2014 REGIONAL INCLUSION REPORT

2014 REGIONAL INCLUSION REPORT
JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN RECONCILIATION PARK
JIM LANGDON, 2014 CHAIR, MOSAIC
PUBLISHER, LANGDON PUBLISHING
FROM OUR CHAIR
As America becomes increasingly diverse and multicultural, it takes all types of talent and many kinds
of people to make a successful company. The best companies today realize it is essential that we adapt
our businesses toward creating and sustaining high-performing workforces that embrace diversity and
inclusion (D&I) and empower all employees to achieve their full potential.
Our success in promoting inclusive workplace cultures that
value differences, individual respect and professional growth
will create our region’s competitive advantage to attract,
develop and retain a skilled diverse workforce.
community outreach. We held Mosaic’s inaugural Economic
Inclusion Forum last October to spotlight 23 companies and
organizations within the region for their positive strides and
successes in D&I leadership.
Mosaic’s mission is to educate, lead and influence businesses
on creating diverse and inclusive workforce cultures to enhance
their competitive advantage. Our members are committed to
advancing the organization’s mission and create actions to
assist area businesses in embracing D&I within its practices
and policies to engage a broader base of business, innovate and
continue to grow in the global economy.
The end of 2014 marks a change in leadership of Mosaic
as Marilyn Ihloff becomes the chair for 2015 and 2016. As
my term as chair ends and leadership rolls to Marilyn it is
encouraging that economic support of Mosaic continues to
grow. Company benefactors have increased from two in 2013
to nine in 2014 and 12 in 2015. All interested persons are
welcome to attend and support the great work of Mosaic at our
monthly meetings on the third Tuesday of each month, 8 a.m.,
at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center.
Mosaic’s mission-centered committees - Membership, Business
Services, Communications, and Legislative - work to engage
thinking and create actions enabling Mosaic to best serve our
mission and grow. One such action was the development of
Mosaic’s diverse and inclusive culture survey to identify area
businesses operating with CEO commitment, diversity supplier
initiatives, diverse people practices, internal policies and
We can all be proud the Tulsa Regional Chamber created
Mosaic to catapult the Tulsa region into the forefront of
diversity and inclusion leadership. The initiative continues to
grow and achieve its important mission.
JUNETEENTH MURAL AT GREENWOOD CULTURAL CENTER
ABOUT MOSAIC
Mosaic is the diversity business council of the Tulsa Regional Chamber,
repositioned in 2010 to leverage the Tulsa region’s diversity, improve
perceptions of our community, and create an inclusive environment
enhancing our economic and social climate. Mosaic members represent
140 of the region’s most influential companies, individuals, organizations
and boards, all dedicated to Mosaic’s vision to catapult Tulsa into the
forefront of diversity and inclusion leadership through sharing best
practices, networking and identifying resources to ensure our global
competitiveness.
Through its endeavors, Mosaic has become both a trailblazer and a beacon in the diversity
and inclusion space. Its programming and initiatives are working to propel Tulsa forward
by building the business case for diversity and inclusion as a competitive advantage, while
fostering conversations and influencing business and legislative decisions for meaningful
change.
Mosaic is chaired by Jim Langdon of Langdon Publishing. Major financial benefactors
include Crafton Tull, Tulsa People and WPX Energy. Supporting sponsors include Bama
Companies, Inc., Bank of Oklahoma, Explorer Pipeline, Oklahomans for Equality, Reliant
Live and Williams.
MOSAIC’S MISSION STATEMENT
Mosaic will educate, lead and influence businesses on creating diverse and inclusive
workforce cultures to enhance their competitive advantage.
MOSAIC’S VISION
Mosaic will catapult Tulsa into the forefront of diversity & inclusion leadership.
2013 & 2014
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
»» 237 members – 112 new members
»» 136 companies or organizations
represented
»» 9 current or former chamber board
members
»» 3 active board members
»» 3 active TYPros leadership team
members
»» Added “diverse” business owner to
Chamber’s membership directory
categories to support diversity supplier
initiatives
»» Launched Mosaic’s Top Inclusive Workplace
Cultures Survey in 2013
»» Recognized our top inclusive cultures at
Mosaic’s inaugural Economic Inclusion
Forum in 2013
»» Validated Mosaic’s 2013 survey with
TCC’s Director of Planning & Institutional
Research and updated 2014 survey based
on recommendations for creating better
measurement of survey answers.
»» Joined DiversityInc in 2014
»» Tulsa delegation attended DiversityInc Best
Practice conference in New York City in
2014
»» Mosaic received 2014 Association of
Fundraising Professionals inaugural
Outstanding Diversity & Inclusion in
Philanthropy Award
»» ACCE’s 2014 Diversity & Inclusion Fellowship
awarded to Mosaic’s Executive Director in
2014
»» Tulsa Regional Diversity & Inclusion Month
logo and narrative created in 2014
»» 2014 Mosaic Hiring Event
»» 2014 Mosaic Lunch & Learns
2014 MOSAIC SURVEY
HIGHLIGHTS
The Business Services Committee partnered with Tulsa
Community College to conduct the 2014 Mosaic diversity survey
to gather baseline information about inclusion efforts within
regional companies. Below are a few snapshots from the survey
results. Thank you to all who participated.
Does your company/organization have a policy and commitment to
supplier diversity?
28% YES
72% NO
Our CEO visually supports and values our company/organization’s
diversity and inclusion work.
STRONGLY AGREE 64%
AGREE 16%
NEITHER AGREE OR DISAGREE 19%
DISAGREE 1%
STRONGLY DISAGREE 0%
WHAT’S NEXT?
powered by the tulsa regional chamber
31
COMPANIES HAVE
MADE CHANGES SINCE
2013 SURVEY
This survey serves a variety of purposes
including setting a benchmark for us
to measure against in the future. We
are also using survey results to guide
Mosaic over the next year and ensure we
are providing the best resources for the
region’s businesses and organizations.
LOOKING BACK TO 2013
53% YES
32% No
15% Other
LOOKING BACK TO 2013
CEO/local senior management
team values diversity
programs, policies and/or
practices?
71% highly value
20% Value
5% somewhat value
3% don’t know
1% doesn’t value
SUPPORTING DIVERSITY AND EQUALITY
2013 – 56% of responding companies had internal policies that provide equity
and support diverse employees
2014 – 63% of responding companies has internal policies that provide equity
and support for our diverse employees including advocacy above and beyond
affirmative action and EEO requirements.
60%
84 of the 139 (or 60%) companies who opened the survey responded.
DEVELOPING AND PROMOTING
2013 – 77.2% of respondents had a policy or practice to recruit hire, train,
develop and promote diverse candidates
2014 – 79% of respondents had a practice of recruiting, hiring, developing and
promoting diverse candidates.
More than 41,000
employees are represented
by the companies who
participated in the survey.
MOSAIC 2014 DIVERSITY SURVEY FACILITATED BY
2014
IN
★★★★ FOUR STAR SCORES
★★★★★ FIVE STAR SCORES
2014 TOP INCLUSIVE
WORKPLACE CULTURES
CL
USI
ULT
VE W
O R K P L AC E C
UR
E
COMPANY NAME
INDUSTRY
OK EES
FIVE KEY METRICS
American Airlines
Transportation
7,000
Mosaic’s five key metrics were identified
through extensive research of programs
across the U.S. and internationally. The
five key areas identified through studying
best practices and other diversity and
inclusion assessments are the foundation
for Mosaic’s program of work and identifying our top inclusive cultures.
Baker Hughes
Energy
300
Bama Companies, Inc.
Manufacturing
960
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma
Health Insurance
CAP Tulsa
Nonprofit
1,108
581
Enterprise Holdings
Customer Service
HP Enterprise Services
Data Processing
480
Oklahomans for Equality
Nonprofit
4
Risha Grant LLC
Marketing/PR
4
Spirit AeroSystems
Aerospace
800+
3,026
Tulsa's Young Professionals
Nonprofit
Verizon
Communications
2
ITT Tech
Education
50
John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation
Nonprofit
2
Key Personnel
Staffing
1,200
600
Northeastern State University
Education
ONE Gas
Energy
1,500
300
ONEOK Inc.
Energy
1,800
SMG Tulsa
Hospitality
575
Tulsa Community College
Education
1,488
Tulsa Global Alliance
Nonprofit
3
Tulsa Public Schools
Education
7,000
Williams
Energy
1,051
CEO COMMITMENT - visual and vocal
commitment to diversity and inclusion
work, including D&I statement on
company website.
DIVERSITY SUPPLIER POLICIES - written
diversity supplier statement, policies and
procedures including links to program on
their company website.
PEOPLE - recruit, train develop, support
and promote diverse candidates and
employees.
INTERNAL POLICY - supports and creates
equity for full employment base, race,
religion sexual orientation, etc.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH - publicly
supports diverse groups, organizations
and programs in their community and
region.
MOVING THE NEEDLE
Last year we asked “what can you do now?” Armed with best practices shared by Mosaic, Bama
Companies, Inc. and Union Public Schools set out to make positive changes in recruitment
techniques and in diversity and inclusion policies. These mini case studies are two prime examples
of how Mosaic is fulfilling its mission by educating, leading and influencing change in our region.
MABEL B. LITTLE HERITAGE HOUSE
BAMA COMPANIES, INC.
UNION PUBLIC SCHOOLS
At Bama, we go beyond understanding and accepting our differences. We appreciate and leverage those
differences to ensure every team member has the opportunity to reach their full potential personally and
professionally. This generates a mindset and culture where people live the Bama mission: “People Helping
People be Successful.”
At Union Public Schools, the faculty and staff believe that a culture of inclusivity and connectedness for
all 16,000 students is key to maximizing student potential. The mission of “100% graduation, college
and career ready” removes barriers so every student has access to the vast curriculum options, fine arts,
athletics offerings, and the wealth of clubs and activities that promote strong relationships among peers
and school.
Diversity and inclusion is a cornerstone of our
Organizational Development System and our business
processes. We demonstrate this by committing to the
following: inclusive talent pipeline practices including
identifying non-traditional talent pipeline models like
Women In Recovery, equitable talent development, CEO
and Leadership commitment to diversity, and supplier
diversity statement and practices.
In the last 12 months, Bama has reviewed our diversity
programs and made these changes to reflect our
commitment to diversity and inclusion in the workplace:
»» Updated our policies to reflect in word the actions we
were already practicing in “People Helping People be
Successful.”
»» Revised and published our team member and
supplier diversity statement.
»» Implemented diversity and education training for our
management team.
»» Provided additional benefits under our EEOC
guidelines.
»» Added LGBTQ protection clause to our policy
manual.
»» Added domestic partner benefits.
Bama recognizes that it will be a long journey for our
inclusion initiatives to become best in class. Due to
our CEO’s passion, we have made a commitment to be
focused and intentional in this work. We continue to
ensure inclusion within Bama’s environment and also
support employees in community roles that create an
inclusive business climate in Tulsa and around the world.
Under the direction of Superintendent Dr. Kirt Hartzler,
the district intentionally implemented diversity and
inclusion strategies within its strategic plan for 20142018. The district’s leadership began attending Mosaic
meetings and utilized the Mosaic network and resources
to strengthen its commitment to inclusive hiring
practices.
Since embracing the strategies and making diversity and
inclusion a key component of its goals and strategic plan,
the school district has:
»» Recruited a more diverse faculty and staff to mirror
the makeup of the student body.
»» Placed a stronger focus on indicators that measure
progress toward excellence and equity.
»» Experienced a rise in achievement in the classroom
and widespread participation in extracurricular
activities.
»» Record number of students are taking advantage of
the 20 Advanced Placement classes and nine college
courses offered on the high school campus.
»» Experienced lowest dropout rates in over a decade.
»» Added a student-led group, the College and Career
Crew, giving 9-12th grade students the chance
to return to their neighborhood schools to provide
younger students with the information and motivation
to be “college and career ready.”
»» 11 National Merit Scholars or Commended Scholars,
and two students received the College Board’s
Hispanic Scholar designation 2014-2015.
Though there is still work to be done, Union Public
Schools has made enormous strides in recognizing and
embracing its diverse population. The district truly
sees its growing diversity as a strength - and so do its
students.
DEMOGRAPHICS
PROJECTED U.S. POPULATION GROWTH 2010 -2050
1%
56%
142%
167%
White
Black
Asian
Hispanic
1 in 9
OKLAHOMANS ARE LATINO OR ASIAN
The Latino share of Oklahoma's population grew from 2.7% in
1990, to 5.2% in 2000, to 9.2% (or 347,623 people) in
2011. The Asian share of the population grew from 1.0% in
1990, to 1.4% in 2000, to 1.7% (or 65,513 people) in 2011,
according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
CITIZENSHIP AMONG
OKLAHOMA CHILDREN
92.7%
94.2%
LATINO FAMILIES
ASIAN FAMILIES
LATINO BUYING POWER
In 2009, 94.2% of children in Asian families in Oklahoma were U.S. citizens, as
were 92.7% of children in Latino families.
$7.2 billion
Oklahoma's 7,663 Latino-owned businesses had sales and
receipts of $1.7 billion and employed 8,940 people in
2007, the last year for which data is available.
ASIAN BUYING POWER
Oklahoma's 6,736 Asian-owned businesses had sales and
receipts of $1.8 billion and employed 15,673 people in
2007, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's Survey of
Business Owners.
an increase of 907.4% since 1990.
$2.9 billion
an increase of 587.3% since 1990.
In Oklahoma, 31.7% of foreign-born persons who were naturalized U.S. citizens in 2011 had a bachelor's or higher degree,
compared to 13.7% of noncitizens. At the same time, only
22.1% of naturalized citizens lacked a high-school diploma,
compared to 50.6% of noncitizens.
MOSAIC LEADERSHIP
Jim Langdon, 2014 Chair, Langdon Publishing
Marilyn Ihloff, 2015 Chair, Ihloff Salon
MOSAIC COMMITTEE CHAIRS
Alaina Jones, Mosaic Communications Committee
Isaac Rocha, Mosaic Business Services Committee
Shane Fernandez, Mosaic Legislative Committee
Derek Gates & Robert Babcock, Mosaic Membership Committee
MOSAIC MEMBERS
Accounting Principals
Girl Scouts of Eastern
Oklahoma
Northeastern State
University-Broken Arrow
Teri Aulph Consulting
American StaffCorp
Aquavita Creative
GOSA.TV
OCOSA Communication, LLC
Arvest Bank
Greenwood Chamber
The Oklahoma Center for
Community and Justice
Baker Hughes
Hmong American Association
of Oklahoma, Inc.
OK National Hispanic
Christian Leadership
Conference
Hogan Taylor
Oklahoma Baptist University
HP Enterprise Services
Oklahoma Center for NonProfits
Bama Companies, Inc.
Bank of Oklahoma
Better Way to Wealth
Blue Cross Blue Shield of
Oklahoma
Hyatt Regency Tulsa
IHelpTulsa.Com
BlueView
Ihloff Salon and Spa
Brady Arts District
IMWell Health, LLC
Brickhugger LLC
Indian Health Care Resource
Center
Bronco Manufacturing
Building Excellent Schools
Camp Fire Tulsa
CAP Tulsa
Capital One
Celebrating Difference, LLC
Cherokee Nation
Entertainment
Oklahoma Policy Institute
Oklahomans for Equality
ONE Gas
ONEOK Inc.
Osage Casinos
Indo-American Chamber of
Commerce (IACCO)
P&R supply & company
ITT Tech
Phillips Theological Seminary
J. Hale & Associates, LLC
Pine Hill Consulting
Jenkins Consulting Group
Pollard & Associates
John Hope Center for
Reconciliation
Reliant
Pancho Anaya
KSS Fuels
Residential Title & Escrow
Services Inc.
LaMode Quality Cleaners
Resume Writers’ Inc
Langston University
RGP
Commerce Bank
Legal Aid Services of
Oklahoma, Inc.
Risha Grant LLC
Crafton Tull
Legal Shield
D. W. Gates Engineering
Saint Francis Health System
Linde Process Plants
DirectConnect
Samson Resources
McGee Enterprises Inc.
Dollar Thrifty
Schnake Turnbo Frank
Mental Health Association
in Tulsa
Scott McCoy Insurance
Chinowth & Cowen Realtors
City of Tulsa
College Bound Academy
EduRec
Esteem Community
Development
MetLife
Rural Enterprises
Selser Schaefer Architects
Socialvention
EverMore Services, LLC
Metropolitan Tulsa Urban
League
Explorer Pipeline
Mill Creek Lumber & Supply
Steven Michael’s Photography
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation
Morgan Stanley Wealth
Management
T.D. Williamson, Inc
TARC
Freedom to Marry
Morton Investigations
Tate Law Firm
GARBA Event Designs
New York Life Insurance
Company
Teach For America
NORDAM
Tedford Insurance
Gatesway Foundation
Gateway Market
State Farm
TEDC
The Insurance Crew
The Persimmon Group
The Q4 Group
The Working Staff
TriArch
Tulsa Camp Fire
Tulsa Community College
Tulsa Community CollegeHispanic Student Association
Tulsa Global Alliance
Tulsa Hispanic Chamber
Tulsa Historical Society
Tulsa Police Department
Tulsa Public Schools
Tulsa Regional Chamber
Tulsa Tech
Tulsa World
TulsaPeople
Tulsa’s Young Professionals
Tyler Media
U.S. Cellular
Union Public Schools
University of Oklahoma
Wayman Tisdale Specialty
Health Clinic
University of Oklahoma-Tulsa
University of Tulsa
Up With Trees
US Cellular
Wells Fargo
Williams
Workforce Tulsa
WPX Energy
YWCA Tulsa
Zaida Kepford Language
Skills
Mosaic Benefactors
Mosaic Supporting Sponsors
Bama Companies, Inc.
Bank of Oklahoma
Explorer Pipeline
Oklahomans for Equality
One West Third Street, Suite 100
Tulsa, OK 74103
TulsaChamber.com
Reliant Live
Williams
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