Document 418414

CHRISTIE’S SALE
A WARHOL GOES
FOR $82 MILLION
THE BEARDED
WHAT WORKS IN
THE BOARDROOM
ROGER COHEN
MERE HUMAN
BEHAVIOR
G-20 SUMMIT
WHERE HOPES
ARE STALLING
PAGE 8
INSIDE
PAGE 7
INSIDE
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CULTURE
|
SPECIAL REPORT
|
OPINION
|
SPECIAL REPORT
....
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2014
Obama plans
to protect
millions from
deportation
Russia to cut
cooperation
with U.S. on
nuclear sites
WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON
Ignoring Republican ire,
president looks to order
overhaul of immigration
Move could undermine
decades of work to secure
potential bomb materials
BY MICHAEL D. SHEAR,
JULIA PRESTON
AND ASHLEY PARKER
BY MICHAEL R. GORDON
President Obama will ignore angry
protests from Republicans and announce
as soon as next week a broad overhaul of
the nation’s immigration enforcement
system that will protect up to five million
undocumented immigrants from the
threat of deportation and provide many
of them with work permits, according to
administration officials who have direct
knowledge of the plan.
Asserting his authority as president
to enforce the nation’s laws with discretion, Mr. Obama intends to order
changes that will significantly refocus
the activities of the government’s 12,000
immigration agents. One key piece of
the order, officials said, would allow
many parents of children who are American citizens or legal residents to obtain
legal work documents and no longer
worry about being discovered, separated from their families and sent away.
That part of Mr. Obama’s plan alone
could affect as many as 3.3 million
people who have been living in the
United States illegally for at least five
years, according to an analysis by the
Migration Policy Institute, an immigration research organization in Washington. But the White House is also considering a stricter policy that would limit
the benefits to those who have lived in
the country for at least 10 years, or
about 2.5 million people.
Extending protections to more undocumented immigrants who came to the
United States as children, and to their
parents, could affect an additional one
million or more if they are included in the
final plan that the president announces.
Mr. Obama’s actions would also expand opportunities for immigrants who
have high-tech skills, shift extra security resources to the nation’s southern
border, revamp an immigration enforcement program called Secure Communities, and provide clearer guidance
to the agencies that enforce immigration laws about who should be a low priority for deportation, especially those
with strong family ties and no serious
criminal history.
A new enforcement memorandum,
which would direct the actions of Border Patrol agents and of judges at the
Department of Homeland Security, the
Justice Department and other federal
law enforcement and judicial agencies,
would make clear that deportations
should still proceed for convicted criminals, foreigners who pose national security risks and recent border crossers,
officials said.
White House officials declined to comment publicly before a formal announcement by Mr. Obama, who will return
from an eight-day trip to Asia on Sunday. Administration officials said details
about the package of executive actions
were still being finished and could
IMMIGRATION, PAGE 4
ANINDITO MUKHERJEE/REUTERS
Sterilization deaths
A woman recovering at a hospital in Bilaspur, India, on Thursday after sterilization surgery. Post-mortems on several victims suggested that tainted
medication given after the procedures at a ‘‘sterilization fair’’ was the most likely cause of the deaths of at least 13 women and the hospitalization of dozens more. PAGE 3
Report on World Cup bids is contested
SOCCER
Investigator says FIFA
distorted facts in clearing
Russia and Qatar to host
BY SAM BORDEN
Soccer’s governing body has found no
significant evidence of corruption in the
bidding among nations to hold the next
World Cups, clearing Russia to stage the
2018 tournament and Qatar to do so in
2022. But the conclusions were immediately contested by the investigator who
collected the evidence.
The conclusions were included in a
summary of the investigation released
on Thursday by FIFA’s head ethics
judge, who noted ‘‘potentially problematic conduct’’ by several of the bidding
nations but largely dismissed broader
questions about corruption in the voting
process, eliminating the possibility of a
revote.
The judge, Hans-Joachim Eckert, a
LYON, FRANCE
BY AURELIEN BREEDEN
MARLENE AWAAD FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES
A menu at a bistro in Lyon, France, with a sticker encouraging diners to ask for a ‘‘gourmet
bag’’ if they fail to finish their plate. The tag line reads: ‘‘It’s so good, I’ll finish it at home!’’
Saving Brazil’s river giant
Call to arms against anti-Semitism
Efforts to save the pirarucu, one of the
world’s largest freshwater fish, have
been a success while offering a strategy
for fending off a broader freshwater
extinction crisis. nytimes.com/world
The American ambassador to the
United Nations said Thursday that an
increase in anti-Semitism poses a threat
to Europe’s values and urged it thwart
anti-Jewish sentiment. WORLD NEWS, 4
Republicans focus on the budget
Deal clears way for global trade pact
Taking Alaska by storm
Get in the mind of Angel Collinson, a
24-year-old big mountain skier who is
making waves in the traditionally male
dominated sport. nytimes.com/video
Latin America and Catholicism
A panorama taken by the Philae lander from a comet’s surface. The lander
bounded up about a kilometer back into space before falling to the surface again. nytimes.com
The Roman Catholic Church’s claim on
the region is lessening as a younger
generation turns to Protestantism, a
Pew study finds. nytimes.com/upshot
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Morocco MAD 25
Mexico N$ 26.00
Moscow Roubles 110
Nigeria NGN 390
Northern Ireland £ 1.50
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Is CI$ 2.00
Estonia ¤ 3.20
Italy ¤ 2.80
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Denmark DKr 26
Finland ¤ 3.00
France ¤ 3.00
Gabon CFA 2.500
Great Britain £ 1.80
Greece ¤2.50
Germany ¤ 3.00
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Ivory Coast CFA 2.500
Jordan. JD 1.50
Kazakhstan USD 3.50
Kenya K. SH. 200
Kosovo ¤ 2.50
Latvia ¤ 3.25
Lebanon LP 4,000
Fabrice Moya, a chef with a boyish grin
who opened a restaurant of the same
name here 12 years ago, has no problems with doggie bags.
‘‘We’ve always been used to letting
people take what they haven’t finished,’’ he said on a recent morning in
his kitchen, where several of his cooks
were chopping fresh carrots and filling
buckets with chickpeas for the day’s
lunch service.
But it rarely happens — one doggie
bag per week at most, out of 500 customers, he estimated. They were much
I NSIDE TODAY’S PAP E R
With their new power and majority in
the Senate, congressional Republicans
have plans to transform Medicare and
Medicaid and to cut taxes for high
earners. nytimes.com/politics
Cameroon CFA 2.500 Ecuador US$ 3.35 Hungary HUF 800
00800 Canada
44C$ 4.5048Egypt78
27
EGP 15.00 Israel NIS 13.00/Eilat NIS 11.00
FIFA, PAGE 13
’:HIKKLD=WUXUU\:[email protected]@[email protected]@a"
WALTER BIERI/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Michael J. Garcia, who collected the evidence, said he would appeal the decision.
Doggie bags for French run up
against some leftover attitudes
ONLINE AT INY T. COM
Andorra ¤ 3.50
Antilles ¤ 3.50
Argentina US$ 5.00
Austria ¤ 3.00
Bahrain BD 1.20
Belgium ¤3.00
Bermuda US$ 3.50
Bolivia US$ 2.75
Bosnia & Herzegovina KM 5.00
Bulgaria ¤ 2.55
German who heads the adjudicatory
arm of FIFA’s ethics committee, released his 42-page summary after reviewing the work of Michael J. Garcia, a
former United States attorney and the
head of the investigatory chamber of
the committee.
But soon after Eckert released his report, Garcia harshly criticized his decision, saying in a statement that the adjudicatory chamber’s report contained
‘‘numerous materially incomplete and
erroneous representations of the facts
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Norway NkrFrance
28
Senegal
2.500
¤ CFA
3.00
Oman OMR 1.250
Serbia Din 250
Peru US$ 3.50
Slovakia
¤
3.30
Andorra ¤ 3.50
Poland ZI 12.20
Slovenia ¤ 2.50
Antilles ¤ Spain
3.50
Portugal ¤ 3.00
¤ 3.00
Qatar QR 10.00
Sweden Skr 28
CFA 2.500
Republic of Cameroon
Ireland ¤3.00 Switzerland
SFr 4.30
Reunion ¤ 3.50
Syria US$ 3.00
Gabon CFA 2.500
Romania Lei 11.50
The Netherlands ¤ 3.00
Saudi ArabiaIvory
SR 13.00Coast
Tunisia
Din 4.300
CFA
2.500
Turkey TL 6
Ukraine US$ 5.00
United ArabMAD
Emirates25
AED 12.00
Morocco
Venezuela US$ 2.75
Senegal
CFA
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Other US$ 2.00
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Din(Europe)
4.300
U.S. Military
US$ 1.75
Reunion ¤ 3.50
IN THIS ISSUE
No. 40,955
Books 9
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Amazon and Hachette end dispute
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Myanmar needs more time
The country is in the midst of changes
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writes U Soe Thane. OPINION, 7
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more likely to take home what was left
in their bottle of wine.
‘‘What’s important is to cook well,’’
Mr. Moya emphasized, and an empty
plate will follow. ‘‘If you do it with passion, people will eat.’’
That is not to say nothing is ever left
behind. Though the French remain resistant to taking home leftovers, a small
movement is afoot to change attitudes.
It has been encouraged by difficult economic times, rising consciousness
about food waste and an environmentally minded younger generation that is
more familiar with takeout culture.
As part of a wider drive to cut down on
food waste, authorities in the south-cen-
FRANCE, PAGE 4
Russia has informed the United States
that it is planning to reduce its participation next year in a joint effort to secure nuclear materials on Russian territory, a move that could seriously
undermine more than two decades of
cooperation aimed at ensuring that nuclear bomb components do not fall into
the hands of terrorists or a rogue state.
Sergey V. Kirienko, the head of Russia’s state nuclear corporation, has told
senior Obama administration officials
that no new projects in Russia are ‘‘envisioned’’ in 2015, according to American officials.
The officials still hope to persuade the
Russians to continue work next year on
some current projects, though Russian
officials have yet to agree.
The reduced cooperation is a
byproduct of the general downturn in
relations between Russia and the
United States, which has been compounded by President Vladimir V.
Putin’s decision to intervene militarily
in Ukraine, and again this week by a
Russian announcement that its longrange bombers would fly missions into
the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico.
Both moves have raised specters of a
return to Cold War-type tensions.
But the move also stems from longstanding concerns among Kremlin
hard-liners about a program that brings
American nuclear experts to Russia’s
nuclear sites and that, they fear, may
create the impression that Russia is in
need of outside help.
Russia also announced last week that
it was planning to boycott an international security summit meeting that is to
be hosted by President Obama in 2016.
But the message delivered by Mr.
Kirienko represents the first time that
the rising tensions between the Kremlin
and the Obama administration have
threatened to disrupt some of the practical efforts that the two sides initiated
at the end of the Cold War to help Russia
safeguard its nuclear materials.
‘‘There is a real danger that 20 years
of U.S.-Russian cooperation to secure
nuclear material will simply stop at the
end of this year, and some of the gains
we have made could slip away,’’ said
Matthew Bunn, a Harvard professor
who, during the administration of Bill
Clinton, supervised a classified government study on protecting nuclear materials in Russia.
A senior Obama administration official said the United States still planned
to work with the Russians on nuclear security efforts in third countries and
hoped to persuade Moscow to continue
cooperation in Russia.
‘‘We would hope that the door can be
left open to any and all forms of cooperation in this important area,’’ said the
administration official, who spoke on the
condition of anonymity to discuss diplomatic exchanges. ‘‘If a reasonable projRUSSIA, PAGE 4
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