson and Deborah
Thompson, took the lion’s share of time
on their grades’ assessment.
Accomplishments at the elementary
level included the implementation of the
EnVision math program last year, the
development and use of a district-wide
pacing guide for that program, as well
as universal screening to identify student
needs in reading and math. The principals
also included as a point of pride the tireless work of the teachers in the schools to
balance meeting standards with making
school safe and fun for their students.
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Please see COMMITTEE, page 16
Page 13
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 14
November 6, 2014
Dining Out
Irish Pub meets New York City ambiance in Somers
By The Undercover Epicurean
O
n a beautiful autumn morning with
a convertible packed with freshly
picked pumpkins my dining companion and I found ourselves famished
and in search of a new restaurant for lunch.
We roamed the streets of nearby Somers,
Conn. and happened upon the Somers
Grill and Tap Room at 124 Main St.
The impeccable brick front façade
and glow of warm glowing lights encouraged us to leave the brisk October air outside and venture within. A bold sign declaring “26 Varieties of Beer on Tap” also
helped with the decision.
We were greeted with the perfect
blend of ambiance, cleanliness and attentiveness as soon as we crossed the
threshold. This was not a dim dank bar but
rather a gleaming, well lit establishment.
We were guided to a cozy booth by the
window with generous wood benches and
a sparkling clean tabletop.
Appetizers
The waitress left us with our menus
and a promise to return for a drink order. The menu was not cumbersome with
roughly four to six items per category
and what seemed to be a typical selection
of appetizers; until you spot the Spinach
and Artichoke Rangoons ($6.99). I am
always interested in trying new twists
on familiar food so I queried our waitress upon her returned. Just the mention
of the rangoons put a smile across our
servers face that said ‘I would eat them
for breakfast lunch and dinner’ and confirmed our suspicions – “they are fantastic”.
Up until then we thought we were
in a well-stocked bar until our server
informed us of their daily specials. We
were in for a surprise.
My companion ordered the handbreaded crispy Fried Mozzarella ($6.99),
not a culinary leap on her part but what
arrived at our table was by no means ordinary. Proving there was nary a frozen
item in their kitchen, the five mozzarella
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My panache for the slightly ridiculous made me select a beer poured from
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washed down my Corned Beef Chowder
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chowder captured the historical tradition
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1 Allen Street,
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Eastfield Mall
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FOOD & SPIRITS
“sticks” were generous wedges of fresh
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bite of Rangoon – crunchy, not greasy,
with a chunky blend of artichoke and
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With our appetizers my companion
ordered a Caramel Apple Martini ($10).
The cocktail was fairly strong but had an
adequate rim garnish of caramel, sugar
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November 6, 2014
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
ARTS & Lifestyles
Page 15
A children’s book with a powerful lesson
Hampden writer
uses grandson as
inspiration
By Tyler S. Witkop
Turley Publications Staff Writer
E
veryone is different. Differences in opinion lead
to new ideas of progress.
They also lead to wars. Learning
to accept differences is among
the hardest lessons to grasp,
especially at young ages, as oftentimes what is different is also
frightening.
It is precisely that fear that
Hampden writer Virginia Wenz
hopes to strip away with her
self-published children’s book,
“Daniel Meets a Dragon.”
At the surface, it’s a fun tale
of a boy with a vivid imagination. With his spatula-sword and
faithful stuffed companion, he
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
Hampden writer Virginia Wenz recently published a children’s book inspired by her grandson.
sets off on an adventure to free
the village from their fear of a
frightening dragon. Finding the
dragon, he discovers the dragon
is the one in need of help, lack-
ing warmth in a cold, dark cave.
“If we can teach children to
be accepting of people who can
be different, by the time they’re
school-aged, they’ll be less in-
clined to be bullies or be bullied
themselves,” Wenz said.
She explained that the
dragon represents someone who
is different, like a new child in
school who may dress or look
different. Wenz commented
that by exposing children to an
idea while they’re young, it will
hopefully progress with them as
they get older.
“It’s about acceptance,” she
said.
She said the idea came to
her after listening to her then 4year-old grandson, also named
Daniel talking one night about a
village in “snowy white mountains.” Being a creative writer
she felt “the time had come” and
got to work on the book. Her son
Christopher, who works as a bar
manager, illustrated the story for
her.
Wenz said her grandson enjoyed the book.
“His only complaint was
that [the fictional Daniel] used a
spatula instead of a sword,” she
said.
She explained that her decision to use a spatula was based
on a child’s imagination, as a
young boy would likely have
more access to a spatula than a
toy sword. He has since shared
the story with his cousins in
Florida and Illinois, she said.
“I love the idea of children
engaging with stories at a young
age,” said Wenz.
At this time, the book is not
available in stores, though she
personally has roughly 100 copies printed. She said she plans to
read it at the Hampden Library
and others soon.
“My mission this year is to
market,” she said.
For a copy of the book, call
Wenz at 413-271-0448 or email
[email protected] The target
age group is children ages 3 to 7.
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
Autumn forest hike at Laughing Brook
Soviet-era artist celebrated in Amherst gallery
HAMPDEN – Laughing Brook
Wildlife Sanctuary will hold a “Late
Autumn Forest Hike” Saturday, Nov.
15 from 10 – 11:30 a.m.
Naturalist Kevin Kopchynski will
lead hikers of all ages and help dis-
AMHERST – The artwork of Soviet-era artist Felix Lembersky is being
celebrated in the Brechner Gallery of the
Yiddish Book Center, 1021 West St., now
through March 2015 from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Lembersky, who was poised to be a
celebrated artist after studying at the Russian Academy of Arts in Leningrad, Russia, spent much of his career in the shad-
cover wildlife preparing for winter. Attendants will search for animal homes
and learn how animals camouflage
themselves. For more information or to
register, call 413-584-3009 ext. 812.
ows as he failed to conform to Stalinist
ideology. The works in the exhibit demonstrate the range of Lembersky’s style
and subject matter: landscapes depicting
the countryside, cities, and factories of his
daily life as well as portraits of ordinary
people.
The gallery is open Friday through
Sunday. For more information, visit www.
yiddishbookcenter.org.
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 16
November 6, 2014
Shade trees planted at Fountain Park
WILBRAHAM – Fountain Park,
which many recognize as a beautiful
place to enjoy summer music, weddings and a leisure walk, recently underwent a minor facelift to make the
location that much more enjoyable.
On Oct. 19, a group of volunteers
gathered to plant a new grove of shade
trees as part of the beautification process. The group included Nan and Mike
Ligenfelter, Mary and Norah Dumula,
Russ and Sherry Jack, and Sofia, Arva
and Dave Carlson. Others involved in
the project but who could not attend
the official ceremony include Paul
Broz, Fred Spain, Greg Harris, Kent
and Karen Larson, Jamie and Jaime
Lopez, Diane Updike-Tarozzi, Joseph
and Karen Wegiel, and Eric and Tracy
Wietsma.
According to Nan Ligenfelter,
who was the catalyst for the project,
the idea struck her while attending the
first concert at the park this past summer. “I was struck by the beauty of the
park then my eyes fell upon the eight
SOMERS GRILL from page 14
and paired it with the untraditional corned beef partner. I considered purchasing a gallon to
take home but remembered that
we had also ordered entrees and
our lunch was quickly turning
into a delectable feast!
While I let out a notch in
my belt buckle to make room for
the next items in store our waitress and bartender came to the
table to check on our progress.
It was a slow lunch so far and it
was nice to see the staff attentive
to the few customers instead of
languidly staring at the bar TV,
like in so many other places.
ugly, old, dead pine trees and I thought
‘they don’t belong in this picture,’”
Ligenfelter said. She envisioned a row
of full-grown shade trees and got to
work.
She brought her vision to Pat
Brady, president of the Wilbraham Nature and Cultural Center, which oversees Fountain Park. “After that it was
simply a matter of emails, a few sunny
warm days, and coordinating things,”
said Ligenfelter.
Dave Ervin and Greg Harris of Ervin & Harris Landscaping, LLC gave
expert advice and picked up the sugar
maple trees, donating one. Paul Bronz,
of P & S Tree Service, of Feeding Hills
cut down the eight 40-foot tall pine
trees and removed them from the property. Jay Emirzian, of Green Meadow
Farm in Wilbraham used his tractor to
move the fallen trees off lawn. Fred
Spain of Arbor Line Stump Removal
from Ware ground the stumps.
When we mentioned we needed
directions back to Wilbraham
the bartender told us that the
restaurant was actually owned
by Wilbraham residents Thomas
and Tracy Dineen, also co-owners of Houligan’s Pub on Boston
Road in Wilbraham now being
renovated.
The staff also told us that
The Somers Grill had recently
undergone extensive changes
itself. Instead of being a typical
barroom the ambience now was
the perfect mix of traditional
Irish Pub meets New York City
culinary experiment.
TIMES photo submitted
A row of shade trees was recently planted at
Fountain Park. (From left) are volunteers Mary
and Norah Dumala; Russ and Sherry Jack; Nan and
Mike Lingenfelter; Sofia, Arva and Dave Carlson.
Entrees
Our entrees arrived with fanfare. I received what they call a
Flatbread but I would call a small
pizza. My Spinach Pesto Pie Flat
Bread ($11.99) was served on
a wooden pizza peel for added
presentation. The Flat Bread was
visually gorgeous with purple
onion, a generous layer of dark
green pesto, creamy white feta
cheese and mozzarella piled
high with just the right amount
of chicken and diced red tomato.
The crust, or bread, was perfection, crisp on the outside and
doughy hot inside.
Amongst the myriad of
beers on tap there was a wacko
looking Spray Paint Can tap.
I decided to try it and the Sam
Adams Rebel IPA ($6.50) is the
first West Coast style IPA from
Samuel Adams - drinkable.
My companion ordered
the Boneless Chicken Wings
($12.99) with the Honey Barbeque as an entree. What is a
very traditional offering in most
establishments was carefully
thought out and created, rather
than “opened” and dropped in a
fryer. The house-made sauce was
more like a tangy citrus glaze and
COMMITTEE from page 13
fire and immediate feedback,
whether through their iPads or iPods or video games, in wrestling
with something that is new and
difficult and challenging, they’re
quick to give up and say ‘I don’t
know. Come help me,’” Caruana
said. “And what we’re really trying to do is get kids to wrestle
with it for a while and take a different look at problem solving
and getting the wrong answers.”
The elementary school principals urged the committee to
provide them with investments
to support teaching and learning in the form of general educational interventionists, reading
support personnel, math support
personnel, and literacy and math
coaches.
“We need personnel,” Caruana said. “We need coaches and
extra support personnel.”
Correspondent Janet Wise
can be reached at [email protected]
it thickly coated the crisp, juicy
chicken filets. The coleslaw was
not a traditional vinegar marinated blend but rather a freshly
made mayonnaise based salad. It
lacked flavor but the crunch accompanied the chicken well.
With a delectable slice of
carrot cake packaged nicely togo, my companion and I decided
to return to the Somers Grill and
Tap Room again soon. There
were still 24 beers on tap still
left to taste!
The Somers Grill and Tap
Room opens daily at 11 a.m. No
reservations are needed.
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
8 [email protected]
@turleysports
www.turleysports.com
Page 17
acebook.com/turleysports
SPORTS
Falcons outlast South Hadley 3-2
in field hockey quarterfinals
By Nate Rosenthal
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
Julie Torchia
controls the ball
and tries to move
away from the
South Hadley
defense.
Turley Publications photo by David Henry
Lady Falcons
blank Lady
Lancers in
season finale
By Nate Rosenthal
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
WILBRAHAM - The Minnechaug
girls’ volleyball team finished their regular with a dominant performance against
Longmeadow, beating them in straight
sets, 25-19, 25-16 and 25-19. They end
the season as they had a year ago at 15-3
and enter the playoff as the top seed. This
time they hope to finish the job.
A year ago, the Falcons beat Longmeadow in their final regular season
match. But when they met in the semifinals, it was quite different and the Falcons
lost three to two. Longmeadow went on
to beat Chicopee Comp in the finals to win
Western Mass. The two could meet again
and if Minnechaug beats East Longmeadow, while Longmeadow bats Amherst. If
Please see volleyball, page 20
WILBRAHAM - The Minnechaug
field hockey team took its first step towards a return to the finals with a 3-2
win over South Hadley. The Falcons,
seeded fourth held off a late run by the
fifth-ranked Tigers and will take on topseeded Longmeadow in the semifinals
this week.
Minnechaug never trailed in the
game, scoring first 12 minutes into the
game. By the midpoint of the second
half, they had scored two more times and
appeared to be in command at 3-0. With
just over five minutes left, the Tigers got
on the board and with just over a minute to play, they scored again to make it
a one goal game. The final minute was
hectic, as the Tigers kept knocking on
the door. But in the end, the Falcons
held them off.
The early pressure was brought to
bear by Minnechaug as they swarmed
the South Hadley end. They got off a
couple of shots near the goal in the first
two minutes by Liz Mastrio and Mary
Clare Crochiere. At 27:25 the pressure
got them the first of their many penalty
corners. In the fourth minute, Mastrio
put one on goal from the left side. Brittany Cote made the stop. She had another in the sixth from the right and Cote
was there again.
In the 10th minute, Kamryn Jebb put
one on goal from ten yards on the right
and that was followed by a shot wide left
by Allie Fedak. Seconds later, at 18:42,
Minnechaug had another penalty corner
and it was Mastrio with her third shot on
goal in the 12th minute.
That pressure resulted in a goal for
the Falcons, when Jebb sent a pass from
Please see Field Hockey, page 18
Falcons take
fifth at states;
Hunt finishes
seventh
By Nate Rosenthal
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
WEST SPRINGFIELD - The Minnechaug boys golf team finished off a great
year on the links with a fifth place finish
at the Division I state championship match
this past week. The team got to play relatively close to home with the match being
held at the Springfield Country Club in
West Springfield.
That completes a stellar season for
the Falcons that included top honors at the
Western Mass Division I Sectionals and a
title in the Valley Wheel. The Falcons tied
Please see GOLF, page 20
Turley Publications photo by Gregory A. Scibelli
Steven Hunt tees off the 12th hole.
He represented Minnechaug well
in the state championship match
on Oct. 27 at Springfield Country
Club.
Falcons drop season finale to Ludlow 2-1
By Tim Peterson
Turley Publications
Sports Correspondent
and they’ve made me a better
coach. This is a very close team
this year and I think we’re moving in the right direction.”
Ludlow, who was eliminatWILBRAHAM— Senior
ed from postseason contention
forward Kailah Papuga and her
by the Lady Falcons last year,
teammates on the Ludlow girls’
wrapped up the regular season
varsity soccer team had no idea
with an 11-3-4 overall record.
that head coach Katie Marino
The fourth-seeded Lady Lions
was just one win away from
th
are scheduled to host either
posting her 100 career victory
fifth-seeded East Longmeadow
entering the final match of the
or 12th-seeded Renaissance in
regular season against Coombs
a Western Mass. Division 1
Division rival Minnechaug.
quarterfinal match on Thursday
Papuga scored a pair of
night at 6pm.
goals and Marino achieved her
Minnechaug, who finmilestone following a 2-1 vicished the regular season with
tory on a rainy evening at Fala 9-3-6 mark, is the third-seed
cons Field in Wilbraham, last
despite losing both regular
Wednesday.
season games against Ludlow.
“We really didn’t know
The Lady Falcons are also
anything about it,” said Papuscheduled to host a quarterfiga, who has been a member of
nal game against either sixththe varsity team since she was
Turley Publications photo by David Henry
seeded Pittsfield or 11th-seeded
a sophomore. “Coach Marino Allison Coopee makes a free kick for the Falcons.
Amherst at 4 p.m. on Thursday
is an awesome coach and she’s
afternoon.
probably very happy about
Last Wednesday’s loss
131 games as the Lady Lions head coach
reaching the milestone.”
against
Ludlow
spoiled Minnechaug’s
from
1982-1991.
Marino, who has been the Lady Li“I’m very happy that I won my 100th senior night festivities.
ons head coach since 2004, is the second
The Lady Falcons four seniors,
winningest coach in the history of the career game with this group of players,”
Marino
said.
“They’ve
taught
me
a
lot
program. Philip Dallessio won a total of
Please see soccer, page 20
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 18
November 6, 2014
FIELD HOCKEY from page 17
Holyoke Catholic
looking for
nominees
CHICOPEE - Holyoke Catholic High
School is now accepting nominations for
the Hall of Fame Class of 2015.
Nominees should be alumni (prior
to the class of 2005) who exemplified
extraordinary sportsmanship on and off
the field. If you know of an alum (individual athlete, team or coach) who you
think should be honored, please contact
the Holyoke Catholic Advancement Office at [email protected]
Turley Publications photoS by David Henry
Liz Mastrio sprints up the field.
The deadline for
submissions for this
sports section is
the Monday before
publication by noon.
To send in information,
contact Sports Editor Dave
Forbes, at 413-283-8393
ext. 237, send an e-mail
to [email protected] or
send it through the mail to:
Turley Publications
c/o Sports Editor
Dave Forbes,
24 Water St.
Palmer, MA 01069
Mackenzie Murphy starts the ball dragging up the right side.
the top of the circle to Fedak who
was right in front of the right post.
Fedak took a step and shot, sending
the ball into the left corner of the
goal. The time was 11:57 and Minnechaug had a 1-0 lead. Less than a
minute later, it was another penalty
corner for the Falcons.
South Hadley got its first good
chance in the 18th minute, when
Hannah Menard put one just wide of
the goal. That led to a penalty corner
for the Tigers. Menard had another
shot, this time on goal and stopped
by Jessica Henry and then South
Hadley got another penalty corner.
They kept up their pressure as Taylor
Guertin put a 15-yarder on Henry in
the 21st minute.
After the Falcons cleared, the Tigers came back and stayed on Henry.
Ali Rondeau had a shot on goal in the
25th that was kicked away by Henry
and Emily Florence put one on her in
the 27th minute.
Minnechaug got back in the next
minute and Mastrio took one from
eight yards that Cote stopped. The
Falcons go a penalty corner, their
fourth of the half. With 20 seconds
to play, Beau Kass put over the goal.
Minnechaug led 1-0 through the first
half.
The Tigers came out quickly after the break and Menard put one on
Henry from 16 yards in the first minute. After Mastrio was wide left in
the fourth, the Tigers cleared and got
it down to Minnechaug end. There
they got a penalty corner.
But Minnechaug was quick to
clear and with a breakaway by Mastrio and Fedak, they scored at 5:51.
Mastrio was just inside the circle
near the top and she sent a pass left
to Fedak who was about eight yards
on the elft. Fedak went far corner for
the goal.
In the ninth minute, Minnechaug
go a penalty corner, which was followed almost immediately by a shot
on goal by Margaret Finnegan in the
tenth minute. The ball got cleared
and for a minute or so, the Tigers had
it in the Minnechaug end.
Then in the 13th minute, Mastrio
used her speed to take it from one
end to the other, resulting in an unassisted goal from 14 yards. The time
was 17:27 left in the game and that
third goal seemed to put the Falcons
in control.
South Hadley would have none
of that. They got a penalty corner in
the 14th minute and shots by Guertin,
Florence and Kate O’Neill in a minute
and a half. O’Neill’s was on goal.
Minnechaug got a couple penalty corners in the 17th minute and a
shot on goal by Mastrio in the 19th.
Seconds after that they had another
penalty corner.
The last 10 minutes seemingly
belonged to South Hadley. After a
penalty corner at 10:03, they got a shot
on goal by Rondeau from eight yards
in the 22nd minute and another wide
right by Menard in the 24th. With
5:17 to play, they got on the board,
as Guertin converted a pass from Menard to make it 3-1. More pressure
was put on by the Tigers and while no
shots were on goal, they kept close to
Henry forcing her around. With 1:01
remaining Guertin pulled the Tigers
to within a point with an unassisted
goal from six yards out.
The Tigers were all over the
Minnechaug end in those final 61
seconds. They did not get a shot on
goal, but they came close on a couple
of rushes. Time ran out and Minnechaug had hung on.
Henry had eight saves in the
game, facing 10 shots over the
course.
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page 19
Roundup: Football suffers loss, but headed for tournament
WILBRAHAM - The Minnechaug
teams completed their regular seasons
this past week and every team will have
a place in the postseason. Here is a preview.
FOOTBALL
The Falcons lost 35-14 to Longmeadow. This one got away early, as they fell
behind 14-0 after the first quarter. The
loss, their fourth in a row left them with
a 4-4 record on the season and 3-4 in the
AA Conference. The Falcons will be the
fourth seed in the Division II playoffs,
playing Longmeadow, the top seed once
again. A win over Longmeadow will
pit the against the winner of Central and
East Longmeadow for the Western Mass
championship. That winner will go to the
state semifinals.
BOYS SOCCER
The Falcons finished their season
with a win over Northampton and a loss to
Pittsfield. Their final overall record was
14-3-1 and they were 5-2-1 in the Smith,
second to Amherst. They were also second to the Hurricanes in the Division I
seeding. They will open their postseason
at home against number seven, Agawam.
The end would be a title at Westfield
State.
CROSS COUNTRY
The boys were 4-5 on the season and
the girls were 5-4. Still to go are the PVIACs in Westfield and the Western Mass
Championships in Northfield for the
team. Some individuals may qualify for
the State Championship in Norton.
GIRLS SOCCER
The Lady Falcons lost their final
match, 2-1 to Ludlow and were 9-3-6 in
their overall record. The loss dropped
them 0-3-5 in the Coombs. They will
go into the playoffs, trying to win back
to back Western Mass Division I titles,
as the third seed. Drawing a bye in the
first round, they will meet the winner of
the Pittsfield (6) and Amherst (11) game
in the quarterfinals. If they can keep winning, they will be at Westfield State for
the finals.
Pittsfield ad East Longmeadow. The finals will be held at Holyoke Community
College.
GOLF
FIELD HOCKEY
Minnechaug beat Westside 3-0 and
tied Agawam 1-1 in their final games this
week. At 13-4-1 they enter the postseason as the fourth seed in Division I. They
open with a match up against number five,
South Hadley. The Lady Falcons were 52-1 in the South Division second to Longmeadow. After the quarters against South
Hadley is Longmeadow in the semifinals
at West Springfield, followed by the finals.
VOLLEYBALL
The Lady Falcons rolled past Longmeadow 3-0 in the season finale and finished 15-3 overall. They were second to
Frontier in the Eastern Division at 6-2.
Minnechaug won the top seed in Division
II and play the winner of the 8/9 game,
The boys were 16-2 over the regular
season and won the Valley Wheel with
a perfect 8-0 record. The Western Mass
championships in Great Barrington and
state championships in West Springfield
are all that remain.
GYMNASTICS
Minnechaug finished at 8-4 in the
regular season. In their final meet, they
were second to Chicopee Comp, 128.65128.50. Agawam was third at 125.725.
The Western Mass championships in
Westfield are next.
Compiled by Sports Correspondent
Nate Rosenthal
Devils rally with two goals to burn Falcons
Despite an early two-goal deficit, the
Albany Devils were able to rally past the
Springfield Falcons, 4-2, Wednesday at the
Times Union Center.
The teams will face each other seven
more times this season.
Springfield goaltender Oscar Dansk
turned away 13 of 17 shots, while his Albany
counterpart, Keith Kincaid, stopped 30 of
32. Both the Falcons and Devils were able to
convert on 1-of-5 power play opportunities.
The Falcons scored two quick goals
before getting a response from the Devils in
the first period. Captain Ryan Craig opened
scoring just 1:10 into the game. Craig skated
the puck across the blue line and into the
Devils’ zone. His shot from the right wing
beat Kinkaid and put the Falcons up, 1-0.
Domenic Monardo earned credit for the assist.
Craig extended the Falcons lead with
a power play goal 6:00 later. T.J. Tynan slid
the puck across the slot to Craig, who earned
his second tally of the game with a strong
wrist shot from the left circle.
The Devils started their rally with 5:09
remaining in the period. Graham Black
shoveled a shot in front of the crease that hit
Dansk in the left shoulder and tumbled into
the net. Corbin McPherson and Stefan Matteau each earned a point for assisting on the
goal.
Two more unanswered goals in the
middle frame brought the Falcons into the
second intermission trailing, 3-2. After a series of quick saves by Dansk, Mike Sislo was
able to pick up a rebound and even the score
with the help of Matteau and Raman Hrabarenka at the 10:52 mark.
Albany took the lead with 37 seconds
remaining in the second. After receiving a
pass from Paul Thompson, Scott Timmins
pulled the puck away from the boards and
found the back of the net with a quick shot
from the right circle.
The Devils added one more to their
tally in the third period to top the Falcons,
4-2. Black scored for the second time while
on the power play at the 10:28 mark. Steve
Bernier chipped out from behind the net to
Black, who potted it from the right side of
the crease.
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CLUES ACROSS
1. Smooth music
7. Fails to explode
10. Voluted
12. Tear down
13. Propose for
office
14. Yiddish expert
15. Great ape of
Borneo
16. Arab outer
garments
17. Hundredweight
18. The Muse of
history
19. Neutralizes
alkalis
21. Mortar trough
22. Lapsed into bad
habits
27. Potato State
28. DeGeneres’
partner
33. Egyptian sun god
34. Makes more
precise
36. Deafening
noise
37. Expresses
pleasure
38. __ Nui, Easter
Island
39. Founder of
Babism
40. Speed
competition
41. Artist’s tripod
44. Records
45. A witty reply
48. The content of
cognition
49. Mohs scale
measure
50. __ student,
learns healing
51. Put in advance
CLUES DOWN
1. Peru’s capital
2. Emerald Isle
3. Group of
criminals
4. Flat sweet pea
petals
5. Vietnamese
offensive
6. A lyric poem
7. Philippine
seaport & gulf
8. Utilizes
9. Lair
10. Covering of
snow
11. Covered
walkway
12. Overzealous
14. Stench
17. Compartment
18. 2nd largest
Costa Rican
island
20. Danish Krone
(abbr.)
23. Long narrow
bands
24. Woody tropical
vine
25. Farm state
26. Tooth caregiver
29. Popular
Canadian word
30. Resort
31. Members of
U.S. Navy
32. Smokes
35. Smiling so big
(texting)
36. Capital of
Bangladesh
38. Tore down
40. Travel in a car
41. American
bridge engineer
James B.
42. “Rule
Britannia”
composer
43. Let it stand
44. Not bright
45. Rated
horsepower
46. Pinna
47. Prefix for
before
Basic Reading/Writing and Math
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TLS Foods (Monson) and TFL Board Members,
Volunteers & all donors.
A special thank you to those donors that received platinum
certificates for their generous contributions over the past two years:
Country Bank, Halpern Titanium,
Hampden Bank and Gladys Sullivan.
SCRABBLE NIGHT
Sponsored by Moulton Insurance
Thursday, November 6, 2014-Palmer Public Library
Registration: 5:30 Games begin: 6:00 Admission $10 per player
For more information, call (413) 283-2329
Need more information on the above? Call Gail at 413-283-2329.
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 20
Western Mass finishes fall unbeaten
LUDLOW – A pair of Will Daniels
goals in Saturday’s finale against Mass
United FC ensured an unblemished season
for Western Mass Pro Soccer Club following a 2-2 draw at Salem State University in
Salem, Mass.
Daniels scored in the 29th and 56th
minutes to give the guests a two-goal lead
that the hosts quickly chopped down with
strikes from Carlos Diniz and Jared Joaquin in the 64th and 69th minutes, respectively.
The draw allowed the Lusitanos to finish the Fall 2014 season with a 6-0-4 (22
points), tops in the ASL. The Riders finished the campaign unable to reach the win
column after going 0-3-6 (6 points).
Saturday’s contest was a rematch of
the season opener between the Commonwealth clubs, which also ended in a draw.
But this time around, it appeared that
Western Mass would walk away with a
win thanks to Daniels’ performance. The
Lusitano striker opened the scoring just before the half-hour when he slotted through
a pass from Luke Perry, beating goalkeeper
Malcolm Cheney.
Daniels added another near the hour,
giving the guests a two-goal lead amid
the rainy and windy conditions that swept
through New England on Saturday.
But the Riders wouldn’t let Daniels
– or the weather – stop them from trying to
get back in the game.
Diniz answered eight minutes after
Daniels’ second goal, while Joaquin canceled out the guests’ advantage in with just
over 20 minutes remaining.
Western Mass made a trio of late substitutions in the hopes of reclaiming the
lead, but the go-ahead never arrived as the
season finale ended on level terms.
The start date for the Spring 2015
campaign will be announced in 2015.
Western Mass was founded in 1997
and started playing in 1998. In 1999, the
second year of the franchise, they won the
USL D-3 Pro League championship. In
2005 they reigned as the regular season
champions, were USL Second Division finalists, and hosted the National Championship match. In 2010 they joined the PDL,
to focus on developing future professional
soccer players. In 2014, the system added
a professional franchise, the Western Mass
Professional Soccer Club, to the American Soccer League (ASL) competing in
Region 1. The Western Mass Professional
Soccer Club also operates numerous youth
camps throughout western Massachusetts.
Continue to refer to the Western Mass Professional Soccer Club website or follow us
on Facebook and Twitter for updates. For
more information about this release, please
contact the Pioneers office at (413) 5834814 or via email at [email protected]
com.
SOCCER from page 17
Kayla Murphy passes the ball off under pressure.
Turley Publications photoS by David Henry
Ashley Jones advances up the field.
who were honored during
a pre-game ceremony, are Natalie Morales, Marissa Falcetti,
Caitlin MacGregor, and Kayla
Murphy.
“Our four seniors have been
to the Western Mass. Division 1
finals the past three years,” said
Minnechaug head coach Nundi
Goncalves “They’re a little bit
disappointed about losing tonight, but we’re hoping to perform well in the tournament
once again this year.”
Following the ceremony,
it began to rain and the match
was delayed for 25 minutes after a lightning siren, which is
located at the high school roof,
went off.
The Lady Lions took a 10 lead during the 15th minute
on a goal by Papuga, who outhustled a defender for a loose
ball before firing a wide open
shot into the right corner past
Minnechaug junior goalkeeper
Emma Weisse.
Ludlow senior midfielder
Jessica Holley was credited
with the assist on Papuga’s first
goal.
Weisse, who only had to
make three saves in the contest,
is the fourth goalkeeper used by
Goncalves this season. She began the season as a midfielder.
“I have to give Emma a lot
of credit for stepping up and
becoming our fourth starting
goalkeeper. This was her second start of her career tonight,”
Goncalves said. “She played
well in tough conditions. There
is a lot of pressure being a goalie because you’re the last line
of defense.”
Freshman Tamra Zippin
was the starting goalkeeper
before suffering an injury in
VOLLEYBALL from page 17
that happens, the Falcons will be ready
to make amends for last year.
The first game set the tone, as the Falcons gradually pulled away. It was still
a one point game midway through. The
Falcons pulled away at the end for a 2519 win. The second set was close for the
first seven points to 4-3. Then the Falcons
took charge and at times had opned the
lead to 12 points, before settling in at 2516. With a 2-0 lead the Falcons were able
to get some other players into the match.
It remained close until the end, still three
points at 19-16. They did lose the lead a
couple of times, but quickly regained their
footing and finished off the 251-19 win.
After taking a 3-0 lead, the Falcons
a road match against Belchertown at the beginning of October. She’s expected to be the
starting keeper in the Lady Falcons quarterfinal match.
“I think Tamra will be
ready to go in our first tournament game,” Goncalves said.
“She’s been practicing, but I
really didn’t want to start her in
tonight’s game.”
Weisse received plenty of
help from her defensive unit
led by freshman Allison Coopee, sophomore Tessa Lagodich,
junior Ashley Jones, and MacGregor.
Down at the other end of
the field, Ludlow senior goalkeeper Meagan McCarthy
was credited with a total of 10
saves.
“Our goalkeeper just
played an amazing game tonight,” Marino said. “It was
their senior night and they really tested us in the first half. I
thought we settled down during
the second half.”
The Lady Lions defensive
saw the Lancers come back with five and
hold onto the lead through 8-7. With Ali
Coelho serving the Falcons got the lead
and never gave it up. The score went from
8-8 to 15-10 and from that point on, the
Falcons held them at arms length. The
Lancers got back to two at 15-13 on a
couple of aces, but in short order, the Falcons got it back to five at 20-15. They
finished with a 25-19 win.
As they had in the first game, Minnechaug scored the first three points.
This time the Lancers never got even.
After the score went to 4-3. Minnechaug
scored the next five points and eight of
nine. On an Ellen Moraitis block, they
led 12-4. Landeck had a couple of aces
to make it 15-5 and the margin got to 12
is led by sophomore Andrea
Jozefczyk, sophomore Nissa
Pereira, junior Morgan Foye,
and senior Kelsey Jordan.
The score remained 1-0
until the 78th minute when a
shot by Papuga from the right
corner that slipped over the
goal-line past the Lady Falcons
keeper for an unassisted goal.
With 38 seconds remaining
in the game, Minnechaug was
given a penalty kick following
a hand ball in the box.
The penalty kick was taken by junior midfielder Jaileen
Goncalves, who fired a linedrive shot into the left corner of
the goal.
It ruined McCarthy’s shutout bid, but the Lady Lions
were still able to celebrate their
second victory of the season
against the Lady Falcons.
The two teams could possibly face each other for the third
time this season in the Western
Mass. finals next weekend.
at 18-6 with a Stephanie Chapin kill. The
Lancers closed at the end scoring three in
a row, before Zoe Lipkens finished the set
with a tip for the 25-16 win.
In third set, 3-0 was once again the
starting point. Lipkens was serving.
Longmeadow would tie it on an ace at
5-5 and then take a 6-5 lead. They also
led 8-7 and got it up to 12-9. Then Minnechaug ran off seven straight points with
six coming on Lipkens’ service. A Paulina Modestow tip made it 16-12. The rest
of the way, the Falcons kept t the Lancers
at arms’ length. They got as close as three
at 19-16, but with an ace by Coelho, the
score was 24-18. The Falcons won it moments later.
November 6, 2014
Golf from page 17
for the best record in Western
Mass during the regular season
as well. As a team, Minnechaug
scored 314 points along with Algonquin. The team winner was
Xaverian of Westwood with 299,
two strokes ahead of St. John’s
Prep of Danvers. A year ago, the
two teams tied for the state title.
Ahead of the Falcons were LincolnSudbury at 307 and both Boston
College High and Central Catholic
with 312. The other Western Mass
team, Longmeadow was eighth at
323.
It was another Falcon who
topped the Western Mass field.
Stephen Hunt, who was the winner
at Western Mass, was once again
the leader amongst Western Mass
finishers at the state event. His 75
was good enough to give him a tie
for seventh overall in the individual
scoring. Just three strokes back
from Hunt, was Jeff Proulx, with
a 78. The individual winner was
Jack Lang of Lexington who posted
a 68 to beat out James Turner of St.
John’s Prep by one stroke. Owen
Quinn of Wachusett, 72, Max Ferrari of Framingham and Jason
Short of Marlborough, 73 and Matt
Hutchins,74 of Lincoln-Sudbury
finished ahead of Hunt. Brendan
Ridge, of BC High was tied with
him.
“I am very pleased with how
we did as a team,” Hunt said. “It’s
been a great year for us and I am
glad I could be a part of it. Personally I am happy with my score
and finishing as high as I did. After a pretty good season last year,
it seemed like I forgot how to play
golf when it came to states. This
time was much better.”
That was the case for Hunt.
He led a solid contingent to the
aforementioned accomplishments
and did himself proud with a great
showing at the sectional and state
matches. After winning at Western
Mass a week ago, Hunt went out as
part of the top foursome. Through
the front nine, he would record a 34
to lead the entire field. That was
one stroke ahead of the next set of
players, Turner and Quinn and two
in front of Lang, Hutchins, Short
and Matt Johnson of Lincoln-Sudbury, all of whom posted 36s. On
the back nine, Lang then shot a 32,
a full five strokes under par for a
68 to beat out Turner’s 69 for top
honors. That they finished under
70 was a great feat, as last year the
best scores were 72.
The team winner, Xaverian,
had five of their six players shoot
80 or under, as did St. John’s Prep
with four of their six in the 70s and
one in the 60s. The difference was
two strokes, 299-301. The Falcons
314 after having scored 347 a year
ago, when they finished ninth. It
would be easy to say the course
was a great deal easier, since all
of the scores were lower, but that
would not be fair to Minnechaug.
The leaders in 2013, Xaverian
and St. John’s Prep had 312. This
year they were better by 11 and 13
strokes. The Falcons improved by
33 strokes and that was significant.
It started with Hunt, who shot
88 in 2013 and improved by 13
himself. The only other returnee
was Matt Gurski, who went from
84 to 80. None of the six a year
ago broke 80 and three were 90 or
greater. This year, all six were below 90 with Hunt and Steve Proulx
under 80. The remaining Falcons
were: Gurski, 80, Mike Proulx, 81,
Bobby Tremblay, 83 and Corey
Page, 86.
“The guys did a great job,”
said Coach Ben Ellis. “We carried
over from the regular season into
the championships. I was hoping
we could finish at least fifth and
that is what we did. Of that, I am
proud.”
November 6, 2014
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 21
TIMES photo by David
Miles
‘Red Dog’
at Farmers
Market…
Christine
Przewoznik, of
Red Dog Farm
in Wilbraham,
sells her wares
at the Hampden
Farmers’ Market
“Harvest
Festival” Oct. 18.
Dexter Mason Andrews
October 14, 2014
Parents: Ashley & Chip Andrews of Enfield, CT
Grandparents: Wendy & Gary Delcamp of Southwick
Mikki & Peter Hinman of New Hartford, CT
Woody Andrews & Mary Breslin of California
TIMES photo submitted
Reads to the children…
Wilbraham Police Officer Peter Laviolette recently read some books
to children during Storytime at the Wilbraham Public Library. They
also toured his patrol car. (From left) are James Wadzinski, Bryce
Beckel, Ava Danio, Adalyn Murray, Jillian True, Tommy Hutcheson,
Officer Laviolette, Kiera Horne, Daniel Heinold, Mason Foerster, Ryan
Mackie, Calvin Webster and Joey Woytowicz.
United Players to stage performances Nov. 7
WILBRAHAM – The Wilbraham United
Players will begin to stage performances of
the comedy “The Man Who Came to Dinner”
Friday, Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m. located at United
Church.
Written by Moss Hart and George
Kaufman, the play takes place at Christmastime in a small Ohio town during the 1930s.
Radio personality Sheridan Whiteside (Paul
Nesbit) is invited to dinner at the home of a
conservative upper middle class family, after
suffering an injury, and they have no choice but
to put up with his antics.
The cast features Nesbit of Springfield, Stacy Gilmour of Wilbraham, and Carolyn Averill
of Wilbraham, Mark Jacobson of Springfield,
and Don Clements of Wilbraham. The production is directed by Deborah Trimble, with set
design by Greg Trochlil, and is co-produced by
Stacy Gilmour and Patricia Colkos.
Performances run through Sunday, Nov.
16. For show times, tickets and more information, contact the box office at 596-6117 or
logon to wilbrahamunitedplayers.com.
Christmas
Show off the newest member of your family!
On Thursday, December 18th
The Wilbraham-Hampden Times will dedicate
a special section to all babies born in 2014.
Baby’s Name: ________________________________________________________________________
Birthdate: ____________________________________________________________________________
Parents’ Names: _____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
Parents’ Town of Residence: __________________________________________________________
Grandparents’ Names & Town of Residence: __________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
TIMES photo submitted
Actor Paul Nesbit, in the role of
Sheridan Whiteside, performs
in the United Players’ production of “The Man Who Came to
Dinner.”
SUNDAY BINGO
LUDLOW ELKS
69 Chapin St., Ludlow
50/50 Elks • Jackpot
PROGRESSIVE GAME
______________________________________________________________________________________
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______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________________
Telephone #: (not to be printed - for office use only) ________________________________________________
Send form with a check or money order for $20. (Scanning and processing fee.)
Make out to: THE WILBRAHAM-HAMPDEN TIMES
c/o Turley Publications, 24 Water St., Palmer, MA 01069, Attn: Stephanie Hadley
Be sure to include a self-addressed, stamped envelope if you wish the photo
to be returned. (Cash is accepted at the office, please DO NOT mail cash.)
Deadline for photos & forms is Friday, Nov. 28th.
DOORS OPEN 4 pm • Kitchen Opens 4:30 pm
GAMES START AT 6:00 PM
589-1189
www.turley.com
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 22
November 6, 2014
Country Club seeks to remove berm, delineate cottages on site plan
HCC from page 1
the process and acknowledged
there would be further permitting and oversight requirements
before any construction began.
Lifestyle Course
“Our goal is to focus on
families,” Head Professional and
Hampden native Billy Downes
said. “(The intent is to) make
(HCC) a lifestyle course.”
Downes noted that they have
already begun construction on a
new, 25,000 square-foot clubhouse that includes dining facilities, spa, male and female locker
rooms, pro shop, tennis courts
and a splash pad and play scape
for children. “This will be one of
the best if not the best courses in
Massachusetts,” Downes said.
Howarth addressed members of the Hampden Country
Club Buffer Committee (HCCBC), a group of concerned
residents who abut the Country
Club, principally along Raymond Drive, who have taken
HCC and the Planning Board to
court, asking them if the berm
were to be taken down, “are you
fine with it?”
Their lawyer, Atty. Tom Miranda said that they would need
to look at something more specific, particularly, “the number
and type of trees.”
HCCBC member Chip
LeClerc requested that the Planning Board hold off any decision
until the Superior Court makes
its ruling.
“I think it would be inappropriate for any elected board
to sit on their hands and wait for
TIMES staff photo by Tyler S. Witkop
Hampden Country Club General Manager Guy Antonacci
(second from right) addresses concerns about golf ball
flight patterns along the course layout, raised by residents
Chip LeClerc (left), Stu Fuller (second from left) and Atty.
Tom Miranda (right).
a court to tell the town how to
operate,” said Planning Board alternate Richard R. Green. Green
sat on the hearing at the advice
of town counsel Atty. Dave Martel, as two members of the board
recused themselves and without
Green, there would not be a quorum of voting members. “We
have the power of the special
permit to go back and enforce
the issue.”
Miranda and HCCBC member Stu Fuller raised concerns
over golf ball distance and trajectory. Fuller noted that in his
research, on certain holes such
as seven, eight and 11, golfers,
particularly long hitting amateurs and professionals, could
conceivably hit balls off houses
and into residential property. “I
think that’s a real concern,” Miranda said. “We should err on the
side of caution.”
Abide by the Bylaw
“None of us can prognosticate the future,” Fitzgerald said
in response. “That’s why we’re
willing to abide by the bylaw.”
Green said to HCCBC
members and residents in the
audience that if anyone notices
balls in their yard to bring complaints to the Planning Board so
that additional trees and other
protective measures can be implemented and enforced.
“I played golf at Hampden Country Club for some 25
years,” said resident and avid
golfer Don Collins. “On the
seventh (hole) I’ve never seen a
ball enter the property line. On
the eighth (hole) I’ve seen only
a couple balls roll onto the property line.”
Much of the concern of residents was over the interpretation
of the 100-foot buffer strip, as
defined in the Town Bylaws for
a Golf Recreation District. According to the bylaws, “In all areas where the golf course abuts
existing or proposed property
development, the one hundred
(100) foot landscaped buffer
strip shall be densely treed to
help reduce the hazard of misdirected golf balls to the neighbors.” Among the residents, former Selectman James Smith and
Rita Vail both interpreted that to
mean 100-feet of trees.
Former Selectman Mark
Casey noted that buffers had not
been enforced for years along
much of the zoning districts in
town. “It’s up to the Planning
Board to decide,” he said.
Planning Board Chairman
John Matthews, along with the
rest of the voting members of the
board, interpreted the definition
to mean a 100-foot landscaped
area that was “densely treed.”
He pointed to the past plans and
layout of the golf course, which
never had 100-feet of trees bordering the property lines.
Casey noted that the one
issue he sees with the proposal
outlined by HCC is that over cottages along the course. He said
there are no provisions for such
lodgings in the bylaws, as hotels/
motels and temporary lodgings
are prohibited.
A search of the Town Bylaws
supports Casey’s statements, as
such are prohibited “Principle
Uses” in the bylaws in the Golf
Recreation District. Where it
may fall into a permissible area
is that Fitzgerald wants the cottages listed as “accessory buildings.” Page 35 of the bylaws allows for an accessory building or
other structure by special permit.
Should the Planning Board decide that the use is prohibited the
method for changing bylaws is
through a vote at town meeting.
Matthews noted that rather
than require residents bring complaints before the board as the
primary means for enforcement,
“a yearly review is a possibility,”
should they issue the special permit.
The Planning Board continued the hearing until a later date
in order to give other elected offices and residents 30 days from
the posting date of the hearing to
review the documents and issue
concerns. In addition, the board
is allowing HCCBC to issue a
point-by-point outline of their
concerns and HCC the ability to
respond.
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
Ludlow Lodge of Elks
No. 2448
69 Chapin Street • Ludlow, MA 01056 ◆ 583-2448
Yellow House
Gift Certicates
make great gifts!
Annual Turkey Raffle
Saturday, November 22, 2014 • 6pm
HOT BUFFET
The
HOUSE
Many Turkey Prizes
& Other Great Gifts
Donation: $8.00
COMMUNITY CENTER FOR LEARNING
1479 NORTH MAIN STREET
PALMER, MA 01069 • 413-289-6091
NOVEMBER CLASSES
Excel Instruction for Individuals or Small Groups
(Private lessons call for appointment)
Beginning Voice Lessons (call for appointment)
Beginning Piano Lessons (call for appointment)
Watercolor Studio (every Wednesday 2-4pm, call to register)
Estate Planning for Your Assets – 11/10
Intermediate Knitting Group – begins 11/10
Signature Box – 11/10
Basics of Digital Photography – begins 11/10
Vegetarian Thanksgiving Tour – 11/11
Watercolor Christmas Cards – 11/12
Windows 8 Computer Lessons – 11/13
Multi-wrap Leather Bracelet – 11/15
Holiday Decorative Tile – 11/17
Healthy Holiday Cooking – 11/17 & 11/27
Make the Most Out of Social Security – 11/17
Basic Computer Skills – begins 11/18 or 11/19
HOLIDAY ARTISAN FAIR, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 10AM-3PM.
Call 413-289-6091 to register for classes
Visit www.yellowhouseccl.com
for full details of all classes
EARLY
DEADLINE
To Celebrate THANKSGIVING
THE WILBRAHAMHAMPDEN TIMES
Advertising Deadline will be
Wed., Nov. 20, Noon
for the Thursday, Nov. 27 edition
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
413-283-8393
www.turley.com
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page 23
Our Town
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES AND BUILD A STRONGER COMMUNITY!
Happy Thanksgiving
WILBRAHAM
Passing the SAVINGS onto YOU
JOIN THE CLUB!
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Affordable Waste
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Two Ways to Pay for College: Save or Borrow
A portion of every
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Before the
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Hometown Rolloff Dumpster Service
413-244-1943
70 Post Office Park, Suite 7010, Wilbraham, MA
What’s Your Strategy?
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Financial Advisor
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2141 Boston Rd Suite G
Wilbraham, MA 01095
413-596-6875
Auto, Home, Business & Life Insurance
Scantic River
Child Care
590 Main Street, Hampden, MA
www.scanticriverchildcare.com
413-566-2906
Sarah Schoolcraft, Director
Program Choices:
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CRANE PARK
Wilbraham
Bring the Best Dessert to Your
Thanksgiving Celebration!
Order your cheesecakes, pies and baked
goods from The Village Store & Cafe!
Come in to learn about our many
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email: [email protected]
WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS
Wilbraham Pizza
Dr. Michael Margolis
ASA
Dr. Peter Duplesis
Headlines Hair Design
Luso Credit Union
Attorney Michael O. Shea
Family Dentistry
Orthodontist
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 24
Health & Wellness
November 6, 2014
Remember to get your flu shot
2014 flu season now
underway
Each year the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) monitor trends in
flu transmission. Giglietti explained that
– depending on the vaccine – the three
By Tyler S. Witkop
or four strains of influenza that they feel
Turley Publications Staff Writer
the public are most at risk of contracting are included in the vaccine. This
ith October now in the past, year’s standard, or trivalent, vaccine covthe 2014-2015 flu season ers the A/California/7/2009 H1N1, A/
– October through May – has Texas/50/2012 H3N2 and B/Massachunow officially begun. Public health offi- setts/2/2012-like viruses. The quadrivacials encourage everyone over the age of lent vaccine covers an additional B/Brissix months to be vaccinated, either with bane/60/2008-like virus.
the nasal spray or standard shot. WilbraIndividual influenza viruses are clasham’s Public Health Nurse Lee Giglietti sified between types A and B.
encourages a “common sense approach”
This past month, the Wilbraham
to disease prevention this year.
Senior Center was busy administering
“The more people who get a flu flu shots to seniors and first responders.
shot, it’s better for the community,” Gi- According to Giglietti, they used all of
glietti said. She explained that it is rec- their state supplied vaccines, even with a
ommended that individuals receive the delay in shipments. She noted that now,
vaccinations before the end of October grocery stores, pharmacies and other lobut that vaccines are available through- cations are able to administer vaccines,
out the season. She noted it takes two as the law no longer limits vaccinations
weeks for the vaccine to take effect.
to medical facilities.
Several Vaccines
Vaccines are available in several forms.
There is the standard
shot, made using an inactivated virus grown
in eggs injected into
muscle, a trivalent shot
injected into the skin, a
high dose shot approved
for seniors and even an
Just $35.00/month after
egg-free trivalent shot.
the first 6 months
In addition there is a
Limited time offer. Dealer participation varies.
quadrivalent shot and
Some restrictions may apply. Credit approval
a quadrivalent nasal
may be required. Expires 11/30/14.
spray.
According to a fact
sheet supplied by Giglietti and released by
the Massachusetts Department of Health and
Human Services, nasal
Culligan of Auburn
sprays are now preferentially recommended
CulliganNortheast.com
for children ages two
(800) 842-1116
through eight, when the
vaccine is immediately
available. If the flu shot
is available over the
spray, the shot should
be administered.
Addressing
the
concern that shots
shouldn’t be adminison any Culligan® Water
tered to sick or symptomatic patients, GiTreatment System
glietti said, “We won’t
With this coupon. Not valid with any other offers.
turn people away if they
Limited time offer from your participating Culligan
have mild symptoms.”
dealer. $9.95 per month for 90 days then standard
rates apply. Expires 11/30/14.
She explained that mild
W
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THERAPEUTIC COUPLES MASSAGE
TIMES photo by David Miles
Sgt. Glen Clark puts the cuffs on senior citizen Harry Setian when nurse
Poppy Nelson gives him his flu shot at the Flu Shot Clinic for senior citizens
and Wilbraham first responders Oct. 21 at the Wilbraham Senior Center.
symptoms could include a mild fever and
body aches.
According to a fact sheet from the
American Lung Association, patients
with chronic illnesses are at a higher risk
of developing flu as well as children with
upper respiratory infections, and should
receive vaccinations.
Giglietti encourages individuals use
“common sense” in their approach to disease prevention. “The best thing to do is
wash your hands,” she said. “Cover your
mouth when you cough. If you cover
your mouth with your hands, wash your
hands before you touch anything.” She
noted it is recommended to cough into
the sleeve. “If you’re sick, stay home.
You should not be at work. This goes for
children, too.”
This approach works for preventing
all diseases, she noted, from flu to the
Enterovirus D-68 strain that is making
headlines across the country. There has
been one reported case of the virus in the
commonwealth, in the greater Boston
area.
‘Does Not Know Borders’
“Infectious disease does not know
borders,” Giglietti said.
She said that the D-68 strain is one
of many forms of enterovirus. She noted
that there hasn’t been a case reported in
Western Mass. and that both the state
Please see FLU SHOT, page 25
Receive a 60 Minute Massage for $70 per person
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Located in Monson ~ Gift Certificates Available
(Sources: Department of Health and
Human Services and American Lung Association fact sheets)
From 1976 to 2007, it is estimated
between 3,000 and 49,000 people died
from influenza in the United States alone.
One study has shown a 77 percent
reduction in flu-related hospitalizations
among people 50 and over who receive
vaccinations.
Flu shots do not contain live viruses and therefore cannot give people
flu. Nasal sprays contain live, attenuated
(weakened) viruses, and cannot cause flu
illness.
Individuals ages 50 and over, children ages six months – 18 years, pregnant
women and those with chronic illness are
at the highest risk of developing flu-related complications.
Vaccination side effects can range
from soreness, low grade fever to localized aches. Spray side effects can include vomiting, headache, muscle aches,
wheezing, fever and sore throat. Severe
allergic reactions are possible.
Those who think they have been injured as a result of the vaccine can file
claims through the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program at 800-3382382.
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
FLU SHOT from page 24
and schools are monitoring the
situation closely.
Symptoms of enterovirus
can be similar to cold-like symptoms, Giglietti explained, but it
will present itself a little more
severely. “If someone tells you
they can’t breathe, get them help
immediately,” she said, adding
that regardless of the disease,
shortness of breath and breathing difficulty is a serious health
issue requiring immediate attention. Further, she said that if
individuals have difficulty deciphering between symptoms and
normal aches and pains, that they
should call their primary care
physician.
Giglietti also offered her
thoughts on the current international Ebola scare.
“We [in the United States]
have the supportive measures
that aren’t available in the countries ravaged by the disease,”
commented Giglietti. She noted
that in many of the nations be-
PET OF THE MONTH
Meet
Bella!
All decked out in her Halloween costume! Bella is a 2 year
old Golden Retriever. She lives with Tom, Diane & Kelley
Dufault in Wilbraham. She loves Halloween!
ing affected by the virus, citizens
don’t have access to clean water
or sanitary medical facilities.
“We’ve had one death in
this country,” she continued, referring to the case of Thomas
Duncan in Texas. “None of his
family has gotten sick,” she said,
noting that his family members
came in contact with him.
According to a fact sheet
she supplied from the state, Ebola can only be contracted by
touching the bodily fluids of an
infected person or objects such
as needles that have also touched
an infected person. The virus is
not transmitted through food,
water or air.
According to WHO, men recovered from the disease can still
transmit it sexually up to seven
weeks after recovery.
Giglietti suggested that anyone with questions or in need of
more information call the stateoperated 211 number. She noted
that she has called the number
Most birds that are kept as pets are native to a rainforest climate. Owners need to prepare their bird for the
change in temperature and humidity that occurs during indoor winters. Your pet will become stressed if not
properly cared for, and his immune system and metabolism will suffer.
Environment and Temperature
Keep his cage in a room with a humidifier. Periodically
spray or mist him with water, simulating rain. For smaller
birds, place a bird bath in his cage — large enough for
him to walk in and out of with ease, but not deeper than
the bird itself. In general, try not to allow the temperature in your bird’s cage to shift dramatically. Birds like to
establish a comfort zone in their cage, and react poorly
to environmental shifts.
Nutrition
A stressed bird’s metabolism shifts, making it more vulnerable to health problems — try the following steps to
avoid them: Diversify your bird’s diet. Birds should be
fed pellets and a vegetable mix. He also needs ample
protein, fats, and carbohydrates so adding beans, corn,
spinach, and bits of fruit are important. Consult with an
animal professional if you have questions about a proper winter diet for your bird.
Molting
Birds respond to changes in photoperiods (days becoming longer and shorter seasonally) by molting their feathers so that they can replace those that are damaged and
worn. It is natural, and should be expected. However, if
he is picking out his own feathers it could be a sign of
stress or illness. Bring him to your vet immediately. It
could be parasites (mites), bacterial infections, low humidity, boredom or attention seeking behavior.
ELDOTC
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Classes held at 144 Shaker Road
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Classes held every Wed. & Thurs. Evening
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We Teach You How to Train Your Dog!
with tough questions and either
received answers or was transferred to someone who could
supply them.
For more information, logon to www.who.int, www.cdc.
gov, and/or www.mass.gov/eohhs. For a list of clinics offering
shots, logon to www.mylocalclinic.com.
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
PET PAGE
READERS!
Send in your pet photos to be featured as
“Pet of the Month.” Email your photos to:
[email protected] Please include your
name and your pet’s name.
How to Prepare Your
Pets for Winter Part 1
BIRDS:
Page 25
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The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 26
November 6, 2014
Schools
School Lunch MENUS
Elementary and
Middle Schools
Minnechaug
Regional High School
Monday, Nov. 10
Popcorn chicken, roasted sweet
potato, brown rice
Monday, Nov. 10
Asian Rice Bowl – Chicken,
choices of sauce, brown rice and
LoMein, broccoli, carrots
Main Street Deli – Crispy chicken
wrap
Falcon Grille Daily – Cheese/veggie
or chicken burger w/ toppings
Pizza Daily – Veggie
Specialty – Grilled chicken, Caesar,
buffalo chicken, or chef salad,
assorted wraps
Tuesday, Nov. 11
Veterans Day – no school
Wednesday, Nov. 12
Pasta w/meatsauce, garden salad,
red pepper strips
Thursday, Nov. 13
Oven roasted chicken, red bliss
roasted potato, garlic green beans,
dinner roll
Friday, Nov. 14
Pizza, garden salad
Fresh local fruits and vegetables
daily. Daily lunch is $2.50. Milk is
50 cents, included with all lunches,
1% or fat free chocolate. Make
checks payable to School Food
Services.
Tuesday, Nov. 11
Veterans Day - No school
Wednesday, Nov. 12
Mexican bar – Taco, burrito or
nacho, chicken, bean or turkey,
lettuce-salsa-cheese, corn
Main Street Deli – Chicken salad
wrap
Falcon Grille Daily – Cheese/veggie
or chicken burger w/ toppings
Pizza Daily – Meatball
Specialty – Grilled chicken, Caesar,
buffalo chicken, or chef salad,
assorted wraps
Thursday, Nov. 13
Calzone, pepperoni or Buffalo
Chicken, garden salad
Main Street Deli – Buffalo chicken
wrap
Falcon Grille Daily – Cheese/veggie
or chicken burger w/ toppings
Pizza Daily – White chicken and
broccoli
Specialty – Grilled chicken, Caesar,
buffalo chicken, or chef salad,
assorted wraps
Friday, Nov. 14
Pasta Bar – Meat sauce or white
sauce, Caesar salad, garlic knot
Main Street Deli – Veggie wrap
Falcon Grille – Cheese/veggie or
chicken burger w/ toppings
Pizza Daily – Buffalo chicken
Specialty – Grilled chicken, Caesar,
buffalo chicken, or chef salad,
assorted wraps
Send a child
something special
this Christmas –
a personalized
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TIMES photo submitted
Top five students
honored…
The Massachusetts Association of School
Superintendents Award was recently
presented to Minnechaug Regional High
School Students Benjamin Laliberte (left)
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the top five students in the senior class.
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number. Make copies of this form as needed. Expires 12-25-14.
CHILD’S NAME(S)
SHIPPING ADDRESS
CITY
Legals
legal notice
This ad is pursuant to MA
Gen. Law Ch.255 Sec. 39A
as of November 7, 2014 the
following motor vehicles are
for sale:
1996 Saturn SL2
VIN# 1G8ZK5276TZ365530
LNO: Eric Howell
46 Armanella St
Chicopee MA 01013
1997 Ford Ranger
VIN# 1FTCR15X6VTA16692
Ramon Rodriguez
Box 3608
80 Patton St
Springfield MA 01101-3608
R & S Assoc Inc
PO Box 543
Wilbraham MA 01095
10/23,10/30,11/6/14
Henrique Baltazar and Maria
Baltazar located at 172 Stony
Hill Road. The Applicant
is requesting special permit approval as required
under Section 3.9.2.2 of the
Wilbraham Zoning By-Law
because the footprint of the
existing 30’ by 26’ detached
garage and the proposed 21’
by 21’ attached garage would
create a combined total
garage space footprint area of
approximately 1,221 square
feet as shown on information
on file and available for public inspection in the Planning
Office.
Jeffrey Smith
Acting Chairman
10/30,11/6/14
WILBRAHAM
PLANNING BOARD
PUBLIC HEARING
The Wilbraham Planning
Board will hold a Public
Hearing on Wednesday,
November 19, 2014, at
7:30 PM in the Town Office
Building, 240 Springfield
Street, on the application of
Henrique Baltazar regarding a
proposal to remove the existing single-family dwelling, to
retain the existing detached
garage and to construct a
new single-family residential
dwelling with an attached
garage on property owned
by Christopher Baltazar,
WILBRAHAM
PLANNING BOARD
PUBLIC HEARING
The Wilbraham Planning
Board will hold a Public
Hearing on Wednesday,
November 19, 2014, at
7:45 PM in the Town Office
Building, 240 Springfield
Street, on the application
of Wilbraham LF Solar,
LLC for site plan approval
as required under sections
3.4.3.7 and 10.7 of the Wil­
braham Zoning By-Law to
allow the development of an
approximately 925 kilowatt
(DC) large-scale, groundmounted solar energy system
consisting of approximately
3,000 solar photovoltaic panels supported on ballasted
racking assemblies and associated ancillary equipment
and site improvements to be
installed on approximately
4 acres of land situated on
top of and adjacent to the
closed municipal landfill on
property owned by Town of
Wil­braham located at 2720
Boston Road as shown on
information on file and available for public inspection in
the Planning Office.
Jeffrey Smith
Acting Chairman
10/30,11/6/14
TOWN OF
WILBRAHAM
BOARD OF
SELECTMEN
240 Springfield St,
Wilbraham, MA 01095
LEGAL NOTICE
REQUEST FOR
PROPOSAL
POLICE FACILITY
REAL ESTATE
ACQUISITION
The Town of Wilbraham
is accepting proposals for
real estate acquisition, and/or
lease, for a new police facility. The real estate must contain at minimum one point
eight (1.80) acres, and at a
maximum of six (6.00) acres
of contiguous land located
STATE
ZIP
STATE
ZIP
YOUR NAME
on Boston Road as a single
location within the Town of
Wilbraham. Additional Min­
imum Requirements of the
real estate are listed in the
proposal document. Com­
plete specifications and RFP
packet is available from the
Town of Wilbraham, Board
of Selectmen Office, 240
Springfield Street, Wilbra­
ham, MA. 01095, (413) 5962800 X101 Attn: Candace
Gaumond at
cgaumond
@wilbraham-ma.gov.
This is the same address
for the delivery of proposal
submissions. Pro­posal documents are available during
standard business hours,
Monday – Fri­day, 8:30am to
4:30pm. Proposals must be
submitted using the forms
provided in the RFP and are
required to be submitted both
electronically and by hard
copy.
Sealed proposals shall be
delivered to the office of the
Board of Selectmen and will
be accepted until the proposal deadline of: December
8, 2014 at 2:00 pm. Sealed
proposal submissions should
be delivered in an envelope
labeled “RFP: Police Facility
Real Estate Acquisition,” and
should include the complete
contact information of the
proposer. Late proposals will
ADDRESS
CITY
PHONE
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EXP DATE:
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PHONE:
MAIL THIS COUPON TO:
Santa at Turley, 24 Water Street, Palmer, MA 01069
or call 413-283-8393 or email: [email protected],
(Subject: Santa) for immediate assistance.
Quantities are limited. Turley Publications reserves the right to end offer at any
time. Payment will be returned if offer expires due to limited quantity being sold
out or multiple names per letter. Sales are based on a first come first serve basis.
be rejected. A public opening of proposals re­ceived will
occur immediately following
the proposal deadline in the
Selectmen’s Office located
at 240 Springfield Street,
Wilbra­ham, MA 01095.
All proposals received
will be reviewed and evaluated by the Police Station
Building Sub-Committee.
The Police Station Building
Sub-Committee will forward a recommendation to
the Board of Selectmen in
accordance with the provisions established under
Massachu­setts General Law,
Chapter 30B, Section 16. The
Town of Wilbraham, Board
of Selectmen, the Awarding
Authority, re­serves the right
to reject any or all proposals,
waive informalities, and to
award a contract in the best
interest of the Town.
11/6/14
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page 27
Schools
College application process more than clicking ‘apply’
By Cassie Cloutier
Times Minnechaug
Correspondent
W
e’ve been flooded with
emails and glossy pamphlets. We’ve followed
one tour guide after the next, staring wide-eyed at campus upon
campus. Long lists have been
shortened, decisions made and
four years’ worth of accomplishments poured into a few generic
boxes.
The Minnechaug class of
2015 has reached the exciting yet
terrifying process of applying to
college. For many seniors, this
means carefully filling out the
common application, asking for
recommendation letters and clicking apply with fingers crossed.
For some of us though, the
process is more involved. Depending on our circumstances
and anticipated major, there can
be a huge amount of choices and
preparations to make.
These choices begin with
when to apply. Some seniors are
still compiling their list of colleges, focusing on their first semester
classes or ignoring the process altogether, waiting until regular decision on Thursday, Jan. 1. How-
ever, many seniors are already in
the midst of applying.
Senior Zak Holden chose
early decision for his top choice,
meaning that if he is accepted, he
has agreed to attend. This decision can be risky, but beneficial
to the small pool of early applicants.
It made sense for Holden
to apply sooner than later, since
he knew if he was admitted, the
school would be his top choice
regardless of other acceptances.
Also, Holden chose early decision to potentially avoid more applications.
“I would not have to worry
about more essays and more
fees,” he said, of the time consuming and costly process attached to each application.
Senior Liz Mastrio will also
be applying early decision to her
top school, but for her, the choice
was a few years in the making.
Her college process began in her
sophomore year, when coaches
from colleges and universities started reaching out to her
through her lacrosse travel-team
coach. Last year, she visited and
compared programs, and is now
planning to play for Dartmouth
College.
Mastrio explained that she
is in the same place as her teammates and her fellow seniors, with
the same application pressures.
“I don’t get any advantages,”
she said.
She still wants to stand out
as a unique academic applicant.
“I actually didn’t write any
of my essays about lacrosse,” she
said.
It was her strategy to display
other aspects of her personality
for a well-rounded application.
Other seniors have been employing their own strategies in order to differentiate themselves in
a sea of applications.
Arno Cai is dedicated to
being honest and true to himself throughout the process, and
maintaining a positive attitude.
“Whatever school you apply
to, they want you,” he said. “You
just have to show them that they
want you.”
For Cai, it was especially
important to be diligent in applying to college. He has applied restrictive early action to
Harvard University, meaning he
is not committed to the school,
but he cannot submit any other
early applications. This required
timeliness on his part, especially
Spotlight
on Minnechaug Interns
Team Pride
A
lex DeSaulnier’s interest
in a career in Athletic Administration, led him to the
doors of the Blake Center and the
office of Senior Associate Director of Athletics, Dr. Craig Poisson.
Dr. Poisson immediately made
Alex one of the team. Along with
athletic department employees,
graduate and undergraduate students, Alex works to make all the
Springfield College Pride teams
compete successfully.
According to Dr. Poisson,
HOW TO SUBMIT LEGAL NOTICES
All legal notices to be published in “The
Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES” should
be sent directly to [email protected]
Karen Lanier processes all legals for this
newspaper and can answer all of your
questions regarding these notices. Please
indicate the newspapers and publication
date(s) for the notice(s) in the subject line
of your email. For questions regarding
coverage area, procedures or cost, please
call Karen directly at 413-283-8393 x271.
Turley Publications, Inc. publishes 15
weekly newspapers throughout Western
Massachusetts. Visit www.turley.com for
more information.
Please check
the accuracy of
your legal notice
prior to submission (i.e., date,
time, spelling).
Also, be sure
the requested
publication date
coincides with
the purpose of the
notice, or as the
law demands.
Thank you.
“Alex has been intricately involved
in the day to day operations of our
broad based intercollegiate athletic
program. He has gained valuable
experience in equipment room
operations, sports communication
responsibilities, budget analysis,
and home and away event management. Alex quickly adapted to the
college level and his strong interpersonal skills dictate success.”
Alex says that every day at
his internship has been exciting.
He is always learning something
new, meeting someone new, and
feeling more and more part of Dr.
Poisson’s team. Alex will finish his
with the supplementary essays
and material required by the Ivy
League school. Also, Cai is a first
generation American, with two
parents who didn’t attend high
school, which motivates him but
requires him to be independent.
“They inspired me,” he said.
“I will prove that I can go to
school, but it’s up to me how hard
I’m going to work.”
For some students, their applications go beyond what they
submit in writing. Performing
arts students need to audition for
their college programs, a process
which takes months of training
and preparation.
Nicole Milette is a prospective classical voice major, preparing for her audition season which
will last from mid-December to
early March. Milette is applying
to seven schools, each with its
own set of audition requirements.
She has to perform classical pieces in four different languages,
which she spends about six hours
a week rehearsing.
What’s nerve-racking for
performance majors is that normal applications are the culmination of four years of effort, where
an audition comes down to one
day.
“It’s like when you watch an
Olympic figure skater,” Milette
said. ”You know they practiced it
right, but if they fall in that moment, it doesn’t matter,”
I am in a similar situation.
I plan to major in music theatre
in college, which means that I
have to prepare music, theatrical
monologues and dance solos for
my auditions and pre-auditions
videos, which Milette and I must
submit to even be invited to some
auditions.
Fortunately, I love to perform, and I just have to keep that
in mind throughout the process.
Nevertheless, it can be frustrating trying to navigate college
websites in search of audition requirements while writing artistic
supplement essays and squeezing
in time to rehearse.
The exciting fact is that as
seniors, we are about to start a
chapter of our lives devoted to
learning about what we love. It
can be extremely challenging to
finish applications and balance
the rest of our busy lives, but I’m
choosing to believe that our efforts will yield a stack of acceptance letters in the spring.
(Editor’s note: The TIMES spotlights the intern program at Minnechaug Regional High School. This is the next in a series on interns in the Career Education
Program at Minnechaug advised by coordinator Paula Talmadge.)
internship with stronger communication skills, stronger leadership
skills, and a plan for his future.
For more information on the
Minnechaug Regional High School
Internship Program, contact Paula
Talmadge at 596-9011 ext. 3832 or
[email protected]
Alex DeSaulnier (center) and
his mentor, Dr. Craig Poisson (far left), pose outside
The Blake Physical Education
Complex with members of
the Athletic Department of
Springfield College.
TIMES photo submitted
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199
Gown Sale
Only At The Western New England Bridal Show 11/23/14
SALE STARTS AT 10:30
COME EARLY FOR BEST SELECTION
ALL SAMPLE BRIDAL GOWNS PRICED $199
Originally Priced from $800 to $2000
OVER 100 SAMPLES TO CHOOSE FROM
CASH, DEBIT, VISA, MASTERCARD, AND DISCOVER ACCEPTED
Check out all the details on the web:
www.cjcevents.com
Exhibitor Opportunities Available, Call (413) 737-7555
Preregister Online
for a
CJC Events Goodie Bag
Tickets are
$6.00 in advance,
$8.00 at the door
Paid admission includes
1 year subscription
to BRIDE’S magazine
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 28
November 6, 2014
Purple Heart to be awarded during Vets Day ceremonies
VETERANS from page 1
Purple Heart took nearly three
years. Geary said that his family had tried several times to do
so, but hit roadblocks along the
way. That’s when he contacted
the town’s Veterans Office.
“I don’t think I would have
the patience,” Geary commented, noting that Veteran’s Agent
Richard Prochnow and his assistant Barbara Harrington worked
tirelessly to strip through the
layers of government paperwork
and offices to bring the project to
fruition.
“It was a pain in the [rear
end] process,” Prochnow said.
He explained that there was a lot
of jumping through hoops but in
the end “we persevered.”
Prochnow explained that the
award should have been granted years ago, but at the time of
Sullivan’s death, the government
was more concerned with ending
the war than giving out medals.
According to documentation
from the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (ABCMR), soldiers wounded during
World War I were recognized
with a Meritorious Service Citation Certificate, Army Wound
Ribbon, and/or authorized to
wear chevrons. The “Purple
Heart,” so called for the purple,
heart-shaped ribbon known as
the “Badge of Military Merit”
established by George Washington, was revived by Gen. Douglas MacArthur on Feb. 22, 1932.
Soldiers wounded in World War
I after April 5, 1917 were retroactively eligible.
The ABCMR recommended
March, 26 of this year, that “all
Department of the Army records
of the individual concerned be
corrected by awarding the …
Purple Heart with Oak Leaf
Clusters … with presentation to
UMass Amherst listed as ‘Green Honor Roll School’
AMHERST – For the
second consecutive year, the
University of Massachusetts
Amherst is listed as a “Green
Honor Roll School” by The
Princeton Review, placing
it among the nation’s top 24
colleges and universities for
environmental awareness and
responsibility.
The Princeton Review’s
“Green Honor Roll” rating, on
a scale of 60–99, measures a
school’s performance as an environmentally aware and prepared institution. It includes
whether students have a quality of life that is both healthy
and sustainable, how well a
school prepares students for
employment in the clean-en-
ergy economy, as well as for
citizenship in a world defined
by environmental concerns
and opportunities, and how
environmentally responsible a
school’s policies are.
UMass Amherst spokesman Edward Blaguszewski
said, “The Princeton Review
survey recognizes the breadth
and depth of the UMass Amherst commitment to building
a sustainable society and to
preparing students to become
responsible citizens of an environmentally fragile planet.
Students, faculty and staff
have worked hard and with
passion to make this campus
a national leader in the green
movement.”
Twenty-five undergraduate majors at UMass Amherst
are sustainability-related, and
more than 300 courses include
some sustainability emphasis.
Three new graduate programs
encourage advanced study in
sustainability, including an accelerated master’s in sustainability science.
Every new building since
2011 has been certified LEED
Gold.
Sustainability is also a
main ingredient of UMass
Amherst’s dining program,
which was rated second nationally for Best Campus Food
in the same Princeton Review
report.
his appropriate next of kin.”
This past May, during the
town’s Memorial Day services,
Prochnow delivered the proclamation of the award to Geary. On
Veterans Day, the official award
will be presented by Gen. Oscar
DePriest (ret.).
According to the Veterans
Office, DePriest will serve as the
guest speaker. An invocation will
be delivered by Rev. Brian Tracy
of Evangel Assembly. Jake Roberts will perform taps and both
the Minnechaug Regional High
School chorus and band will perform. Light refreshments wil be
SENIOR from page 1
the Senior Center operates in
space leased from the Scantic Valley YMCA in Post Office Park.
According to Catlin, when
building a senior center, his team
looks first at geographic location,
then at demographic locations, in
order to find a single site that can
be accessible and best accommodate its users.
Committee member Nick
Manolakis and Chairman Dennis Lopata raised concerns during
deliberations whether the average
cost-per-square-foot
presented
by Catlin & Petrovick was too
high. Lopata noted that in terms
of senior centers, the firm “is defi-
T
he Wilbraham-Hampden Times, a weekly newspaper with an office in Wilbraham, MA, is seeking
an editor to handle day-to-day operations. The
preferred candidate will possess strong management,
organizational and people skills; editorial experience in
news and feature reporting, including writing, editing,
assigning, photography, and social media content; have
the ability and willingness to represent the newspaper
in the community through coverage of meetings/events
and involvement in community activities.
This is an excellent opportunity for an experienced
individual who enjoys community weekly journalism,
meeting deadlines and organizing and managing correspondents. The successful candidate must also possess a strong desire to network actively within the
community and maintain close working relationships
with colleagues and cultural, political, educational and
municipal departments.
This is a job for a self-starter who has a vision for
growing and connecting with our valued readers. If this
describes you, please send your resume to:
Timothy D. Kane, Executive Editor
Turley Publications, Inc.
80 Main Street, Ware, MA 01082
or via email at [email protected]
MEMORIALS
haluchsmemorials.com
Newspapers Provide
Exciting Creative Options!
Community newspaper advertising options
have exploded - now offering a variety
of specialty publications and all types of printed
ads inside and outside the
pages of the paper.
SENTINEL SEEKS
CORRESPONDENT
nitely the Cadillac.” According to
the firm, their cost is dictated by
the market, most recently around
$300 – 325.
Dubord noted that the Agawam Senior Center, built by Reinhardt Associates, who touted a
cost roughly $50-per-square-foot
less, was completed before the
collapse in the housing market.
“A council on aging is not
a police station,” said Brennan.
“It’s not appearance; it’s function.
You get what you pay for.”
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
Cemetery Memorials ✦ Markers
Granite Benches
Religious Statuary ✦ Outdoor Display
Custom & Traditional Designs
Weekly Newspaper
Editor Sought
Tyler S. Witkop can be
reached at [email protected]
Committee votes to recommend
architect for Wilbraham senior center
Sympathy Floral Arrangements
Randalls Farm & Greenhouse
631 Center Street, Ludlow
589-7071 ~ www.randallsfarm.net
served at the Village Store.
While his family has the
honor of validation and the
amendment of service records,
Geary recognizes that there are
still likely others that are in the
same position his was just a few
short months ago.
“They’re all heroes as far
as I’m concerned,” said Geary,
speaking of all who gave their
lives for their country.
RAY HALUCH INC.
1014 Center St ❙ Ludlow, MA ❙ 583-6508
Your Hometown Photographer
WEDDINGS
•
SPECIAL OCCASIONS
•
SPORTS TEAMS
To see your photos
go to
www.photobymiles.net
“The man with the funny hats”
David Miles Photography
596-4525 • [email protected]
T
he Sentinel, a Turley Publication, covering
Belchertown and Granby, is seeking a freelance correspondent to REPORT ON LOCAL
EVENTS AND WRITE FEATURE STORIES. Applicants
should have good writing and communication skills.
A degree in communications, English or journalism is
not required, but encouraged. The applicant should
be available on nights and weekends. Position is paid
per story. Please send cover letter, resume and writing samples to Editor Aimee M. Henderson at P.O.
Box 601, Belchertown, MA 01007 or [email protected]
turley.com. No phone calls or drop-ins please.
www.turley.com
www.turley.com
Turley Publications, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.
Turley Publications, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer.
Newspaper Rates Provide the
Most Bang for your Bucks!
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Page 29
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
For Sale
Wanted
OLD
CARPENTER
TOOLS
wanted. Planes, chisels, saws,
levels, etc. Call Ken 413-4332195. Keep your vintage tools
working and get MONEY.
A public service announcement
presented by your community paper
ANTIQUE AND PERIOD chairs –
Restored with new woven seats –
Many styles and weaves available.
Call (413)267-9680.
T-SHIRTS CUSTOM PRINTED.
$5.50 heavyweight. “Gildan,” min.
order
of
36
pcs.
HATS,
embroidered $6.00. Free catalog.
(800)242-2374. Berg Sportswear.
40.
Moving Sale
121 RICHMOND ROAD, Ludlow.
Furniture, tools, misc items. Sat.
Nov. 8th, 9am-3pm. Rain or Shine
Auctions
WINTERGARDEN
PRE-HOLIDAYS
AUCTION
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8th,
2014, 10:00 AM QUABOAG
COUNTRY CLUB, PALMER
RD., RT. 32, MONSON, MASS.
Join us for a terrific Auction
packed with Furniture of all
Types, Ornate Sterling Silver
Flatware Set, Antique Sewing
Items, Estate Jewelry, Violins,
Crank Phonograph, Life Size
Manikins, Goebel, Hummel,
Anri, Royal Doulton and Lladro
Figurines,
David
Winter
Cottages, Stunning Roseville
Jardinere & Pedastal, Large Hat
Collection, Textiles, Lanterns,
Country Smalls, Glass & China,
Artwork & Prints and much,
much more!
Preview Hours: Friday Nov. 7th
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM, Saturday
Nov. 8th 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Antiques
EASY
STREET
ANTIQUES.
Buying one item or entire estates.
Buying
antique
&
vintage
glassware, pottery, Hummels,
jewelry, coins, watches, military,
toys, Legos, hunting, fishing,
stringed instruments,
books,
tools, & more. Call today.
www.ezstreetantiques.com
or (413)626-8603.
Firewood
FIREWOOD
Fresh cut & split $160.00.
Seasoned cut & split $225.00
All hardwood.
*Also have seasoned softwood for
outdoor boilers (Cheap).
Quality & volumes guaranteed!!
New England Forest Products
(413)477-0083.
WANTED
ANTIQUES
&
COLLECTIBLES
Furniture,
Advertising signs, Toys, Dolls,
Trains Crocks & Jugs, Musical
Instruments, Sterling Silver &
Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Books,
Primitives, Vintage Clothing,
Military items, Old Lamps.
Anything old. Contents of attics,
barns and homes. One item or
complete estate. Call (413)2673786 or (413)539-1472 Ask for
Frank.
WE
PAY
FAIR
PRICES!!!
NEW
ENGLAND
ESTATE
PICKERS “in the Old Monson
Bowling Alley” We are buying
all types of Antiques and
Collectibles!! Simply Bring your
items in for a Free Evaluation
and/ or Cash Offer!! We will
come to you. Contents of attic,
basements, entire estates!!
Clean sweep service. All Gold
and Silver Items to include;
jewelry, costume and estate
pcs., wrist/pocket watches,
class ring, etc., broken or not.
Silverware
sets,
trays,
trophies, etc., Coins of all sorts,
Proof sets, Silver dollars and
other coinage collections! All
types of Old Advertising
Signs, Military items to include
Daggers, Swords, Bayonets,
guns,
medals,
uniforms,
helmets etc. Old toys, train
sets, dolls, metal trucks, old
games, model car kits from the
’60s,
old
bicycles,
motorcycles,
pedal
cars,
Matchbox, action figures, Pre1970’s Baseball cards, comic
books, etc.! Old picture frames,
prints and oil paintings, old
fishing equipment, lures, tackle
boxes! Post Card albums, old
coke machines, pinball, juke
boxes, slot machines, musical
instruments, guitars of all
types,
banjos,
horns,
accordions, etc. Old cameras,
microscopes, telescopes, etc.
Just like on T.V. We buy all
things seen on “Pickers” and
the “Pawn Shop” shows!! Call
or Bring your items in to our
4,500 square foot store!! 64
Main Street., Monson (“The
Old Bowling Alley”) We are
your Estate Specialists!! Over
30 yrs. in the Antique Business!
Prompt Courteous Service!
Open Daily 10:00- 5:00 Sun.
12:00- 5:00 (413)267-3729.
THIS COOK IS so bad he has to
cook outdoors. His grill just died.
Please sell me your gas grill.
(413)533-4813.
Services
*****
Miscellaneous
A CALL WE HAUL
WE TAKE IT ALL
WE LOAD IT ALL
Lowest Rates,
accumulations, junk, estates,
attics, garages, appliances,
basements, demo services
10% disc. with this ad.
All Major CC's
CALL NOW (413)531-1936
WWW.ACALLWEHAUL.COM
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
READ IT!!!
15 Weekly Newspapers
Serving 50 Local Communities
Services
A B Hauling and
Removal Service
Services
Colonial Carpentry Innovations, Inc.
Design & Build Team
“New World Technology with Old World Quality”
*******A & B HOUSEHOLD
REMOVAL SERVICE*******
Cellars, attics, garages cleaned,
yard
debris.
Barns,
sheds,
demolished.
Swimming
pools
removed. Cheaper than dumpster
fees and we do all the work.
Lowest rates. Fully insured.
(413)267-3353, cell (413)2228868.
www.colonialinnovation.com
Kitchens • Baths • Doors • Additions
Renovations • Custom Designs • New Homes
Lifetime Warranty on Craftsmanship
lic. & ins.
Bob (413) 374-6175
or Jen (413) 244-5112
***A A CALL – HAUL IT ALL***
Cheaper than a dumpster. I do all
the work, cleanouts, attics, cellars,
barns, garages and appliance
removal. 10% discount with this
ad. Free Est. (413)596-7286
90 YEAR OLD company offering
free in-home water testing. Call
Eric 413-244-8139
SNOWBLOWER & LAWNMOWER
TUNE UP & REPAIR
A & M TUNE-UPS
Push lawnmowers, riding mowers
and small engine repair.
Work done at your home.
Call Mike
(413) 348-7967
ACE
CHIMNEY
SWEEPS.
Cleanings, inspections, repairs,
caps,
liners,
waterproofing,
rebuilds. Gutterbrush Installations.
Local family owned since 1986.
HIC #118355. Fully insured.
(413)547-8500.
AFFORDABLE, PROFESSIONAL
IRONING and sewing done in my
home. Pick-up and delivery (small
fee). Sewing Creations by Mini
Pearl (413)213-1042.
CHAIR SEAT WEAVING &
refinishing - cane, fiber rush &
splint - Classroom instructor, 20 +
years experience. Call Walt at
(413)267-9680 for estimate.
CHIMNEY SERVICES: CLEANINGS, caps, dampers, repairs
including masonry and liners. The
best for less!!! Worcester to
Pittsfield.
www.expresschimney.com
413-650-0126, 508-245-1501
Services
Child Services
DRYWALL
AND
CEILINGS,
plaster repair. Drywall hanging.
Taping & complete finishing. All
ceiling textures. Fully insured.
Jason at Great Walls.
(413)563-0487
*NEW STATE LAW. Anyone
advertising caring of children must
list a license number to do so if
they offer this service in their own
home.
FREE METAL PICKUP Washers,
dryers,
all
appliances,
lawnmowers, motorcycles, car
parts, gas grills, old car batteries,
any metal. Cars- we pay $. If you
got junk call Pete or Ruth
(413)283-6006.
BABY SITTER WANTED. Family
in Hampden is looking for a baby
sitter for our special needs
daughter. Local high school or
college student preferred. Please
call 413-531-4125.
HOME THEATER, AV Tech.
(Cert. ISF/HAA). The only Cert.
Installers in this area. Put in
theater for you or install a Plasma
the right way. Sales, service. 413374-8000, 413-374-8300.
www.a-v-tech.com
Cleaning Services
PLUMBING JOBS DONE by fast
and accurate master plumber.
Small jobs welcome. Cheap hourly
rate. LC9070 Paul 413-323-5897.
REDKUPS SETUPS
COMPUTER REPAIR,
TV Mountings, Home Theater
Installations, Surveillance
Cameras Installation
we do it all.
For home or small business.
Check us out at
www.redkupssetups.com
or call us at (508) 635-0250
Commercial & Residential
35 Years Experience
Bathrooms ✦ Kitchens
Sunrooms ✦ Windows
Doors ✦ Decks
Vinyl Siding
Interior Painting
“Let Age & Experience
be Your Guide”
Call Today
413-538-4228
CLEANING SERVICE
VERY
responsible/ 8 years experience
we can help you keep your house
in perfect condition. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
Free
estimates.
Excellent references.
413-4559633
ROOM TO ROOM Cleaning &
More Cleaning/ Housekeeping,
Decorating & Painting Free
Estimates * References* Friendly/
Personable/ Trustworthy. Call
Jeanne 413-627-0364
Computer Services
COMPUTERS SHOULDN’T BE
frustrating or frightening. I’ll come
to you. Upgrades, troubleshooting,
set-up, tutoring. Other electronics
too. Call Monique (413)237-1035.
Electrician
BILL CAMERLIN. ADDITIONS,
service changes, small jobs for
homeowners, fire alarms. Fast,
dependable, reasonable rates.
Insured, free estimates. E280333.
24 hour emergency service.
(413)427-5862.
PAINT AND PAPER Over 25
years experience. References. Lic
#086220. Please call Kevin 978355-6864.
Jim’s Renovation,
Repair & Services
BILODEAU AND SON Roofing.
Established 1976. New re-roofs
and repairs. Gutter cleanings and
repairs. Licensed/ insured. Call
(413)967-6679.
FREE- ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS
tree, 6 ft 6 inches tall with lights
attached. Good condition. Please
call (413)374-3722.
PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCT,
service or business to 1.7 million
households
throughout
New
England. Reach 4 million potential
readers quickly and inexpensively
with great results. Use the Buy
New England Classified Ad
Network by calling (413)283-8393,
[email protected] Do they
work? You are reading one of our
ads now!! Visit our website to see
where your ads run
communitypapersne.com
www.turley.com
Want it!
Find it!
Buy it!
Sell it!
Love it!
Drive it!
Wanted To Buy
BUYING RECORD collections.
Jazz, big band and 50’s. LP’s and
45’s. Cash paid. Call (413)5688036
✦
WE
RENOVATE,
SELL
&
PURCHASE (any condition) horse
drawn vehicles such as sleighs,
carriages, surreys, wagons, dr’s
buggies,
driveable
or
lawn
ornaments. Some furniture and
other
restoration
services
available.
Reasonable prices.
Quality
workmanship.
Call
(413)213-0373 for estimate and
information.
Demers & Sons
Belchertown, MA
Appliances
COLEMAN APPLIANCE SERVICE. Servicing all makes and
models of washers, dryers,
refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers,
air conitioners. Also dryer vent
cleaning. (413)536-0034.
DEPENDABLE
ELECTRICIAN,
FRIENDLY
service,
installs
deicing cables. Free estimates.
Fully insured. Scott Winters
electrician Lic. #13514-B Call
(413)244-7096.
ELECTRICAL WORK. NO job too
large/
small.
Residential/
Commercial.
33+
years
experience. Senior Discounts.
Free estimates. Insured. #31521E.
Chris (413)575-0338.
JAMES
FERRIS:
LICENSE
#E16303. Free estimates. Senior
Discounts. Insured. 40 years
experience. No job too small. Cell
(413)330-3682.
RMG ELECTRIC- JOURNEYMAN
and Electrician, lic. #E50916. Fully
insured. Residential, Commercial,
Industrial. No job too small. Call or
text Roger (413)563-3953.
NOTICE
To Celebrate THANKSGIVING
EARLY
DEADLINES
for CLASSIFIED ADS
For the week of Nov. 24th publications
DEADLINE is
Thursday Noon, Nov. 20th
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 30
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Classifieds
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Heating & Air Cond.
Landscaping
HEATING- AFFORDABLE, PROFESSIONAL service & maintenance on all brands, gas, heat
pump & mini split systems. Tony’s
Heating
&
Cooling
Service
(413)221-7073
[email protected]
A-1 RICK BERGERON
LAWN CARE, INC
Home Improvement
ACO
MASONRY, HEATING & AIR
CONDITIONING
Heating & Air Conditioning
Service & Installation
Furnaces, Sheet Metal
All types of masonry work.
Chimney repair, tile work, stucco,
stone, brick, block, concrete, flat
work, pavers, retaining walls.
Power Washing
License & Insured
Commercial & Residential
Free Estimates
Competitive Rates
Call Adam 413-374-7779
C-D HOME IMPROVEMENT. 1
Call for all your needs. Windows,
siding, roofs, additions, decks,
baths, hardwood floors, painting.
All work 100% guaranteed.
Licensed and insured. Call Bob
(413)596-8807 Cell
CS Lic.
#97110, HIC Lic #162905
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION
Kitchen, bath, foyers. References.
Lic #086220. Please call Kevin
(978)355-6864.
DAMAGE RESTORATION SERVICES This month only: Free roof
leak repair. if you got any interior
water damage. (866)505-2222,
www.911storm.com
Certified,
Licensed and Insured contractor.
DELREO HOME IMPROVEMENT
for all your exterior home
improvement needs. ROOFING,
SIDING, WINDOWS, DOORS,
DECKS & GUTTERS. Extensive
references
available,
Fully
Licensed & Insured in MA. & CT.
Call GARY DELCAMP @ 413569-3733
Fall Clean-ups
Mowing & Landscaping
Loader and Backhoe
Trucking
Over 30 yrs. in business
All Calls Returned
413-283-3192
WATER DAMAGE
-CALL JAY (413)436-5782FOR REPAIRS
Complete
Drywall
Service.
Finishing,
Painting,
Ceilings
(Smooth or Textured). 38 years
experience. Fully insured
House Cleaning
TWO BROKE GIRLS looking for
work cleaning your home or office.
Weekly, biweekly or monthly. Also
commercial cleaning. Reasonable
rates. Fifteen years experience.
Call Ruthie or Laura (413)2836006.
Instruction
TRUCK DRIVERS
NEEDED
A & B CDL CLASSES + BUS
Chicopee, Ma (413)592-1500
UNITED TRACTOR TRAILER
SCHOOL
Unitedcdl.com
Landscaping
**ALL
SPRING,
SUMMER,
FALL** Specializing in shrub
trimming, tree pruning, landscape
design, clean-ups, loam, stone,
mulch deliveries. Also small front
loader and backhoe service. Fully
insured. Professional work. Please
call
Bob
(413)538-7954,
(413)537-5789.
A+ ROZELL’S
LANDSCAPING & TREE
SERVICE
Full Service Property Maintenance
Bobcat & Chipper Service
Tree, Brush, Shrub,
Stump Grinding
55’ Aerial Lift
Fully Insured
Competition Doesn’t Cut It!
413-636-5957
www.turley.com
✦
DAVE’S LAWN & Garden The
leader in property maintenance.
We include Fall clean-up and
snow removal. For free estimate
call (413)478-4212.
***AAA DEVENO LANDSCAPING***
Fall Clean-ups, Shrub
trimming, weekly maintenance,
bobcat service, new lawns, new
landscaping, brick walks and
patios.
Free
estimates.
Residential/
Commercial
(413)746-9065.
FALL
CLEAN-UPS,
HEDGE
trimming, leaf and brush clean-up.
Small tree & brush removal.
Senior citizen prices. (413)3014997 or (413)796-7948.
GUTTER CLEANING AND Fall
clean-ups, shrub trimming. Snow
removal. Senior discounts. Call
Carl (413)221-2113
✦
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
Lawn & Garden
Roofing
Pets
Help Wanted
LEAF CLEAN-UP, PICKUP AND
removal. Free estimates. Best
Price Guaranteed. Will beat any
written
estimate.
Call
Ben
(413)883-2616.
ALL TYPES OF ROOFING,
shingle, flat and slate. Call Local
Builders (413)626-5296. Complete
roofing systems and repairs.
Fully licensed and insured. MA CS
#102453.
Lifetime
warranty.
Senior Discount. 24 hour service.
BE A RESPONSIBLE PET
OWNER - Financially needy? Call
for assistance to spay/neuter your
cat/dog.
(413)565-5383
CONCERNED CITIZENS FOR
ANIMALS.
DRIVERS: DEDICATED HOME
Weekly Account!
Average of $63,000.00 yearly!!
Driver unloading using rollers.
Werner Enterprises: 1-855-6154429
Masonry
ACM. HYDROSEEDING, LOAM,
bobcat, fieldstone walls, retaining
wall systems, pavers, trex decks,
mulch and plantings. Waterfalls
and ponds. ACMBUILDING.COM
(413)348-9826.
WESTERN MASS MASONRY:
Chimneys, new rebuilds, patios,
walkways,
stucco,
chimney
sweeps, pointing, stonework. Free
estimates. Fully insured. Dave
(413)788-9068.
Painting
FORBES & SONS PAINTING &
STAINING Interior ceiling/ drywall
repairs, wallpaper removal. New
construction.
Free
estimates.
Owner operated since 1985.
Affordable prices. Residential/
Commercial.
Insured.
www.westernmasspainting.com
(413)887-1987
INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR PAINTING, handyman, house and deck
powerwashing, deck staining,
gutters
cleaned.
Prompt
professional service. Call 413-3236425,
[email protected]
Plumbing
HYDROSEEDING AND LANDSCAPE Construction. Retaining
walls, walkways, patios, erosion
control, skid steer work, fencing,
plantings, loam, trenching, etc.
Free
estimates.
Medeiros.
(413)267-4050.
GREG LAFOUNTAIN PLUMBING
& Heating. Lic #19196 Repairs &
Replacement of fixtures, water
heater installations, steam/HW
boiler replacement. Kitchen & Bath
remodeling. 30 years experience.
Fully insured. $10. Gift Card With
Work Performed. Call Greg
(413)592-1505.
IMMACULATE LAWN CARE
Fall Clean-ups Are Here
Full Service Landscaping
Call Josh
(413)668-7020
LINC’S PLUMBING LIC #J27222
Prevent Emergencies Now
Call LINC’S
For Your Connection
(413)668-5299
HOME IMPROVEMENTS. REMODELING. Kitchens, baths.
Ceramic tile, windows, painting,
wallpapering, textured ceilings,
siding, additions. Insurance work.
Fully insured. Free estimates. 413246-2783 Ron. Member of the
Home Builders Association of MA.
November 6, 2014
SKY-TECH ROOFING, INC. 25
years experience. Commercial,
residential. Insured. Shingles,
single-ply systems. Tar/ gravel,
slate repairs. 24 hour Emergency
Repairs.
(413)536-3279,
(413)348-9568, (413)204-4841.
Snow Removal
DC & SON accepting residential
snow accounts. Call Dan at
(413)218-0687.
SNOW PLOWING - Agawam and
surrounding towns competitive
pricing fully insured contractor with
free estimates. 413-222-1109
SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
Affordable, reliable and friendly.
Accepting
new
customers.
Residential and Commercial. Fully
insured and equipped. Call
George (413)348-4891.
Tree Work
AFFORDABLE STUMP GRINDING. Fast, dependable service.
Free estimates. Fully insured. Call
Joe Sablack. 1-413-436-9821 Cell
1-413-537-7994
ATEKS TREE- A fully insured
company offering free estimates
and 24 hr emergency service.
From pruning to house lot
clearing.
Firewood
saleshardwood & softwood. (413)6873220.
Pets
AKC ENGLISH MASTIFF PUPS,
fawn and brindle available.
Pups will have AKC papers,
shots, dewormed and 1 year
health guarantee.
(413)244-7027
RETIRED RACING
GREYHOUNDS AVAILABLE
FOR ADOPTION
spayed/neutered, wormed,
shots, heartworm tested,
teeth cleaned
Make a Fast Friend!
Greyhound Options Inc.
Call Mary at 413-566-3129
or Claire at 413-967-9088
or go to
www.greyhoundoptions.org.
Horses
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS
offered year round at our state of
the art facility. Beginner to
advanced. Ages 4 years to adult.
Boarding, sales and leasing also
available. Convenient location at
Orion Farm in South Hadley.
(413)532-9753
www.orionfarm.net
LEARN TO RIDE, Jump, Show!
Tiny Trotters Program. Great Fall/
Winter
Programs.
Licensed
instructors.
Excellent
school
horsesponies.
Boarding,
Training, Leases. Gift Certificates
available
(860)668-1656,
(860)668-9990
www.endofhunt.com
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: CDL-A. DO you want
more than $1,000 a Week?
Excellent Monthly Bonus Program/
Benefits. Weekend Home time you
Deserve! Electronic Logs/ Rider
Program. 877-704-3773
EXECUTIVE
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT (FT)
Complete HealthCare Solutions,
Inc., located in Palmer, MA, is
seeking
an
Executive
Administrative Assist reporting
to the President/CEO/Sales &
Marketing
Manager.
RESPONSIBILITIES: Provide
professional
administrative
support. Complete weekly and
monthly reports on a variety of
projects. Schedule and organize
conferences. Schedule and
manage travel arrangements.
Interact daily with employees
and management.Assist as
needed
with
daily
correspondences.
Prepare
PowerPoint
presentations.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
Associate's degree. Corporate
administrative
experience.
Expert in Microsoft Word, Excel,
PowerPoint and Access. Ability
to write, speak and interact
clearly
and
professionally.
Extremely organized. Strong
multi-tasking
and
timemanagement skills. Can handle
sensitive information with the
highest degree of integrity and
confidentiality.
Interested
parties please email resume'
and
cover
letter
to
[email protected]
FOSTER CARE: YOU can help
change someone’s life. Provide a
safe home for children and teens
who have been abused or
neglected.
Call
Devereux
Therapeutic Foster Care at 413734-2493.
$ Fill Out and Mail This Money Maker $
CATEGORY:
Quabbin Village Hills
Circulation: 50,500
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34.00
Run my ad in the following Zones(s):
QUABBIN
❑
Buy the Quabbin Village Hills or the Suburban
Residential ZONE for $24.00 for 20 words plus
50¢ for additional words. Add $5 for a second ZONE.
SUBURBAN
❑
PHONE
NAME
ADDRESS
TOWN
STATE
Suburban Residential
Circulation: 59,000
First ZONE base price
ZIP
THE DEADLINE IS FRIDAY AT NOON
Send to Turley Publications, 24 Water St., Palmer MA 01069.
Must include check.
Or call 413-283-7084 to place your ad.
Add a second ZONE
includes additional words
+ $500
Subtotal
x Number of Weeks
TOTAL enclosed
Did you remember to check your zone?
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
November 6, 2014
Classifieds
Buzzin’ from Town to Town
Turley Publications’ Community Marketplace
Help Wanted
Real Estate
✦
www.turley.com
Real Estate
HAIRSTYLIST WANTED FOR
booth rental in trendy East
Longmeadow salon. Please call
413-531-4125.
LANDSCAPERS TO DO general
yard clean-up, raking, shrub
trimming. Immediate hire. Call
(413)301-4997, (413)796-7948.
LICENSED DRIVER TO drive
Agawam, MA to Monroe, NY
round trip on Nov. 26th and again
on Nov. 30th. For details call
(413)786-7326.
LICENSED
HAIRSTYLIST
WANTED for busy salon. Pay
hourly or commission. (413)7866988.
NURSING OPPORTUNITIES
LIFE Care Center of Wilbraham
NURSE SUPERVISOR - RN | LPN
Part-time position available for 7
a.m.-7
p.m.
shift,
including
alternating
weekends
and
holidays. Will work 12 hours a
week. Must be a Massachusettslicensed
nurse.
Supervisory
experience preferred.
RN | LPN PRN positions available
for all shifts. Must be a
Massachusetts-licensed nurse.
CERTIFIED
NURSING
ASSISTANT Full-time and parttime positions available for 3 p.m.11 p.m. shift. Must be a
Massachusetts-certified
nursing
assistant.
Long-term
care
experience
preferred. We offer great pay and
benefits to full-time associates in a
team-oriented environment.
Marcia Porter 413-596-3111| 413596-9072 Fax. 2399 Boston Rd.,
Wilbraham, MA 01095
[email protected]
LifeCareCareers.com
EOE/M/F/V/D – 53010
TOOMEY-LOVETT
109 West St.
Ware, MA 01082
REAL ESTATE
ASSOCIATES
www.Century21ToomeyLovett.com
413-967-6326
800-486-2121
West Brookfield:
508-867-7064
JILL A. GRAVEL, BROKER
See thousands of homes
for sale
24 hours a day
7 days a week at
www.gravelrealestate.com
Call us for an accurate FREE
market analysis.
413-967-6326/800-486-2121
END OF
SUMMER
SAVINGS!
NORTH BROOKFIELD: Four
bedroom, three bath home near all
town amenities. Original wide
board floors, first floor bedroom,
beautiful perennial gardens with
water
feature.
Must
see.
$224,900.
FROM
LABOR DAY
UNTIL THE 1st
SNOW FALL
WHEN YOU LIST
OR PURCHASE
YOUR HOME
THROUGH ANY
GRAVEL AGENT
WE WILL TAKE
$500 OFF
YOUR CLOSING COSTS!
NORTH BROOKFIELD: Young
turn key home with all the bells
and whistles, three bedrooms,
master suite, farmers porch,
private great room with Bose
sound system. Must see today.
$349,900
WARE – Well cared for colonial,
newer kitchen, 2 new baths and
updates that include boiler and
electrics. Four bedroom home with
room for all. $153,000.
Evenings call:
NICOLE FLAMAND
JAVIER STUART
LORI FISHER
CLAUDIO SANTORO
MERRIE BROWN
KAYE BOOTHMAN
JILL GRAVEL
413-695-2319
413-627-2700
617-620-0027
413-813-8257
413-668-8190
413-477-6624
413-364-7353
HISTORIC HOME PALMER Live
“mortgage free” in this vintage
home by renting out the upstairs!
Central Palmer location with easy
access to stores, Post Office,
churches, etc. Many upgrades.
Has nice, wraparound porch. Will
sell
“as-is”.
Reduced!
No
$130,000. Call (413)283-4913.
WEST BROOKFIELD: Post and
Beam home nearly complete, four
bedrooms on almost two acres,
deeded rights to Brookhaven
Lake. Just off the beaten path but
near Route 9. $279,900
WARREN:
Oversized
three
bedroom ranch with beautiful view
from your family room. Large
patio, level back yard, minutes to
pike and Sturbridge. $219,900
Dorrinda
O’Keefe-Shea
Glenn Moulton
Ruth Vadnais
Jill Stolgitis
Shalene
Friedhaber
Mary Hicks
Alan Varnum
Christy Toppin
Cheryl
Kaczmarski
Bruce Martin
Joe Chenevert
Kathy Hosley
Carolyn Bessette
413-348-8916
413-477-8780
413-593-6656
508-612-4794
508-867-2727
508-341-8934
413-348-0518
508-523-0114
508-331-9031
508-596-0209
518-618-7188
Real Estate Wanted
OUR INVENTORY
HAS DWINDLED
LIST NOW PROPER PRICING
EQUALS FAST SALES
Thinking of selling?
Call us today for a
no cost, no obligation
market value on
your home!
Call us toll free at 1-800-824-6548
✦
Real Estate
FULL OR PART time Horse
Groomsweekdays
and/or
weekends for leading show barn.
Part time riding instructor. Suffield,
CT (860)668-1656, (860)8748077.
HHA’S,
CNA’S,
NEEDED.
Highest competitive rates for
Home Care Agency, also paid
mileage. Professional Medical
Services, Inc. (413)289-9018
Denise, (413)858-4506 Alyssa
EOE
Page 31
978-434-1990
413-967-5463
For Rent
For Rent
CHICOPEE SZOT PARK, large 3
BR, 1,700 sq.ft. plus 2 car garage,
new flooring, new paint. Includes
stove, fridge and wall A/C, w/d
hook-ups in basement. $1,250/ mo
plus utilities. 1st, last, security, No
smokers/ pets. Must pass credit
and background check. (413)8960049.
PALMER AREA/ THORNDIKE
remodeled one BR apts $625
stove, refrigerator, w/d hook-up,
off-street parking. NO PETS.
Deposits. Messages (413)8962513.
CHICOPEE,
ALDENVILLE
AREA, NEWLY REMODELED.
3rd
FL,
2
BEDROOMS,
APPLIANCES INCLUDED, W/D
IN UNIT. NO PETS, 1ST, LAST,
SECURITY $800.00/
MONTH
PLUS UTILITIES. (413)533-9028.
A BEST CASH offer for any type
of
property,
circumstance,
condition or location. Ugly houses
are OK. Fast closing. (413)2443842
FOR RENT
Mobile Homes
All real estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act of 1968, which makes
it illegal to advertise any preference,
limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status (number of children and
or pregnancy), national origin, ancestry,
age, marital status, or any intention to
make any such preference, limitation or
discrimination.
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising for real estate that is in
violation of the law. Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings advertising in
this newspaper are available on an equal
opportunity basis. To complain about
discrimination call The Department of
Housing and Urban Development “ HUD”
toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. For the N.E.
area, call HUD at 617-565-5308. The toll
free number for the hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.
BRIMFIELD 2 BEDROOMS, 2
baths, 2004 24’x44’ in 55 plus
park. All appliances, new tile,
carpet, H2O, shingles, shed
$79,000.
413-593-9961
DASAP.MHVILLAGE.COM
For Rent
ALL REAL ESTATE advertised
herein is subject to the Federal
Fair Housing Act, which makes it
illegal
to
advertise
“any
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, or national origin,
or intention to make any such
preference,
limitation,
or
discrimination.” We will not
knowingly accept any advertising
for real estate which is in violation
of the law. All persons are hereby
informed
that
all
dwellings
advertised are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
BELCHERTOWN - 1 MONTH
FREE, LARGE, MODERN 2
bedroom apt. on bus route, w/w
carpeting, large yard, laundry on
premises, off-street parking in
plowed lot, appliances. $775/ mo
(413)323-1119 (413)537-7080
PALMER 1BR - Quiet Secure
Country Location. Locked Storage
& Laundry in Basement. K/DR
Combo - LR-Full Bath. Nice
Layout.
No
Smok/Pets.
1st/last/sec. $700.00 Breton Est.
413-283-6940
PALMER 2 BR duplex, 1 mile to
Pike. Clean, private, w/large
backyard.
Stove,
refrigerator,
dishwasher, w/d hook-up, cat ok,
no smoke. 1st, last, security. Open
House 11/9, 12-2. $750 month
(413)896-9741.
PALMER, BEAUTIFUL 1ST fl, 2
BR, all appliances, w/d hook-ups,
close to Tpke, non-smoking, $775/
mo, 1st, last, security (413)2841783.
Reaching our online readers and homes in
50 local communities every week.
ADVERTISER NEWS
23 Southwick Street
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
(413) 786-7747
Fax: (413) 786-8457
◗ THE BARRE
GAZETTE
5 Exchange Street
P. O. Box 448
Barre, MA 01005
(978) 355-4000
Fax: (978) 355-6274
◗ QUABOAG CURRENT
80 Main Street
Ware, MA 01082
(413) 967-3505
Fax: (413) 967-6009
◗ THE CHICOPEE
REGISTER
(413) 592-3599
Fax: (413) 592-3568
◗ COUNTRY JOURNAL ◗ THE REGISTER
P.O. Box 429, 5 Main Street
Huntington, MA 01050
(413) 667-3211
Fax: (413) 667-3011
◗ THE SUN
(413) 612-2310
Fax: (413) 592-3568
◗ THE JOURNAL
REGISTER
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
◗ THE SHOPPING
GUIDE
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
◗ THE SENTINEL
P. O. Box 601
10 South Main Street
Belchertown, MA 01007
(413) 323-5999
Fax: (413)323-9424
◗ SOUTHWICK
SUFFIELD NEWS
23 Southwick Street
Feeding Hills, MA 01030
(413) 786-7747
Fax: (413) 786-8457
◗ THE TOWN
REMINDER
138 College Street, Suite 2
So. Hadley, MA 01075
(413) 536-5333
Fax: (413) 536-5334
◗ WILBRAHAM
HAMPDEN TIMES
2341 Boston Rd.
Wilbraham, MA 01095
(413) 682-0007
Fax: (413) 682-0013
◗ THE TOWN
COMMON
24 Water Street
Palmer, MA 01069
(413) 283-8393
Fax: (413) 289-1977
best
ar
CLASSIFIEDS
ound
◗ AGAWAM
the
Our publications
Deadlines:
The deadline for all print classified
ads in the Quabbin and Suburban
Zones is Friday at noon for publication
the following week. The deadline
for the Hill Towns Zone is Monday at
noon. All online ads will be published
for 7 days including the corresponding
print editions.
◗ THE WARE
RIVER NEWS
80 Main Street
Ware, MA 01082
(413) 967-3505
Fax: (413) 967-6009
Find quick links to our newspaper web sites at www.turley.com – Many are also on
www.turley.com
Email: [email protected]
©Turley Publications, Inc, and MediaSpan.
Powered by MediaSpan.
PALMER ONE & 2 bedroom
updated apts. Heat/hot water
included, near MA Pike, off-street
parking, laundry, appliances. $835
& $860 (413)596-8208.
WILBRAHAM in-law apt $900.
THORNDIKE/ PALMER AREA 5
RM apt. Convenient location offstreet parking. NO PETS. $850,
Deposits. Messages (413)8962513.
WARE- 2 TOWNHOUSE APTS.
SPACIOUS, SUNNY 3 BR $800
& $850 and plus utilities, w/d
hook-up, storage. Also Beautiful 2
BR apt. $700. No smoking, no
pets. Credit check/references
(413)320-5784.
Housemate Wanted
1 BEDROOM ROOM for rent
country setting with swimming
pool and nearby park for walking
hiking, etc. $200.00 weekly 413537-8788
Vacation Rentals
WARM WEATHER IS year round
in Aruba. The water is safe, and
the dining is fantastic. Walk out to
the beach. 3-bedroom weeks
available. Sleeps 8. $3500. Email:
[email protected] for more
information.
Storage
GATED OUTDOOR STORAGE
for boats, RV’s, campers, or large
equipment.
For
details
call
(413)967-4721
Monday–Friday
9am- 5pm.
Auto For Sale
2014
EQUINOX SUV Low
Mileage
2006
Honda
Motorcycle - 2 Snowmobiles
Must Sell Due to Death of Owner
Call (413)283-6561
Autos Wanted
$$$ AUTOS WANTED TOP Dollar
paid for your unwanted cars,
trucks, vans, big and small,
running or not. Call 413-534-5400.
*CASH TODAY* WE’LL buy any
car (any condition) + free sameday removal. Best cash offer
guaranteed! Call for free quote
(877)897-4864
CASH FOR CARS: Any
model or year. We pay
Running or not. Sell your
truck today. Free towing!
offer: 1-800-871-0654.
make,
more!
car or
Instant
Please
Recycle
This
Newspaper
The Wilbraham-Hampden TIMES
Page 32
November 6, 2014
Celebrating 20 years in business!
Your LOCAL Kitchen, Bath and Remodeling Experts
Kitchen Encounters is locally owned by the Gasteyer
families. We offer friendly, affordable, professional service.
We will help you visualize your new kitchen or bath with
our expert design service and we are ALWAYS a better
value than the big box stores. You can trust Kitchen
Encounters because our families are local, just like yours!
Thank you to all of my wonderful
clients, friends and family
for once again voting me
the Reader Raves Best Realtor.
Patricia D Wheway,
Broker
Cell: 413-478-1166
Email: [email protected]
TheGroupThatSells.com
136 Dwight Road, Longmeadow, MA
If you or someone
you know is in need of
Real Estate Services,
contact me and experience
first hand the top rated,
caring services I provide.
Please call or email me
for a FREE Home Buyer’s
Guide or Home Seller’s
Guide or to receive email
market updates.
Service. Experience. Integrity.