Program & Conference Handbook

Program
&
Conference Handbook
Program: Day 1—Tuesday 11 November 2014................................................... 2 Program: Day 2—Wednesday 12 November 2014 ............................................. 3 Program: Day 3—Thursday 13 November 2014 ................................................. 4 Session Abstracts: Day 1—11 November 2014................................................... 5 Session Abstracts: Day 2—12 November 2014................................................... 8 Session Abstracts: Day 3—13 November 2014................................................. 13 Day 1—Tuesday 11 November 2014
07:30am
Session 1.1 Breakfast Session: Exhibition open and coffee available
9:00am
Session 1.2 Plenary Session: Opening Session
Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra and Mr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG
Keynote Address: Mr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG
10.00am
Morning Tea
10.30am
Session 1.3a Plenary Session: CIO Session
Keynote Address: ICT Strategy and the Way Ahead: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Chief Technology Officer, CIOG
Keynote Address: The Infrastructure Journey: MAJGEN Mike Milford, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG
12.30pm
Lunch
Session 1.3b Update: 2015 Defence White Paper (Mr Mike Kalms, KPMG & Dr Stephan Fruhling, ANU)
1.30pm
Session 1.4a
Update: Six Tech Trends to Transform
Defence
(Mr Dave Maunsell & Gordon Stewart,
Accenture)
Session 1.5a
Update: Bringing the Transformed Defence
Terrestrial Communications Capability to Life
(Mr Craig Smith, Telstra)
Session 1.6a
IEEE STREAM
Paper 1: Evaluating Impacts of System Integration
on Joint Fires Operations
Paper 2: Simultaneous X/Ka-Band Feed System for
Large Earth Station SATCOM Antennas
Session 1.7a
Product Brief: Building Safer Smart Cities
(Mr Leo Chu & Mr Jimmy Ng, NEC)
2.30pm
Session 1.4b
Update: Finding the Path Forward to
Interoperability of the Emerging Link 16
Upgrades
(Dr Pete Camana, ViaSat)
Session 1.5b
Product Brief: Case Studies in Mobility for
Classified Environments
(Mr Jon Green, Aruba Networks)
Session 1.6b
IEEE STREAM
Paper 1: Enhancing Space Situational Awareness
Using Passive Radar From Space Based Emitters of
Opportunity
Paper 2: Practical Implications of the New Australian
and New Zealand Laser Safety Standard
Session 1.7b
Product Brief: High Throughput Satellite (HTS)
Communications for Government and Military
Applications
(Mr “D” D’Ambrosio, O3b Networks)
4.00pm
Session 1.4c
Panel Session: Does Australia Need a
Defence Industry?
(Sponsored by ADIESA)
Session 1.5c
Product Brief: Dependable and Secure
(Mr Andy Start, President Inmarsat Global
Government)
Session 1.6c
Update: Developing a Mission Partner
Environment; Lessons from Exercise Aqua Terra
2014
(MAJ Jason Broderick and Dr Peter Holliday,
Land Network Integration Centre)
Session 1.7c
Update: Cloud Adoption for Government and the
Large Enterprise – Lessons Learned
(Mr Mark Potts, Hewlett-Packard Company)
5.00pm
to 6:30pm
Welcome Networking Drinks
3.30pm
Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 6:30pm (open to exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 4:30pm)
IEEE Stream (Refereed papers) co-sponsored by IEEE
Day 2—Wednesday 12 November 2014
07:30am
Session 2.1 Breakfast Session—Exhibition open and coffee available (SCAC Members in attendance)
Product Brief (Ballroom): Hitachi Data Systems
Mr Andrew McGee, CTO & Sales Director, Australia & New Zealand, Hitachi Data Systems
9.00am
Session 2.2 Plenary Session: Coalition and Whole-of-government Interoperability
Keynote Address: MAJGEN Mike Milford, Head ICT Operations Division, CIOG
Keynote Address: Mr Victor Vae’au, CIO NZDF
10.30am
Morning Tea
11.00am
Session 2.3a Plenary Session: Capability Developments
Keynote Address: LTGEN John Caligari, Chief Capability Development Group
Keynote Address: CDRE David Scott, Director General Strategic Capability Coordination, Joint Capability Coordination
12.30pm
Lunch
Session 2.3b Product Brief: New Directions In Secure Information Management (Mrs Lisette Holmes, Mr Ross King, & Mr David Klein, Berkeley IT)
1.30pm
Session 2.4a
Update: RPDE Update
(Mr Ken Snell, RPDE, CDG)
Session 2.5a
Update: Meeting Defence’s Secure
Information Sharing Challenge:
MuSE
(Mr Daniel Lai, BSTTech Consulting)
Session 2.6a
Session 2.7a
INDUSTRY STREAM
Product Brief: Deploying
Refereed Papers
SharePoint in the Theatre
Paper 1: Executable System of Systems
(Mr James Milne & Mr Chris Rumel, Modelling for Options Analysis
Myriad Technologies)
2.30pm
Session 2.4b
Update: Why Identity
Management?
(Mr Richard Brown, Cogito Group)
Session 2.5b
Product Brief: T360 – Trusted
Information Sharing Capability
(Mr Bruce Talbot, BSTTech
Consulting)
Session 2.6b
Update: Crossing the Chasm
(Mr Craig Lindsay, Cisco)
3.30pm
Afternoon Tea
4.00pm
to
5:00pm
Session 2.4c
Update: Network Enabled Mission
Command
(COL (Retired, US Army) Buddy
Carman, ViaSat)
Session 2.5c
Product Brief: Overcoming Physics
for Networked Applications in a
Consolidated Data Centre
Architecture
(Mr Ian Raper, Riverbed ANZ)
Session 2.6c
Update: Security and the Internet
of Everything
(Mr Gary Spiteri, Cisco ANZ)
7.00pm–
11.00pm
Conference Dinner (7:00pm for 7:30pm)
Session 2.8a
Tutorial: Small Cells, HetNets, and Self
Session 2.7b
INDUSTRY STREAM
Organizing Networks (SON): Benefits to
Refereed Papers
Defence
Paper 1: Big Data over Limited Networks
(Dr Mark Reed, UNSW Canberra)
Paper 2: Rethinking Satellite Ground Station
Architecture
Session 2.7c
Product Brief: Reduce Risk and Increase
Collaboration through Secure
Information Sharing
(Mr Jason Ostermann, Raytheon Cyber
Products)
Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 5:00pm (open to exhibition-only registration from 1:30pm to 5:00pm)
Day 3—Thursday 13 November 2014
07:30am
Session 3.1 Breakfast Session—Exhibition open and coffee available
Product Brief (Ballroom): Handheld Push-to-Talk Radio Over Satellite – Secure, Fast, Easy Remote Push-to-talk Communications That Work Anywhere
Mr James de Vroome, Business Development Manager – Enterprise & Government, Pivotel
9.00am
Session 3.2 Plenary Session: Navy, Army, Air Force CIS Interoperability
Moderator: GPCAPT Darren May, Business Relationship Manager – Military, CIOG
Keynote Address: CAPT Brian Delamont, Director General Navy Communications and Information Warfare, Navy
Keynote Address: COL James Murray, Director Enabled Systems Development - Army
Keynote Address: WGCDR Daniel McManus, Deputy Director Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, Air Force
10.30am
Morning Tea
11.00am
Session 3.3a Plenary Session: SecureCanberra Track
Welcome Address: Mr W. Hord Tipton, Executive Director, (ISC)², Former CIO, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S.A
Keynote Address: Resilient Systems and Cyber Missions: Dr Mike Davies, Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Keynote Address: Forensics in the Cloud: Prof. Jill Slay, Australian Centre for Cyber Security, University of New South Wales
12.30pm
Lunch
Session 3.3b Product Brief: Tactical Advantage for Data Management at Scale and Gaining Value (Mr Callan Fox, Emerging Technologies Division, EMC Global Holdings)
1.30pm
Session 3.4a
SecureCanberra Track Session 3.5a
Product Brief: Google Cloud Innovation
- Be More Secure in the Cloud
1. Optimising Cyber Security Learning
Through Hands-on and Role-play Approach
(Mr Andrew Sklar, Dialog Google
Solutions Practice)
2. Developing an Architectural Framework
Towards Achieving Cyber Resiliency
Session 3.6a
Battlespace Communications System (Land)
Development
1. Land Network Concept and the Army Digitisation
2. Interdisciplinary Framework for BSC(L) Architecture
and Engineering
Session 3.7a
Tutorial: Collaborating with SharePoint
(Mr James Milne & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad
Technologies)
2.30pm
Session 3.4b
Session 3.6b
Battlespace Communications Architecture
Considerations
1. Considerations on ICT Architecture and Technologies
for the Battlefield Communications Systems (L)
2. C2 Systems Architectural Considerations in the
Tactical Communications Environment
Session 3.7b
Tutorial: Document and Records Management in
SharePoint
(Mr James Milne & Mr Chris Rumel, Myriad
Technologies)
Session 3.6c
Battlespace Communications Architecture Development
1. Land Communications Reference Architecture Brief
2. Enlightenment: Modelling and Simulation of Radio
Networks
Session 3.7c
Tutorial: Building Electronic Forms and
Workflows to Streamline your Business
Processes
(Mr James Milne & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad
Technologies)
SecureCanberra Track Session 3.5b
Update: GIS for Defence Operations
1. A Changing Landscape: The Internet of
(Mr David Eastman & Ms Kate Levy, Esri
Things
Australia)
2. Using Big Data to Secure Your Enterprise
3.30pm
Afternoon Tea
4.00pm
to
5:00pm
Session 3.4c
SecureCanberra Track Session 3.5c
Update: Defence Spectrum Management
Understanding Advanced Threats:
– Challenges and Trends
Identifying and Tracking the Hacker
(Mr David Murray, Department of
Defence)
Exhibition runs from 7:30am to 1:30pm (NO exhibition-only registrations available)
MILCIS2014
Session Abstracts
Session Abstracts: Day 1—11 November 2014
1.1 Breakfast Session
The Exhibition is open and coffee is available in the Exhibition Hall.
1.2 Plenary Session—Opening Session
Welcome: Professor Michael Frater, Rector UNSW Canberra and Mr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG
Keynote Address: Mr Peter Lawrence, Chief Information Officer, CIOG
1.3a Plenary Session: CIO Session
Keynote Address: Mr Aiyaswami Mohan, Chief Technology Officer, CIOG
Keynote Address: Major General Mike Milford, Head of ICT Operations Division, CIOG
1.3b Lunch Session Product Brief: Defence White Paper
Presenters: Mr Mike Kalms, KPMG & Dr Stephan Fruhling, ANU
1.4a Update: Six Tech Trends to Transform Defence
Presenters: Mr Dave Maunsell & Mr Gordon Stewart, Accenture
Defence organisations are at a critical juncture. Set against a backdrop of budget pressures, they face a volatile and
changing world, with new types of military engagements and adversaries. While advanced IT capabilities are the
hallmark of modern front line forces, defence’s administrative and logistical functional capabilities aren’t keeping pace.
Mobile, analytics, apps, cloud computing, Big Data – everywhere the digital revolution marches on; now is the time to
fully examine how it can help transform and optimise defence.
These new digital tools offer previously unavailable solutions for defence leader to do more with less, driving
operational efficiency and effectiveness.
This presentation will explore how this can be achieved. Drawing on six technology trends from the Accenture
Technology Vision 2014, and compelling examples from the private sector, it will outline the considerable cost and
efficiency benefits for those clear-thinking about digital.
1.4b Update: Finding the Path Forward to Interoperability of the Emerging Link 16 Upgrades
Presenter: Dr Pete Camana, ViaSat
Link 16 is widely deployed to provide Situation Awareness and Command and Control by many nations and on many
different mission platforms. This is a blessing for Coalition and Joint interoperability among Nations and Armed
Services but it is also an impediment when an improvement is to be deployed across this broad user base without
disruption. Such is the situation with the emerging Link 16 capabilities that are being introduced. What are the logical
uses for Link 16 Enhanced Throughput (ET), which is already in the MIDS JTRS terminals and to be deployed to all
MIDS-LVT terminals along with Crypto Modernization (CM), Dynamic Network management (DNM) and Frequency
Remap (FR) in Block Upgrade 2 (BU2)? But, what is the effect of ET not being deployed to the JTIDS terminals. Next,
along comes a Concurrent Multi-Net/Concurrent Contention Receive (CMN/CCR) capable terminal, designed to
enhance the fighter-to-fighter experience along with allowing seamless use of Stacked Surveillance zones for mobile
users. MIDS JTRS is getting CMN/CCR-4 while neither MIDS-LVT nor JTIDS are being upgraded for it. This
presentation discusses possible ways to use these capabilities in a mixed fleet of terminals (putting a heavy load on the
Network Designers of course) and where there are benefits and where the employment is not possible. It introduces
ways to overlay additional functions in multi-nets that can make use of these emerging capabilities. These ideas are
also part of the basis for the US Air Force Pathfinder Study that is addressing deployments of these capabilities to
existing USAF aircraft over a several year study.
1.4c Panel: Does Australia need a Defence industry - What would the Defence acquisition and sustainment landscape look
like without Australian Defence Industry partners?
Panel Members: Industry representative (multinational prime), Industry representative (small/medium Australian
company), Senior Defence Executive, Government representative
The facilitated panel comprises four speakers representing a broad range of views from Industry, Defence and
Government. Questions and comments relevant to the theme can be submitted in advance or on the day through email
or in person. Following a brief commentary from each panel member with their perspective on the theme, there will be
a Q&A session based on the audience submitted questions.
1.5a Update: Terrestrial Communications Capability to Life
Presenter: Mr Craig Smith, Chief Engineer, Defence Engagement, Telstra
The Defence Terrestrial Communications environment, one of the largest in Australia, is on the verge of a major
transformation. Join us to explore how Telstra and Australia’s Department of Defence have partnered to introduce best
practice architecture, new capabilities and an ongoing management and support structures. The new environment
delivers a robust platform for technological innovation, vital strategic initiatives and rapid response to future national
and global priorities, into the future.
Use this session to understand the transformed environment and how you might bring the technology to life for your
current or future needs. We’ll share:
• The new business and technical services that Telstra manage for Defence and the new capability that will support
them in the transformed environment
• How Defence ICT support is heightened in the event of military or emergency response and helps to ensure secure
and reliable command and control communication.
•
How the new communications solutions can help you to drive collaboration and productivity with your people
Additional insight – LTE advanced network for emergency services (LANES)
Learn how Telstra has worked with Victoria’s emergency services to introduce an innovative new solution supporting
critical communication. Through LANES, Telstra has provided certainty of emergency communication, even during
times of the extreme network congestion that can occur if disaster strikes.
1.5b Product Brief: Case Studies in Mobility for Classified Environments
Presenter: Mr Jon Green, CTO Government Solutions, Aruba Networks
Based on experience with the U.S. Commercial Solutions for Classified (CSfC) program, this session will present a
series of case studies showing how military and intelligence users have deployed commercial mobile devices and
networks in classified environments.
This broad technical briefing will demonstrate how standard commercial equipment can be combined with Aruba
technology to deliver highly secure mobile, WiFi and VPN solutions in real world scenarios. This includes:
•
•
•
•
A Wi-Fi network operating at the SECRET level with Windows 7 laptops
A mobile network operating at the TOP SECRET level with multi-OS laptops
A cellular LTE network operating at SECRET using Android handsets
An Ethernet-attached workstation supporting multiple security levels.
1.5c Product Brief: Dependable and Secure
Presenter: Mr Andy Start, President Inmarsat Global Government
Inmarsat has over 30 years of experience in designing, implementing and operating global mobile satellite
communications networks and has a track record of high-quality services and reliability. We have pioneered
innovations in satellite communication services to make higher data speeds available to smaller and lighter mobile
terminals. Our average satellite communications network availability exceeds 99.9% and this reliability was further
strengthened in 2013 with the successful launch of our new Alphasat satellite, providing in-orbit redundancy for the
Inmarsat-4 network. This dependability is particularly attractive to government and military-level users around the
world, whose operations typically require mission critical communications support. The successful launch of the global
express satellite in 2014 heralds the start of the next generation of satcom technology. A complimentary service to
WGS, global express will extend the capability of existing military terminals and increase broadband speeds available
to the end user.
1.6a Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream
Paper 1: Evaluating Impacts of System Integration on Joint Fires Operations
Authors: Edward Lo, Peter Hoek, and Andrew Au, Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Abstract. Advances in military information and systems technologies have greatly improved war fighters' situational
awareness on the battlefield and ability to make critical decisions in a timely manner. System integration is an important
enabler for improving planning and execution of operations via availability of timely, relevant information and
synchronization of activity. The Coalition Attack Guidance Experiment (CAGE) aims to assess potential joint fires
capabilities and the resulting operational impacts, which can be effective to meet challenges from new and evolving
threats. This paper highlights results from a recent CAGE activity and key lessons learnt to improve future endeavours.
Of primary importance is the need to consider the human dimension and extant processes for effective system
integration.
Paper 2: Simultaneous X/Ka-Band Feed System for Large Earth Station SATCOM Antennas
Authors: Christophe Granet, Ian Davis, John Kot, and Greg Pope, BAE Systems Australia Ltd, Australia
Abstract. A dual X/Ka-band feed system suitable for large Earth Station SATCOM antennas has been developed. The
feed system is suitable for simultaneous four-port operation over both X- and Ka-band and supports monopulse tracking
at Ka-band. Secondary radiation patterns on a representative 13m class reflector have been calculated and compared
with the requirements for WGS.
1.6b Refereed Papers—IEEE Stream
Paper 1: Enhancing Space Situational Awareness Using Passive Radar from Space Based Emitters of
Opportunity
Author: Craig Benson, University of New South Wales
Abstract. Space debris is a growing hazard to space users. Debris trajectories must be accurately predicted to maintain
safe space access. Accurate predictions are premised on precise knowledge of the current trajectory, and a detailed
understanding of disturbances that affect the future trajectory. Both tasks are facilitated by accurate and timely tracking
of debris. It is possible to track space debris using radar and telescopes, yet both are expensive and result in
unacceptable trajectory projections due to limitations on both accuracy and update frequency. In this paper we consider
the performance budget necessary to augment debris tracking by passive radar, initially using Global Navigation
Satellites as emitters of opportunity.
Paper 2: Practical Implications of the New Australian and New Zealand Laser Safety Standard
Author: Trevor Wheatley, University of New South Wales
Abstract. This paper provides an in context advance look at the practical implications to the Defence and general laser
community of the pending update to the premier Australian and New Zealand laser safety standard. It discusses the
significant changes to the standard, rationale and implications such as the revision of the maximum permissible
exposure (MPE) limits, the changes classification system and unavoidable issues creates by the adoption process. These
details are of value to laser operators, laser safety officers, policy makers, distributors and regulators alike who will be
impacted by this change.
1.6c Update: Developing a Mission Partner Environment; Lessons from Exercise Aqua Terra 2014
Presenters: MAJ Jason Broderick and Dr Peter Holliday, Land Network Integration Centre)
Exercise Aqua Terra 2014 (AT14) provided the Australian Army with a unique opportunity to build, test and evaluate
an Australian developed Mission Partner Environment (MPE) involving the five eyes ABCA community. This update
brief will present a background and summary of the key MPE enablers developed by the Land Network Integration
Centre (LNIC) for AT14, and provide an update on further improvements being evaluated by Army on the Road to
Hamel.
1.7a Product Brief: Building Safer Smart Cities
Presenter: Mr Leo Chu & Mr Jimmy Ng, NEC
1.7b Product Brief: High Throughput Satellite (HTS) Communications for Government and Military Applications
Presenter: Mr “D” D’Ambrosio, EVP Government Solutions, O3b Networks
O3b Networks’ solution uses Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites, which is an ideal solution for government and
military applications because of the three primary benefits delivered: high throughput, low latency, and focused
coverage. These beams can be put where the customer wants them, and adjusted constantly to where he wants them.
O3b’s “fibre in the sky” provides customers reduced latency and higher throughputs similar to terrestrial fibre.
The throughput on O3b’s satellites—as high as 1.6 Gbps in a single spot beam—provides uplink and downlink data
rates necessary for heavy traffic and large file sizes. Government and military IT groups’ Big Data requirements for
high volumes of varying data needing to be transferred at high speeds can be met. The low latency, high throughput
combination of the O3b solution supports interactive applications as well.
Because MEO satellites orbit far closer to the earth than a GEO satellite orbit (only 4,998 compared to 22,300 miles),
latency is reduced, (150ms compared to 500ms), so response time is dramatically faster. Cloud-based applications are
extremely important to government and military customers, but are extremely latency-sensitive. High latency makes use
of these productivity systems frustrating at best, and in many cases simply impractical.
In addition, since theO3b satellites only have high-powered, steerable spot beams, customers get connectivity where
they want and when they want between 62N and 62S. O3b has eight earth gateway stations globally, including two in
Australia. All gateway stations are built adjacent to terrestrial fiber rings, allowing the interconnection between remote
site, satellite terminal and the connection point allowing for full and complete backhaul. With O3b’s Beam on the Move
(BOTM) capability, it allows the beam to follow moving customers on the land, sea or air.
1.7c Update: Cloud Adoption for Government and the Large Enterprise – Lessons Learned
Presenter: Mr Mark Potts, CTO Corporate Strategy, Hewlett-Packard Company
Mark Potts is an HP Fellow, Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and Vice President Corporate Strategy. In this
presentation, he will cover:
• The Journey to the Cloud: Adoption paths and models, barriers and risk, where are we?
• Cost and/or Agility: The business value drivers.
• Hybrid Delivery: Organisational, business model and technology changes.
• Applications and Workloads: Which ones, new or migration?
• Obvious Concerns: Security, compliance, privacy, sovereignty etc.
Session Abstracts: Day 2—12 November 2014
2.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Hitachi Data Systems
Presenter: Mr Andrew McGee, CTO and Sales Director, Hitachi Data Systems
2.2 Plenary Session: Coalition and Whole-of-government Interoperability
Keynote Address: Major General Mike Milford, Head of ICT Operations Division, CIOG
Keynote Address: Mr Victor Vae’au, CIO, NZDF
2.3a Plenary Session: Capability Developments
Keynote Address: LTGEN John Caligari, Chief Capability Development Group
Keynote Address: CDRE David Scott, Director General Strategic Capability Coordination, Joint Capability
Coordination
2.3b Lunch Session Product Brief: New Directions in Secure Integration Management
Presenter: Ms Lisette Holmes, Mr Ross King, and Mr David Klein, Berkeley IT
Berkeley IT specialise in secure information management solutions. Operating in Defence since 1999, Berkeley IT
pride itself on delivering secure information management solutions to the ADO. We are dedicated to removing
information “stovepipes” and providing secure information management and exchange between applications,
dissimilarly classified networks, strategic and deployed systems, and between government departments and coalition
partners.
The session will be a “must see” for information management professionals in Defence, as we present a discussion on
information management and the methods we employ to deliver information in a secure manner to the ADF.
We will review recent developments and preview forthcoming product capabilities, including:
Substantial upgrade of the Nexus solution to meet the evolving needs of the Defence community.
 Enterprise Search with Context
 Inline Metadata Editing
 UI Enhancements
 Integration with Major Capabilities: Military Messaging, Objective, IC Pubs
Product Overview: Secure SharePoint via Enterprise Security Services Platform (ESSP)
 Insider Threat Protection
o No Lone Zone Patented Technology
o System Administrators Moved Away From The Data
o Devolved Administration Model
 Security Trimmed, Enterprise Search Capabilities
 Object Level Security
The session will demonstrate the practical benefits of reduced administrative overhead and improved information
security that Berkeley IT solutions are delivering every day.
2.4a Update: Rapid Prototyping, Development & Evaluation (RPDE) Program Update
Presenter: Mr Ken Snell, Engagement Manager, RPDE, CDG
RPDE is a unique collaboration between Defence, industry and academia, bringing together the best and brightest from
across the defence industry spectrum. Our mission is: To accelerate and enhance Australian Defence Force (ADF) warfighting capability through innovation and collaboration. When these forces join in a neutral, non-competitive
environment, knowing that intellectual property and commercial interests are protected, the results are formidable. This
update will cover a range of subjects that includes operational update and projects in progress, and coming
opportunities.
2.4b Update: Why Identity Management?
Presenter: Mr Richard Brown, Cogito Group
IdM is the management of individual and device identities, their authentication, authorisation, roles, and privileges
within or across system and enterprise boundaries with the goal of increasing security and productivity while decreasing
cost, downtime, and repetitive tasks.
Why do we need IdM?
IdM is inextricably linked to the security and productivity of any organisation involved in electronic commerce.
Companies are using IdM systems not only to protect their digital assets, but also to enhance business productivity. The
systems' central management capabilities can reduce the complexity and cost of an essential process. The centralised
access control also supports consistent security policy enforcement.
ID management systems also give organizations a way to control the swarm of untethered devices (Network Equipment,
Computers, mobile devices) in the enterprise. The ability to enforce a set of policies on the devices that connect with the
network through the management of the identities of the users of those devices is fast becoming a must-have security
capability.
Furthermore, the government says you have to care about identity management.
Benefits:
• Improved security, auditing and compliance
• Reduced operating costs US saved $142 per user PA = $14.2m for 100k users
• Dynamic access provisioning / deprovisioning
Challenges:
• Data mapping/alignment and transformation needs to be performed to simplify the automation of access control
decisions.
• Funding availability.
• Implementation can consume precious resources and
• Poor implementation can perpetuate existing problems
2.4c Update: Network Enabled Mission Command
Presenter: COL (Retired, US Army) Buddy Carman, ViaSat
“Net-Centric” discussions are misguided; the network is an ENABLER to leaders to accomplish missions, not the
center. The last decade of non-contiguous, non-linear, asymmetric conflict have highlighted the need for change in
sharing information and visualizing operations. The overwhelming majority of young leaders are “digital natives” –
having grown up in a world based on connectivity through the internet, mobile computing, and intuitive interfaces. The
military is woefully behind in leveraging the inherent skill set of digital natives as junior leaders in the military.
Networks need to be simple to use, adaptive and reliable. Formations will continue to operate well beyond the doctrinal
ranges they were designed to cover. The linear battlefield is unlikely to exist again, even against “conventional/near
peer” adversaries. Nation states and/or non-state actors have seen the impact of insurgent, low-tech, targeting on the
battle space that erodes combat power and disrupts lines of communication. Networks must include beyond-line-ofsight connectivity to overcome the effects of this asymmetric threat in complex, extended terrain. Efficient use of
bandwidth is critical to allow for real-time updates of friendly and threat positions, changes in control measures,
clearance of fires, as well as multiple modes of collaboration: voice, chat, and graphical. Security domains must also be
simplified to allow coalition/multinational task force collaboration, as “need to know” morphs into “need to share”.
Adaptive, efficient networks enable leaders to be successful in the future: reducing fratricide risk, enhancing decision
making, and enabling effective, timely targeting of threats.
2.5a Update: Meeting Defence’s Secure Information Sharing Challenge: MuSE
Presenter: Mr Daniel Lai, BSTTech Consulting
The need to efficiently and effectively share information securely and in a timely way has never been a greater
challenge for Defence. From Special Access Programs, Tactical Operations Planning, Intelligence, and Joint
Operations, solving this problem is a major priority across Defence.
BSTTech Consulting first presented at MilCIS in 2009 on the successful delivery of Silver Birch, an accredited Multi
Level Security system to securely share information across compartmented security holdings. Silver Birch was the first
NSA attribute based access control (ABAC) accredited system in Defence. This Update describes how that
Implementation led to the development of Muse (Multi Level Security Environment) Architecture to address the
challenges of Trusted Information Sharing.
From Strategy, through Architecture, to Solution, MuSE is a comprehensive system to address the challenges of secure
information management. MuSE has been proven to deliver Defence outcomes including The Single Information
Environment Security Architecture (SIESA) for Defence and the CIOG Nexus Architectural Review. BSTTech
presented the Single information Environment at MilCIS in 2012 and 2013.
This update tells the story of the development of MuSE from the implementation of Silver Birch to its application to the
SIESA and the Nexus Architectural Review. Most importantly it describes its applicability to how it can assist Defence
meet its current information management challenges addressing the need to provide information securely, flexibly and
in a timely fashion. The presentation will describe how this can be achieved cost effectively and rapidly implemented.
If you have an information sharing challenge this presentation is a must.
2.5b Product Brief: T360 – Trusted Information Sharing Capability
Presenter: Mr Bruce Talbot, BSTTech Consulting
The secure and controlled flow of information between parties is a key factor in achieving operational success. In
support of disaster relief, covert, bare base and other similar deployments, Defence operations frequently require
seamless collaboration between different people, nationalities, security clearance levels and information structures.
Using isolated networks for this purpose has proven to be overly complex, ineffective, costly and difficult to secure.
T360 has been designed to meet these specific operational requirements. It is a self-contained, portable product that
provides multilevel secure information management and control for communities of interest and deployed
environments. T360 has been designed using BSTTech’s MuSE Architecture Framework to align information sharing
and security requirements to mission objectives. Moving away from a roles-based approach to information
management, T360 combines business rules and attribute based access control (ABAC) to positively secure the flow of
information between parties and prevent unauthorised disclosure, modification or access. Not only does this
combination enable information to be accessed according to specific contexts, it also allows the conditions of access to
be dynamically modified to reflect events and changes in organisational/security policies.
This brief will outline how the product’s design draws on ICT enterprise architecture to balance information security
and sharing requirements and how it aligns to the Defence Single Information Environment Security Architecture
(SIESA). It will then demonstrate a number of scenarios to show how the product delivers trusted information sharing
for communities of interest within a Defence operational context.
2.5c Product Brief: Overcoming Physics for Networked Applications in a Consolidated Data Centre Architecture
Presenter: Mr Ian Raper, Regional VP, Riverbed ANZ
The existing and evolving Defence network architecture presents several challenges—not the least of which is the
tyranny of distance and the ever constant speed of light. Both challenge network design and this design is judged by end
users, be they Operational troops in the field or staff in HQJOC, and everyone in between. Their yardstick is the
performance of their applications and ultimately the end user experience.
The nature of incumbent applications based upon TCP/IP is that they tend to traverse the network many times for each
application function. Add in a measure of network latency for each application turn, due simply to distance rather than
bandwidth, and suddenly the end-user is experiencing unacceptable application performance. This is a challenge.
True centralisation involves minimising the hardware footprint at the remote offices. But some applications are heavy
network users and really need to have local storage and compute power. How can this be resolved? This is a challenge.
When centralised processing architecture exists for remote branch offices, there is a requirement to be able to recover or
restore operational capability in the event of a serious outage. This window to restore is governed by the physical
limitations of the network to perform this function. This is a challenge.
When a large change in network architecture is undertaken, it’s important to baseline the existing networked application
performance before you start. Once the change is made, how do you take out the human element and objectively know
the performance impact of the change? Have you satisfied the success criteria or not? This is a challenge.
This presentation will address these challenges and explain how Riverbed’s world-class WAN optimisation technology
is at the forefront of assisting Defence move to a faster, more efficient network infrastructure.
2.6a Product Brief: Deploying SharePoint in Theatre
Presenter: Mr James Milne & Mr Chris Rumel, Myriad Technologies
Some of the key challenges facing organisations today is the geographically dispersed networks both in Australia and
abroad and the limited network connectivity and availability. Sharing information in these hostile environments has
previously been limited and the need to exchange information about operations in the field is critical. In this session we
will demonstrate how Microsoft SharePoint 2013 technology combined with iOra Geo-replicator can be utilised to
allow collaboration on documents in multiple locations regardless of the network status.
2.6b Update: Crossing the Chasm
Presenter: Mr Craig Lindsay, Director Advisory Services, Cisco
In order to enhance security decision-making effectiveness and to ensure security can operate within an innovative
business framework, security needs to be more than a gatekeeper. The goal is to put in place the ability to discover,
investigate, adapt, and evolve your network such that it enable business and allow for new productivity measures
securely. Moving from a security practice that selects, integrates, logs and performs basic compliance of security boxes
to a model where security is a business partner protecting not only the security of but also the operations and brand of
the business is essential given current and further threats. In this regard, many companies are at the point of ‘Crossing
the Chasm’.
This session discusses how to ensure security can operate in partnership with business, operations and security
stakeholders. The end goal is for your security practice to be viewed as a partner rather than as an impediment within
the business that may be slowing down progress and productivity. Security can enable the business while managing the
increased environmental complexity and new technologies.
The use of data and machine speed analytics is a critical element of future security solutions, and must be combined
with sufficient defensive strategies to include security instrumentation, identity, zones, and access control to drive a
learning and adaption capability that keeps you at pace with the changes in your business or operational execution.
2.6c Update: Security and the Internet of Everything
Presenter: Mr Gary Spiteri, Consulting Security Engineer, Cisco ANZ
In the rapidly emerging Internet of Everything, which ultimately builds on the foundation of the connectivity within the
Internet of Things, adversaries committed to finding weak links and using them to their full advantage will be made
even easier. Anything connected to a network, in business, home and on the field, presents an attack surface to exploit.
The effects of cyber attacks are sobering, in terms of both costs and losses in productivity and reputation. This session
discusses threat intelligence and cybersecurity trends and what can be done to reduce their number and effects.
2.7a Refereed Papers—Industry Stream
Paper 1: Executable System of Systems Modelling for Options Analysis
Authors: Matthew Britton, The University of Adelaide and Gavin Puddy DSTO
Abstract. In this paper we demonstrate the viability of an affordable model-based end to end performance
determination of military System of Systems leveraging the model-based systems engineering framework combined
with a system execution modelling approach in the context of operational scenarios. We show how designs of COTSbased real-time systems, such as defence combat management systems, can be realistically analysed early in their
design lifecycle using the technique of executable modelling, potentially identifying problems earlier in the design
lifecycle than by using traditional design methodologies, with resultant cost and time savings. We then present results
of a system-in-the-loop experiment showing the performance of middleware implementations in realistic operational
conditions.
2.7b Refereed Papers—Industry Stream
Paper 1: Big Data over Limited Networks
Authors: Lawrence Poynter and Philip Wilcocks, iOra Limited
Abstract. This paper examines the emergence of Big Data repositories and the particular problems that are encountered
when these data sources need to be transmitted over limited military networks. Following a review of the historical
development of Big Data the paper details the technology challenges involved in the management and analysis of large
repositories and is illustrated by some existing and emerging military examples including applications in Intelligence,
Command and Control, operations, logistics and field maintenance. In an attempt to offer options for dealing with Big
Data an evaluation of some of the techniques that can be applied to data to overcome the network constraints that exist
are examined.
Paper 2: Rethinking Satellite Ground Station Architecture
Authors: Paul Solomon, Jeremy Hallett, and Samuel Kenny, Clearbox Systems
Abstract. The systems architecture of the satellite ground station has not changed significantly in the last 35 years.
However, during this time technologies have been developed that could serve to introduce sustained innovation to the
satellite ground station. This paper explores how recent advances in spectrum digitisation, high speed fibre
communications, and computational power may unlock the next evolution in ground station design and how the
convergence of Signal Processing and Heterogeneous Computing could lead to the development of an open hardware
and software platform for satellite signal processing. This would evolve the existing marketplace, opening up
competition and standardisation in satellite communications environments, paving the way for new levels of value,
capability, redundancy, flexibility and surge capacity.
2.7c Product Brief: Reduce Risk and Increase Collaboration through Secure Information Sharing
Presenter: Mr Jason Ostermann, Chief Engineer – Transfer Solutions, Raytheon Cyber Products
We are inundated with data at every turn. And that just involves work and personal data for yourself and your relatively
small network of contacts. Now, consider the same for billions of people, companies, and governments and imagine the
task of collecting and sorting out what is critical. World events continue to shed light on the fact that data collection
from satellites, sensors and other sources must be augmented with data from social networks for a full picture. This data
must be securely shared with a myriad of people and systems across governments, militaries, law enforcement and
corporations. The need to quickly, securely and appropriately link these entities through information sharing across
public, private, and national boundaries is critical to global security.
Governments and industries are realizing that ‘it takes a village’– no one entity can handle all this data on their own.
IBM estimates that 2.5 quintillion bytes of new data are created every day – ‘90% of the data in the world today has
been created in the last two years alone’. Entities from businesses to governments are tapping this vast data ocean to
develop multi-faceted holistic pictures. Big data is not just about analytics, before you can use tools, data must be
collected and stored in the right places with the right protections and access controls. Most data is from unclassified or
unrestricted domains – social media, the Internet. Before that data can be considered ‘intelligent’ or ‘actionable’ it must
be combined into a larger picture.
Cross domain information sharing solutions are built with strict security controls, ensuring that the right data is shared
with the right people and across systems to efficiently and effectively protect personal and public interests. Raytheon
Cyber Products provides a suite of solutions to ensure that your data is moved securely inside and outside of your
network.
This session will discuss the importance of secure data transfer – from machine to machine and person to person, while
mitigating against viruses, malware and policy violations.
2.8a Tutorial: Small Cells, HetNets, and Self Organizing Networks (SON): Benefits to Defence
Presenter: Dr Mark Reed, UNSW Canberra
Small Cells and Heterogeneous wireless cellular networks (HetNets) are being introduced to provide a scalable solution
to the forecast ten times increase in mobile broadband demand over the next five years. HetNets utilize multiple tiers of
cells to serve users, this results in a massive increase in operational complexity and cost if traditional approaches to
radio management are used. To overcome these challenges, SON has emerged as paradigm that can reduce costs while
at the same time yield optimal performance which otherwise can be virtually impossible with manual configuration.
This tutorial will first introduce Small Cells by looking at the utilisation and deployment scenarios. We will then
introduce key concepts of HetNets with emphasis on the air interface. We will finally discuss SON use cases, including
latest standardization activities and industrial progress. The tutorial will utilise examples from commercial activities,
however, we will also consider the benefits of this technology to Defence.
Session Abstracts: Day 3—13 November 2014
3.1 Breakfast Session Product Brief: Handheld Push-to-Talk Radio Over Satellite – Secure, Fast, Easy Remote Push-to-talk
Communications That Work Anywhere
Presenter: Mr James de Vroome, Business Development Manager – Enterprise & Government, Pivotel
Pivotel Group is an Australian owned and operated satellite communications company offering a secure, reliable
Australian satellite network across a range of satellite service providers. With network interconnect points across
Australia users can rely on their connection to the Pivotel Network Gateway to transmit sensitive information quickly
and securely.
Pivotel’s new Push-to-talk (PTT) service using the Iridium Satellite Network takes push-to-talk communications to the
next level. Remote Defence personnel often require a fast, reliable and secure communication channel for one-to-many
voice communications when making a one-to-one satellite call is not time-effective. The PTT service allows a group of
users to communicate in the same way they would use push-to-talk radio services, but using a secure, reliable satellite
connection. Using specially configured Iridium Extreme satellite handsets, a group of users within a specified
geographic footprint can simply push a button to broadcast a message to the other users within their talk group.
The Iridium Satellite Network offers truly global coverage and its Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite constellation
provides a fast PTT service with very low latency. Iridium’s PTT is secure; it uses AES256 encryption to transport all
PTT voice content; AES256 is one of the top encryptions in use and is currently used by the leading Governments when
transmitting top secret data. The PTT service is affordable and flexible, with the ability to configure handsets within a
group easily and quickly.
3.2 Plenary Session—Navy, Army, Air Force CIS Interoperability
Moderator: GPCAPT Darren May, Business Relationship Manager – Military, CIOG
Keynote Address: CAPT Brian Delamont, Director General Navy Communications and Information Warfare, Navy
Keynote Address: COL James Murray, Director Enabled Systems Development, Army
Keynote Address: WGCDR Daniel McManus, Deputy Director Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, Air
Force
3.3a Plenary Session: SecureCanberra Plenary
Welcome Address: W. Hord Tipton, Executive Director, (ISC)², Former CIO, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S.A
Keynote Address: Resilient Systems and Cyber Missions: Dr Mike Davies, Research Leader, Cyber Assurance and
Operations, Cyber and EW Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation
Keynote Address: Forensics in the Cloud: Prof. Jill Slay, Director, Australian Centre for Cyber Security, School of
Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales
3.3b Lunch Session Product Brief: Tactical Advantage for Data Management at Scale and Gaining Value
Presenter: Mr Callan Fox, Emerging Technologies Division, EMC Global Holdings
This session will explore a storage solution which make managing large datasets at scale easy, while providing out-ofthe-box integration with analytics platforms to gain intelligence from the data in place.
The sheer amount and ever-increasing sophistication of information can overwhelm analysis systems and processes.
Data from sources as varied as unmanned aerial vehicles, surveillance video, network devices and online chat result in
a constant flood of information so vast that only a fraction of it can be analysed quickly. The Intelligence, Surveillance
and Reconnaissance (ISR) community are struggling to develop capabilities to analyse intelligence at an unprecedented
speed and capacity. The growth in the number of UAVs collecting intelligence is exponential. Airborne sensors now
track dozens of targets simultaneously. UAVs feed full-motion video directly to front-line troops. Automated systems
suction emails, chats and Twitter feeds continuously from the ether, forming constellations of sensors and sensor
networks. The problem of collection has largely been addressed, but has created massive challenges related to storing
and analysing data, and to disseminate useful intelligence.
3.4a SecureCanberra Track
Optimising Cyber Security Learning Through Hands-on and Role-play Approach
Presenter: Mr Jimmy Ng & Mr Wee Kok, NEC
Developing an Architectural Framework Towards Achieving Cyber Resiliency
Presenter: Mr TBA, Secure Logic
3.4b SecureCanberra Track
The Changing Landscape: The Internet of Things
Presenter: Professor Sanjay Jha, University of New South Wales
Using Big Data to Secure Your Enterprise
Presenter: Mr Matt Carling, Cisco Australia
3.4c SecureCanberra Track
Understanding Advanced Threats: Identifying and Tracking the Hacker
Presenter: Mr David Roberts, NTT Comm Security
3.5a Product Brief: Google Cloud Innovation - Be More Secure in the Cloud
Presenter: Mr Andrew Sklar, Dialog Google Solutions Practice
With Google’s recent release of Google Drive unlimited, organisations are now offered with never before seen
unlimited storage capacity and live collaboration solutions at only $10 per user, per month. Google Drive is the only
tool in the world allowing live document creation, edit and review capability on any mobile platform across over forty
file types. These include MS Office file types, Google Documents and more.
With proven security certifications including Google Drive for Work and the corresponding data centres are SSAE 16 /
ISAE 3402 Type II, SOC 2-audited and have achieved ISO 27001 certification. For industries or geographies subject to
specific regulations, Google Drive supports FISMA, FERPA, and HIPAA and adheres to the Safe Harbor Privacy
Principles. Additionally, administration can leverage audit API’s to track sharing of files across any department and
allocate/revoke access as required, from any device, at any given moment.
Google Drive includes dozens of critical security features specifically designed to keep data safe, secure and in your
control. These include encryption in transit as your data moves from your device to Google, as it moves between
Google's data centres and encryption at rest when it is stored on your mobile device.
Drive for work and Google Cloud Innovation technologies deliver an Environment of tomorrow with unmatched
security protocols, data capacity, unsurpassed uptime reliability of 99.8% and a new benchmark of productivity.
3.5b Update: GIS for Defence Operations
Presenters: Mr David Eastman & Ms Kate Levy, Esri Australia
An ever evolving breadth and depth of sensor capabilities and outputs exists across the Australian Defence Forces
(ADF). This trend is adding to the collection of an almost overwhelming amount of data. Being able to intuitively and
effectively integrate, synthesise and share this information is critical for precise and timely decision-making, and is a
stated Defence goal. Almost all decisions in the defence environment involve location and as such, geography provides
vital intelligence. When making decisions, being able to answer the 'where?' component is important - and increasingly,
knowing the 'why?', 'what?' and 'where will' of any given scenario will become absolutely critical. Today's advanced
Geographic Information System (GIS) technology goes far beyond displaying a map background in a defence
application - and it is no longer a specialised niche capability in defence operations. Rather, GIS technology facilitates
the integration and exchange of information across and within Defence environments and has the capability to extend
information sharing to partners, agencies and allies. The technology also empowers individual staff by providing access
to information required to make informed and timely decisions. By leveraging geography, it provides a platform of
understanding - enhancing situational awareness and supporting decision-making across the spectrum of operations at
the strategic, operational and tactical levels alike. This paper outlines a new approach for how the ADF can deploy its
existing investment in GIS technology to seamlessly integrate its joint taskforces. It also discusses how the latest
paradigm shift in GIS technology will ensure a common understanding and flow of information across all levels of
Defence. The net result is better, faster, and less expensive analysis and information dissemination. For Defence, this
will result in more informed and timely decision-making, ensuring a cohesive and collaborative approach to all
operations.
3.5c Update: Defence Spectrum Management – Challenges and Trends
Presenter: Mr David Murray, Director Defence Spectrum Office, Department of Defence
Electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) is considered as a scarce and hence valuable resource by organisations operating
spectrum-dependant (SD) systems. In the military context, the ability to control access to electromagnetic spectrum is
crucial in the modern battlefield where advanced systems compete for spectrum. A commander would not commit
forces to an area in which he could not reasonably expect to contest freedom of action and the EMS is no different.
Access to spectrum when and where required is essential for a number of current and future Defence capabilities during
wartime and peacetime alike. Defence organisations own and operate a complex and advanced mix of SD systems in the
C4ISR domain, including but not limited to, space and terrestrial communications, radars, telemetry, training aids, base
protection, weapon control systems and electronic warfare systems. These applications are found on maritime, ground
and air platforms. In this brief we will discuss: the fundamentals of spectrum management, an overview of spectrum
related legislation in Australia, the provisions for spectrum access by Defence, sharing vs exclusive access to spectrum,
spectrum sharing methods, spectrum supportability, international regulations (ITU-R), frequency management tools,
emerging trends and spectrum technologies. The discussion consists of case studies (not necessarily Defence) of
spectrum supportability and frequency assignment in Australia. We will also look at the roles, responsibilities and
challenges faced by present day military spectrum management agencies.
3.6a Battlespace Communications System (Land) Development
Presentation 1: Land Network Concept and the Army Digitisation
Presenter: COL James Murray, Director Enabling Systems Development - Army
Land Network Concept and the Army Digitisation Implementation Plan with respect to the BCS(L).
Presentation 2:
Interdisciplinary Framework for BSC(L) Architecture and Engineering
Presenter: Dr. Mansoor Syed, Engineering Director, Project 2072, DMO
Large scale Defence systems are typically developed through a well established System Engineering approach.
However, ICT systems are increasingly developed using an architectural approach. Both approaches have their merit,
though an interdisciplinary approach for materialising large scale Defence ICT systems is not practised let alone
documented. The Joint Project 2072 has developed an interdisciplinary framework for developing ADF deployable
Communications Network infrastructure for land battlespace. The framework ensures that the development of
Communications Network Infrastructure is based on services model and functional model typical characterised for ICT
Architecture and Systems Engineering respectively. Key features of the framework include streamlining the ICT
architectural development process and artefacts within a typical Systems Engineering lifecycle process.
3.6b Battlespace Communications Architecture Considerations
Presentation 1: Considerations on ICT Architecture and Technologies for Battlefield Communications Systems (L)
Presenter: Mr. Anant Mahajan, Director/Lead Domain Architect – Land, CTO Division, CIOG
Different considerations are required for managing Information and Communications Networks in battlefield
environments. Strategic Network centric architecture and technology approaches need to be suitably adapted and/or
tailored for tactical edges where battlefield communications systems face a plethora of challenges.
This presentation will cover essential ICT needs of the tactical edges covering network characteristics, resource
availability, information assurance needs and user interface profiles. Furthermore, it will introduce a brief background
on the ICT reference architecture work that has been undertaken for the Defence deployed and Mobile tactical
networking environments. Future BCS implementation challenges with respect to technology and design patterns such
as SOA-based tactical systems, IPv6, Software defined networking and Network Function Virtualisation will be
discussed in brief
Presentation 2: C2 Systems Architectural Considerations in the Tactical Communications Environment
Presenter: Ms Jenny Abela, Chief Engineer, Project Land 75, DMO
The design of C2 Architecture and its ability to deliver timely information to the commander is challenging in a highly
mobile tactical environment. The effectiveness of a C2 system is not only dependant on the proficient integration and
use of the available communications network but in its ability to provide a customisable C2 system. Understanding and
balancing the commanders’ priorities, the growing demand for battlefield data and maximising the use of the available
communications bandwidth are all key contributors in the design of the system. The capability advantage of providing
the commander with a well designed C2 system that delivers an all informed “Common Operating Picture’ will increase
operational tempo and support quicker and more informed decisions.
3.6c Battlespace Communications Architecture Development
Presentation 1: Land Communications Reference Architecture Brief
Presenter: Mr Graeme Neil, Lead Architect, Project 2072, DMO
The Battlespace Communications System (Land) (BCS(L)) supports the information environment for the ADF land
battlespace. Effectively, the BCS(L) transports information around the land battlespace, thus enabling almost every
other Defence Capability within and about the battlespace. Joint Project 2072 has developed a Land Communications
Reference Architecture (LCRA), based on DoDAF v2.02 process, underpinning the acquisition, operations and
sustainment of ADF deployable Communications. The LCRA addresses the business of ADF Land Communications
through reusable Architectural Patterns, Architectural Objects and relationship between them. The LCRA scope
includes the Information and Security domains associated with the Land Communications. The LCRA is documented
together with a method for validation and evaluation of architectural artefacts. The Reference Architecture is delivered
via a BCS(L) Solution Architecture which informs the development of Capability Development Documents. The
Architecture Patterns, Architecture Objects and the method of architecture validation are employed to identify gaps
between the target and current Communications capabilities. The BCS(L) Solution Architecture is, in turn, implemented
via a BSC(L) System Architecture.
Presentation 2: Enlightenment: Modelling and Simulation of Radio Networks
Presenter: Dr Daniel Salmond, Senior Research Scientist, Cyber and Electronics Warfare Division, DSTO
Quantifying the performance of a radio network is notoriously difficult as performance depends on diverse parameters
in a complex and interacting manner. Modelling and simulation of radio networks is however, often the best available
means for evaluating their performance when it is not possible to test hundreds of radios in the laboratory using realistic
traffic models and path losses. However, modelling and simulation has its limitations and requires careful application
and assessment of the results. This presentation will discuss these issues using examples drawn from a recent modelling
and simulation activity undertaken by the Centre for Defence Communications and Information Networking (CDCIN)
on behalf of DSTO and the Australian Defence Battlespace Communications System Project Office. The CDCIN
characterised the performance of a network of over 700 radios implementing a TDMA waveform with well-defined
node dispositions and traffic load. In this case, modelling and simulation could indeed provide valuable data to assist
stakeholders in assessing the function and applicability of the proposed networks.
3.7a Tutorial: Collaborating with SharePoint
Presenters: Mr James Milne and Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies
This session will demonstrate how SharePoint can be leveraged as a collaboration platform in the field to share and
exchange critical information in a timely manner. During this session we will demonstrate how information can be
shared and updated in a collaborative manner. Using SharePoint to dynamically create content online can dramatically
change how information is shared within your organisation. Come along to this session to see how SharePoint can
change the way you work today.
3.7b Tutorial: Document and Records Management in SharePoint
Presenters: Mr James Milne & Mr Chris Rumel, Myriad Technologies
From the point of creation through to eventual disposal, an organisation's business information needs to be managed,
protected, secure and easily accessible. With unprecedented growth in electronic information and the complexities
inherent in determining what information to trust, to keep, to secure, and of course, to discard it becomes exceedingly
difficult for an organisation to effectively manage information. In this session we will demonstrate the technology
available today that can make managing, finding and securing information efficient and seamless.
3.7c Tutorial: Building Electronic Forms and Workflows to Streamline your Business Processes
Presenters: Mr James Milne & Mr Nathan Pearce, Myriad Technologies
This session will demonstrate how Nintex workflow combined with SharePoint can be used to workflow and automate
your business processes both within your organisation and in the field. During this session we will build an electronic
form and create the workflow behind the form to ensure the business process completes in a timely manner. Using
Nintex and SharePoint can dramatically change the way your organisation streamlines your business processes. Come
along to this session to see how Nintex can change the way you work today.
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