T G N Y

The Greater New York
Academy of Prosthodontics
60th Scientific Meeting
The Appel Room, one of the three main performance venues
in Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
Credit: Brad Feinknopf
Friday and Saturday, December 5 - December 6, 2014
Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall
Broadway at 60th Street, New York City
Message From The President
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics is pleased to invite you to attend our 60th Annual
Fall Scientific Meeting, once again being held at the Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall in
New York City. The Academy is proud of its long and impressive history of excellent programs, and plans
are in place to assure a wonderful experience for all. Dr. Stephen Chu and his Program Committee have
created a super scientific program for clinicians, educators and students. Dr. Caroline Grasso and her
Fall Arrangements Committee have put in order the finest venue and events that highlight the Academy’s
traditions. We hope that you will join us for this opportunity to see state-of-the-art presentations
given by experts from around the world in a facility second to none. New York City is a wonderful
attraction around the holiday season. In addition to our scientific program, the theater, arts, shopping,
sightseeing and reconnecting with colleagues and friends await you! We hope to see you there.
Lawrence E. Brecht, DDS
President, Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics
Scientific Program
Friday, December 5, 2014
Saturday, December 6, 2014
7:15 REGISTRATION
Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
Continental Breakfast and Commercial Exhibits/Poster
Clinics
7:30REGISTRATION
Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
Continental Breakfast and Commercial Exhibits/Poster Clinics
7:45
PRESIDENTIAL GREETINGS
Morning Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: German O. Gallucci, DMD
8.00Hans-Peter Weber, DMD
Abutment Color and Mucosal Thickness: What’s the Correlation?
8:30
Marc L. Nevins, DMD, MMSc
Innovations for Minimally Invasive Esthetic Implant Surgery
9:10
Joseph Y. Kan, DDS, MS
Inter-Implant Papillae Management in the Esthetic Zone
9:50
DISCUSSION BREAK - Ertegun Atrium Commercial Exhibits/Poster Clinics
10:30
Richard B. Smith, DDS
Immediate Molar Implants: When, Where, Why and How?
Morning Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Petra Gierthmuehlen, DDS, Prof. Dr Med Dent Habil
8:00
Andrea Ricci, DDS
Treatment Planning Multidisciplinary Cases – When is it Worthwhile to Give Up Teeth and Place Implants? Criteria for
Decision Making
8:40
Tomas Linkevicius, DDS, PhD
Development and Preservation of Crestal Bone Stability Around Implants
9:20
Maurice A. Salama, DMD
Modern Implant Dentistry: Rules of Engagement in the Esthetic Zone
10:00
11:00
Peter Wöhrle, DMD, MMedSc, CDT
Single Tooth Immediate Implant Replacement in the Esthetic
Zone: 20 Years in Retrospect
11:40
LUNCHEON- The Appel Room
Presentation of the 2014 Jerome M. and Dorothy Schweitzer Research Award of the Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics to Avishai Sadan, DMD, MBA
Presentation of the 2014 Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics Foundation Distinguished Lecturer Award to
Rade D. Paravina, DDS, MS, PhD
Afternoon Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Wael Att, DDS, PhD
2:00
Avishai Sadan, DMD, MBA
Adhesively Retained Restorations: In Search of Minimally Invasive and Long Lasting Functional Solutions
2:40
Ward M. Smalley, DDS, MSD and Robert R. Faucher, DDS, MSD
Class II Treatment – Why Surgery?
3:50
Galip Gürel, DDS, MSc
Ultimate Commumication Dentist/Specialist/Ceramist Patient: The Tools for a Predictable and Customized Design
4:30
Open Discussion and Wine Reception - Ertegun Atrium
DISCUSSION BREAK - Ertegun Atrium
Commercial Exhibits
10:40
Edmond Bedrossian, DDS
Biomechanical and Histological Evdence for Immediate Loading
the Fully Edentulous Patient
11:20
Eduardo D. Rodriguez, MD, DDS
The Future of Facial Transplantation Redefined
12:00
BUFFET LUNCHEON - Ertegun Atrium
Lunch with Commercial Exhibits
Afternoon Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Irena Sailer, DDS, PhD, Prof Dr Med Dent
1:20
Rade D. Paravina, DDS, MS, PhD
Color in Esthetics: The Science Behind Beauty
2:00
Naoki Aiba, CDT
DENTSCAPE™: Shade Communication Through Photography
2:40
Ronald Jung, Dr Med Dent, PhD
Implant Prosthetics and Abutments: Make the Right Decisions in
the Esthetic Zone
3:20
Michael Bergler, CDT, MDT
Material and Workflow in CAD/CAM Technology
4:00Adjournment
7:00
DINNER MEETING
The Metropolitan Club - One East 60th Street, New York, NY
RESERVE ESSAYIST - Marcus Abboud, DMD
T he Art and Science of Digital Technology – The Transformation
of the Prosthodontic Specialty
Continuing Education Credit
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics is an ADA CERP recognized provider of continuing education credit. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental
Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it
imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry. Concerns or complaints about a CE provider may be directed to the provider or to ADA CERP at www.ada.org/cerp’.
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics designates this activity for 12.50 continuing education credits.
This meeting is sponsored by The GNYAP
PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2014
7:00 AM
REGISTRATION
Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
Continental Breakfast and Commercial Exhibits/
Poster Clinics
7:45 AM
PRESIDENTIAL GREETINGS
Morning Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: German O. Gallucci, DMD
8:00 AM
This program will present guidelines for incremental levels of
flap elevation from flapless to open procedures for implant site
development. The use of growth factors has increased the ability
for optimal hard and soft tissue regeneration with less invasive
techniques. This course will provide a decision matrix for how
to manage extraction site defects including whether to raise a
flap and how to sequence soft tissue grafting.
Course Objectives:
1. A
pplying tissue engineering to clinical decision-making
achieves optimal biologic and esthetic results for
challenging dental implant cases
Hans-Peter Weber, DMD
Boston, MA
2. T
echniques utilizing rhPDGF-BB for combined hard and
soft tissue grafting will be presented
Abutment Color and Mucosal Thickness:
What’s the Connection?
3. T he use of technology can ease the treatment process for
patients and improve the predictability for biologic and
esthetic longevity
Abutment selection is a key component in implant prosthodontics
and requires special considerations in esthetic sites. Compared
to prefabricated abutments, custom abutments offer the
choice of various materials and the possibility to individualize
position, angulation, contour, margin location, and even color.
Mucosal thickness presents one of the determining factors when
choosing abutments for implant restorations in the esthetic zone.
Titanium abutments have the advantage of proven mechanical
stability long-term, but they tend to induce a noticeable color
change in this labial peri-implant mucosa. Abutments made of
zirconia fare much better in this regard. However, their longterm performance in the oral environment remains unproven.
Colored metallic abutments are offered as an alternative and
may combine proven mechanical long-term behavior with
uncompromised esthetics. It is the purpose of this presentation
to review the current understanding of the relationship of
abutment color and mucosal thickness and make evidence based
clinical recommendations for indication specific abutment
selection in implant prosthodontics.
Course Objectives:
1. A
ssess the correlation between ‘thin gingiva biotype’ and
thin peri-implant mucosa
2. C
ompare the esthetic effectiveness of different colored
abutments in sites with thin peri-implant mucosa
3. D
efine indications for colored abutments depending on
soft tissue thickness
8:30 AM
Marc L. Nevins, DMD, MMSc
Boston, MA
9:10 AM
Joseph Y. Kan, DDS, MS
Loma Linda, CA
Inter-Implant Papillae Management in the
Esthetic Zone
Achieving anterior implant esthetics is a challenging and
demanding procedure. To create implant papillae that emulates
nature is a fusion of science and art. Understanding the biologic
and physiologic limitations of the soft and hard tissue will
facilitate predictability in simple to complex esthetic situations.
This presentation will focus on current implant treatment
philosophies and methodologies for papilla management around
single and multiple adjacent implants in the esthetic zone. Equal
emphasis will be placed on the diagnosis and treatment planning,
surgical and prosthetic management of soft and hard tissue for
anterior implant papilla esthetics.
Course Objectives:
1. Understand the biology of implant papillae
2. Different methods in maintaining inter-implant papillae
3. Prognostic variable for implant papilla management
9:50 AM
DISCUSSION BREAK - Ertegun Atrium
Commercial Exhibits/Poster Clinics
10:30 AM
Richard B. Smith, DDS
New York, NY
Innovations for Minimally Invasive Esthetic
Implant Surgery
Immediate Molar Implants: When, Where, Why and
How
This presentation will provide a clinical update on minimally
invasive approaches for Esthetic Implant Site Development.
The utilization of a recombinantly engineered platelet-derived
growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) has accelerated the trend toward
minimally invasive surgical procedures to preserve and enhance
the esthetic foundation for dental implant supported restorations.
While immediate implant placement in the molar extraction
socket has been well-documented in the literature, until
now, there has been no organized, evidence-based treatment
protocol. A new classification system for molar extraction
sockets will be presented. This classification system categorizes
the extraction socket based upon the bone available within the
socket for stabilization of an immediately placed implant. Three
categories, Types A, B, and C are described. The relevant
anatomy of the socket and the tooth as well as the use of various
implant designs will be illustrated. Issues including gap distance,
initial stabilization and anatomic limitations will be addressed.
This presentation will offer a treatment protocol based upon this
new socket classification system. This new protocol represents
a game-changing shift in the management of molar extractions.
11:40 AM
Course Objectives:
1. T
he participants will be able to identify molar extraction
sites using a new classification system
Afternoon Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Wael Att, DDS, PhD
2. I mplant placement decisions in molar sites will be made
more easily based upon the protocol presented
3. P
articipants who are placing their own implants should
be able to begin placing immediate molar implants in a
predictable manner
11:40 AM Peter Wöhrle, DMD, MMedSc, CDT
Newport Beach, CA
Single Tooth Implant Replacement in the Esthetic
Zone: 20 Years in Retrospect
Losing a single tooth, especially in the esthetic zone, is a
traumatic event for any patient. The traditional protocol at the
time (extraction, healing period, delayed implant placement
followed by another healing period, final restoration) took
months to complete. Results were unsatisfactory, especially with
regard to the patient’s needs and soft tissue morphology.
In 1998 a technique was introduced that combined extraction,
implant placement and temporization into one procedure, solely
focusing on maintaining hard and soft tissue architecture in
the esthetic zone while providing patients with an immediate
solution to replace esthetically sensitive teeth. Implant survival
rates observed with the immediate replacement protocols were
maintained, while quality of survival was improved for many
patients. Yet, problems subsequent to the procedures appeared
mostly due to errors during diagnosis and treatment planning
and surgical execution.
This lecture will highlight the development of the technique, the
mistakes that were made and the refinements that have led to
the current techniques that allow for superior quality of survival
compared to traditional approaches while addressing patient’s
needs.
Course Objectives:
1. U
nderstand indications and contraindications for
immediate tooth replacement
2. B
e able to diagnose if the patient is a candidate for
immediate tooth replacement
3. Understand and provide immediate prosthetic solutions
LUNCHEON- The Appel Room
Presentation of the 2014 Jerome M. and Dorothy
Schweitzer Research Award of the Greater New York
Academy of Prosthodontics to Avishai Sadan, DMD
Presentation of the 2014 Greater New York Academy
Prosthodontics Distinguished Lecturer Award to
Rade D. Paravina, DDS, MS, PhD
2:00 PM
Avishai Sadan, DMD, MBA
Los Angeles, CA
Adhesively Retained Restorations: In Search of
Minimally Invasive and Long-Lasting Functional
Solutions
With a conservative approach in mind, prosthodontists should
be able to provide patients with minimally-invasive, functional,
highly-esthetic and long-lasting solutions.
These solutions should take into consideration patient needs
and desires, functional issues, available materials and clinical
approaches.
Novel conservative restorative techniques are able to combine
a variety of treatment modalities for a large range of clinical
situations including some that, until recently, were not considered
possible. This presentation provides a systematic and scientific
approach for selecting esthetic treatment modalities based on
original research data with special emphasis on techniques and
new materials design and selection.
Course Objectives:
1. U
nderstand challenges related to establishing a stable
adhesive interface
2. Choose adhesive solutions that are age appropriate
3. F
ollow a decision making tree for treatment planning
adhesively retained restorations
2:40 PM
Ward M. Smalley, DDS, MSD
Edmonds, WA
Robert R. Faucher, DDS, MSD
Edmonds, WA
Class II Treatment – Why Surgery?
This presentation will focus on an interdisciplinary approach
to the management of two patients with Class II malocclusions
complicated by missing and/or worn teeth. An emphasis
will be placed on the establishment of an anterior Class I
relationship to achieve the most optimal results of treatment.
It will also demonstrate the problems that can occur with
respect to esthetics, function occlusion and stability when
a Class I relationship is not established during treatment.
Since orthognathic surgery to advance a patient’s mandible is
often necessary to achieve optimal results of care, the various
parameters in how such surgery is managed will be covered in
some detail. Achieving the most optimal results of treatment
certainly requires adequate treatment planning, but planning
well beyond that of the single tooth dentistry we were all taught
in dental school. This presentation will detail how to plan and
deliver optimal treatment in a comprehensive, interdisciplinary
approach to care.
Course Objectives:
1. L earn how to manage Class II debilitated dentitions from
an interdisciplinary perspective
2. Realize the shortcomings of not establishing an anterior
Class I relationship
4. T
esting the wax-up in the patient’s mouth before prepping
the teeth (EPT-Esthetic Pre-evaluative Temporaries)
5. Prep through the EPT
6. Impression making (digital versus analog)
7. Building the veneers (digital versus analog)
4:30 PM
OPEN DISCUSSION AND WINE RECEPTION - Ertegun Atrium
Commercial Exhibits/Poster Clinics
3. G
ain understanding in why and how orthognathic surgery
is required to achieve the best treatment result
4. L
earn how true interdisciplinary care results in much
better management of treatment
3:50 PM
Galip Gürel, DDS, MSc
Istanbul, Turkey
Ultimate Communication Dentist/Specialist/Ceramist/
Patient: The Tools For a Predictable and Customized
Smile Design
Modern techniques and materials can be useless if the final
outcome does not live up to the patient’s esthetic expectations.
It has always been a challenge to create a smile design for which
the final result would be precisely predicted from day one. In
some cases the dentists build this design by themselves directly
in the patients mouth. However, some leave it to the ceramist
that they work with. More importantly, this smile design
should also match with the patient’s functional, biological and
emotional needs. Also, the final esthetic results may fail to meet
the patient’s expectations due to disharmony between the smile
design and the patient’s personality. The patient may feel that
the restored teeth do not really “belong” to him or her. Without
the proper knowledge, the origin of this disharmony can be
difficult to identify, and it becomes even more challenging if
the team (dentist, specialists and the ceramist) do not physically
work together in the same place.
This lecture highlights the creation of these very personalized
smiles by utilizing the ultimate long distant communication
among the team using the latest digital technology.
The protocol that is presented will improve the esthetic diagnosis,
the interdisciplinary communication and the predictability of
anterior esthetic restorations.
Course Objectives:
1. I mportance of the mock-up for the smile design and
communication with the patient
2. T
ransforming the information to the lab (conventional
versus digital)
3. Reproduction of the smile design in the lab (digital versus
analog)
PRESENTATION ABSTRACTS
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2014
7:30 AM
REGISTRATION
Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
Continental Breakfast and Commercial Exhibits
Morning Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Petra Gierthmuehlen, DDS, Prof.
8:00 AM
Dr Med Dent Habil
Andrea Ricci, DDS
Florence, Italy
Treatment Planning Multidisciplinary Cases – When
is it Worthwhile To Give Up with Teeth and Place
Implants? – Decisional Criteria
Caries, tooth discoloration, defective restorations, wrong
restorative
materials,
advanced
periodontal
disease,
consequences of periodontal therapy, iatrogenic lesions, wrong
soft tissue management, wrong timing of procedures may all
lead to different esthetic problems such as elongated teeth,
altered gingival margins, lack of three-dimensional hard and
soft tissue volume: namely an inadequate relationship between
soft tissue and teeth and/or restorations. This, as a consequence,
may determine an unnatural, non- pleasing smile. Modern
techniques and materials can be useless if the final outcome
doesn’t achieve the patient esthetic expectations.
This presentation will focus on how to adequately diagnose the
different sites, how to forecast the clinical outcome, the eventual
solutions of these problems and the options available. In most
cases, multidisciplinary approaches are required as well as a
thorough knowledge of the restorative material and protocols
which involve the effort of the entire dental team.
The treatment approach required to “select the right treatment
for the right patient” will be discussed. In fact, a standard
protocol or treatment sequence is not indicated for all patients
but a customized clinical approach should be preferred.
Course Objectives:
1. H
ow to predict the possibility of saving a compromised
tooth long-term
2. S
urgical and prosthetic protocols and materials utilized to
restore function and esthetic in multidisciplinary treated
patients
8:40 AM
Tomas Linkevicius, DDS, PhD
Vilnius, Lithuania
Development and Preservation of Crestal Bone
Stability Around Implants
Crestal bone stability is considered to be important for bone
preservation, longevity of implants and to prevent peri-implant
tissue recession. Mucosal tissue thickness was shown to be
the factor having impact on bone stability. It is suggested that
thin tissues might be thickened during implant placement, thus
reducing bone resorbtion. Allogenic membranes might be
introduced as a material for vertical tissue thickening. Further, it
is important to preserve bone levels. Current recommendations
allow clinicians to place cementation margins up to 2 mm
subgingivally. Recent research has proved that the deeper the
position of the margin, the greater amount of residual cement is
left undetected. The use of standard abutments for cementation
with permanent cement involves high risk of cement excess.
Cement remnants should be considered as a predisposing
factor in development of chronic peri-implant disease. A
special technique with cement-screw retained restorations with
zirconium was developed for prosthetic rehabilitation.
Course Objectives:
1. To
provide clinical approaches on how to develop stable
crestal bone levels, especially working in thin soft tissue
biotypes
2. T
o present prosthetic solutions which minimize the risk of
cement remnants, thus preserving the stability of crestal
bone
9:20 AM
Maurice A. Salama, DMD
Atlanta, GA
Modern Implant Dentistry: Rules of Engagement in
the Esthetic Zone
With the advent of new technologies, techniques and materials,
the ability to replace missing teeth with the form, function and
beauty of the natural dentition is now possible. Resin bounded
bridges, porcelain fused to metal and all ceramic restorations as
well as implants can be offered as solutions to patients suffering
from the loss of teeth in the “Esthetic Zones.”
With any and all of these procedures, in order to attain a
successful outcome, the focus must be the framing of the
restoration within the confines of the lip and gingivae to
provide for ideal proportion and beauty in the final restoration.
Therefore, any restorative endeavor in this region must entail the
foundation of a beautiful soft tissue frame and the construction
of harmony of the gingival scallop between the restorations, the
adjacent dentition and the border of the lip perimeter.
This presentation will focus on the interdisciplinary relationship
of the restorative dentist, periodontist and orthodontist to
reconstruct the soft tissue foundation for all of these restorative
options in anterior tooth replacement. The diagnosis of
deficiencies as well as the varied treatment options will
be discussed in detail. This includes periodontal crown
lengthening, esthetic periodontal plastic soft tissue grafting
procedures as well as prescription adjunctive orthodontic tooth
movement to manipulate the soft tissue foundation prior to or
subsequent with the restorative options of implants, bridges or
pontic replacement.
Course Objectives:
Include being able to answer the following questions:
1. What are the risk factors in anterior implant therapy?
2. W
hat are the four most important diagnostic components
leading to a successful treatment design for an esthetic
restoration?
3. H
ow and when should we perform immediate implant
replacement?
4. H
ow do new macro and micro-geometry of implant
designs affect treatment planning?
5. How do new digital and CAD/CAM technologies
optimize therapy?
6. How to integrate abutment selection and new ceramic
components with soft tissue augmentation procedures
to create the most esthetic zone of emergence for our
implant restorations?
10:00 AM
DISCUSSION BREAK - Ertegun Atrium
Commercial Exhibits
10:40 AM
Edmond Bedrossian, DDS
San Francisco, CA
Biomechanical and Histological Evidence for
Immediate Loading the Fully Edentulous Patients
Presence of pneumatized maxillary sinuses as well as lack
of alveolar bone due to significant horizontal and/or vertical
resorption in the completely edentulous maxilla, posed unique
surgical treatment planning challenges. Prosthetic challenges
such as esthetics, lip support and phonetics also are affected.
Therefore, unique considerations are needed when treating the
edentulous maxillary arch in this group of patients.
The successful fabrication and delivery of fixed implant
supported prosthesis for this group of patients is dictated by a
systematic approach to surgical as well as prosthetic treatment
planning.
A paradigm shift has taken place as the graftless surgical
approach has gained credibility through multicenter publications
showing predictable positive outcomes.
Reduced treatment time, a single stage surgical reconstruction
and immediate loading, eliminating the need for transitional
dentures, has resulted in a higher degree of case acceptance by
most patients.
This presentation will discuss the biomechanical criteria for
immediate loading the fully edentulous patient. The critical
number of implants and their distribution will be discussed as
well as the criteria for undersizing the osteotomy in order to
attain a reliable initial stability which is paramount for immediate
loading.
Course Objectives:
1. Treatment planning concepts for the maxilla
2. Decision making tree for the graftless approach
Course Objectives:
1. D
efine the current state of facial reconstruction
2. D
escribe the role and indications for facial
transplantation
3. D
efine the requirements for creating a comprehensive
and innovative facial transplant program
12:00 PM
BUFFET LUNCHEON - Ertegun Atrium
Lunch with Commercial Exhibits
Afternoon Presentations - Rose Theater
Presiding Moderator: Irena Sailer, DDS, PhD, Prof. Dr Med Dent
3. The number and the distribution of implants
1:20 PM
Rade D. Paravina, DDS, MS, PhD
Manvel, TX
4. B
iomechanical and the histological bases for undersizing
the osteotomy
Color in Esthetics: The Science Behind Beauty
11:20 AM
Eduardo D. Rodriguez, MD, DDS
New York, NY
The Future of Facial Transplantation Redefined
Facial transplantation is a clinical reality; however, immunotherapy
remains one of the leading obstacles to widespread acceptance
of facial transplantation and limited large animal model
studies exist.
A large animal translational non-human
primate vascularized composite allograft (VCA) model is
integral to the success of teams focusing on studying technical
feasibility, long-term graft survival and tolerance strategies.
With the increasing transplantation of more extensive facial
VCAs, fundamental craniofacial and esthetic principles become
increasingly important. Additionally, the combination of
computer-assisted planning and intraoperative navigation may
consistently improve the precision of face VCA transplants and
efficiency in these complex procedures. Experience treating
severe craniofacial injury allows consistent transfer of facial
VCAs while maintaining proper occlusion in a cadaveric model.
Although cadaveric dissections are an essential preparatory
exercise, they cannot simulate the true clinical experience of
facial VCA recovery. Transplantation of a facial VCA is a highly
complex procedure that requires meticulous planning and
affords little room for error. Adequate preparation is critical
to maximize VCA outcomes and preserve solid organ allograft
function. A facial VCA research procurement offers a unique
educational opportunity for the surgical and anesthesia teams,
the organ procurement organization and the institution.
Finally, following Institutional Review Board and organ
procurement organization approval, a total face, double jaw
and tongue transplantation was performed on a 37-year-old
male with a central face high-energy avulsive ballistic injury,
representing the most comprehensive transplant performed to
date. Through a comprehensive and systematic approach, the
restoration of human appearance and function for individuals
with a devastating composite disfigurement is now a reality.
This presentation will be very different from programs in color
matching, communication and reproduction of natural teeth
that you may have attended in the past. The didactic part will
emphasize the nature, principles and fundamentals of color
and tools that are essential to master a plan for successful color
matching in both office and dental laboratory, together with
step-by-step instructions. Examples and practical suggestions
will be provided, including the latest changes recommended
by the presenter. Dental Color Matcher, a color education and
training program for esthetic dentistry authored by the presenter,
will be demonstrated. This program has been used by dental
professionals and students in 100+ countries.
Course Objectives:
1. UNDERSTAND color
2. L
earn about advanced shade matching conditions and
methods
3. Contrast dental shade guides and elaborate color-related
properties of dental materials
4. Review the state of the art in tooth whitening monitoring
5. L earn about resources for color education and training in
esthetic dentistry
2:00 PM
Mr. Naoki Aiba, CDT
Monterey, CA
DENTSCAPE™: Shade Communication Through
Photography
Dental photography can be used as a means of communication
between the dentist and the technician. Ideally, the technician
who is going to fabricate the restoration should see the patient
and make the appropriate shade selection. However, the great
majority of restorations are fabricated by offsite technicians
who do not have access to the patients. Photography provides a
means to bridge the “gap” between the patient and the technician
regarding shade and surface character.
In this presentation, award-winning professional photographer
and ceramist, Naoki Aiba, CDT will address what dentists
and technicians need to know about photography for shade
communication. A number of clinical cases will be presented to
illustrate practical applications.
Course Objectives:
1. D
escribe the method of photographing Shade View
photos and their use for shade analysis and virtual
blueprints
2. U
nderstand the importance of coding shade guide and
calibration
3. Illustrate the workflow of custom white balance and color
profiling for shade assessment
2:40 PM
Ronald Jung, Dr Med Dent, PhD
Zurich, Switzerland
Implant Prosthetics and Abutments: Make the Right
Decisions in the Esthetic Zone
The prosthetic reconstruction should imitate the appearance of
the natural teeth. It was reported that restorations could cause
a discoloration of the mucosa. Furthermore, different studies
have proposed the use of all-ceramic restorations for esthetic
rehabilitation. However, the benefits of all-ceramic restorations
over the use of porcelain fused to metal (PFM) restorations in
terms of soft tissue discoloration needs to be investigated. For
that reason, it might be postulated that the color of abutment
and reconstruction might play an important role for the color
of the peri-implant mucosa around single-tooth implants in the
esthetic zone.
Clinical and experimental data will provide information on
the color-change effect of all-ceramic restorations, based on
all-ceramic abutments compared with PFM restoration based
on titanium abutments on marginal peri-implant soft tissue.
Decision criteria will be formulated in order to choose between
all-cermamic abutment and crowns and well as titanium
abutments and porcelain fused to metal crowns.
Course Objectives:
1. T
o understand the influencing parameters (biologic
aspect, material technical aspects, clinical performance,
mucosa thickness) to choose the right implant abutment
and reconstruction material
2. T
o recognize the correlation of the soft tissue thickness
and the restorative materials
3. To make the right decision for the right restorative
materials in the esthetic zone
3:20 PM
Mr. Michael Bergler, CDT, MDT
Philadelphia, PA
Material and Workflow in CAD/CAM Technologyt
CAD/CAM technology has drastically altered traditional dental
fabrication processes and has already become an integral part
of many dental laboratories. The benefit of this technology
is not anymore just a reliable and precise fabrication process.
Much more importantly, it offers a whole new range of materials
which require different fabrication protocols. Excellent esthetic
features paired with favorable physical and biological properties
have made, for example, high-strength ceramic materials such as
zirconium oxide, a true alternative to conventional dental alloys.
There are many different kind of zirconia materials available
which can be used in a variety of clinical indications. For longterm clinical success, however, and to take full advantage of
the unique material properties, it is especially crucial for the
laboratory technician to know about the required protocol
changes and limitations of those materials. Furthermore, the
digital workflow plays a decisive role in achieving a predictable,
functional and esthetic end result. If these guidelines are
followed, CAD/CAM technology and all-ceramic materials are
not limited to single crowns and short-span FPDs, but can be
applied to construct implant-supported restorations and fullmouth rehabilitations in complex cases.
This lecture will present and discuss guidelines of handling
protocols for different high strength materials and will explain
and outline different approaches in the digital workflow for
achieving a reliable and predictable end result. Furthermore,
various design options for implant-supported restorations,
ranging from single crowns to complex fullmouth reconstruction,
will be discussed.
Course Objectives:
1. D
ifferentiate modern ceramic materials and their
indications
2. L
earn about CAD/CAM technology and its different
applications and workflows
3. U
nderstand guidelines for long lasting ceramic
restorations from single crowns to implant supported full
mouth rehabilitations
4:00 PM
ADJOURNMENT
7:00 PM
DINNER MEETING
The Metropolitan Club
One East 60th Street
New York, NY
RESERVE ESSAYIST
Marcus Abboud, DMD
Stony Brook, NY
The Art and Science of Digital Technology – The Transformation of
the Prosthodontic Specialty
We are in the midst of a professional change. Technology intrudes
into biology and dental specialties. Boundaries shift or disappear.
A new world is emerging at the intersection of classic dentistry and
digital technology and everything we think we know might just be
incomplete.
This lecture demonstrates and reviews the latest advances and
wants to challenge us to pause and rethink modern dentistry. It
provides the dentist and dental technician with the background
information on the rapidly changing digital dental technologies
like CAD/CAM, that allow you to make a decision on what to use
and how to gain the greatest benefit.
The presentation will highlight customized products together with
integrated digital solutions. Matching several different digital
technologies offers benefits like reduced treatment time, more
predictable results and increased confidence of the clinician.
Cutting edge biomimetic products blending digital technology
with organic tissue clearly mark the latest developments in this
segment.
Course Objectives:
1. The advantages and limitations of CAD/CAM technology
2. How to improve results with customized prosthetics
3. The potential of fully integrated digital solutions
Corporate Sponsors
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics gratefully acknowledges the support of the following sponsors:
DIAMOND SPONSORS
Nobel Biocare, USA, Inc.
Straumann, USA
SAPPHIRE SPONSOR
Henry Schein
PLATINUM SPONSORS
Biomet 3i
Dentsply
Implant Direct
Ivoclar-Vivadent Inc.
Leonard Marotta Dental Studio
GOLD SPONSORS
BioHorizons, Inc.
CADBLU
Zimmer
SILVER SPONSORS
Keystone Dental
Neoss
Rhein 83
United States Air Force
CORPORATE MEDIA PARTNER
Quintessence Publishing
SOCIAL EVENTS
Thursday Speaker’s Dinner (GNYAP Council, speakers, sponsors with their spouse/guests)
This dinner, which honors the speakers, will be held at the elegant Columbus Club, which is located at 8 East
69th Street (at Fifth Avenue) at 7:00 PM. Attendance is limited to speakers with spouse/guest and the following
Academy members: Executive Council, all Past Presidents, Chairs of the Following Committees: Program, Fall
Meeting, Audio Visual and Dinner Meeting. If you wish to attend, please fill out that portion of the registration
form and include the appropriate amount in your payment. Space is limited and guests will be accommodated
on a first-come, first served basis. Business Attire.
Saturday Night Dinner Meeting
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics cordially invites you to attend this year’s spectacular Dinner
Meeting! The event is held to honor our new officers, our distinguished speakers and the entire Academy
family. It will be held on Saturday, December 6th at 7:00 PM at the Metropolitan Club, One East 60th Street,
New York City. Once again, Nobel Biocare generously sponsors this event. Black tie is required. New York
City is particularly beautiful at this time of year. The lights, mood and holiday atmosphere make the city a
glorious place to be. What better way to compliment the 60th Scientific Meeting and enjoy the Holiday Season
than by joining us at the Metropolitan Club! We promise you a very special evening.
POSTER CLINIC PRESENTATIONS
As part of our commitment to education and research, please join our graduate prosthodontic residents who
will present poster presentations on one day only, Friday, December 5, 2014.
JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER'S FREDERICK P. ROSE HALL
This venue is located near Columbus Circle. Please note the address: Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P.
Rose Hall, Broadway at 60th Street. This location is NOT the Lincoln Center but a separate and distinct
entity.
Hotel arrangements have been made at Le Parker Meridien Hotel, 118 West 57th Street (between Avenue of
the Americas and Seventh Avenue). See inside back cover for additional information.
ATTENTION RESIDENTS AND RECENT GRADUATES:
THE DR. MARTIN E. KANTOR SEMINAR
Current residents in Advanced Education Programs in Prosthodontics (AEPP)and their recent graduates
(2010-2014) are invited to attend a special seminar on Thursday afternoon, December 4, 2014 at 12:45 PM at
the University Club, One West 54th Street. The seminar is named for our past fellow, Dr. Martin E Kantor,
whose commitment to prosthodontic education lives on.
The featured speakers are Avishai Sadan, DMD, MBA and Rade D. Paravina, DDS, MS, PhD. This special
seminar encourages discussion between the attendees and the speakers. This is an excellent opportunity
to meet these dedicated educator-clinicians. If you plan to attend, please register for this seminar on the
enclosed registration form. Please note: ONLY current AEPP residents and recent graduates may attend!
Following the seminar, there will be a reception for those attending. Please come and enjoy the camaraderie.
Business Attire Required.
MEETING REGISTRATION INFORMATION
E
nclosed you will find a registration form. If you wish to attend, please fill out the
registration form and return by November 21, 2014 with the necessary payment to:
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics, 426 Hudson Street,
Hackensack, NJ 07601.
Or, you can register online at www.gnyap.org.
Pre-Registration by Mail:
Pre-Registration by Fax: Our fax: (201) 440 7963
On-Site Registration: (December 5, 2014) Ertegun Atrium, Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
(December 6, 2014) Ertegun Atrium, Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall
Friday: 7:00 AM to 2:00 PM Saturday: 7:30 AM to 1:30 PM
MEETING REGISTRATION CANCELLATION POLICY
•  Full refunds will be granted to written requests postmarked six weeks prior to the Fall Meeting
•  A 75% refund, minus a $25 processing fee, will be granted for written requests postmarked 4-6 weeks prior to the
Fall Meeting
•  A 25% refund, minus a $25 processing fee, will be granted for written requests postmarked within four weeks
prior to the Fall Meeting
•  The GNYAP Administrative Coordinator will process all approved refunds within 45 days after the completion of
the meeting
•  In case of cancellation due to natural disaster and/or Act(s) of Terrorism, refunds are limited to meeting
registration fees and social event fees only
HOTEL REGISTRATION
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics has reserved a limited number of hotel rooms at Le Parker
Meridien Hotel, 118 West 57th Street (between Avenue of the Americas and Seventh Avenue) at a special
meeting rate of $ 610 Deluxe King. Please call the Reservations Department at Le Parker Meridien Hotel
directly (800) 543 4300 and ask for the Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics group rate before the
deadline of November 4, 2014 to ensure this rate. After this deadline, you will be charged the normal rate and
rooms may not be available. These rates will be subject to the current state tax of 8.875% and NYC hotel tax of
5.875% plus a $2.00 per night New York City occupancy tax, a $1.50 per night Javits Center Fee and a Facilities
Fee of 10.00 per night plus tax.
Business Meeting
(GNYAP Members Only)
The Business Meeting will take place from 1:00 to 4:00 PM
on Thursday, December 4, 2014
at the University Club
One West 54th Street, New York City
Reception to follow
This meeting is sponsored by the GNYAP.
All Photography and videotaping of any presentation within the Jazz Facility is by permit only.
Those violating this policy face the potential confiscation of any recording, photo or video.
The Academy encourages limited discussion after each presentation.
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics • 426 Hudson Street, Hackensack, NJ 07601
(201) 440-6522 • Fax (201) 440-7963 • www.gnyap.org
About The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics
Our Mission
The mission of the Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics is to promote: the art, science and practice of
prosthodontics; the highest ethical standards and professional membership; a better understanding among the
specialties of dentistry and related professions; basic and clinical research in prosthodontics.
Our Goals
The goals of the Academy shall be:
• To elevate the art and science of prosthodontics by having its members participate in education, research
and patient care.
• To improve the health and well being of the public through the dissemination of prosthodontic knowledge.
• To select for membership those persons who have demonstrated accomplishments and proficiency in
prosthodontics and can make meaningful contributions to the art, science and practice of prosthodontics.
• To encourage lifelong learning in its membership and the prosthodontic community and to further
encourage its members to seek opportunities to share their prosthodontic knowledge and skills.
• To encourage its membership to anticipate and implement changes in the practice of prosthodontics.
• To ensure that its membership adheres to the highest professional ethical standards.
Our History
The Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics was formally organized on December 6, 1954 in New
York City, to meet the needs of dentists located in the eastern part of the United States who were interested
in the practice of prosthodontics and its related sciences. The Academy’s original aim was to foster a better
understanding among the various specialty groups in dentistry, and to promote and stimulate further research in
prosthodontics and its related fields. The organization has grown from its original thirteen charter members to
194 at present. Membership is by invitation, and is not confined to the New York area.
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