P V O I N T O F

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Page 1
INT
OF
Our Community Newspaper
V
I E W
may 1, 2012
AN APT REPLACEMENT FOR THE
“THRILL” OF RAISING KIDS
By Frederick A. Hurst
688 Boston Road
resisted going on a European vacation to Scotland,
Ireland and England so adamantly that when my wife
A
COMMUNITY
BANQUET
finally tricked me into acquiescence, as intelligent as I
HALL WITH ELEGANCE
“Although advance reservations must be made, might be, I couldn’t figure out how she did it, and I
they are known for inviting the public to their scratched my head repeatedly during the flight over the
I
successful, bi-monthly (every two months) ‘lobster and seafood feasts’.”
By Zelmon (Zee) Johnson – 8
SELECTIVE SERVICE:
ARE YOU REGISTERED?
“When a male reaches his 18th birthday, he is
required to register for the selective service, and
failing to register for the selective service is a
felony that carries penalties of up to 5 years in
prison and up to a $250,000 fine.”
By Larry Martin – 8
‘REVERSE RACISM’ DOES NOT
EXIST, THE “RACE CARD” IS
Publisher Rick Hurst and Glen O’Connor,
NOT IN THE DECK AND “POST
owner of O’Connor’s Pub
RACIAL AMERICA” HAS NOT
Atlantic and wondered how in the hell anyone could have
BEEN BUILT YET
“If we don’t discuss race then it’s allowed to fes- convinced me to spend my valuable vacation time in
ter and grow unchecked like an untreated Celtic Europe.
malignant tumor. Race is an issue every citizen
I had been programmed to believe that the weather
must care about. It’s not a black issue; it’s not and the people were equally wet and dank and would repa white issue; it’s not a Puerto Rican issue. It’s
resent the worst of the residue of their immigrant anceseveryone’s issue.“
tors who migrated to America and enslaved my ancestors.
By Rev. Talbert W. Swan – 13
READING ROCKS!
“Many of our children have little to no control
over any aspect of his/her life. Families divided.
Jobs unavailable. Food limited. Streets unsafe.
No control. What they do have control over,
however, is their desire to learn. The choice to
read. Be a rock star.”
By Gianna Allentuck – 17
OVERCOMING SHAME
“One of the ways some people cope (with
shame) is to act out roles that disguise their
shame; it serves a useful purpose of protecting
their ego or pride. It may even help them to
save face. These pretenses act as a defense
against the feelings of shame. But even though
they may think they are skillfully defending
themselves against the shame, it can be seen by
others when they hang their head, slump down,
avoid eye contact or apologize for having needs
and desires.” By Dr. Sweets S. Wilson – 23
GO, MAYOR
SARNO!
By Frederick A. Hurst – 24
I figured they still might not have recovered from the
Revolutionary War debacle that sent them scurrying, and
from the War of 1812 where the burning of the White
House left them with puffed up egos but, to the delight
continues to page 5
A PARTNERSHIP FOR THE AGES
By Kevin McCaskill
chool partnerships have been
around for decades. Small and
large businesses, local community organizations, and local city governments have partnered with local
schools to assist in providing
resources and support of educators
and students in their respective communities. The city of Hartford is no
different; countless numbers of entities have provided their services to
help improve the lives of students
and families here. I would like to
highlight one — the Connecticut
Public Broadcasting Network
(CPBN).
CPBN is Connecticut’s only
locally owned media organization
producing television, radio, print,
and Internet content for distribution
throughout the state. In 1962,
S
CPBN partners with Hartford Public Schools
Connecticut Educational Television in its state-of-the-art facility at 1049
Station started in the basement of the Asylum Avenue. CPTV and WNPR’s
Trinity College library in Hartford. In community-supported, statewide
1978, Connecticut Public Radio public broadcasting networks are
(WNPR) joined the network, form- committed to serving diverse coming Connecticut Public Broadcasting, munities in Connecticut with a mix
Inc. (CPBI). Today, the organization of educational, news, public affairs,
has evolved into CPBN and is housed
continues to page 7
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african american point of view
may 1, 2012
page two
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african american point of view
A N A FRICAN A MERICAN POINT OF
AN AFRICAN AMERICAN Point of View
may 1, 2012
page three
COVER
VIEW AN APT REPLACEMENT FOR THE “THRILL” OF RAISING KIDS
A PARTNERSHIP FOR THE AGES
Point of View is a monthly news journal with an African American orientation. It is distributed free to select locations in Hampden and Hampshire counties and in Connecticut.
Letters, articles and comments appearing in the newspaper reflect the opinions of the contributors and do not constitute an endorsement by POV and are subject to editing. POV
assumes no responsibility for photos, articles, letters, press releases or unsolicited materials. Decisions as to the editing and publishing of material are based on space availability and the discretion of the publisher and editor. Distribution locations are listed on our
web site. POV assumes no financial responsibility for failure to publish an advertisement, incorrect placement or typographical errors in its publication. Advertisers are solely responsible for the content of their advertising and claims and offers contained within
their advertising. POV reserves the right to refuse advertising for any reason. No portion
of this publication may be reproduced without written permission.
PUBLISHER:
Frederick A. Hurst
EDITOR:
Marjorie J. Hurst
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: THIS ISSUE
Black Businesses
Zelmon Johnson
Life’s Challenges
Black Sports International Melvin Wm. Bell, Editor Mama’s Boyz
Charles Lightfoot
Men’s Fashion
Business & Workforce Dev. Larry Martin
Call to the Cause
Kirk Smith
Children’s Book Corner
Terri Schlichenmeyer
Dr. Sweets S. Wilson
Jerry Craft
Jeffrey S. Clemons Sr.
Op-Ed
Brenda Douglas
Parent & Community
Patricia Spradley
Pen & Ink
Brenda’s Child
Community Focus
Trevis Wray
Community Perspectives
Rev. Talbert W. Swan II
J. Roscoe Hurst
Education & Hope
Gianna Allentuck
Juanita Torrence-Thompson
Financial Cents
Walter D. Woodgett
Religious Point of View Rev. Dr. W.C. Watson, Jr.
Financially Yours
Samuel N. Wilson Jr.
The Urban Cook
Rhonda Jones
Hartford Public Schools
Kevin McCaskill
Urban Gardening
Zaida Govan
Health Matters
Doris Harris, Editor
Anika C. Johnson
Inhale Music < Exhale Life Heshima Moja
PRODUCTION
Artistic/Layout Dir.
Marie Zanazanian
Marjorie J. Hurst
Inspirational Thoughts
Willette H. Johnson
Marketing Director
[email protected] Groove
Magdalena Gómez
Photographer
Edward Cohen
Website Designer
Marie Zanazanian
Leadership Pioneer Valley Lorenzo Gaines
LOCATE OUR ADVERTISERS
Affordable Airport Car Service --------------------15
Alden Baptist Church ------------------------------27
Baystate Medical Center ---------------------------11
Bethel AME Church --------------------------------27
Branford Hall Career Institute --------------------17
Bytebak Computers---------------------------------34
Camp Atwater---------------------------------------21
Canaan Baptist Church of Christ------------------27
Connecticut Real Estate Management ------------32
Family Church---------------------------------------27
Freedom Credit Union------------------------------9
Fresh Anointing Ministries COGIC---------------27
Gentle Smiles Family Dentistry -------------------12
Hall & Hall Siding----------------------------------14
HCS Headstart--------------------------------------7
Holyoke Community College----------------------7
Home Inspections by Marco, LLC.----------------15
Jeffrey’s Suit Rack ----------------------------------30
Jesus Christ Enlightened Christian Bible Seminary 27
Who’s On My Side? Stage Play -------------------16
Lewin’s Boutique------------------------------------15
Lyle Legal Services ----------------------------------13
Macedonia COGIC ---------------------------------27
MBC Realtors ---------------------------------------15
MetroPCS--------------------------------------------2
Mount Calvary Baptist Church--------------------27
New Life Calvary Baptist Church -----------------27
OG1Gold ----------------------------- 9 , 20, 22, 36
Progressive Community Baptist Church----------27
Roberta B. Johnson/Real Living Real Estate -----15
Shiloh SDA Church ---------------------------------27
Solid Rock Community Baptist Church ----------27
Soul Purpose-----------------------------------------3
Springfield Dept. of Health & Human Serv. -----10
Springfield Neighborhood Housing Serv.---------15
Springfield Pediatrics, LLC -------------------------12
Springfield Technical Community College -------6
St. John’s Congregational Church-----------------27
The SHINE Program-------------------------------21
Third Baptist Church-------------------------------27
Third Baptist Church - Musician------------------26
Trinity United Methodist Church -----------------27
United Bank-----------------------------------------5
Vibrations --------------------------------------------15
Wesley United Methodist Church-----------------27
Western Massachusetts Electric -------------------35
Westfield State University -------------------------16
X-Bankers Check Cashing -------------------------15
YMCA of Greater Springfield ---------------------34
SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS
BUSINESS & FINANCE
Black Businesses ...............................................................................8
Business & Workforce Development .................................................8
Financial Cents .................................................................................9
Financially Yours...............................................................................9
CLASSIFIED ......................................................................................32
COMMUNITY
C O N T E N T S
688 Boston Road, Springfield, MA 01119
Phone: (413) 796-1500 Fax: (413) 796-6100
E-mail: [email protected] Website: www.afampointofview.com
Call to the Cause...............................................................................14
Community Focus.............................................................................16, 34
Community Perspectives ...................................................................13
Congratulations Corner.....................................................................34
Events...............................................................................................33
[email protected] Groove.................................................................................14
Leadership: Pioneer Valley.................................................................13
EDITORIAL
AF-AM Newsbits .............................................................................4
From the Publisher’s Desk ................................................................24
Letters to the Publisher.....................................................................24
Op Ed...............................................................................................25
EDUCATION
Education & Hope ............................................................................17
Hartford Public Schools ....................................................................Cover
Parent & Community Engagement ...................................................6
FEATURES
Superintendent Screening Team ........................................................6
Scenes and Songs from Fannie Lou....................................................21
A Service of Remembrance: Garian Bernice Robinson Caulton..........26
FOOD & FASHION
A Gentlemen’s Fashion Sense...........................................................30
The Urban Cook..............................................................................30
HEALTH
Health Matters................................................................................10, 12
Urban Gardening ............................................................................12
LIVING
Inspirational Thoughts .....................................................................23
Life’s Challenges ...............................................................................23
PHOTO GALLERY ..........................................................................18-19
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES ...........................................................15
RELIGION
Religious Point of View .....................................................................26
Religious Directory ...........................................................................27
SPORTS
Black Sports International ...............................................................31-32
THE ARTS
Children’s Book Corner.....................................................................28
Inhale Music < Exhale Life...............................................................28
Mama’s Boyz ....................................................................................3
Pen & Ink .........................................................................................29
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Join Our Journey Of The Senses!....We Are A Different Kind Of Company!
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AF-AM NEWS b i t s
By Frederick A. Hurst
THE INVISIBLE
(BLACK) MAN
hat’s one of the great frustrations of African-American life,
those times when you are standing
right there, minding your business,
tending your house, coming home
from the store, and other people are
looking right at you, yet do not see
you….They see instead their own
superstitions and suppositions, paranoia and guilt, night terrors and vulnerabilities. They see the perpetrator,
the suspect, the mug shot, the dark
and scary face that lurks at the open
windows of their vivid imaginings.
They see the unknown, the unassimilable, the other….They see every d—n
thing in the world but you….And
their blindness costs you. First and
foremost, it costs your sacred individuality. But it may also cost you a job,
an education, your freedom. If you are
unlucky like Trayvon Martin, it may
even cost your life. (Leonard Pitts
Commentary published in The
Republican, March 20, 2012)
“T
THE CHANGING FACE
OF HARLEM
he only perfectly reliable constant
is that things change. And the
political face of New York’s Harlem
neighborhood is no exception. The
voting age population of Harlem is
now a third African-American and
more than 50% Latino. And Harlem’s
besieged 82-year-old Congressman,
Charlie Rangel, is feeling the difference as Adriano Espaillat, a
Dominican-American launches a substantial challenge for the seat. Over
the last 15 years Espaillat rose from
community organizer to the state’s
Assembly to its Senate. He has a natural base and, if he wins, it would be
the first time since before Adam
Clayton Powell Jr.’s election in 1944
that Harlem’s congressman isn’t
Black. (The Wall Street Journal,
March 24, 2012)
T
MCDONALD’S CEO
AFRICAN-AMERICAN
cDonald’s chief operating officer,
African-American
Don
Thompson, has been selected to
become the company’s chief executive
beginning July 1.
M
may 1, 2012
page four
african american point of view
THE REPUBLICAN ON
THE BROWN/WARREN
CAMPAIGN
hile it is still early in the
game, it appears to us that
Brown’s campaign is heading for a
home run with fans cheering in the
stands while Warren’s campaign still
doesn’t seem to know how to swing
the bat….If Warren doesn’t get better
advice, start showing up a lot more in
Western Massachusetts and working
harder to relate to the average voter,
she’s going to have a tough time
unseating
Brown.”
(Sunday
Republican, March 25, 2012) Amen!
“W
SO FAR THE
SERVANTS HAVE BEEN
INDICTED
.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz
announced indictments in the
state’s probation scandal against former Springfield deputy probation
commissioner William Burke III, former probation commissioner John J.
O’Brien and former second deputy
probation commissioner Elizabeth V.
Tavares. The three are accused of operating a sham hiring system that
favored politically connected candidates for probation jobs who were
sponsored by current and former state
legislators. The quid pro quo is that
the state legislators would give favorable budget treatment to the officials
doing their bidding. The only problem
is that those indicted are the servants.
It is difficult to conceive of how the
U.S. attorney can avoid indictments
against the legislators involved,
although the question of where it will
all end is open ended and goes way
beyond probation. The types of relationships involved in the indictments
are routine throughout government.
U
WAR IS THE
UNFOLDING OF
MISCALCULATIONS
couldn’t help but think about some
people I know when I read the opening quote in a Wall Street Journal article by Ron Prosor (March 22, 2012)
where he wrote, “War is the unfolding
of miscalculations.” While Prosor was
referring to those in the international
community who “stand idle” while terrorism in the Gaza Strip is rising to
I
levels that threaten regional stability,
the quote is just as useful in describing
those everyday folks who deliberately
start unnecessary “wars” they can’t win
after making the miscalculation that
they can.
cantly more economically rigid than
many other developed countries. How
did our perception of ourselves end up
so far out of sync with reality?” (The
New Republic, March 1, 2012) Myths
die hard.
THE PRISON
INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
IN THE U.S.
ONE OUT OF EVERY
FOUR BLACK
he U.S. has 760 prisoners per HOUSEHOLDS HAS NO
100,000 citizens. That’s not just
ASSETS OTHER
many more than in most other develTHAN A CAR!
T
oped countries but seven to 10 times as
many. Japan has 63 per 100,000,
Germany has 90, France has 96, South
Korea has 97, and Britain – with a rate
among the highest – has 153. Even
developing countries that are well
known for their crime problems have a
third of U.S. numbers. Mexico has 208
prisoners per 100,000 citizens and
Brazil has 242. As Robertson pointed
out on his TV show, the 700 Club,
“We here in America make up 5% of
the world’s population but we make
up 25% of the world’s jailed prisoners.
(Fareed Zakaria, Time, April 2, 2012
explaining how the failed war on drugs
has led to a dramatic expansion in
incarceration at an annual cost of
$45,006 as opposed to the $8,667
annual cost for college)
SOUTH AFRICA
HONORS KENNEDY
acob Zuma, President of South
Africa, recently announced he will
be honoring the late Senator Ted
Kennedy for being “a tireless campaigner for the introduction of sanctions” against the former White racist
apartheid regime that was eventually
toppled when Nelson Mandela was
released from his South Africa prison
and eventually elected the new government’s president.
J
THE PERCEPTION
AND THE MYTH
ommenting on the loss of economic mobility in America (movement
from a lower to higher economic status), The New Republic’s Timothy
Noah wrote, “Most of Western Europe
today is both more equal in incomes
and more economically mobile than
the United States. And it isn’t just
Western Europe. Countries as varied
as Japan, New Zealand, Singapore,
and Pakistan all have higher degrees of
income mobility than we do. A nation
that prides itself on its lack of class
rigidity has, in short, become signifi-
C
“…the Great Recession has left blacks
in a worse-off position than whites by
virtually every measure. The numbers
are startling. Based on the latest Pew
study, released in 2011, median white
wealth is now 20 times that of black
households, the highest since the survey began. If a roof collapses, a car
breaks down, a scholarship falls
through, a job is lost, a child gets sick,
property taxes go up, the basement
floods, a breadwinner falls ill, or any
combination thereof, white households
can draw on $92,000 to get through
it, while black families must figure out
how to weather life’s storms on
$4,900….One out of every four black
households has no assets other than a
car, compared with one out of 17 white
households. African Americans’ cars
were of lesser value ($3,000) than
those of whites ($5,960)…. Blacks are
less likely than whites to own a home
(46% for blacks versus 74% for
whites), less likely to own stocks (7%
versus 27%), less likely to have equity
in a business (6% versus 12%), and less
likely to own interest-earning assets
(5% versus 16%).” (“Race to the
Bottom,” Isabel Wilkerson, The New
Republic, March 1, 2012)
THE UNIVERSITY OF
CONNECTICUT IS IN
THE CELLAR
he graduation rate for Black
NCAA athletes at the University
of Connecticut is 14%, the second lowest in the league. And it has lingered at
such low levels for years. It is shameful
and disgraceful that UCONN is on the
verge of being sanctioned by the
NCAA under its new rules. The only
worthwhile sanction is to ban it from
playing until it sees its players as students first.
T
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african american point of view
Page 5
may 1, 2012
page five
AN APT REPLACEMENT FOR THE “THRILL”
OF RAISING KIDS
continued from page 1
of President James Madison, ended their intimidation of the New World once and for all. Given what
I recalled about their history, I figured they would
still be a bit angry and, as so often happens in
America, I figured Black folks on the continent
might be their scapegoats. I couldn’t have been
more wrong as the front page photographs illustrate.
What lovely people! I was especially pleased to
see that, William Wallace, who we all know as the
actor Mel Gibson, is honored in Scotland right
alongside the nobleman, Robert Bruce, whose
namesake sweaters I used to sell from my counter at
the late Steiger‘s department store without the
slightest idea who he was. And it was a pleasure to
visit Edinburgh Castle where Mary Queen of Scots
(poor, unlucky soul) hid out and gave birth to King
James (VI of Scotland and I of England). And it was
pleasant to see that the precise-speaking, cool, tiltnosed English people portrayed in our media do not
represent the open-armed, warm folks that we met.
But our biggest surprise came in Ireland where
we spent the bulk of our trip. The people were so
funny and friendly. They embraced us wherever we
went in their hotels and in their many pubs, the proliferation of which made our vacation that much
Our Scottish guide who got us into
St. Andrews for lunch!
more special. We ate one of our meals in O’Connor’s
Public House in Blarney in County Cork, Ireland
and were surprised to learn that the owner, Glen
O’Connor, was born in Boston where his family
restaurant started and now has very popular pubs in
Brookfield, Connecticut and Brewster, New York as
well as in Ireland. He agreed to take a photograph
with me which adorns the left side of the front cover.
That other fella’ in the right hand photograph, I
don’t know from Adam. He approached me from
behind as my wife was taking a picture outside of
the O’Connor pub after we had finished eating (and
drinking, of course) and insisted on being in the picture…on his own terms, as you can see. We laughed
with him and his Irish friends as they made their
way into the pub.
It was all fun but our trip to Cobh (originally
called Queenstown), the last port of call made by the
Titanic before it sunk exactly 100 years to the day
after our visit, was educational and sobering. The
timing of our visit to Cobh reminded us of our timely visit to Saint Peter‘s Square at the Vatican where
we held vigil with anxious throngs of others as Pope
John Paul II was dying.
Kudos to our cousins, Cathy and Moe, for convincing us to become world travelers. The experiences – Sicily, Italy, Greece, Spain, France, China,
South Africa and more have been thrilling and
invaluable and an apt replacement for the “thrill” of
raising kids.
Look what’s changing
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Page 6
may 1, 2012
page six
african american point of view
E D U C A T I O N
PARENT & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Patricia Spradley is
Chief Administrator
for Parent and
Community
Engagement,
Springfield Public
Schools
(413) 787-6597
other’s Day is a celebration
honoring mothers and motherhood, maternal bonds, and
the influence of mothers in our lives. It
is a time to reflect on our mothers as
well as ourselves as mothers. We recall
the things they did or said, and find
ourselves agreeing with them more and
more even perhaps repeating some of
their famous sayings to our own children! And then there were those things
that we wished we’d paid closer attention to, now knowing what a powerful
foundation of information they had to
offer!
Motherhood is incredibly rewarding but can also be very challenging.
Many women move from full-time
work into full-time motherhood in a
M
MOTHERS WITH MOMENTUM
short period of time. Most often, no
matter how fast paced their work life
was, motherhood caused one to pick
up the momentum, if only even slightly. How is this possible? Where does
this source of energy come from to
handle caring for the family, the house,
the husband and life at-large?
The complexities of dealing with
children—married or as a single parent—are compound and complex.
Support networks like family and close
friends are important to stay afloat but
not everyone has them. Some mothers
feel overwhelmed by the parenting
experience and find it very challenging
to effectively manage their day-to-day
roles and responsibilities. Many
women have expectations of themselves and the type of mother they
want to be. These expectations are
based on childhood experiences and
the type of parenting they received. If
SUPERINTENDENT
SCREENING TEAM
By Marjorie J. Hurst
Marjorie J. Hurst
is an attorney, former member of
the Springfield
School Committee
and
editor of POV
s an informational follow-up to
my article in our April issue,
“We Must Act Now or We
Will Lose Again,” here are the names
of the Springfield residents who were
unanimously selected to serve on the
Superintendent Screening Team by
the Springfield School Committee:
A
Nancy Cavanaugh - Parent
Jose Claudio - New North Citizens
Council Communications Director
B. John Dill - Colebrook
Realty President
Heriberto Flores - New England Farm
Workers Executive Director and
President of Paramount Theatre
Rev. Mark E. Flowers - Pastor of Mount
Calvary Baptist Church
Burt Freedman - Teacher
Sherann Jackson - Teacher
Sharyn Kakley - Community Member
Thomas O’Brien - Principal of
Boland Elementary School
Charles H. Rucks - Springfield
Neighborhood Housing
Services Executive Director
Kenneth Stahovish - Student
Rev. Talbert Swan - NAACP Executive
Director and Pastor of
Spring of Hope COGIC
Thaddeus Tokarz - Principal of
Central High School
If you know any of these persons,
you might want to contact them and
make your feelings known about the
selection of our next superintendent.
They will be responsible for nominating three to five finalists from which
the school committee will select the
new superintendent.
Although initial interviews,
which will take place May 5, May 10,
continues to page 35
By Patricia Spradley
initial experiences of becoming a parent are different from those expectations, this can cause stress, anxiety or
even depression. For many women
these issues can result in feelings of
inadequacy, while others take on these
issues as challenges that actually fuel
their adrenaline. What a contrast.
So what or how do mothers with
an aggressive, persistent momentum,
get and keep up this pace? And how
is it that they do it in the face of adversities like the lack of financial, practical
or emotional support—left to fend for
themselves and/or their families and
even extended families?
Mothers with Momentum refuse
to let anything or anyone deter them.
They are on a mission that is focused,
strategic and intentional. Their eyes
are constantly on the prize. Mothers
with Momentum are strong-minded,
blocking out negative thoughts and
noises they are bound to encounter.
Mothers with Momentum know where
they are going and have figured out
how to get there or seek help from the
experienced!
Mothers
with
Momentum are relentless at repeating
that which works and letting go of
that which proves fruitless!
Paraphrasing Proverbs 31—
which says that we are to give the honorable (virtuous) woman the reward
she has earned and let her works bring
her praise at the city gate—clearly
Mothers with Momentum have earned
and will continue earning this honor.
So please accept this as my small
tribute to mothers whose work is
immeasurable; whose value to her children, husband, family, and to her culture cannot be calculated. What a special creature God has made! He miraculously created mothers—and in most
cases, Mothers with Momentum!
Need Summer Classes?
Register Now!
Online:
www.stcc.edu
Walk-in:
Registrar’s Office,
Garvey Hall South/
Bldg. 15
Phone:
(413) 755-4321
Session I
June 4 - July 6
Session II
July 9 - August 9
Online
June 4 - August 9
Springfield Technical
Community College
Exceptional Education. Proven Results.
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african american point of view
may 1, 2012
E D U C A T I O N
HARTFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Kevin McCaskill is
Director of School
Secondary Education,
of Hartford Public
Schools
A PARTNERSHIP FOR THE AGES
continued from page 1
children’s and entertainment programming and services. CPBN provides programming through a variety
of multi-media platforms, in addition
to traditional television and radio
broadcasting.
to enhance their learning and open
the doors of opportunity for post-secondary and career options in the field.
The Journalism & Media Academy
(JMA) at Weaver High School is the
school linked to this partnership.
Commencing for the 2013-14 school
year, JMA seniors will spend their
final year of high school at CPBN
headquarters.
Students will be
housed on the fourth and fifth floors
of the facility, utilizing the 20,000
Hartford Public Schools (HPS)
and CPBN have forged a monumental partnership that will expose
Hartford students to the field of
multi-media, as well as providing
these students with access to resources
square foot allotment to the program.
The space will include classrooms,
production studios, an auditorium,
production facilities, and media workstations. Students will be taught by
JMA faculty in core content areas
SAVE THE DATE!
mployers and all interested Veteran services
representatives and workforce specialists are
invited to a June 6 summit in Springfield on The
Veteran Workforce.
E
he summit will take place from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Rivers Memorial Hall at Western New
England University and will include panels of
experts from government and the business sector.
This is a community event sponsored by the City of
Springfield Veterans Services Department,
Department of Veterans Affairs, Western New
England University, and Springfield College along
with other partners.
T
ur purpose? Share ideas and discuss the many
support resources available to hire, retain,
and promote Veterans. Go to http://vetsroi.com
at VetsROI.com to register and for more information.
O
while CPBN professionals will provide their expertise to enhance students’ knowledge and interest in the
multi-media field.
CPBN President and CEO Jerry
Franklin is the biggest supporter of
this venture. Mr. Franklin states, “No
other public broadcasting institution
in the country is taking
a third of its facility and
building a school there.
It’s a trailblazing educational project, and we
couldn’t be more proud
to
partner
with
Hartford Public Schools
on it.”
In addition to the
JMA project, CPBN has
launched an elementary
school program at the
America’s Choice at
SAND
Elementary
School. In its second
year of programming,
SAND seventh and
eighth grade students
are exposed to the field
of multi-media with the
assistance of CPBN professionals who work collaboratively with SAND
teachers to not only give
students a glimpse of
the field, but to enhance their academic performance.
We at HPS are truly ecstatic
about this partnership and the endless
positive outcomes that will come from
it. Hartford students will benefit from
the rich experiences gained from this
unique partnership.
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may 1, 2012
page eight
B U S I N E S S
&
F I N A N C E
WHERE ARE THE BLACK BUSINESSES?
Zelmon Johnson,
Owner Olive Tree
Books-n-Voices
97 Hancock Street,
Springfield, MA
413-737-6400
A COMMUNITY BANQUET HALL
WITH ELEGANCE
hall business?” They replied how it
was difficult to find a comfortable
place to host celebrations within their
ith the spring season upon community, so they decided to OWN
us and the summer season THEIR OWN.
Here’s their story.
approaching, it is a good
Ivin, a Marine Corps Veteran and
time to think about preparing for
former
Springfield police officer, was
graduation parties, baby and bridal
showers, wedding and anniversary born in the Virgin Islands. He has
receptions, and other private gather- been a Head Chef, and has owned
ings. If you have a need to celebrate catering, photography, and floor covCharlesetta, a
with 100 guests or less, Brown Stone ering businesses.
Springfield
native,
is a Special
Banquet Hall and Meeting Place is an
Education Springfield school teacher,
excellent choice to consider.
Brown Stone Banquet Hall and with a MBA in Business Management.
Meeting Place located at 1482 State With their complementary backStreet, Springfield, Massachusetts is grounds, they share the responsibilities
owned by Ivin Rennix-Smith and of day-to-day operational manageCharlesetta Rennix-Smith. When I ment.
Ivin and Charlesetta purchased
asked “How do you describe Brown
Stone Banquet Hall?” They were the building in 2007, renovated it
quick to say, “Although, we are fully from 2007-2009, and celebrated their
licensed, it is not a bar. It is a commu- first customer in 2009. Since that
nity banquet hall with elegance.” time, birthday parties, fundraisers,
Then I asked, “Why own a banquet holiday parties, etc., have been held at
[email protected]
W
By Zelmon Johnson
the Brown Stone Banquet Hall.
Although advance reservations must
be made, they are known for inviting
the public to their successful,
bimonthly (every two months) “lobster and seafood feasts.”
Because, I was so excited about
their business and ownership, I wanted to know more.
Can one’s own food be brought
in? Does the hall provide food catering
services and staff? Is the hall available
every day? Is outside entertainment
allowed with an event? Will other
“food themes” in addition to lobster
and seafood feasts be offered? Are
there any specific long-term goals?
Ivin and Charlesetta chuckled with a
definitive “Yes” to all my questions.
They also mentioned that a long-term
goal is to expand the building to
accommodate more than 100 guests.
Mr. and Mrs. Rennix-Smith were
gracious hosts as I learned about their
banquet hall. It is evident that they
are proud of their business. While
interviewing them, I was offered a
delicious “non-alcohol, mystery
drink.” When I inquired about its
contents, Ivin would only say, “It is a
recipe from the Virgin Islands.”
Although it was tempting to accept
another drink due to the banquet
hall’s comfortable environment, I
declined their offer. In other words, I
was so relaxed in the setting that I
could have stayed for many more
hours.
For an elegant and spacious
atmosphere, reserve your event at the
Brown Stone Banquet Hall by calling
(413) 732-1122 or (413) 4780093/(413) 218-5716. You will not be
disappointed with their rental rates,
service, and their reinvestment in their
own community, AND, OF COURSE,
be sure to ask for “Zee’s drink!”
BUSINESS & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
Larry Martin, Editor,
is Business Services
and Special Projects
Manager at Regional
Employment Board
of Hampden County
Inc. (“REB”)
[email protected]
www.rebhc.org
f you are a male born after
December 31, 1959, there is an
important registration process you
need to be aware of that could significantly impact your life. It is the
Selective Service registration. When a
male reaches his 18th birthday, he is
required to register for selective service, and failing to register for the
selective service is a felony that carries
penalties of up to 5 years in prison and
up to a $250,000 fine. Male students
who fail to register with the Selective
Service before turning age 26 are ineligible for Federal student loan and
grant programs, including Pell Grants,
Federal Work Study, and Stafford
Loans. In addition, if you were
required to register and you did not,
you will not qualify to participate in
I
SELECTIVE SERVICE: ARE
YOU REGISTERED?
By Larry Martin
many federally-funded workforce
training programs. In addition, most
state department of motor vehicle
agencies provide the list of individuals
applying for licences to the selective
service agency to check for compliance
with the selective service requirement.
We all understand the reasons a
person would prefer not to register:
religious, moral or other personal reasons too numerous to mention in this
article; however, you still have to register. I personally take no stand for or
against selective service, but it is the
law and those of us that are in workforce development have seen the repercussions of non-compliance with this
law. During the worst economic downturn since the great depression, individuals who need retraining are turned
away from good job training programs
because they did not register for selec-
tive service. The problem with not registering usually will not impact a person in their youth unless they are
going to college, then they can just go
sign up and that is it. The problem
begins when you turn 18, and you
don’t register for whatever reason, and
move it to the “I’ll do it sometime
later” category which never happens.
Then you work and get comfortable
and before you know it, you are 30
years old, may have a couple of children and a mortage, and you just lost
your job. It is too late to register for
selective service since you are past 26
years old, and now, many training programs have closed their doors to you.
Student loans are hard to get at reasonable rates, and you cannot apply for
any type of federal job.
High schools inform students of
the selective service requirement, but
it is not a consistent process. If their
parents or guardians don’t inform our
young men about this responsibility,
and they don’t have plans for college,
then many don’t register. The attitude
of “they will have to come find me
because I refuse to register” has consequences. I have a better idea. If you are
the parent or friend of a young man
who is 18 years old but less than 26
years old, encourage them to register
for selective service so they do not lose
out on any services. There is nothing in
the law that prohibits you from being
a conscientious objector if a draft were
to be instituted. The chances of a draft
are slim; the chances that you may
need the services denied to you for not
registering for selective service if you
are unemployed or get laid-off are
high. For more information visit
http://www.sss.gov/default.htm .
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african american point of view
B U S I N E S S
&
FINANCIALLY YOURS
Samuel N. Wilson Jr.,
Certified Public
Accountant, owns an
accounting firm in
Bridgeport, CT and is
an investment advisor.
He can be reached at
[email protected]
sbcglobal.net or
203-368-6086.
FROM BRIDGEPORT,
CONNECTICUT
IRS NOTICES:
WHAT TO DO
IF YOU
RECEIVE ONE
By Samuel N. Wilson, Jr.
fter you file your tax return,
the last thing that you want to
see is a notice from the IRS
questioning your return. But if it happens to you, here are a few things to
keep in mind.
A
MAINTAIN YOUR RECORDS. Your
records are your ultimate defense
against any type of adjustment that
the IRS might propose. Keep good
records and maintain them long after
the return is filed in order to prove
DON’T PANIC. Many of these
your deductions to the IRS.
notices ask only for additional inforHowever, if you do find yourself
mation to clarify the return that was
in a jam with the IRS, make sure to
filed. You likely have received the
engage the services of a qualified tax
notice because something on the tax
professional who can represent you
return doesn’t match IRS records.
before the IRS in order to help you out
REVIEW THE NOTICE. Don’t just with your tax problems.
F I N A N C E
FINANCIAL “CENTS”
assume that the IRS is correct in what
they propose in their notice. Many of
these notices are simply incorrect for
any number of reasons. Make sure that
what the IRS is asking for wasn’t
reported on another part of the return.
And be sure that you protest the
notice if you believe it to be incorrect.
RESPOND TIMELY. Don’t ignore
the notice under any circumstances.
The IRS will generally deal with you
fairly as long as you respond to the
notice in a timely fashion. However, if
you ignore the notice, you can expect
the IRS to become more aggressive in
future letters, even to the point where
they will institute collection actions.
Most issues can be handled through
the mail, without the frustration of a
telephone call.
may 1, 2012
Walter D.
Woodgett can be
reached at
413-827-8383
or [email protected]
comcast.net
CAN YOU
TURN “BE A
MILLIONAIRE
DAY” INTO
REALITY?
By Walter D. Woodgett
• TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TAX DEFERRAL.
When you invest in tax-deferred
vehicles, such as a traditional
Individual Retirement Account
(IRA) and your 401(k) or similar
employer-sponsored retirement
plan, your money has the opportunity to grow faster than it would if
placed in an investment on which
you paid taxes each year. Of course,
when you start taking withdrawals,
presumably at retirement, you’ll
have to pay taxes, but by then, you
may be in a lower tax bracket. And
since you’ll have some control over
your withdrawals, you can help control taxes, too.
f you look hard enough, you can find • BUILD SHARE OWNERSHIP. As an
many obscure holidays, but few of
investor, one of the best things you
them can instantly capture people’s
can do to build your wealth is to
interest as much as Be a Millionaire Day,
increase the number of shares you
which is “celebrated” on May 20. While
own in your investments. So, look
amassing a million dollars may not be as
for buying opportunities, such as
significant a milestone as it used to be,
when prices are low. Also, consider
most of us would still feel pleased if we
reinvesting any dividends or districould someday attain “millionaire” stabutions you may receive from your
tus. While there are no perfect formulas
investments.
or guarantees, here are some steps to
consider when working toward any • DON’T BE OVERLY CAUTIOUS. For
your money to grow, you need to
investment goal:
put a portion of your investment
Put time on your side. The earlier
dollars in growth-oriented vehicles,
you begin saving and investing, the
such as stocks. It is certainly true
better your chances of reaching your
that stock prices will always fluctufinancial goal. You can’t expect to
ate, sometimes quite sharply, and
“strike it rich” immediately with any
you may receive more or less than
single investment, but by investing
your original investment when sold.
year in and year out, and by choosing
But if you avoid stocks entirely in
quality investment vehicles, you have
favor of more stable vehicles, you
the opportunity to achieve growth
run the risk of earning returns that
over time.
may not keep you ahead of infla• PAY YOURSELF FIRST. If you wait
tion. As you approach retirement,
until you “have a little extra money
and even during retirement, your
lying around” before you invest, you
portfolio will probably still need
may well never invest. Instead, try
some growth potential. Work with
to “pay yourself first.” Each month,
your financial advisor to determine
move some money automatically
the appropriate approach for you.
from a checking or savings account
I
into an investment. When you’re
first starting out in the working
world, you might not be able to
afford much, but as you advance in
your career, you can increase your
contributions.
• CONTROL YOUR DEBTS. It’s easier
said than done, but if you can keep
a lid on your debt payments, you’ll
have more money with which to
invest.
• THINK LONG TERM. By creating a
long-term investment strategy and
sticking to it, you’ll be less likely to
take a “timeout” from investing in
response to perceived negative
news, such as market downturns
and political crises.
Following these suggestions may
someday allow you to reach the point
when your financial goals become a
reality for you.
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may 1, 2012
H E A L T H
HEALTH MATTERS
Doris Harris,
Editor
Prevention Specialist
Caring Health
Center, Inc. Doris
can be contacted at
[email protected]
18th Annual Community
Baby Shower
Saturday, May 19, 2012
12:00PM-3:00PM
High School of Commerce
415 State Street
Springfield, MA 01105
FREE EVENT FOR
PREGNANT, PARENTING
WOMEN, MEN &
FAMILIES
ENTERTAINMENT,
REFRESHMENTS, RAFFLES
AND EDUCATIONAL
INFORMATION
his event is sponsored by the
Springfield Department of
Health and Human Services
Maternal Child Health Commission,
numerous local community health
agencies and businesses.
The mission of the Community
Baby Shower is to promote healthy
birth outcomes by providing important maternal child health educational
information to pregnant/parenting
women, partners and families in a fun
and interactive way. It is our belief
that family education and support
help to nurture and protect children
by strengthening the families who are
responsible for their care. It also
strengthens the community in which
they live.
The Department of Health and
Human Services partners with many
community based organizations. Our
collaboration allows us to educate and
inform families and the general public
about maternal child health issues and
also provides linkages between health
and other community family services.
The
Maternal
Child
Health
Commission is comprised of over 60
community health agencies along with
T
“CELEBRATING
FAMILIES”
major medical centers: Baystate
Health Systems, Baystate Medical
Center, Boston Medical Center
Healthnet Plan, Mercy Medical
Center and Mercy Women’s Health
Services. Listed are just a few of our
community partners: Thom Infant
Toddler Services, the Massachusetts
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty
to Children (MSPCC), Square One,
New North Citizen’s Council,
Springfield Women’s Infant and
Children(WIC) and the Mass.
Department of Public Health which
includes the Sudden Infant Death
Foundation (SIDS).
The Community Baby Shower as
an event has been sustained through
the Department of Health and
Human Services and through contributions
from
our
generous
Grandparent
Sponsors: Mercy
Medical Center,
Mercy Women’s
Health Services,
Partners for a
Healthier
C o m m u n i t y,
Baystate Health
S y s t e m s ,
Baystate Medical
Center, Boston
Medical Center
Healthnet Plan,
Health
New
England
and
Cherish Every
Child, an initiative of the Irene E. & George A. Davis
Foundation. The city of Springfield’s
Maternal Child Health Commission is
the only group in Springfield that provides this unique service. Each year we
host over 300 participants who are
able to gain valuable information and
services from at least 50 healthcare
and social service vendors. We also
provide nutritious refreshments and
raffle wonderful baby shower gifts that
are donated by our vendors and local
businesses.
This year’s baby shower will also
bring awareness to “Safe Sleep
Environments” for your baby. An
interactive harm reduction display will
provide alternatives to bed sharing
and co-sleeping. According to
Springfield’s infant death data in
2010, eight (8) babies died in unsafe
sleep environments or positions. The
2008 Massachusetts birth data records
2,458 births in Springfield with 27
infant deaths. The Infant Mortality
Rate that year was 11.0. The harm
reduction ABC’S of Safe Sleep are
ALONE, ON HIS BACK, IN HER
CRIB.
If you would like further information about this exciting event, please
contact Sandra Johnson RN at
(413)787-6739 or email [email protected]
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african american point of view
page eleven
may 1, 2012
Wishing All Moms
The Best From Day One
One of life’s most precious, amazing moments is the birth of your baby. That’s why our hospitals provide special, personalized care
with a range of birthing options, highly skilled experts, individualized nursing care, and comfortable, welcoming environments.
We want your experience to be the best possible, for all of you.
To learn more, sign up for our free Parent Care E-Letter customized for your week of pregnancy or baby’s age through age three,
at baystatehealth.org/babymail.
For a free tour of our birthing units or a referral to an experienced obstetrician or certified nurse-midwife on staff at Baystate Medical
Center or Baystate Franklin Medical Center, please call 1-800-377-4325.
B a y st a t e M e d i ca l C e n t e r
B a y st a t e Fra n k l i n M e d i ca l C e n t e r
b a y st a t e h e a l t h . o rg/birthing
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may 1, 2012
page twelve
H E A L T H
HEALTH MATTERS
Anika C. Johnson,
PhD (c), MPH, CLC
Hill Health Center
WIC Manager
-Your Health
Is My Wealth-
CLUB CLEAN
PLATE
By Anika Johnson
any times parents are dismayed when a child does not
eat all the food on his plate.
When we were children, many of us
may have heard, “You have to eat all
your food because there are starving
kids in other places.”
Thereafter a parent would
hover over said children to
ensure all food was consumed. As parents ourselves, we must realize
there are countless reasons
why children are not
members of the “Club
Clean Plate” or simply
may not want to eat.
Occasionally, kids
refusing to either eat or
eat a substantial amount of food
served to them could mean illness. Be
mindful that at the onset of some illnesses and during or after an illness, a
child’s appetite may shrink. For example, when a child has a cold he may ask
for more fluids rather than meals.
Keep in mind, besides water, mostly
all beverages have calories; if enough
fluid is consumed through drinks,
these calories can easily add up to the
same amount that could have come in
meals!
Another reason for our kids’ nonmembership in the club is that we
sometimes set kids up for failure.
There are times when we feel kids
could be hungry and they truly are
not. If illness is ruled out, it is very
important not to force a child to eat.
Also watch portion sizes. Research
shows the act of forcing a child to eat
large portions can alter a child’s
hunger gauge and could lead to
weight issues or simply eating…to
eat.
M
Also keep in mind that the small
things count. As discussed above,
drinks can have a substantial amount
of calories. Snack items too have the
same effect. For example, if dinner is
served in early evening and a child
simply refuses to eat, it may be a good
idea to consider other foods the child
had prior to mealtime. If a child had a
large cup of milk along with a late
afternoon snack of crackers or cookies,
it is no wonder mealtime can prove to
be difficult. Therefore it may be best
to limit snacks a hour or two before
meals.
Lastly, children may not want to
eat as a way to declare their independence even if they are hungry. They
may whine and cry for specialty items
like chicken nuggets or a burger.
Without the specialty items on their
plate, there will be a fight. Once again
if illness has been ruled out, parents
should be watchful not to regularly
give in to such demands. Adhering to
a well balanced diet daily based on the
food guide is important.
Dear Robust Reader,
s parents, it is our job to offer
foods to our children and it’s a
child’s job to decide if he wants to
eat the foods offered. Children need
food items introduced and then reintroduced many times before they
decide whether they like the food
item. Let “Club Clean Plate” be a
thing of the past, as our goal
should be aimed at proper nutrition.
Next month we will be discussing
another nutrition-related topic. Please
forward your thoughts, comments and
ideas, as they are important to me to:
[email protected] attention:
Anika
A
URBAN GARDENING
LET’S GET STARTED!
By Zaida Govan, MSW, LCSW
pring is here
and the gardening itch
has
gotten
to me.
Zaida Govan
My friend, Peter
Merzbacher, is my urban gardening
guru. He says “grow food anywhere”.
So with his help last year a community garden was started on Bay Street in
Springfield. A group of us got together and we said we want a garden.
Some of us knew nothing about gardening, like me. Others of us were
S
that we can have more community
gardens.
Community gardens have many
benefits including, of course, bringing
the community together and helping
people eat more vegetables. It is a scientific fact that people who participate
in community gardens eat more fresh
fruits and vegetables than people who
grow food in their own personal gardens and even more than those who
don’t have gardens at all.
For the health of our community
Community residents participate in ribbon cutting to celebrate the
opening of a community garden in front of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Family Services on Bay Street in Springfield (June, 2011 file photo)
pro’s at gardening. All of us had a plot and the people who live in it, I am
to garden and we grew, among other pleased to start this column and I
things, tomatoes, eggplant, onions, invite you to join me and many others
basil, even corn. It was amazing! The in our city in being a part of a commugarden is called the Bay Street nity garden. Maybe you want to start
Community Garden and is located at one in your neighborhood. Call me at
365 Bay Street.
413-301-2533 or email me at zeerIt is time to begin sowing our [email protected] Although I am not
seeds for this year‘s community gar- an expert, I know someone who is. I
den. This year we are inviting even hope to hear from you all soon. See
more members of the community to you next month or sooner at a comjoin us and share in our efforts to grow munity garden.
food
everywhere.
Community gardening is SPRINGFIELD PEDIATRICS, LLC
becoming a trend in our
Maria Ethel Evales, MD, FAAF
fair city of Springfield. By
the time this article
(413) 747-KIDS (413) 747-5437
appears, the Springfield
Fax: (413) 747-5433
Food Policy Council will
299 Carew Street, Suite 126
have presented and, hopeSpringfield, MA 01104
fully, had approved by the
City Council a community
N e w b o r n s t h r o u g h A g e Tw e n t y
gardening ordinance so
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african american point of view
may 1, 2012
COMMUNITY
COMMUNITY PERSPECTIVES
Rev. Talbert W.
Swan, II is Pastor
of The Spring Of
Hope Church Of
God In Christ
(This is Part 4 of a 4-part series that
began in the February 1st issue of
Point of View and concludes in this
issue. You can read Parts 1, 2 and 3 in
our online paper by going to our website at: www.afampointofview and
clicking on POV Archives.)
DEAR PIONEER VALLEY,
he election of Barack Obama
ushered in the silly term “postracial” and emboldened the
existing notions of “reverse racism”
and “playing the race card;” however,
they are all concepts that do not exist.
They are mythical ideas that should be
as painful to the mind’s ear as fingernails on the chalkboard are to the outer
T
‘REVERSE RACISM’ DOES NOT EXIST, THE ‘RACE
CARD’ IS NOT IN THE DECK AND ‘POST RACIAL
AMERICA’ HAS NOT BEEN BUILT YET
ear. Unfortunately, widespread use of
these terms seems to lend credence to
the idea that they are true. Therefore,
I suspect that I’ll be called a “racebaiter” across the Valley over and over
again and I will continue to be accused
of “playing the race card” each time I
take a stand against racial discrimination. I also suspect that the NAACP
will continue to be labeled as a “racist
organization” by those who either deny
history or subscribe to the fantasy of a
“post-racial” America.
Race is like weather — we only
talk about it when it’s extreme but it’s
always there. If we can convince ourselves that we live in a “post-racial”
era, race no longer matters; therefore,
we no longer need to think about race
or take the discussion of it seriously.
This way the concept becomes a shield
By Reverend Talbert W. Swan, II
against the uncomfortable but necessary discussion, which allows people to
say or think, “Why are they complaining about racism again?” This barrier
to honest and open dialogue is dangerous in a community where race and
racism still matter very much. A place
where black unemployment is far
higher than white unemployment,
where profiling and institutional
racism and white privilege and myriad
other forms of racism still shape so
much of life in the Pioneer Valley. If we
don’t discuss race then it’s allowed to
fester and grow unchecked like an
untreated malignant tumor. Race is an
issue every citizen must care about. It’s
not a black issue; it’s not a white issue;
it’s not a Puerto Rican issue; it’s everyone’s issue. It’s relevant and important
because we all live here together and
because the issue hurts everyone.
The concepts of “post-racial” and
“race card” and “reverse racism” have
run amok like gremlins across the
Valley, dissimulating race and making
discussions about it harder. Our community still has so much work to do
regarding race and racism and false
concepts are only making that work
harder to do. Only through being
aware of racial disparities and talking
about race can we have any chance of
forward movement. The notions of
“post-racial,” “playing the race card,”
and “reverse racism” are enemies of
communication, understanding and
progress. They only pervert and distort
the discussion of race and give people
who wish to disrupt the conversation a
place to park their ideas.
vitality of the region.
The regional approach of the program is also unique and has been quite
a learning experience for me. I have
slept in a convent, toured Holyoke on
a bus, and am part of a group who all
want to talk about a place called Gill.
We have had diverse trainers who have
shared their experience and expertise
in an open and safe environment
where questions are welcomed and
encouraged. I have gained new personal relationships and connections
that will last a lifetime. Working so
closely with a group of people over a
long period of time trying to address
and resolve some of the most pressing
concerns in the region is challenging.
However, being the given the tools
and the resources to create solutions
and ultimately presenting a sustainable solution relative to the Plan for
Progress by helping to “shape a successful and competitive 21st century
region” is creating a legacy.
I am not a skeptic anymore. I
firmly believe the LPV is a game
changer and will connect people who
are committed to positive social
change and equality for all regardless
of background or circumstances.
LEADERSHIP PIONEER VALLEY
REACHING BEYOND
y experie n c e
w i t h
Leadership
Pioneer
Valley
Lorenzo Gaines (LPV) has been
one of “reaching beyond” in many
senses of the word. When I first heard
of LPV, I was skeptical. What is this
endeavor about? What would I learn
from it and how could I apply the skills
gained to myself, my organization and
my community to become a better
leader?
This experience has opened my
eyes up to the values leaders must
demonstrate on a regular basis—
including model the way, inspire a
shared vision, and challenge the process. These are not new concepts to
me; however, the opportunity to
explore different leadership pedagogies
with others excited me. I believe that
better understanding yourself affords
you the opportunity to better understand others, ultimately making you a
more empathetic and effective leader.
I have learned that leadership is
M
By Lorenzo Gaines
an Art and not a Science. There are
many ways to lead and many different
types of leaders and leadership. Both
LPV and I firmly believe that you can
lead from anywhere. As Gandhi said,
“Be the change in the world that you
wish to see.”
I am enjoying being part of the
inaugural class of Leadership Pioneer
Valley and understand the high expectations many of the stakeholders have
in our success. Being a member of LPV
I have been inspired to meet other
individuals like myself who have made
the commitment and desire to be more
effective leaders. Some of the highlights of my experience include the collaborative nature of the program, the
diverse array of speakers and the wide
range of workshop topics. By working
together in large and small groups, we
hear a range of voices with different
experiences and perspectives, which
adds richness and has allowed us to get
to know each other better and on a
deeper level. This has fostered networks and relationships that can be
leveraged in the future to increase the
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may 1, 2012
page fourteen
COMMUNITY
CALL TO THE CAUSE
Kirk Smith is
President & CEO,
YMCA of
Greater Springfield
413-739-6951
www.springfieldy.org
he splashing and laughter
coming from the swimming
pool…The sizzling of the backyard grill…The happy squeals of kids
chasing down the ice cream
truck…Ahhh, the sounds of summer!
In a few short weeks, we’ll be hearing
lots of them.
We all know that summer is
meant to be a carefree time, but hidden behind the smiles and fun is a
looming issue that for too many kids
goes unnoticed until the damage is
done. I’m talking about summer
learning loss.
Think about the feeling you get
T
LIVE AND LEARN ALL SUMMER LONG
when you make a trip to the gym after
taking a hiatus from exercise for a
while. Your muscles feel weak, you
struggle to breathe and you feel somewhat defeated. Now, imagine returning to the classroom when your brain
has been on hiatus for two months.
Think about the challenge this presents to our students, parents and educators, who now have to re-learn and
re-teach much of what was already
taught during the prior school year.
On average, students lose approximately 2.6 months of grade-level
learning equivalency in math skills
during the summer months. It’s worse
for students living in low-income communities, who also experience a loss of
more than two months of reading
achievement. Couple these statistics
with our region’s disparaging educa-
By Kirk Smith
tion standings and Springfield’s 47
percent graduation rate, and we have a
real problem on our hands.
So, what can we do?
As the father of three boys, I
appreciate what summer break means
to kids and their families. I’m not suggesting that our kids attend school
year round. What I am suggesting is
that we encourage families to enroll
their students in summer enrichment
programs. The same research that
points to the loss of learning during
the summer months, also demonstrates marked gains in cognitive and
effective achievement for students
when they participate in learning outside the classroom through enrichment programs. High-quality summer
learning opportunities, such as camp,
keep students engaged in learning,
teach new skills, foster creativity and
positively impact their self-esteem and
confidence. Add to the mix that these
programs keep kids physically active
in a safe, playful environment with
kids their own age and you have a perfect summer break. And, students
return to school in the fall ready to
continue their studies.
As the school year begins to wrap
up, think about registering your child
for a summer enrichment program. It
could be the best thing you do for
their education. Even better – consider sponsoring a child who could benefit from summer enrichment but doesn’t have the means to pay for it.
Answer the call to the cause – our kids
are depending on you!
[email protected] GROOVE
Magdalena Gómez is
the Co-founder and
Artistic Director of
Springfield’s first and
only [email protected] theater,
Teatro V!da. Ms.
Gómez has been a
teaching artist for
over 35 years.
“GREEN THE
GHETTO”
By Magdalena Gómez
n March 23rd, I had the honor
of attending the Bay Path
College
Leading
with
Compassion conference. The event featured keynote speakers, Sister Helen
Prejean, Ms. Ashley Judd and Ms.
Majora Carter. There were 1,500 people in attendance, mostly women.
The opportunity to hear ecoentrepreneur, Majora Carter, who had
been my theater student at the East
Harlem Music School when she was a
teen, and is now on the advisory board
of Teatro V!da, was inspirational
beyond words.
Majora, who coined the term,
“Green the Ghetto,” is one of the most
prominent and world renowned activators in the sustainability movement
O
worldwide. Born in the South Bronx,
Majora chose a path for her life that
brought her back home after getting
her Master‘s from New York
University. From 2001-2008, Majora
was the Executive Director of
Sustainable South Bronx. A visionary
of passion and relentless commitment,
Majora turned a $10,000 seed grant
into $3.5 million dollars and according
to her bio, “pioneered green-collar job
training and placement systems in one
of the most environmentally and economically challenged parts of the U.S.”
A MacArthur Genius Award recipient,
she is now president of her own economic consulting firm, the Majora
Carter Group, LLC. Please look her
up—you will be inspired by how one
person was and can be the catalyst of a
major movement from impossible to
possible.
As a result of meeting at the conference, Majora is now in dialogue with
Ms. Sarah Page, Associate Executive
Director of HAP Housing, regarding
the possibility of getting on board as a
consultant for the rebuilding of posttornado Springfield. A collaboration
with Majora Carter would be a great
boon to Springfield. When I said to
Majora, “You would transform
Springfield into the jewel of New
England,” her response was,
“Magdalena, you know that what I
would do is provide the tools so that all
of you can make it happen—it isn’t
about me. Springfield will make it
happen.”
Several areas in Massachusetts
recently received the coveted Cultural
District
designation:
Boston,
Pittsfield, Gloucester, Lynn and
Rockport. Why not Springfield? We
can become a cultural and green
mecca—there are plenty of visionaries
living in Springfield and the region,
our assets are many and Majora’s
expertise would be another profoundly
effective tool with which to rebuild.
I grew up in the South Bronx
when it was the arson and homicide
capital of the U.S. My playgrounds,
like Majora’s, were building rubble
and discarded mattresses. We had to
ride trains to see beautiful green
spaces. Now there are beautiful parks,
Magdalena Gómez
and Majora Carter
gardens, and green spaces where children can go to imagine greater possibilities for their lives. Springfield, with
so many beautiful parks and assets
already, has a jump start. Let’s make
Springfield into the Jewel of New
England it is ready to become and has
been for a long time.
For information about Majora
Carter’s
vision,
visit:
www.majoracartergroup.com
Specializing in Siding,
Repairs on siding,
Insulation, Windows,
Roofing, Drywall, Flooring,
Painting and much more!
We will save you money in the cost of having your home
sided. Compare our prices with our competitors.
You will see that our prices are the lowest.
413-273-4022
Call Today, Do Not Delay.
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may 1, 2012
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african american point of view
PROFESSIONAL SERV I C E S
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Bridesmaid-orders of 5 or more, hems are free!
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Social occasions
Tuxedo Rental
We specialize in Plus and Petite sizes
"Personal service is our style"
Always a sale on in stock samples
Hair Care Center
“Where Beauty is in Motion”
120 Boston Road
Springfield, MA
(413) 731-7001
Tuesdays - Saturdays
9:30am - 9:30pm
BEAUTIFUL BROWN WEDNESDAYS
Give yourself a BLAST of Color
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Office: (413) 886-0010 Fax: (413) 886-0011
925 Carew Street, Springfield, MA 01104
[email protected]
X-BANKERS, Inc.
Bridgeport, CT Locations
875 East Main Street
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Other CT Locations
31 Church Street, New Haven
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may 1, 2012
page sixteen
COMMUNITY FOCUS
“PURPOSED FOR PERFECTION” DEBUTING MAY 19th
t. John’s Congregational Church is
pleased to announce its 2012 Anna
E. Hatchett Christian Debutantes
& Gentlemen’s Cotillion. The Cotillion
will be held on May 19th at the
Springfield Sheraton, beginning at 6:00
p.m. The theme for this year’s event is
“Purposed for Perfection,” which reflects
our vision for a promising group of
Debutantes and Gentlemen participants.
The St. John’s Anna E. Hatchett
Cotillion is designed to guide youth
participants over a yearlong journey to
young adulthood. The “Debs” and
“Gents,” as we refer to them, begin by
completing a thorough application
inclusive of high school transcripts, recommendations, and resumes. This
helps ensure participant commitment
to the rigorous course of lectures and
workshops to follow. Students are
informed on a variety of subjects, such
as personal image, health and wellness,
and cultural awareness. They are further schooled in proper social etiquette
around formal dining, public engage-
S
By Trevis Wray
ment, and public speaking. College engage in the
preparedness is a highlight, involving process and a
instruction in college admissions inter- commitment to
viewing, college writing, and on site see it through.
The need
college tours. Participants further
for
a
modern day
engage in community leadership and
volunteerism and receive lectures on cotillion remains
faith and Christianity to round out quite clear. There
are
harmful
their journey.
Cotillions started as exclusive, social elements
upper-class European affairs, rooted in that young peoFrench culture as evidenced by the ple need to be
word “cotillion.” They were comfort- mindful of and
Participants of the 2012 Anna E. Hatchett
ably adopted into African American shielded from.
Christian
Debutantes & Gentlemen’s Cotillion
“high society” and maintained exclu- For instance, in
sivity as a means for socially elite Springfield we have witnessed our his- quency. For this St. John’s cotillion
African Americans to create tight knit torically warm and inviting “City of undertaking, there is no better time
networks for the protection and Homes” experience some of the most than the present.
We look forward to May 19th and
advancement of their offspring. This significant declines in quality of life in
was acceptable, considering the chal- recent history. A disproportionate per- hope you are able to join us at the
lenges for African Americans in cli- centage of our young people of color Springfield Sheraton for a wonderfully
elegant evening, showcasing our young
mates of intense racial hostility. In are experiencing unprecedented levels
people as they make their debuts as
modern-day communities of color, the of at-risk involvement: teen pregnancy,
young adults through the Anna E.
cotillion has evolved to become a rite of STDs, truancy, high school drop-outs,
Hatchett Christian Debutantes &
passage for participants from all social disparate on-time four year graduation
Gentlemen’s Cotillion.
classes. Participants need only a will to rates, gang activity, and general delin-
TERRELL HILL ’92
Principal of High School, Inc.
Avid gardener
We are
Westfield.
We are explorers and scholars, builders and innovators, artists and athletes,
dream seekers and care takers. We are a community of possibilities — onsite,
online and in touch.
P R I VAT E Q U A L I T Y. P U B L I C VA L U E .
WeAreWestfield.com
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may 1, 2012
page seventeen
E D U C A T I O N
EDUCATION & HOPE
Gianna Allentuck is
an Adjustment
Counselor at Elias
Brookings School,
Volunteer, Wife and
Mother. For questions
or comments on uniting
in hope, call (703)
930-0243
n March at Elias Brookings
Elementary School, we celebrated the
power of reading with a Reading
Rocks! Celebration, wherein I assumed
the identity of an 80’s Rock Star and
chatted with every classroom regarding
the benefits of reading. I donned a crazy,
spiky purple wig and fishnet gloves and
zebra-striped pants with a white t-shirt
adorned with silver stars and Reading
Rocks! logo. For their participation in the
celebration, the children each were given
his/her own set of Reading Rock Star
glasses.
There were lots of giggles and “so
cools” from all, but everyone was strictly business when we started our discussions around reading. From Pre-K to
5th grade, we conversed on why reading rocks. We asked: What is your
favorite book? Why do you like to
read? Who are your favorite characters? Why is reading important?
Answers ranged from 2nd Grader
I
READING ROCKS!
By Gianna Allentuck
Rudy, who noted that “reading is
important because if you are lost in a
car somewhere with your dad and you
don’t know where you are going, you
can read a map.” Or, Jessica, who
offered that “reading let’s me visit faraway places.” Some of our 5th graders
had college on their mind and stated
“reading will help me get into College.”
Another student mentioned a love of
animals and wanting to be an “animal
doctor” so she likes reading books
about turtles. From pee-wee to preteen, these children were excited and
engaged—reaching their hands to the
sky to be chosen to share his/her
thoughts on reading.
To support the reading discussions, we had a table displaying several
different levels and genres of books.
These books sat next to a bucket of
bright, shiny, colorful Rock Star glasses. Interestingly, though the children
were excited by the glasses, they were
more enthusiastic by the prospect of
taking home a book. And though we
were in the Gym where the children
run and play in learning games and
activities, for this time in the Gym,
JUDEO-ISLAMIC RELATIONS: WOMEN’S
CONTRIBUTIONS TO LOVE AND PEACE
these children were most
eager to hear a book read
to them. To laugh and be
silly and get lost in the
story.
No little eyes darting
Reading Rocks! Celebration at Elias
around for the Gym
Brookings Elementary School
Teacher or cues for a new
activity. Just focused eyes waiting for a life. Families divided. Jobs unavailable.
chance to share with and learn from Food limited. Streets unsafe. No coneach other about Dinosaurs, Diaries of trol. What they do have control over,
Wimpy Kids, Loraxes, and Magic Tree however, is their desire to learn. The
Houses…The recall of funny charac- choice to read. To be a Rock Star.
Author’s Note: There are 350
ters, sad situations, and unsolved mysstudents
ages 3 to 11 at Brookings. We
teries was impressive and demonstrative of these children’s desire and abili- would love to collect enough books
ty to learn. To soak up what we give from the community to send one home
them. From books to newspaper comic with each student for the Summer. If
strips to the back of cereal boxes to site you have gently used or new books you
word flashcards, what we provide is would like to donate to Brookings for
what they seek. Words. Knowledge. this goal, please call Gianna at
703.930.0243 or 413.787.7390 to
Power.
Many of our children have little to arrange a drop off. Thank you and
no control over any aspect of his/her rock on…!
THE SMART
CAREER MOVE
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you started on the path toward a
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Iranian Nobel Peace Prize winner, Dr. Shirin Ebadi (center), received
an honorary Doctoral degree from Westfield State University during
an event entitled Judeo-Islamic Relations: Women’s Contributions
to Love and Peace. From left: Waleska Dejesus, Westfield State
University President, Dr. Evan Dobel, Kaveh Khala, Dr Shuba
Sharad Rajgopal, Dr. Kamal Ali, Dr. Shirin Ebadi, Amadou Talla,
Lawana Hood, Elise Young and Galeet Dardashti who sang a PersianJewish version of a song for peace at the event.
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may 1, 2012
Around Town & . . .
Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Services Black College Tour
students and chaperones
The Carl Walker-Hoover Foundation Scholarship Committee and
Recipients. From left: Senga Fulton, Founder Gwynnetta J. Sneed,
Recipients Carrie-Ann C. White, Lawanda S. Ross, Rushawn A.
Walters Michael K. Ames, Monica E. Czausz, Tess G. Domb Sadof,
Patricia Johnson-Housey, Melanie N. Gomes, Dominic J. MondonPoirier, Jessica Fournier, Brianna Carter, Raul Centeno Pedraza,
Brianna Hartford, Sirdeaner Walker, mother of Carl Walker-Hoover,
Recipients Bianca Couture and Corey Allen Rapa, Regina Jeames,
Nick Sneed and Eileen Kirk.
MA and CT Cosmetologists at the Dudley Beauty Products training
held recently at the Springfield Sheraton as part of the company’s
anniversary celebration
Western Mass. Black Nurses at their Annual Scholarship Brunch
The Springfield Dept. of Health and Human Services held its Public
Health Month Kick-Off on April 2. From left: Magda Rodriguez,
Mable Sharif, Award Recipients Johnetta Renee Baymon and
Jeanette Rodriguez; Deputy Director Bettye Anderson-Frederic,
Keynote Speaker Gamaria Amtul-Wadud, Commissioner Helen
Caulton-Harris, School Committee Member and Public Health
Month Kick-Off Event Chairman Barbara Gresham and Rev. Rosa
Lopez
Dr. Carolyn L. Bledsoe, Regional Vice President of the Association
of Ministers Wives and Ministers Widows recognizes MA Chapter
President Ambrozine Snowden, First Lady of Progressive
Community Baptist Church, at the annual Northeast Regional
Conference held at the Springfield Marriot
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may 1, 2012
. . .In The Community
Bishop Bryant Robinson, Jr., Pastor of Macedonia COGIC and
Prelate of the Greater Mass. Jurisdiction (left) with Bishop P.A.
Brooks, First Assistant Presiding Bishop of the COGIC at the
Annual Spring Conference of the Greater Massachusetts
Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction of the COGIC
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art featured the exhibit
opening and book signing of “We Are The Ship: The Story of Negro
League Baseball“ by Kadir Nelson and “Testing the Ice“ by Sharon
Robinson. From left: Kari Njiiri, Dr. Ruth Njiiri, Sharon Robinson,
daughter of Hall of Fame baseball player Jackie Robinson, author
and artist Kadir Nelson, and Rachel Robinson, wife of the late
Jackie Robinson
St. John’s Congregational Church‘s pastor Rev. Dr. Calvin J.
McFadden and first family with national recording artist Vanessa
Bell Armstrong (center) after Easter Sunday Resurrection service
held at the MassMutual Center
The Springfield Symphony Orchestra, Baystate Health and Stone
Soul Festival honored several individuals at a pre-concert reception.
From left: Steven Bradley and Suzanne Hendery, Baystate Health;
Joyce Davis and Jay Griffin, Stone Soul Festival; Awardees Cynthia
Scott-Mitchell, Frank Robinson and Bettye Anderson Frederic, and
Springfield Symphony Executive Director Michael Jones
Contestants in the 4th Annual Sen. Edward Brooke III Oratorical
Scholarship Competition are pictured with Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity, Inc. Theta Iota Lambda Chapter members
Joe C. Long, Jr. owner of Fabulous Cuts Barbershop recently held a
grand opening of his second location at 373 Worthington Street in
Springfield. From left: Joe C. Long Sr., Richia Barklow, Lynn Orr,
Sydney Barklow, Lynise Barklow, Joe C. Long Jr. and wife Yvette
Long with son Jalen, Kamari Long, son Jordan, Rev. Dr. Brett
Snowden and First Lady Ambrozine Snowden
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may 1, 2012
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SPRINGFIELD NATIVE DR. STANLEY F. BATTLE TO ADDRESS BETA
SIGMA BOULÉ’S W.E.B. DU BOIS PUBLIC POLICY SERIES
ADDRESS
TO COVER GROUND-BREAKING WORK WITH COMEDIAN
interim president of Southern
Connecticut State University, will
deliver a public policy address on education and literacy.
Dr. Battle’s topic, “Educating
Our Children – Do We Really Care?”
reflects the urgent need to establish
break-through programs, particularly
in reading development, to enhance
learning skills among school children.
His collaboration with comedian Bill
Cosby on efforts to bridge the achievement gap through a range of educational initiatives has received national
attention. One literacy initiative in
particular will target third and fourth
Dr. Stanley Battle
graders by leveraging a new line of
pringfield, MA – Beta Sigma Cosby books of the “Little Bill” series.
Boulé of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity
Prior to serving as interim presiwill host its 2012 W.E.B. Du Bois dent at Southern Connecticut State
Public Policy Series on Thursday, May University, Dr. Battle was president of
10, at 5:30 p.m. at The Community North Carolina Agricultural and
Music School of Springfield, located at Technical State University in
127 State Street in downtown Greensboro (2007-2009) and Coppin
Springfield. Dr. Stanley F. Battle, a State University in Baltimore (2003Springfield native and immediate past 2007). His previous administrative
S
BILL COSBY
TO CLOSE ACHIEVEMENT GAP
positions also include vice chancellor
for academic and multicultural affairs
at the University of WisconsinMilwaukee and associate vice president of academic affairs at Eastern
Connecticut State University. Earlier
in his career, Dr. Battle was a member
of the faculty at the University of
Connecticut, Boston University, and
the University of Minnesota. This fall,
he will begin his appointment as professor of sociology and social work at
Central Connecticut State University.
“The W.E.B. Du Bois Public
Policy Series is all about elevating the
relevancy of Du Bois’ work across
many social areas, including education, where there is a significant
achievement gap in urban, lowincome communities,” said Willie
Hill, Sire Archon of Beta Sigma Boulé.
“We are especially delighted to have
such a noted and accomplished scholar
as Dr. Battle come share more about
his platform for addressing educational disparities.”
Balise Lexus is a major sponsor of
the 2012 W.E.B. Du Bois Public
Policy Series. “We are thrilled to have
Balise Lexus involved with Beta Sigma
Boulé,” said Michael D. Balise, vice
president of Balise Motor Sales. “At
Balise, we strive for excellence at every
level of our dealerships. Our commitments to education and to the communities we live in closely mirror
those of the Boulé. At Balise, we provide quality cars and exceptional service at great prices. We believe the
Boulé is exceptional as well.”
Tickets to the W.E.B. Du Bois
Public Policy Series are $100 each and
may be purchased by contacting Vince
Jackson (972-489-7191) or any other
member of Beta Sigma Boulé.
Proceeds from the event benefit the
Boulé Scholars Program and the annual Howard L. Edmonds Academic
Scholarship—a four-year scholarship
award to a local high school student in
the Greater Springfield area.
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african american point of view
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may 1, 2012
“Scenes and Songs from ‘Fannie Lou’”
The full cast and crew
oint of View has proudly followed free-lance
journalist Felicia Hunter since our article on
her in June, 2010 in her efforts to fund and
bring to the off-Broadway stage her original work, a
musical about the late, grassroots activist Fannie Lou
Hamer. Along her way to Broadway, Felicia presented a concert presentation of selected dialogue and
musical numbers from the show in Stamford, CT in
P
Local Voting-Rights Resistance Leaders are
played by Robert Rice, Josh Rothberg and
Paul Fraccalvieri
Local civil rights leaders were portrayed by, from left: Lucinda Carr,
Tiffani Coleman, Chris Gwynn, Cheri Hunter, Vincent Filliatre,
Brittane Rowe and Victor Arnez
October, 2011. Needless to say, we were excited
when we learned of the New York premiere which
took place March 24, 2012, at the mid-town
Producers Club, located at 358 W. 44th Street.
The opening matinee was sold out. The staged
reading consisted of selected dialogue and music
from the upcoming “Fannie Lou,” an original play
inspired by the life of voting rights activist Fannie
Lou Hamer, which will be presented in full this fall.
“Scenes and Songs from ‘Fannie Lou’” performers
consisted of more than a dozen actors and singers;
several parts were double cast and some actors
played more than one role.
For ticket and other information about the
upcoming fall production of “Fannie Lou,” please
email [email protected]
Tiffani Coleman as Fannie Lou and Brittane
Rowe as Laura share a light moment
Diane Parker as Fannie Lou and Paul
Fraccalvieri as The Reporter debate the merits
of fighting for the vote
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CONNECTICUT BITS
BRIDGEPORT MAYOR FINCH CELEBRATES MRS. which would have put him in line to become a New London, CT firefighter. The
report called for the termination of the fire school recruitment coordinator William
NETTIE YOUNG’S MILESTONE BIRTHDAY
riends and relatives gathered at
Walters A.M.E. Zion Social Hall
at 12 Gregory Street, on April 21 to
celebrate with Mrs. Nettie Young as
she marked her 100 birthday. Mayor
Bill Finch, at left, with Mrs. Young,
and the Rev. Carl McCluster, read a
proclamation in her honor and
brought good wishes on behalf of the
City of Bridgeport.
F
DeFord and others and was accompanied by a demand that Mayo be hired by the
New London fire department, which has so far not responded.
DOWNTOWN BRIDGEPORT’S
DEVELOPMENT MOVES ON
ayor Bill Finch announced that the city has chosen three developers to move
forward the planned Downtown North Village District project, a six-acre
parcel spanning six city blocks. The developers include Spinnaker Real Estate
Partners, Navarino Capital Management, and Schipper & Co. USA. The proposals include mixed-use, residential and commercial development on the parcels
they will acquire. “All three of the developers which we’ve chosen have proposed
L’AMBIANCE PLAZA DISASTER RECALLED
unique and exciting projects that will bring more people to downtown to live,
ity, state and federal dignitaries, union leaders, family members and the pubwork and visit,” said Mayor Finch. “This marks the beginning of a new chapter
lic gathered in Bridgeport on Monday, April 23 to recall the day 25 years ago
that the partially constructed L’Ambiance Plaza building collapsed, killing 28 in downtown development.” The amazing revitalization of downtown
construction workers and injuring many others. The L’Ambiance Plaza tragedy Bridgeport continues!
attracted international attention and is considered one of the state’s most tragic
RECREATION FOR DOWNTOWN
construction accidents. The apartment complex was being built with the “lift-slab”
BRIDGEPORT’S WATERFRONT
construction method, in which concrete floor slabs were poured on the ground and
ayor Bill Finch announced that the city of Bridgeport will be partnering with
raised into position. Following the accident, and subsequent investigation, lift-slab
Connecticut Community Boating (CCB) to bring boating, sailing, kayaking
construction fell out of favor and has not been used since.
and other outdoor activities to Downtown Bridgeport’s waterfront. The city has
NAACP INVESTIGATION OF CONNECTICUT
granted CCB permission to open a gate into the dock that sits below the
FIRE ACADEMY SHOWS RACISM
Bridgeport Train Station at 1 Stratford Avenue. “Today’s announcement is anothew London State Representative Ernest Hewitt and Scott Esdaile, president er victory in our city’s waterfront recapture initiative. We are already making great
of the Connecticut NAACP announced the findings of its investigation of the progress on this front with the opening of a waterfront park on Knowlton Street,
state fire academy that pulled Black fire recruit Alfred Mayo from the academy and the reconstruction of the dock and procurement of vessels to bring the people
days before he was to graduate after he had scored 90% on his certification exam, of Bridgeport back to Pleasure Beach,” said Mayor Finch.
M
C
M
N
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may 1, 2012
LIVING
LIFE’S CHALLENGES
Dr. Sweets S. Wilson
is a Christian life purpose coach, motivational speaker and CEO
of Inspire ME,
LLC. [email protected]
gmail.com or
860-869-8067
FROM HARTFORD,
CONNECTICUT
OVERCOMING
SHAME
By Dr. Sweets S. Wilson
hame is a feeling we get when
something brings censure or
reproach. Most people experience
it. Shame is universal. None of us
measure up to the countless standards
of perfection that exist. When we do
not measure up to a standard that is
important to us, we feel a painful
emotion caused by consciousness of
guilt or a condition of humiliating disgrace; we feel shame.
Guilt is a bad feeling we experience when we do something wrong.
While guilt can be dealt with quickly
and easily, we seem to get stuck with
our shame since it is perceived to be
who we are. Though that perception
may be inaccurate, there is no way out
until we choose to change our beliefs
about self.
Even though we attempt to hide
our feelings of shame, we usually
believe that others can see through our
façade and into our defectiveness.
Shame leads to hopelessness, thoughts
that no matter what we do we cannot
measure up. We tend to isolate ourselves and become lonely. We feel
alone with our shame, cut off from
others. What is worse is that we may
say, “I can’t stand hearing how bad I
am,” or “I’m afraid to tell you about
S
my shame because if I do, you will
think I’m bad and I can’t stand hearing how bad I am.” So not only do we
keep it to ourselves, we often block it
out or pretend it’s not there.
One of the ways some people
cope is to act out roles that disguise
their shame; it serves a useful purpose
of protecting their ego or pride. It may
even help them to save face. These
pretenses act as a defense against the
feelings of shame. But even though
they may think they are skillfully
defending themselves against the
shame, it can be seen by others when
they hang their head, slump down,
avoid eye contact or apologize for having needs and desires. Those with
shame may occasionally feel nauseous,
cold, withdrawn and at times alienated. But no matter how well we may
defend ourselves against it, the shame
will not go away, unless we learn what
it is, confront the source and choose to
dismantle it.
Our shame seems to come from
what we do with the negative messages and affirmations, beliefs and
rules that we heard as we grew up. We
hear these from our parents,
guardians, older relatives or other people in authority, such as teachers and
coaches. Even friends may put us
down and cause us to have feelings of
inadequacy. These messages basically
tell us that we are somehow defective
or unworthy, that we are not acceptable. But the fact is, we are all worthy.
God created us to be worthy. You have
control over what you believe and
what you think about. You do not
have to feel shame; it is your choice,
shame or no shame.
INSPIRATIONAL THOUGHTS . . .
Willette H.
Johnson a
Retired
Springfield
Public Schools
Educator
AN
INFLUENTIAL
BODY
By Willette Johnson
or the past few months, I have
taken a hankering to watching
Dr. Oz. For those of you who
don’t know him, he’s a television medical doctor who Oprah Winfrey
launched into fame during her reign as
queen of talk show hosts. Since doing
anything for twenty-one days makes it
a habit, I suppose I’m a habitual viewer. I like his program because his daily
topics focus on self-help ideas. How to
lose weight, improve your diet, exercise for more energy, or how to enjoy
your life by staying in the moment
were probably subjects broached during his hour-long program. So much
of what he highlights centers around
getting people in tune to their bodies
and allowing their bodies to influence
what they do.
During the month of May, while
nature is in full bloom in New
England, we can’t help but think
about how this time of year affects
decisions about our appearances. Even
though our winter was relatively mild
(Thank God), we still experienced a
season of clothing coverings that concealed our bodies and allowed us to
freely travel throughout the community without exposure to public scrutiny or adverse stares. These days, the
nail salons and spas are crowded with
F
Check us out online at:
www.afampointofview.com
people seeking mannies, peddies,
facial waxings, and massages declaring
that their bodily appearances are influencing decisions they make.
Hair is another area of the body
that claims a major influence on decisions we make. I attended a forum on
a college campus some weeks ago
where young collegiates were discussing the topic “How your hair
speaks to you.” The forum participants were African American females
and males who expressed opinions
about why hair commands so much
attention within our culture. I listened
as these young scholars delved into an
arena of endless public opinion. The
conversations included soft expressions
of personal favorites and “what works
for me” to vehement disdain for what
others do with and to their hair and
why they should or shouldn’t. Some
concluded that even though they may
prefer a certain hair style, they are
acutely aware of the impact, negative
or positive, that a hair decision could
have on their overall appearance, their
frame of mind, and how others receive
them. Their youthful exuberance fascinated me, but I had to admit to
myself and to them that this particular
topic is truly a rerun. My contemporaries and I used to have these same
conversations over thirty years ago.
Nothing was resolved then, either.
An influential body could have
great controls over who we are and
become. When individuals can’t find a
place of acceptance about their
appearance, they will continue to fret
about what changes they should make
to fix what’s broken. Spending money,
precious time, and energy listening to
our bodies can be beneficial. I believe
self- improvement is always in order.
Being the best we can be is a lifelong
strategy. I caution all who allow your
body to influence your decisions not to
limit your actions to cosmetic
demands, but include those annual
check-ups and health issues that regularly need our attention. Condition
your brain to address what’s vital to
overall healthful living. Never forget
that it is, and will always be, mind
over matter.
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E D I T O R I A L
Frederick A . Hurst
MY POINT
OF VIEW
FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK
he first thing that came to my
mind when reading that the
Greater Springfield Council of
Churches (“Council”) had decided to
oppose a casino in Springfield and
other places in Western Massachusetts
just after Springfield Mayor Domenic
Sarno came out publicly in support of
one was, “How strange!”
I wondered where this religious
powerhouse had been for the last
decade when local promoters were
relentlessly pushing for a Palmer casino up to the point of securing the land,
winning local approval, gaining the
partnership of a Connecticut Indian
tribe that is operating a well-used casino in Uncasville which is well attended
by Springfield residents (some of
whom travel there by church-sponsored bus trips). And where was it
when these same folks were actively
petitioning our legislature for a law
legalizing casinos that finally passed
last year under the stewardship of a
pro-casino House Speaker, whose anticasino predecessor landed out of office
and in jail for what some will always
believe was that he ran afoul of the
powerful casino interests?
Where was the Council of
Churches when the final vote was
taken on legislation that guaranteed
Massachusetts will have at least three
casinos, one of which was clearly being
planned for Western Massachusetts?
Where was it when the Holyoke casino proposal was under active consideration, and the Brimfield proposal?
Where was it when the private casino
developer was buying up acres of
vacant land on Page Boulevard and
boldly publicizing its intent to bring
the Western Massachusetts casino to
Springfield? What specifically did the
Council of Churches find in Mayor
Sarno’s public commitment to fight for
a casino for the city he leads? What did
he say that woke up the Council of
Churches from what can only generously be labeled its Rip Van Winklelike “moral slumber on the issue of
casinos?”
T
GO, MAYOR SARNO!
By Frederick A. Hurst
Generously put, for most of us,
the Council’s protests rung hollow!
There is no nice way to say it! “The dye
has been cast.” “The horse left the barn
long ago!” The race for casinos has
been run and won! “Game over!”
Including the celebration! So, what is
the point? As every person extant in
town knows, the only immediate relevant issue is where a casino will be
located in Western Massachusetts.
And the most immediate relevant
question for each community in
Western Massachusetts, including
Springfield, is which casino location
will benefit it the most? So, if the
Council of Churches wishes to become
a relevant and credible player in the
casino debate that is the question it
must address because that is the primary question it has left itself to
address.
And, it is the one question that
Springfield’s top elected official cannot
responsibly avoid. Is it better for
Springfield for a casino to locate in
Springfield or is it better for
Springfield for a casino to be located
outside of Springfield? The mayor
seems to think a Springfield location is
best as do some major investors who
are already financially committed.
What does the Council of Churches
think and why? We would all be interested in some clarity on that issue.
The Council’s protest cannot fairly be labeled an “Ann Gear moment”
as was suggested by its spokesperson. I
knew Ann Gear. She was a personal
friend and a warrior who fought tirelessly to prevent casinos in
Massachusetts and in the Springfield
area in particular. And she paid dearly
for her convictions. What stands out is
that Ann Gear went all-in from the
beginning of the fight and won what
she saw as her moral battle. There are
people among the status quo who
never forgave Ann for her bold and
successful efforts and who, thereafter,
froze her out of their circles of power.
But whether you agreed with her or
not, you had to agree that her motives
were clear and pure, her battle plans
timely and transparent, and her moral
authority uncompromised.
I cannot say the same about Ann
Gear’s successors. It is arguable, as
Ann believed and as, I’m sure, current
Council of Churches’ members also do,
that God may disapprove of casinos.
But it is hilarious to suggest that He
might want His moral battle waged
over such clearly political and relatively unholy trivia as location—that He
would prefer Page Boulevard in
Springfield or Interstate 91 in Palmer,
or the woods of Brimfield or a golf
course in Holyoke or anywhere else. To
think that God would embrace such
distinctions in a moral context is utter
nonsense. These are the petty issues to
be decided among men and women in
the political and economic arenas,
although God might be as puzzled as
we mortals by the Council’s cloudy
reasoning. As my grandmother use to
say about cloudy arguments,
“Somethin’ ain’t right.”
The lobbying by Western
Massachusetts interests for casino support, which has been taking place long
before passage of the casino bill, has
been as thorough as it has been subterranean. Commitments have been made
and given. Put in old fashion political
terms, folks and groups have made
deals. For whatever price we will never
know because that’s not how the system works. But what we do know is
that many deals were made before
Mayor Sarno’s announcement. And
some people and groups are caught
“out there.” We would hope that the
Council of Churches is not among
them.
Most of us are pleased that old
fashioned American competition is
shining some light on what had
heretofore been too close to a
monopoly. We don’t yet know what
site is the best site for a casino in
Western Massachusetts. But it is reassuring to know that the mayor of
Springfield will compete as vigorously
for Springfield as the elected officials in
Palmer will compete for Palmer, just as
we hope those elected officials in other
towns that emerge as potential sites
will do.
And may the best team win!
That’s the age old value of honest
competition, which, whether you are
pro- or anti-casino, is the best we can
all hope for.
Go, Mayor!
LETTERS TO THE PUBLISHER
W
hat an excellent issue—Point of View’s (March 15, 2012) “Diversity
Matters”! The articles and pictures truly carried that spirit. I was especially impressed with the beautifully written article by St. John’s Congregational
Church’s Senior Pastor, Reverend Dr. Calvin J. McFadden, Sr. (“Can’t We All Just
Get Along?”) . . .
Sincerely,
Paula Gallup
W
e so appreciate you recognizing Anaia’s accomplishments on the front page
of the POV! (April 1, 2012, Springfield Public School Students “Light Up
The Stage”)
God Bless you and she thanks you for the support.
Love you,
Anne Dixson
Letters to the Publisher and other content MUST be sent
electronically to: [email protected]
(Please reference a subject matter or e-mail is automatically deleted.)
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O P - E D
A TALE OF TWO CITIES
By Brenda Douglas
Lennie Brown
s I attended the 1,000 Hoodies
Walk on March 31st in support
of Trayvon Martin and looked
around, I couldn’t help but think that
while it was very organized, peaceful,
and well attended, I would have liked
to have seen many more participants
and more support from our community leaders. This is what compelled me
to want to publicly share my story and
express to others in this area, especially on the heels of the recent, significant case of a police officer being convicted of severely beating a citizen
during an arrest in Springfield, why
we all should have an interest in and
awareness of what happened in
Sanford, Florida, because it has also
happened
in
Springfield,
Massachusetts.
I, too, had a son who died in a
questionable way. While the circumstances of how my son died were very
different from how Trayvon Martin
died, there are many similarities that
make the incident in Sanford relevant
to what is happening right here in
Springfield.
My son, Lennie Brown, (DOB:
07/31/79) was arrested due to a traffic
violation on October 10, 2008. At
approximately 2:30 a.m. the officers
drove away from the scene of the
arrest and stated Lennie would be able
to get out of jail on bail in a couple of
hours. At 5:16 a.m. the telephone
rang and on the other end of the line
was Baystate Medical requesting that
I come to the hospital right away concerning my son, Lennie Brown. As I
proceeded alone to the hospital that
dark morning, my nightmare began.
Upon arriving at the hospital, I was
directed to that room—you all know
that room—and I sat silently knowing
but waiting for an explanation.
A
Initially, I was met by the attending physician and a nurse who
explained that they could not revive
my son upon his arrival and basically
announcing his death to me as the
next of kin. I was then approached by
a detective who informed me that he
had been notified of my son’s death
and needed to take pictures and ask
me questions about his date of birth,
where he lived, etc. I was then taken
to the emergency room area behind a
curtain where my deceased son lay,
from what I could see, completely
dressed, with some kind of apparatus
supporting his neck, and wrapped very
tightly in hospital blankets. As I stood
there looking at my first born son,
who I had jokingly chased out of my
house just a few hours before, lying
dead on the hospital bed, I was immediately jolted from grief to suspicion as
I lay my face on his and it was so very
cold.
Just like what Trayvon’s family
experienced, initially I did not receive
any support or answers from the police
department about what I perceived as
a questionable death. I did not receive
a Chaplin for any emotional or spiritual support. In addition, I did not
receive any official visit from the police
department, even though my son
expired in their custody, explaining
what happened or giving me any indication of what the follow-up investigation and the department policies or
procedures would be. In fact, there
was very limited dialogue and no follow-up. I experienced just what the
Martin family experienced—all information was discussed and shared with
others, but not with us, the parents of
the deceased sons. All of my questions
and concerns were either dismissed or
ignored.
Regardless of what the outcome
of the Florida case is or even what the
circumstances end up being, one must
take notice that whether it is in
Sanford, Florida, or miles away in
Springfield, Massachusetts, the commonality is the feeling of unfairness. It
feels unfair when it appears certain
cases are not investigated using stan-
1,000 Hoodies Walk participants on Springfield City Hall steps
dard protocol or procedure and are not
responded to due to a lack of concern.
You are made to feel like you are not
privileged to receive any information
nor do you have the right to receive it;
you are made to feel you shouldn’t
have the audacity to ask any questions. The whole message leaves you
feeling devalued, whether it is communicated explicitly or implied, and it
is clear the lack of worth that is felt
about you. In addition, the attitudes,
predisposition, and stereotypes that
are applied to people of color and,
specifically, young black males certainly give the impression that they are
discounted and easily disposable.
For me personally, while these
misconceptions and beliefs are communicated daily by city officials, the
police and media, it was very disheartening to hear the same sentiments
from some citizens of the community
and some community leaders. During
my own experience, this occurred
when I reached out to the community
for guidance and support as evidenced
by the unwillingness people had to
even want to get involved. I believe
some felt paralyzed while others did
not want to rock their boat or compromise their status. I actually had one
“community leader” ask why I had
called him. It is very ironic that some
of the same people at the march who
spoke in support of the Martin family
and the injustice that their family was
experiencing were some of the same
people who did not even question or
request answers to what seemed a
questionable issue that affected our
own community.
On the other hand, I must also
say that there were others who were
very supportive, who listened with
compassion and empathy, and were
instrumental in assisting me to meet
with key officials to share my story.
But the real lesson I learned is that the
world is not fair.
Finally, while both cases share
many qualities of what could be considered injustice based on the lack of
concern and obvious unequal inquiries
of the public officials involved which
appear to be based on who the victims
were, the bottom line is that one is left
to seriously question the investigative
process when other cases are handled
much differently. Whether it turns out
to be in-your-face as the Trayvon
Martin case has become, or more subdued (and much more commonplace)
as my son’s case was, people would
like to know and should insist on the
same protocols, policies and procedures being followed no matter who
the victim is.
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african american point of view
may 1, 2012
page twenty-six
R E L I G I O N
RELIGIOUS POINT OF VIEW
Dr. Brett Snowden,
Editor
Pastor, Progressive
Community
Baptist Church
599 State Street
Springfield, MA
01109
Pastors, Ministers, Professors and Theologians, please submit your
articles for this page to Dr. Brett Snowden at [email protected]
HAVE YOU BEEN CALLED TO
TAKE A STAND?
By Rev. Dr. W.C. Watson, Jr.
ost of us have an innate drive to do something significant and profound in this
world. We are wired with a drive to try and
make the most of ourselves. That is actually a
blessed mindset to have, when you consider that the
alternative is to live a life of meaningless existence
and mediocrity. Who wants to be satisfied with
merely being born, existing for a time, and then
dying? Isn’t it true that we are “fearfully and wonderfully made” by an Awesome God, and that we
are made in His image, and for a purpose? On the
other hand, too many have lived a frustrated life of
dashed dreams and hopeless aspirations. They
always wanted to be something when they grew up
—but it just never came together for them. Hence
they settled for existing in the shadows of what they
thought were more interesting and accomplished
people.
I would ask of these people, “Have you considered that your greatest calling in this world may be
M
something that you once did instinctively without
much fanfare?” Or, it may be something that you
are yet prepared to do whenever the right circumstances present themselves? Perhaps your calling has
been to simply take a stand on some compelling
issue, or for some worthwhile cause? Your greatest
accomplishment may have been to stand as that
dedicated parent in spite of some painful difficulties
you faced. Your claim to fame may have been to
stand for your marriage, your family or your community when everything else said bail out, tuck-tail,
and run. Your signature achievement may have been
to stand on a principle or endure a great sacrifice for
a cause that only God fully appreciates, and only He
will fully honor someday.
I have often thought about the unanticipated
heroes and sheroes of life and the bible who took a
stand. Rodney King became both a tragic and heroic figure because he endured an infamous beating by
police, but then stood to challenge the whole nation
with this question: “Can’t we all
just get along?” Dr. Martin Rev. Dr. W. C.
Luther King probably did not
Watson, Jr.,
grow up thinking that he would Pastor, Canaan
Church
change the world as a Baptist Baptist
of Christ
preacher and activist. But when
fate tapped him on the shoulder in Montgomery,
Alabama, he committed himself to take a stand,
mentally and spiritually, for civil and human rights
—no matter what the cost. A Jewish woman,
Esther, in the Bible, emerged as a beautiful and
beloved queen in the Persian Empire, but she could
not have known that divine fate had called her to
the kingdom “for such a time as this.” Her destiny,
it turns out, was not to be just some pretty showpiece on the arm of King Xerxes. Esther had been
positioned to stand as an intercessor and redeemer
for the whole race of her people. Who knew?
But, then, who knows what simple, profound
and honorable stand you have been called to take.
A SERVICE OF REMEMBRANCE:
GARIAN BERNICE ROBINSON CAULTON
(February 24, 1947—April 5, 2012)
By Marjorie J. Hurst
attended a service of remembrance
on Saturday, April 21st for Garian
Robinson Caulton who passed
away suddenly on April 5th. Her obituary appeared in The Republican
while we were away and my husband,
who knew her family well (and who,
without fail, reads every local newspaper he missed the day we return from
vacation), cut out Garian’s obituary
and left it for me on the kitchen
counter.
I read Garian’s obituary with
great sadness. Not just because she
was my age and her death was obviously so unexpected. And not because
I
we were close friends. There was just
something about reading the notice of
her death that unexpectedly triggered
memories of our occasional encounters
and brief, but delightful, conversations
over the years. I could picture her face
and see her smile and I felt a warmness of her spirit. Rick, who was far
closer to the family growing up than I
was, had returned from our vacation
with a nasty cold and thought it better
that he not attend the service, but I
felt compelled to go.
People attend funerals and services of remembrance for many different reasons but it was unquestionably
clear that all of the people who attended Garian’s service were there for the
same reason, for Garian. Despite their
obvious pain, the family members who
spoke deliberately endeavored to keep
the service light as they recounted stories about Garian, some funny, some
poignant—all revealing, that spoke of
Garian’s strong independence, her
love of family and friends, her love of
entertaining and travel, her love of art
and photography, her love of the color
“purple,” and her total unselfishness.
The positive feelings that I had
g{|Üw UtÑà|áà V{âÜv{
about Garian were confirmed at that
service of remembrance. She was truly
a person who genuinely cared about
others, a person who loved unconditionally, and a person who was loved.
She will be missed.
MUSICIAN
, located in Springfield, Mass., has an opening for
a Musician who will report to the Pastor of the Church, and be responsible
for directing the Third Baptist Church Choirs to include: Sanctuary Choir,
Children’s/Youth Choir and the Male Chorus. Must be available weekly to
rehearse with the various choirs.
The Musician must be able to play the piano and/or the organ. The Musician
must be able to play various types of music: gospel, hymns, spiritual and
anthems. Must have a minimum of three to five years of experience directing, playing and working with church choirs and must be able to read music.
If interested in applying for this position, please forward a cover letter and
resume to:
Rev. Nathaniel Smith, Sr.
Third Baptist Church
P. O. Box 91166
Springfield, MA 01139
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RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY
BETHEL AFRICAN
METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
27 Pendleton Avenue
Springfield, MA 01109
(413) 734-7611
Rev. Angelo S.
Dawson, Pastor
Rev. Donald A.
Thomas, Associate
Minister
g{|Üw149UtÑà|áà
V{âÜv{
Walnut Street
PROGRESSIVE
COMMUNITY BAPTIST
CHURCH
599 State Street
Springfield, Massachusetts
(413) 736-8844
“A Church Determined To Follow Christ”
P.O. Box 91166
Springfield, MA 01139
413-734-4143
Join us for our Worship Services
Sunday School
Sunday Worship Service
9:30 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
Reverend
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Nathaniel Smith,
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Sr., Pastor
Âg{x YÜ|xÇwÄç V{âÜv{Ê f|Çvx DKIL
Where all who enter may be blessed
Rev. Amelia Eddy,
Associate Minister
James D. Bullock,
Minister of Music
Pastor’s Bible
Study
Sunday 8:50 am
Sunday Morning
Divine Worship
10:00 am
Bible Study/Prayer
Church School
Saturday 11:00 am & Class Meeting
Wednesday 7:00 pm
Wesley United Methodist Church
741 State Street
Springfield, MA 01109
413-734-3233
Dr. Brett Snowden, Pastor
Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible School - 9:00 a.m.
Bible Study - Wednesday - 6:30 p.m.
Sundays
Sunday School (all ages) 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service 10:45 a.m.
Rev. Joyce
Whetstone
Wednesdays
Bible Study 6:00 p.m.
•Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors.Ž
New Life Calvary
Baptist Church
A N EW
Alden Baptist Church
649 State Street
Springfield, MA 01109
413-788-9910
B EGINNING
Sunday School
9:00 AM
Morning Worship
Service
10:00 AM
Rev. Jesse E.
Prayer/Bible Study
Williams Sr.,
Wednesday
Pastor/Teacher
6:00 & 7:00 PM
Rev. Karen Rucks,
Associate Minister
981 Wilbraham Road
Springfield, MA 01109
(413) 796-1600
“We believe God has
called us to be a vital
sign of faith at work
in the community. This
vision is actualized
through our
Ministries.”
Rev. J. Willard
Cofield, Jr., Pastor
Sunday School
9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning
Worship Service
10:00 a.m.
Prayer Service
Monday
6:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Noon &
6:00 p.m.
Bible Study
Monday &
Wednesday
7:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry
Friday
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
SHILOH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH
Canaan Baptist
Church of Christ
The Church in the Heart of the City
Sabbath Services (Saturday)
1430 Carew Street
Springfield, MA 01104
413-739-5053
Sabbath School - 9:00am
Divine Worship Services - 11:00am
Adventist Youth Services - 5:30pm
Community Service Center - Mon. & Tues.
10:00am - 1:00pm
Joseph F. Aaron,
Prayer Meeting - Wednesday - 7:00pm
Pastor
Church School (SSAJA) Monday - Friday
797 State Street, Springfield, MA 01109; Tel: 413-734-0103
e-mail: [email protected]
Solid Rock Community Baptist Church
821 Liberty Street, Springfield, MA 01104
Telephone (413) 734-5441
Fax (413) 734-5438
Transportation (413) 575-4035
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 am
Weekly Bible Study/Prayer Service Tuesday 7:00 pm
Bishop Curtis L. Shaird, Pastor
Reverend Harold P. Dixson, Assistant Pastor
JESUS CHRIST ENLIGHTENED
CHRISTIAN BIBLE SEMINARY
ACCREDITED
141 Union Street
Springfield, MA
Fridays 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Saturdays 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.
Contact Bishop Emanuel Brown, President
Rev. Dr. W. C.
Watson, Jr., Pastor
Sundays
Sunday School (all ages) ------9:15 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ----10:45 a.m.
Church Life
Wednesdays
Worship, Prayer, Mid-day Prayer & Praise- 12:00-1:00 p.m.
Bible Study --------7:00 p.m.
Praise & Study
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THE ARTS
CHILDREN’S BOOK CORNER
INHALE MUSIC < EXHALE LIFE
The Bookworm is
Terri Schlichenmeyer.
Terri has been reading
since she was 3 years
old and she never goes
anywhere without a
book. She lives on a
hill in Wisconsin with
two dogs and 11,000
books.
Heshima is an internationally recognized
vocalist, multi-instrumentalist and songwriter/composer whose
music can be heard at
www.myspace.com/he
shimaiam and facebook.
“JUST AS GOOD:
HOW LARRY
DOBY CHANGED
AMERICA’S
GAME”
AN ARTS
SCENE IS
MORE THAN
ARTS
By Chris Crowe and
Illustrated by Mike Benny
c.2012, Candlewick Press $16.99 /
$19.00 Canada 32 pages
Reviewed by Terri Schlichenmeyer
verybody loves being first.
E
You know how great it is to be the
kid at the head of the line. You like
being first to speak up, first to finish
your assignments, and it’s even fun to
be the first kid on the playground or
ball field because you get first choice
for the equipment.
But not everybody can be first.
Somebody has to be second and, as
you’ll see in the new book “Just as
Good” by Chris Crowe, illustrated by
Mike Benny, coming next in line can
be pretty awesome, too.
Homer and his Daddy loved the
Cleveland Indians baseball team.
It was 1947, and they knew that
baseball season was going to be great
because Larry Doby joined the team
that year. Doby wasn’t the first Negro
pro ball player – Jackie Robinson was
first overall – but Doby was the first in
the American League and to Homer,
that was miracle enough.
Because of some bad news lately,
Homer needed a miracle.
It started when Coach O’Brien
kicked him off the Little League team
because Coach said Negro ballplayers
weren’t “worth a spit!” That made
Homer mad and sad, but now Larry
Doby gave him hope.
By fall, Homer’s dreams had
come true: the Cleveland Indians were
in the World Series! Everybody was
excited, but nobody was more excited
than Homer. On game day, he finished
up his paper route and raced home to
do his chores. He had to be at
Standard Drug to get his spot near the
radio, or he’d miss the big game.
But Daddy had a surprise: he
bought a radio just so they could listen
to the action on the field. The sound
was crackly but they found the station
and they could hear every hit, every
run, and every yell from the announcer, Mel Allen. As the game played out,
Homer and Daddy paced and danced
and urged the Indians to hold on to
their one-run lead. And you can bet
the Indians did!
The morning after the game,
Daddy helped Homer fold newspapers
for the paper route. That was nice, but
Homer knew that Daddy really only
wanted to be first to see the newspaper. There, he found a picture of two
faces, one black and one white, smiling
as big as Lake Erie...
Sometimes, it’s hard to remember
how much has changed in the past few
decades. Your young sports fan, for
instance, will never know a color line
in any sport, and this book helps to
explain why.
Based on a true event, this oftenovershadowed tale is spun into an
exciting fictional story that kids can
relate to, and author Chris Crowe also
includes a nice set of historical notes as
well as a bibliography that will send
you running to the library. I liked that,
and I liked the rich illustrations from
Mike Benny.
I think that, if your 4-to-7-yearold slugger loves a good read-aloud,
this is the book to catch. For him (or
her), “Just as Good” will be up first.
By Heshima Moja
n a recent visit to Springfield, I
decided to take a walk through
the downtown area of the city. I
strolled Main Street and then up
Worthington to what many know as the
entertainment district. I began to think
about my first adventures as a musician
and a fan of music and art in the city. I
reminisced about Sunday afternoons
spent at Theodore’s with mentors Billy
Arnold and Charles Greenlee in traditional finishing school type jazz jam sessions. I remembered playing for the first
time at the Paramount Theatre and
stepping onto that historic stage where
artists like Katherine Dunham and Tally
Beatty had performed. I remember
Caffeine’s Night Club where live jazz was
featured four to five nights a week.
And uptown, at the Network, on
the corner of Bay Street and St. James
Avenue, there were regular events
ranging from Jazz to R & B concerts
(featuring local and national talent). I
remember talking to the people who
were my seniors, and them telling me
of the glory days of Springfield when
Miles Davis and Charlie Parker would
roll through town to play jazz clubs in
the city. And, of course, anybody growing up in the city cannot forget the
wonder of the Harambee festival every
year that united the community. I am
O
even willing to admit that I was at the
first Def Jam Tour at the Springfield
Civic Center. There was a strong movement of artists and patrons who
attempted to provide a wide range of
arts programming in the city.
But in addition to all of the great
entertainment, the downtown area of
the city offered something else in those
days, a strong, thriving business community. I remember many Saturday
afternoons with my mother and grandmother, eating downtown after being
dragged from store to store. I remember, as a teenager, spending many
hours and much of my summer job
money at Johnson’s Bookstore. I
remember a well balanced mixture of
affordable family retail stores, side-byside with stores that catered to businessmen/women. I remember hotels
which catered to upper echelon clients
and families. I remember a downtown
that was alive.
But somehow, over the years, the
viable businesses have been replaced by
nail salons, cell phone stores, and fast
food restaurants. The downtown area,
after 6 p.m., becomes a ghost town,
and Saturdays are left to the few who
venture out to stroll empty streets.
Promoters of live music events and the
arts understand something that city
planners and politicians still can’t seem
to grasp. In order for Springfield to
come alive again, it needs a strong,
thriving business community to support the incredible amount of rich talent and creativity which can help this
city claim its place as a rising star of
New England. It doesn’t need another
nail salon. It doesn’t need another cell
phone store. And it doesn’t need
another nightclub that will change its
name in six months after a drunken bar
room brawl. Because a strong arts
scene involves much more than just the
arts, it involves the building of a community which thrives, and takes pride
in all that it has to offer.
Check us out online at:
www.afampointofview.com
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african american point of view
may 1, 2012
THE ARTS
PEN
&
INK
JUANITA TORRENCE-THOMPSON Nominated Woman of the Year 2009 by American Biographical
Institute Board for International Research. Breath-Life (2009, Scopcraeft Press) nominated for Pushcart
Prize. She is Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Mobius, The Poetry Magazine, which was “best pick” 2007,
2008, 2009 by Small Magazine Review. New York And African Tapestries, (2007, Fly By Night Press) “best
pick” by Small Press Review. Reads U.S. & abroad. See her Youtube videos:
http://www.Youtube.com/poetrytown. Website: www.poetrytown.com
HAIKU EYES
PATRIOTS
AT THE PARK
By J. Roscoe Hurst
HAIKU #12
KOTO: THE JAPANES
HARP
By Juanita Torrence-Thompson
Jewel eyes, burnt toPaz observing crocus, peace.
Splatter of spring rain.
By Juanita Torrence-Thompson
HAIKU SERENADE
She plays the Koto
Softly as a gentle wind
Strokes an olive branch
By Juanita Torrence-Thompson
Sparrows serenade
At dawn. Strip silence from Queens’
Maple-shaded street.
Copyright 2005, 2010, 2012
by Juanita Torrence-Thompson
(Dedicated to the memory of Ronnie
Hurst, a soldier, father, husband,
brother, a nephew and son)
BRENDA’S CHILD has made it her life’s mission to inspire people through poetry and stories and
through leading by example with courage, confidence, and integrity. In April 2007, she self-published her
first book of poetry, “A Piece of My Mind...Poetic Confessions of a Self-Proclaimed Diva.” Since then she
has published four more titles. For more information, email: [email protected]
MARGINALIZED
By Brenda’s Child
Please don’t ask me if my hair is a weave,
And if I say that is…
No, you can’t touch it!
And why do you think it’s okay
for you to ask how I wash it?
You call it curiosity
but I find it rude and demeaning
That you are so clueless about me
and I have been forced to learn your ways
since the day
I was born.
Your ignorance is not bliss,
it just creates animosity and injustice.
It’s offensive.
You might as well snap your fingers and roll your neck!
And I can’t explain why I can do the Beyoncé bounce
and you can’t.
Anyway, what makes you think ALL Black people
know how to dance?
No, I don’t know
why some of us think it’s okay to use the “N” word,
so freely
But I still know I better not hear it leave your lips,
not in my presence
Your ignorance is not bliss,
it just creates confusion and injustice.
Why do I bother to explain my peeve?
Somehow I feel you don’t believe
that you are naïve,
uneducated and far removed from my people,
our culture, who we are.
You cannot decipher between
what you read in the news and see on “reality” TV;
you can’t conceive why your obliviousness
irritates me, infuriates me;
you’ll never truly understand it,
or its significance.
For once I wish you would see
It’s not all right for you to call me “Girlfriend”
Besides the fact that this term of endearment is outdated,
your ignorance is not bliss,
and it only creates fear and injustice.
You’re not familiar with oxtails,
But my people have heard of Shepard’s pie.
I know Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost,
And you may have heard of Maya Angelou,
But do you know the flow of Nikki, Langston, and Sonia?
You still think Malcolm X was a violent “reverse racist”
Don’t you?
And because you’ve heard a couple Biggie songs,
you think you know about inner city life;
now you’re qualified to relate to its youth, right?
(3/17/1946 - 4/12/1967)
There are some voices who would say
We’re at this gathering just to play.
But father’s off for a day or two,
And mother’s work is never through.
On this Memorial Day we celebrate
Valor of those who were so great.
We use this day to again instill
A faithful patriotic will.
To have our families born anew
And raise them up the way we grew.
To be very thankful for what we’ve got
It cost some people quite a lot.
All these parents fixing meals.
Kids on bikes with training wheels.
Little tykes scramble everywhere
Without a worry nor a care.
Tents, campers, vans and cars.
Children gathering childhood scars.
Oh what a joy it is to see
The folks enjoying liberty.
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FOOD AND FASHION
THE URBAN COOK
Rhonda Jones is
a Personal
Caterer and a
Food Consultant
[email protected]
LOVING MY
POTATOES
By Rhonda Jones
’m loving this beautiful weather
and I’m about to get ready to celebrate Memorial Day. Memorial
Day is a day that commemorates all
men and women who have died in
military service in the United States.
There are those who visit cemeteries
and place memorials on this day and
there are those, like me, who search for
I
the perfect cookout to attend. It is said
that you can wear white clothes and
shoes after Memorial Day. I don’t
know if this rule still applies because I
definitely see people with white on
year round.
Usually by now I have my plans
in order. I know whose house I will be
crashing with my potato salad in
hand. It took a long time for me to
even eat potato salad but once I ate it,
I was hooked and ready to learn and
master it for myself.
I remember at a very young age
that I didn’t like potato salad; it’s not
that I didn’t like the taste. It’s just
that I couldn’t get the concept in my
head of mixing cold potatoes with
mayonnaise. The sad thing about it
was that my mom made it and I still
wouldn’t eat it. Life is funny though
because I ended up being placed in a
situation where I had to eat potato
salad. When I met my mother-in-law,
she made dinner for me and, of course,
potato salad was part of the meal. I
was petrified. I didn’t want to offend
her so I ate it and lo and behold, I
loved it. I couldn’t believe that this
was what potato salad tasted like. In
my mind I had imagined something
totally different.
I went home and called my mom
for her recipe and it was just like my
soon-to-be mother-in-law’s. There
were a few differences but close
enough. After I fell in love with potato salad, I began eating it at different
functions but soon found out that you
can’t eat everybody’s potato salad!
Now I only eat my mother-in-law’s or
my sister’s and I only eat my sister’s
because I gave her the recipe! I hope
she doesn’t read this article but her
potato salad does taste good. She just
has to work on not overcooking the
potatoes. Have you ever had potato
salad with too soft or too hard pota-
toes? If you have, I’m sure you understand where I’m coming from.
Watch your potatoes and you too
can make good potato salad!
POTATO SALAD
2 -3 pounds red potatoes, cubed
1 small onion finely chopped
2 celery stalks finely chopped
4-5 hard-boiled eggs, broken up
½ cup sweet relish
1 tablespoon chopped pimentos
1 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sugar
Celery salt to taste
Salad supreme seasoning or paprika
to taste
Cook potatoes and drain then cool.
In a large bowl add potatoes and
remaining ingredients. Refrigerate
until ready to serve.
A GENTLEMAN’S FASHION SENSE
Jeffrey S. Clemons
Sr., Clothier, Owner
and Proprietor,
Jeffrey’s Suit Rack,
287 East Street,
Ludlow, MA 01056
(413) 583-3200
his article is for the many gentlemen who say to me that they
are going to come and purchase
a suit from me when they take off 20
pounds.
Please do not take this as an
insult, but please take it as a motivator! Many of you have good intentions
about trimming down, but let’s face it,
it can be hard for some of us. I’m led
to write this article because many men
are not in the best shape and we want
and wish to be in better shape. I usually do an article close to the beginning of the year regarding this topic.
But winter is over and the summer months are approaching soon.
Can you feel comfortable taking your
shirt off on a 90 degree day to wash
your car or do some yard work? Never
mind talking about a new suit! Many
guys do not want to invest in a new
suit when they know that they have
put on weight. Here are a few pointers
for you.
T
HOW IS THE 20 POUND LOSS
WORKING OUT FOR YOU?
By Jeffrey S. Clemons Sr.
First, cut out the bread/flour in
your food intake. Flour exits the body
very slowly and is hard to burn off
especially when you are not doing any
cardiovascular at all! Second, stretch
your meals out over the course of the
day. Try to eat something every couple
of hours. Good carbs—not the bad
ones—and some protein, and please
stay away from the fried foods. They
will kill you every time! Third, get
your body in motion on a consistent
basis! I have mentioned this before
regarding cardiovascular and some
anaerobic exercises. This is a good fundamental start to help you shed those
20 pounds and it is not hard to do; it
just takes some motivation and dedication. You can do this.
If you have a dog, maybe you can
start off by walking your dog for 30
minutes 3x weekly or go for a walk
with your wife or girlfriend; it’s quality time and exercise at the same time.
Or buy a bike and take a bike ride
with your kids. It’s fun. I do it regularly. Whatever it takes to get your body
in motion, just do it.
For those of you who have tried
and gotten away from it, try to get a
partner to work out with you so someone can help motivate you and also see
the results from your hard work. To
the gentlemen who have never had an
exercise program, get educated about
it so you can understand its importance and ask questions regarding
good health because it is more than
just working out! For you gentlemen
who know what I am truly talking
about and have gotten away from a
healthy lifestyle, shame on you. Get it
back; you have the knowledge so get
busy! To the gentlemen who I may
have offended with this article, please
be advised that it was not my intent
and I pray that you find a healthy
lifestyle. Remember, the body is a
temple, a gift from God!
Jeffrey’s Suit Rack
When First Impressions Count
Prom and Wedding Season
is Approaching
Let Us Meet Your Formal
Needs
We Feature Complete Tuxedo
Rental Services
Jeffrey S. Clemons, Sr.
Proprietor
EMail: [email protected]
Hours: Tuesday-Sat.11-5 Sunday and Monday by Appt. only
287 East St. Ludlow, Ma. 01056
(413) 583-3200 Tel. (413) 583-3208 Fax
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page thirty-one
BLACK SPORTS
BLACK SPORTS INTERNATIONAL
GOLF TIPS: CREATE AWESOME POWER
ften, golfers who set their shoulder angle
improperly at address create reverse pivots
and faulty hip slides into their backswing.
Many advanced players know how to avoid this
reverse pivot hip slide action by tilting their shoulders slightly behind the forward hip to capture a
level shoulder turn.
Here are two powerful components essential for
creating this strong upper body movement when setting up for a conventional golf swing. Upon studying the sequence of motion, there is a slight lateral
shift and distinct rotation of the body. One important link that reinforces movements of this type is
steady footing with flexed knees during the takeaway into the top of the backswing.
Athletically rotating the rear hip back with
some resistance in a squatting manner can load balance points to effectively support upper body power
accumulations.
First, find your center of balance with your head centered
and your stance set at 50/50
O
Drill: With your right hand,
hold the club against your sternum, the center of your chest.
Align the shaft to the small
rounded hollow on the surface
of the stomach. Establish a
solid balanced stance, feet shoulders width apart.
Tilt forward from the hips toward the ball, and then
From the Desk of Charles Lightfoot
tilt to the side, away from the target slightly behind
the ball.
The proper shoulder tilt should improve your
range of motion and ability to swing your arms effectively through impact. For the best effect, the set-up
attitude should be maintained throughout the backswing into the forward release point.
Drill: Set your forward spine
angle, bending from your hips
and observing your club head
equally placed between your
knees. Visually check the
upper center, forward knee,
and rear knee position.
When your shoulder angle
is level and dynamically set to
rotate on the axis of the spine, your angle of attack
to the golf ball will improve. A complete shoulder
turn with the support of your lower body will extend
the swing arc radius reducing the need for compensation or fixes.
Drill: Tilting your spine slightly away from the target until
the club head nears the inside
of your forward knee is a way
to measure a position relative
to the mechanical type model.
Notice the line of sight
down and through the target
line. The plane is the angle of
the shaft relative to the ground; devoid of interruptions, the spine tilt should determine the bottom of
the swing arc. This positioning of the spine tilt causes the forward shoulder to set higher than the rear
shoulder in natural alignment toward the forward
post. You should sense an imaginary vertical line
drawn below the center of your chin to the inside
position of the forward foot.
Improvement of your set-up
posture will invariably help
you build a better understanding of your swing profile and
the mechanical aspects that
support it.
Reprint permission and photos
courtesy of www.bstmllc.com.
FOR MORE SPORTS GO TO: www.bstmllc.com
PEDRO MORALES 1ST TO WIN ALL THREE MAJOR
MEN’S TITLES IN THE WORLD WRESTLING FEDERATION
edro Morales is a retired Puerto
Rican professional wrestler. He
began his wrestling career as a
teenager in 1959, and continued
through to the late 1980s. Morales was
the first man in wrestling history to
win all three major men’s titles in the
P
World Wrestling Federation (WWF):
the
WWF
Heavyweight
Championship, the Intercontinental
Championship and the WWF World
Tag Team Championship. He was
inducted into the World Wrestling
Entertainment) (WWE) Hall of Fame
in 1995.
Morales debuted in 1959, at the
Sunnyside Gardens, beating Buddy
Gilbert. He wrestled on the West
Coast in the U.S. during the 1960s,
taking on regional stars of the day such
as Fred Blassie and The Destroyer, the
latter from whom he took the World
Wrestling Association’s (WWA)
World Heavyweight Championship on
March 12, 1965. Morales lost the title
on July 23rd to “Crazy” Luke Graham.
But, he took it back from him on
October 17th. He held the title for
nine months before being defeated by
Buddy Austin on August 5, 1966.
Morales then concentrated on tag
team wrestling, co-holding the WWA
tag belts four times during 1966-68,
with four different partners: Luis
Hernandez, Mark Lewin, Victor
Rivera, and Ricky Romero. During a
stint in the National Wrestling
Alliance (NWA), he held the Hawaiian
U.S. Title for two months in 1969.
In 1970, Morales joined the
World Wide Wrestling Federation
(WWWF, now known as World
Wrestling Entertainment) on the East
Coast in the U.S. He won his first
championship in the WWWF in
January 1971, when he defeated
Freddie Blassie in a tournament final
for the WWWF United States
Championship.
As a fan favorite, Morales could
not be expected to feud with fellow fan
favorite Bruno Sammartino for his
WWWF
World
Heavyweight
Championship belt. Opportunity
knocked on January 18, 1971, when
Ivan Koloff ended Sammartino’s
seven-year reign. Three weeks later, on
February 8th, Morales wrestled Koloff
for the belt at New York’s Madison
Square Garden. He won the match to
become the fourth Heavyweight
Champion in WWWF history. When
he won the WWWF World
Championship, the United States
Championship became vacant.
Morales proved to be a popular
champion, especially among New
York’s Puerto Rican community. Like
Sammartino before him, Morales was
continues to page 32
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african american point of view
PEDRO MORALES
continued from page 31
an ethnic champion. He became
known for his scientific wrestling ability and endurance, as well as a “fiery
Latin temper” that emerged during
matches. During his reign as champion, Morales feuded with Freddie
Blassie, who was the number one contender for his title.
On September 1, 1972, however,
he wrestled Bruno Sammartino in the
main event of Showdown at Shea (Shea
Stadium in New York). It was the first
WWWF title match to ever pit two
fan favorites against each other. After
several near pins, the two men wrestled to a seventy-five minute curfew
draw. After the match, the fans were
noticeably angry, and some jumped
into the dugouts to shake their fists at
the wrestlers.
During his reign, Morales worked
an angle with the then-villain Larry
Hennig. After a title reign of almost
three years, Morales lost the title to
Stan Stasiak on December 1, 1973, at
the Philadelphia Arena. He soon faded
from the WWWF. Meanwhile,
Sammartino pinned Stasiak at
Madison Square Garden 9 days later to
regain the title.
may 1, 2012
page thirty-two
After leaving the WWWF,
Morales wrestled for other promotions
around the United States and Puerto
Rico, including returns to NWA
regions where he won more tag team
Gold with Pat Patterson and then
Rocky Johnson.
In May 1980, Pedro staged a
WWF comeback. He added yet anothth
er title to his career on August 9
when he teamed with reigning
Heavyweight
Champion
Bob
Backlund to defeat the tag team titleholders, the Wild Samoans, at the
Showdown at Shea 1980. Backlund
and Morales quickly had to forfeit the
belts, however, due to a rule stating
that no Heavyweight Champion could
also hold a second title at the same
time (the decree was abolished in 1994
when Diesel simultaneously held the
WWF Intercontinental and the WWF
World Tag Team Championships he
held with Shawn Michaels).
The WWF Intercontinental
Championship was now the only major
men’s title that Morales had never won
in the promotion. On December 8,
1980, however, he became the first
man to complete the federation’s
Triple Crown with a victory over Ken
Patera at Madison Square Garden.
Morales feuded with “Magnificent”
Don Muraco during 1981, losing the
belt to him on June 20th, but reclaiming it on November 23rd. With this
win, Morales became the first man to
hold the Intercontinental title twice,
and he held it for fourteen months, the
longest reign up until that point.
During his second reign, Morales
defended the title against Don Muraco
and “Superstar” Billy Graham. It was
Muraco, however, who ultimately
ended
Morales’
second
Intercontinental title reign on January
22, 1983.
Morales travelled to Puerto Rico
and won the WWC North American
title from Buddy Landel in June 1983,
then losing it to Sweet Daddy Siki in
January 1984. Morales regained the
title in March of 1984, before losing it
to Randy Savage in September of the
same year. At this point, Morales
moved back to the WWF.
He never won another title, and
had reached an advanced stage in his
career by the time of Vince McMahon
Jr.’s national expansion of the WWF
in the mid-1980s. He competed in the
1985 King of the Ring Tournament,
defeating Johnny Valiant and receiving
a bye to advance to the third round
before losing to Don Muraco. The following year, he defeated Rudy
Diamond, Mike Rotundo and Nikolai
Volkoff before losing the final match to
Harley Race.
Morales
made
his
only
WrestleMania appearance in 1986,
when he was a part of a 20-man invitational battle royal at WrestleMania
2. He wrestled in a WWF ring for the
final time in late 1987.
After retirement from the squared
circle, Morales became a commentator
for WWF’s Spanish-language TV programming. Pedro Morales was inducted into the WWF Hall of Fame in
1995. Reprint permission and photos
courtesy of www.bstmllc.com.
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P
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african american point of view
MAY 2012
may 1, 2012
page thirty-three
For Updated Events,
go to: www.afampointofview.com/events.htm
EVENTS
ON-GOING
Calling All Graduates of the High School of Commerce Class
of 1962 for 50th Reunion Gala
Where: Elks Club Lodge, Springfield, MA
Info:
Larry at 413.782.4632 or
[email protected]
FOR ADDITIONAL MAY EVENTS, SEE ADS ON
PAGES 7, 16
Thursday—3
Revival Time Evangelistic Center W.I.N. Women’s
Empowerment Crusade, “Women in the Now” with Dr.
Rita Twiggs and Bishop Iona Locke
When: 7pm Nightly
Where: Marriott, Downtown Springfield, Springfield, MA
IInfo: 413.734.4861; www.revivaltimeministries.org
Comedians, Dance Teams
When: 7:45pm
Where: Melha Temple, 133 Longhill Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
Must be 16 years old; $10 in advance; $12 at door;
413.783.8810 or 413.221.6824
Thursday—10
American Heart Association 2012 Pioneer Valley Heart
Walk
When: 9am Registration; 10am Walk Kick Off
Where: Forest Park, Sumner Avenue, Springfield, MA
Info:
413.827-0400; pioneervalleyheartwalk.org
Dr. Maya Angelou
When: 7:30pm
Where: The Bushnell, Hartford, CT
Info:
$35 and up; 860.987.5900; www.uniquelives.com
Teatro V!da presents “Breaking Silence, Saving Lives”
National Book Release Event
Saturday—12
When: 5:30—8:30pm
World’s Largest Pancake Breakfast
Where: City State, One Columbus Center,
When: 8—11am
Downtown Springfield, MA
Where: Main Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
$; All proceeds to benefit on-going bullying
Info:
FREE and open to the public
prevention initiatives; 413.330.8210;
Annual Power to End Stroke Gospel Brunch
www.teatrovida.com/events.html
When: 9am—12noon
Friday—4
Where: St. Anthony’s Maronite Church,
St. John’s Congregational Church Seasoned Saints Ministry
Island Pon Road, Springfield, MA
hosts “Church Women United” May Friendship Day; Info:
FREE and open to the public educational event;
Theme is “Listen to Our Sisters”
Pre-registration is required at 413.735.2102; or
When: 8:30am—1pm
[email protected]
Where: St. John’s Congregational Church,
“Who’s On My Side?” Stage Play Based on Novel by
643 Union Street, Springfield, MA
Keshawn Dodds, Directed by Keshawn Dodds and
Info:
413.734.2283
Benjamin Smith
When: 1pm Matinee; 6pm Feature Show
Saturday—5
Where: American International College, Griswold Theater,
Glickman’s Bazaar/Tag Sale
1000 State Street, Springfield, MA
When: 10am—2:30pm
Info:
$5 Matinee; $10 Feature Show; For tickets contact
Where: Glickman Elementary School,
Benjamin Smith 413.739.1500;
120 Ashland Avenue, Springfield, MA
[email protected];
Info:
FREE and open to the public; vendor s
[email protected] (See ad on page 17)
pace available; [email protected]
Union Baptist Church’s All Saints Day: A Wo-Men’s
Celebration present South African All-Male Thula Sizwe “A
Dress for Success Western Massachusetts presents Capella” Chorus
Common Threads, An Evening of Empowerment
When: 4pm
When: 5:30—8:30pm
Where: Union Baptist Church,
Where: The Log Cabin, Holyoke, MA
1921 Main Street, Hartford, CT
Info:
$50
Info:
$20; 860.247.0648;
www.unionbaptisthartford.org
Wednesday—9
Tuesday—8
Saturday—19
18th Annual Community Baby Shower
When: 12noon—3pm
Where: High School of Commerce,
415 State Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
FREE and open to the public; 413.787.6739;
[email protected]
2012 Anna E. Hatchett Christian Debutantes &
Gentlemen’s Cotillion
When: 6pm
Where: Springfield Sheraton, Downtown Springfield, MA
Info:
$50; 413.734.2283
Saturday—19 & Sunday—20
The Mt. Calvary Baptist Church celebrates its 93rd
Anniversary where Dr. Mark E. Flowers, Senior Pastors,
presents Thirst: Because A Dry Church Worships God
Desperately
When: Saturday Prayer Breakfast at 9:30am;
Sunday Worship Service at 10:45 am
Where: Mt. Calvary Baptist Church Street,
17 John Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
413.737.9583;
mountcalvarybaptistchurchspringfield.org
Tuesday—22
2012 United Way Annual Celebration Luncheon and
Awards Presentation
When: 11:30am
Where: The Log Cabin, Holyoke, MA
Info:
$20; RSVP by May 14th to [email protected]
Friday—25
Memorial Day Ceremony on Steps of Springfield City Hall
When: 12noon
Wednesday—16
Where: City Hall, 36 Court Street, Springfield, MA
White Brook Middle School presents An Evening of Jazz
Info:
FREE and the public is encouraged to attend
with Recording Artist/Multi-Instrumentalist Jo Sallins
When: 6:30—8pm
Kimdon Productions presents Springfield Talent Exposed
Where: White Brook Middle School Auditorium,
featuring Springfield’s Best Hot Bands, Vocalists, Rappers,
200 Park Street, Easthampton, MA
Comedians, Dance Teams
Info:
FREE and open to the public
When: 7:45pm
Where: Melha Temple, 133 Longhill Street, Springfield, MA
Wednesday—16 thru Friday—18
Info:
Must be 16 years old; $10 in advance; $12 at door;
The
Mt.
Calvary
Baptist
Church
celebrates
its
93rd
413.783.8810 or 413.221.6824
Springfield School District announces the Wraparound
Anniversary
where
Dr.
Mark
E.
Flowers,
Senior
Pastors,
Zone Initiative
presents Thirst: Because A Dry Church Worships God
JUNE EVENTS
When: 9:30—11am
Desperately
Sunday—3
Where: Springfield College, Dodge Ballroom, Richard B.
When: 7pm Nightly with different guest preachers
Flynn Campus Union, 263 Alden Street,
The Women of Martin Luther King, Jr. Community
Where: Mt. Calvary Baptist Church Street,
Springfield, MA
Presbyterian Church will hold their Annual Women’s Day
17 John Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
Light refreshments; RSVP by May 2nd at
Program with Guest Speaker First Lady Jamina ScippioInfo:
413.737.9583;
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Springfield
McFadden of St. John’s Congregational Church
mountcalvarybaptistchurchspringfield.org
WAZRegistration; 617.227.2100x100
When: 4pm
Where: Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Presbyterian
Friday—18
Wednesday—9 thru Friday—11
Church, 14 Concord Terrace, Springfield, MA
Massachusetts Public Health Association 10th Annual
St. John’s Congregational Church 2012 Annual Stewardship
Info:
413.737.0777
Awards Breakfast
Revival with Bishop Victor T. Curry as Guest Preacher
When: 7:30—9:30am
Tuesday—12
When: 7pm Nightly
Where: State Room, 60 State Street, Boston, MA
Where: St. John’s Congregational Church,
2012 Western Massachusetts 85th Annual Human
Info:
$; 857.263.7072x113;
643 Union Street, Springfield, MA
Relations Award Banquet
http://www.mphaweb.org/breakfast.htm
Info:
413.734.2283; www.sjkb.org
When: 6pm Reception; 7pm Dinner and Program
Kimdon Productions presents Springfield Talent Exposed Where: Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, Springfield, MA
featuring Springfield’s Best Hot Bands, Vocalists, Rappers, Info:
$150; 860.683.1039
American Stroke Association presents Pioneer Valley
Stroke Survivors and Caregivers Forum with Emcee Chris
Tabb
When: 9am—2pm
Where: MassMutual Center, Main Street, Springfield, MA
Info:
$5, includes light breakfast and lunch; open to
public; educational information, guest speakers;
exhibitors; www.heart.org/PVstrokeforum;
413.827-0400
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may 1, 2012
page thirty-four
african american point of view
BROTHER AND SISTER CHAMPIONS WILL COMPETE IN NATIONAL
COMPETITIONS IN THEIR RESPECTIVE SPORTS
Aysia Whitely-Sharif
n March 25th, Aysia WhitelySharif’s hard training paid off
as she won the CT State
Championship Level 10 All Around
Title in the 13-15-year-old division,
with a score of 36.85. To win the All
Around Title, your score in all four
events is totaled. The championships
took place in Southbury, CT at
O
Pomporaug High School.
Fifteen-year-old Aysia is a 9th
grade student at Springfield Central
High School and trains 20 hours a
week in Wallingford, CT at the CT
Gymnastics Academy. She is a Level
10 gymnast, the highest level of gymnastics in the USA Women’s Junior
Olympics.
Aysia is also the Beam and Floor
1st Place Champion and has qualified
for the Level 10, Region 6
Championships which will take place
in Danvers, MA on April 28-29. If
Aysia places within the top 8 All
Around scores, she will advance to the
Level 10 Nationals in Hampton, VA
which take place May 11-13.
Last season as a Level 9 gymnast,
Aysia was ranked 4th in the country at
the Eastern Nationals and was highlighted in the July, 2011 issue of USA
Gymnastics Magazine.
C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S
CORNER
years. He wrestles for the Springfield
Youth 5A Wrestling Club which is
coached by his uncle, Ed Whitley.
Hakeem also trains extensively in
wrestling, grappling and karate five
days a week under his father, Sensi
Ahmad A. Sharif, at the School Of The
Noble Warrior, in Springfield, MA.
Ahmad Hakeem Whitely-Sharif
leven-year-old Ahmad Hakeem
Whitley-Sharif (Hakeem) is going
to the Nationals for wrestling on
May 5th in Baltimore, MD after winning 1st place on March 10th at the
2012 Youth New England Wrestling
Championship in the 5&6th grade age
division,117 lb. Novice weight class.
A 6th grader at Zanetti
Montessori Elementary School,
Hakeem has been wrestling for five
E
The top five placements in each age
division and weight class at the state
championships advance to the Youth
New
England
Wrestling
Championship Tournament and in the
state contest, Hakeem won 3rd place
in the 5&6th grade age division, 117
lb. Novice weight class, which was on
February 26th, in Northborough, MA.
We wish both sister and brother
the best of luck in their Nationals
competition.
CONGRATULATIONS TO TWO OF
SPRINGFIELD’S CENTENARIANS!
ongratulations to Marjorie Glasgow
on the celebration of her 100th birthday
on April 3, 2012 at Heritage Hall Nursing
Home in Agawam. She was joined there by her
three children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other family members,
friends and her Wesley United Methodist
church family. Mrs. Glasgow is the widow of Joseph Glasgow. She has
the distinction of being the oldest resident at Heritage Hall and has
lived there the longest, for 13 years. Mrs. Glasgow had the distinct
honor of receiving birthday congratulations from President Barack
Obama.
C
ongratulations to Lee Ernest Davis on the
celebration of his 100th birthday on April 10,
1912. Family came from near and far to celebrate
this momentous occasion with him at Chez Josef.
Mr. Davis was born in Furman, Wilcox County,
Alabama to George and Maybelle Lee Davis. He
was married to the late Helen Brown Davis and is
currently married to Dorothy Washington Lee
Davis. He is the father of 10 children, one of whom is deceased. He
has 34 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren and 19 great greatgrandchildren. Mr. Davis worked for the Alabama Gas Company
before moving to Springfield where he worked on many construction
sites, including the building of Interstate 291, the Baystate West (currently known as Tower Square) office building and the Berkshire
Avenue U.S. Post Office. He loves to play the Harmonica and checkers, sing in quartet groups, is a Red Sox fan and a church member.
C
160
1852-2012 AN
NIVERSARY
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Page 35
african american point of view
may 1, 2012
page thirty-five
R E S I D E N T I A L
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dents — up for failure. Then the
cycle starts again, as we search for
intendents are confronted. The followthe next prophet whom we can
ing facts were taken from a 2011 artianoint and — eventually —
cle written by Jonathan Zimmerman
destroy.”
that appeared in The Christian Science • “That’s why the average length of
Monitor.
service for an urban superintendent
in the United States is just 3.6
• “Urban school districts look to
years.”
‘savior’ superintendents, only to
fire them when they fail to fix
If we are really serious about
everything. Leadership is impor- looking for someone to lead our school
tant, but no single individual can system, we need to first eliminate polredeem American’s failing big-city itics from the selection process, then
schools. By pretending otherwise, we need to give the person who is chowe set our leaders — and our stu- sen a minimum of a 5-year contract,
SUPERINTENDENT SCREENING TEAM
continued from page 6
May 12, May 17 and May 19, are not
open to the public, final interviews
will be. I suggest that you call
413.787.7874 to find out exactly
when and where the final interviews
will take place. EVERYONE
SHOULD ATTEND.
Much is being said about the
necessity of the next superintendent
showing his/her commitment to our
school system by living in Springfield.
Well, I’d like to share with you the
reality with which urban school super-
and then we need to give that person
our unqualified support to make the
changes that are necessary to achieve
the result we say we want, while holding him/her accountable, but we cannot not expect that person to walk on
water. Additionally, we need to hold
the school committee accountable and
insist that they put aside individual
agendas and function as a body (the
definition of a school board) to support
the next superintendent in doing the
work that must be done to educate our
children. After all, that is what we
elected them to do.
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may 1, 2012
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