Township Times - Richland Township

RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 1
RICHLAND
Township Times
FALL 2014
Inside
Article
Page
Snow Removal Tips
for Residents
2
Pictures from
Creative Arts Camp
4
Tim’s Two Cents About
the QCSD
5
Penna: Past Time for a
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
6
Why Not Plant a Tree?
9
Interaction Important to
Achieve Results
12
Pictures from
Mad Science Camp
13
Richland, QCSD &
Pennsylvania
14
State Education Funding 18
Garden Plots Available
in Spring
20
Richland Historical
Society Update
21
Three More Farms
Added to Open Space
21
Exciting Changes: RTPD
23
To Recycle or
Not to Recycle
24
Leaf Collection
Schedule
26
Dispose of Used CFL’s
28
Community Accountability Program
Left to right: Bucks County Commissioner Charlie Martin, Bucks County Commissioner Diane EllisMarseglia, Bucks County District Attorney Chief of Prosecution Matt Weintraub, Quakertown Police
Chief Scott McElree, Quakertown Police Officer Bob Lee, Richland Township Police Chief Rich Ficco,
Richland Township Police Officer Matt Lawhead, and Bucks County Commissioner Rob Loughery.
In September of 2011, District Attorney
David Heckler approached Chief Rich
Ficco about starting a pilot program in
the Upper Bucks area for first time adult
offenders. The brainchild of District
Magistrate C. Robert Roth and Court
of Common Pleas Judge Rea B. Boylan,
this project began with meetings on
how it would proceed. Richland and
Quakertown Police were invited to be the
pilot or test area for this program.
By the end of 2012, CAP, as it is
known, was up and running. The
program allows low level, non-violent
offenders a chance at redemption by
going through a program administered
by the community instead of going
through the courts. This program has
been a big success due to the support
of the two police departments, the
judges, the district attorney’s office and
our community panel members. This
program has been expanded to include
Central Bucks and is on its way in Lower
Bucks County.
On Wednesday, October 1, 2014, the
Bucks County Commissioners held
their meeting at Benner Hall, hosted by
the Borough Council of Richlandtown.
On the agenda was a commendation
for four police officers. Chief Rich
Ficco and Officer Matt Lawhead of
Richland Township Police and Chief
Scott McElree and Officer Bob Lee of
Quakertown Police were awarded the
County Commendation from County
Commissioners Loughrey, Martin and
Ellis-Marseglia.
All articles submitted by elected supervisors and contributing writers may or may not reflect the official policy of Richland Township.
PAGE 2
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Township Personnel
Supervisors:
Craig Staats, Chairman
Richard Orloff, Vice Chairman
Tim Arnold
Township Manager:
Stephen Sechriest
Assistant Manager/
Zoning Officer:
Richard Brittingham
Administrative Assistant:
Laura Held
Treasurer:
Charles Botson
Assistant Treasurer:
April Hillaert
Receptionist:
Tracey Virnelson
Code Enforcement Officer: Ray Constable
Solicitor:
B. Lincoln Treadwell, Jr.
Road Department:
Thomas Roeder, Public Works Director
Leonard Johnson • Jeff Ohl
Michael Schmell
RTWA: Dianne McLane, Office Manager
Tim Gluck, Operations
Engineering Department:
Mike Schwartz, Amy Kaminski
Gilmore & Associates
David Jones, Judy Stern Goldstein
Boucher & James
Police Department:
Chief Richard J. Ficco, Sr.
Rosemary Wheatley, Admin. Asst.
Nancy Benfield, Receptionist
Sergeant Michael Kisthardt
Det. Sergeant Ray Aleman
Matt Mergen • John Burke
James Hohenwarter • Ryan Naugle
Matthew Lawhead • Thomas Murphy
Brian Hendrzak • Zachary Herb
Ronald Rosenberg • Michael Colahan
Patrick Kitchenman
Auditors:
Samuel Quier, Chairman
Bill Spanier • Nathan Fox
Snow Removal Tips for Residents
from the Public Works Department
While we are enjoying this beautiful
time of year, we should remember that
snow season is just around the corner.
When the road crew removes snow
from the street, we must push the
snow to the outside of the roadway.
The plow operators do their best to
make sure nobody gets more than
their “fair share” of snow, but the
snow must go somewhere, and some
of it goes in front of driveways.
Here are some tips for residents to
make it easier on everyone:
• Wait until the trucks are finished
plowing to shovel your driveway, if
possible.
• As you are standing in your
driveway facing the street, shovel
snow to the right of the driveway,
otherwise the plow will push the pile
into your driveway on the next pass.
• Depositing snow in the street
is a violation of local law. Why not
place the snow on the yard behind the
sidewalk?
• Park off the street whenever
possible. When plows have to
negotiate around parked cars, it takes
us longer, and snow will get packed
tightly around your car making
shoveling more difficult for you.
• Observe and obey Snow
Emergency Routes. Our police spend
valuable time getting residents to
move vehicles off Snow Emergency
Routes. Whenever snow is deep
enough to plow, move your vehicles to
clear the snow routes.
• Make sure your mailbox is sturdy
and placed as far off the roadway as
practical. If the mailbox is on the road
right-of-way and is damaged by snow,
the township is not responsible for
damage. If the mailbox is actually hit
by the plow we will take responsibility
for repair. It is rare that a plow
actually hits a mailbox. Most damage
is done by the weight of the snow
coming off the plow.
• Move basketball nets far away
from the street and curb. Nets hanging
out past the curb are still in the way.
Snow plow operators are doing a
difficult job under adverse conditions.
They are not trying to make life
difficult for you, they are doing their
best to make traveling safe for you and
emergency vehicles.
Richland Township
Committees
Agricultural Security Area
Advisory Committee (ASAAC)
Craig Staats, Chairman
Dale Henninger • Robert Gerstenberg
John Keller • Thomas Stoneback
Robin Davidheiser
Community/Police Liaison Board
Jim Sulger, Chairman
William Rosson • James Smith
Andrew Maseloff • Barbara Werner
Patricia Keller • Frank Hilt
Wayne Rubic • Jonathan Taylor
Steve Cardell • David Galione
Leanna McGuigan
Facilities Committee
Richard Stoneback, Chairman
Mike McGee • Mark Fournier
Karen Mallo
Patricia Keller • Steaven Klein
Chris Fennell • Richard Petovic
Ordinance Review Committee
Richard Keller • James Stiteler
Larry Jalowiec • George Schwartz
Park & Recreation Board /
Trails Committee
Cynthia Rosson, Chairman
Tom Marino • Greg Pambianco
Barbara Keller • Michelle Loux
Planning Commission
Timothy Ritter, Chairman
Chris Fennell • Scott Guidos
Robert Bonomo • Mary Sulger
Cathy Woods • Gwen Simek
Preservation Board
Kathleen Fedorocsko, Chairman
Dale Henninger
Douglas Godshall • Richard Sadler
Joe Geib • Neil Erkert
Water Authority
Ken Mitchell, Chairman
Chris Vanelli • Zane Stauffer
Bruce Jones • William Rosson
Tim Arnold, Executive Director
Mark Bahnick, Engineer
Stephen Shelly, Solicitor
Zoning Hearing Board
Thomas Steinfort
Todd Koch • Emery Ashton
Al McCrea Jr., Alternate
Kok Keng Yong, Alternate
Richard Brown, Solicitor
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 3
From the Chair
A Great Team – ALL of Richland can be Proud!
by Craig Staats, Chairman, Richland Board of Supervisors
From time to time we get notes, run into people at
township events or shopping, see people walking away
happy or relieved after doing business with the township,
or petitioning for help with a problem at a Board of
Supervisor’s meeting. We receive letters or emails thanking
the police, or Tom Roeder’s road crew, more or less saying
“nice work” on our customer service to you. Complaints
are far fewer than ten years ago. That begs the question,
“How did that come to be?”
The answer is - The ENTIRE Richland governing
team, elected officials, permanent staff and an extensive
volunteer and ad hoc committee system. Looking back
over the past nine years of my own time as a Supervisor, it
stands to reason.
Consider:
• The facilities committee, under Rick Stoneback’s
leadership, led to the $2.6 million state of the art Police
Station. Stoneback, a professional engineer, saved us some
tens of thousands in consulting fees.
• Retired Supervisor Steve Tamburri authored the policy
of negotiating with developers, as opposed to fighting
them, which led to millions in public infrastructure like
traffic lights, walking trails, fire company donations and
much more.
• Under the Park & Rec leadership of Carla DeMuro and
Paul Hetrick, we now have Veterans Park and the preeminent girls softball complex in the region.
• I was honored to be appointed by the Supervisors
(before becoming one) to lead the Preservation Board
that has since been carried on by Kathy Federoscko and
resulted in over 1,400 acres of preserved land.
• Former Supervisor Patricia Keller, under intense
criticism at the time, led in pushing through the
roundabout - now copied in dozens of communities across
Pennsylvania.
• Under Vic Stevens, Dick
Keller, Doug Landes and others,
we now have a comprehensive
Ordinance Codification that would have cost over $40,000.
• And our financial position is outstanding due, in part,
to the skill of my colleague, Supervisor Rick Orloff, who is
a Certified Public Accountant.
• I can think of Emery Ashton of Walnut Bank Farm who
developed our annual Community Day.
• Supervisor Tim Arnold, who has developed the family
Movie Nights under the stars.
• Dianne McLane, who does this Newsletter, has
won Richland five awards out of 1,500 contestants. (Our
newsletter format is now widely copied).
Thinking of our staff, when someone calls the township
for assistance, the first person they speak to is Tracey
Virnelson - always a sunny demeanor. If they ask for the
manager, they get Steve Sechriest, who thoroughly and
carefully researches EVERYTHING before moving to an
answer or bringing it to the Board. Have a permitting or
zoning issue? Speak with Rich Brittingham, who again
moves to solve problems BEFORE “writing citations.”
Public Works Director Tom Roeder initiated weekly fall
cleanups and this year, for the first time, a spring cleanup –
curbside at your home. The crew of Curt Hinkle, who just
retired, and steadfast Leonard Johnson (who does more
at 70 than many 50-year-olds) Jeffrey Ohl and Michael
Schmell do an able job under Tom.
And let’s not forget our police. Initiated under the
leadership of Chief Woods, Chief Ficco has continued his
good legacy. Our officers have had the highest “officer to
call” ratio in the five county Philadelphia region, making
them THE most productive police agency - a great group of
guys with servant hearts.
Continued on page 7
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FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Pictures from Creative Arts Camp
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 5
Tim’s Two Cents About the QCSD
by Supervisor Tim Arnold
How about all the changes that
we have seen occurring at the
Quakertown School District (QCSD): a
new Superintendant, new curriculum,
new bussing system, and new surface
on the football field? I could go on. But
yet there is still so much negativity
being thrown around about the QCSD.
OK folks, everyone back to their
neutral corner, and let’s take a breath
while I attempt to gather my thoughts
and give you my two cents.
First topic
Let’s start with our newest Superintendent, Dr. Harner. Whether you
like him or not, he is now the guy
running the school district, and we can
sit back and put a microscope on him
and wait for him to make a mistake, or
we can make statements such as “he
was given this job because he knew
someone,” or how about “we should
have interviewed other applicants,” or
“I just don’t like him because someone
else does.” Sound familiar? Yeah, I
know, I heard it too.
But guess what? He’s the guy who’s
now running the show. So go to the
School Board meetings and listen
to what he has to say and watch the
direction that the School District is
going. I have had the opportunity to
speak with Dr. Harner several times,
and have been impressed with what I
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have heard him say and the direction
he would like to see the District go.
I’m a true believer that our actions
speak louder than our words. We will
see.
OK…on to the next
How about this new grading
system? This topic has been hot and
heavy for many years and the School
Board has decided to eliminate the
standard base grading. What are my
thoughts on this? I think the form
of grading system is important to
my daughter’s education, but I also
feel that the curriculum and how it’s
taught is important.
I am of the opinion that if we
curently do not, maybe we should
get the teachers involved in the
conversation about the curriculum
that is being taught to our children.
Get a curriculum that the teacher can
teach and the students can follow.
Do you think that our teachers wake
up every morning with the thought
on their mind, “how can we mess up
these kids’ futures?” No!! They care
about our kids and they want to see
them achieve in life. So let them teach.
Almost done
I had someone call me and tell me
about the new bussing schedule,
and by the tone of their voice I really
thought the world was going to end
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on the first day of school. With the
many delays that happened as a result
of the new schedule, some people may
think it did. But guess what? It didn’t.
Is it an inconvenience to some? Yes,
it probably is, but if the saving to
us taxpayers of $400,000.00 a year is
correct, I think we can stick it out.
I’m getting there, I promise
How about the new surface on the
football field? I think it looks great.
The naysayers may say we spent
too much on it or it shouldn’t have
been done. Those are probably the
people who didn’t have kids playing
football, soccer, field hockey or the
great Quakertown Community School
District band on a muddy field that
smelled like my shoes. That’s a bad
analogy but you get the idea.
In closing
After reading this, I’m not expecting
everyone to get together, hold hands
and sing “Kumbaya,” but can we
agree on one thing? What we really
want is the best education for our
children. Who doesn’t hope that their
children have it just a little better than
we did? I know I do.
You see, my friends, as we sit
back, argue and debate about all the
issues and problems that occur in
our district, let’s remember the big
picture… our children.
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PAGE 6
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Pennsylvania: Past Time for a
Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
by Richard W. (Rick) Orloff, CPA
In 2001, Pennsylvania’s Teachers and Government
Pension System (PSERS) was more than fully funded at
110% of its obligations. In 2014, it’s now underfunded by
$50 billion. By way of contrast, (not counting agencies like
the Turnpike Commission), the entire state budget is about
$29.6 billion. In 2001, Governor Ridge and the Legislature
created this debacle, Schweiker did nothing, Rendell made
it worse, and Corbett effectively has followed suit. Look for
an increase in the sales tax and a 4% (or more) state income
tax. Local school districts are piling on as well. In QCSD,
the entire 2014 tax increase went to PSERS; 10% of the
entire QCSD budget is now dedicated to pensions.
Sadly, few citizens are aware of the situation, even
among PSER beneficiaries. With QCSD’s labor rates among
the highest in Pennsylvania, Richland will get hit harder.
My message to legislators: There’s not enough revenue
from shale taxes to pay $50 billion, PLUS your other wish
list items. Legislators think Shale Oil will pay for this
debacle.
At the heart of this is hubris and corruption; teachers
and other public unions, in bed with legislators of BOTH
political parties, cooked this broth. Fixes are beyond
gimmicks. Significant tax increases are likely. It’s one
thing to bear a general tax increase for a broad based
public program; quite another to tax 12.4 million people
to transfer their money to 300,000 people associated with
powerfully connected public unions. Taxpayers have no
market choice in the matter.
Offsetting spending cuts are not doable; the $30 billion
state budget is allocated a third each for the states’
education subsidies, public welfare and everything else
including roads, law enforcement, parks and a number of
other programs. Pensions (and Medicaid – another story)
will overwhelm the state budget if left unabated.
A solution? A Chapter 11 Bankruptcy - or relocate
to a competently governed state. Chapter 11 permits
reorganization under the bankruptcy laws of the United
States.
Bankrupt parties can reorganize affairs in order to
meet obligations in an orderly manner. In the process,
all existing contracts can be redone, making it possible to
fix this debacle (including union and pension contracts).
A governor does not need the legislature to declare
bankruptcy - only the courts. Reorganization could
include restoring ALL pension benefits to pre-2001 levels.
Controlling wage growth in the over compensated public
sector would further address the problem. Ending payouts
BEFORE age 60; making that 62, the same as Social
Security, would also help. To continue allowing teachers
to pull 80% of pre-retirement income starting in their mid
50’s is unaffordable – and absurd. The rest? Speaking for
myself, I’d be willing to pony up some tax money provided
there are real reforms on the payout side. So would most of
the people.
Indeed, government bankruptcies are not unheard
of. In the 1870’s and 1840’s, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana,
Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Florida AND
Pennsylvania filed for bankruptcy. Pennsylvania incurred
debt through the building of canals to connect the Midwest
to ports on the Atlantic Ocean. At least Pennsylvania in
1840 had public works and improved transport systems
to show for its debt. Pennsylvania’s 2014 debt is “ALL IN”
for an exclusive well-connected club: Pennsylvania’s state
government and school employees, and its legislators.
Credit rating agencies are not waiting. Pennsylvania’s
credit worthiness was downgraded twice in recent years
due to the PSERS debacle. Doing nothing is not an option.
Rick Orloff is a practicing Certified Public Accountant. He
holds an MBA in Finance from St. Joseph’s University as well as
certifications in Forensics, Internal Auditing and Management
Accounting. He has been a sitting Supervisor in Richland
Township, Bucks County, since 1996 and sits on the PICPA
Local Government Committee where he receives briefings on
PSERS.
DON’T FORGET
TO VOTE!
Election Day
November 4, 2014
Polls Open 7:00 AM - 8:00 PM
POLLING PLACES
Richland 1: Richland Elementary School
Fairview Avenue
Richland 2: Municipal Building
California Road
Richland 3: Grace Bible Fellowship Church
Old Bethlehem Pike
Richland 4: First Church of the Brethren
Trumbauersville Road
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 7
Richland’s Four
Voting Precincts
If you are unsure of where to vote, here is a
brief description of each voting precinct. (See the
attached map.)
Richland 1
If you live south of Raub Road and east of Route
309, you will cast your ballots at the Richland
Elementary School just off Route 313.
Richland 2
If you live in the northeast section of the
township, north of Raub Road and east of the
Railroad Tracks, you will cast your ballot at the
Richland Township Municipal building located
on California Road.
Richland 3
If you live in the northwest section, west of the
railroad tracks and north of Cemetary Road and
Milford Square Pike, you will cast your ballot at
Grace Bible Fellowship Church on Old Bethlehem
Pike near Stonegate Road.
Richland 4
If you live in the southwest portion of the
township, south of Mill Road and west of Route
309, you will cast your ballot at First Church of
the Brethren, 455 Trumbauersville Road.
A Great Team
Continued from Page 3
On the Planning Commission, I thank Mike
Merkelt, who steadfastly served for 18 years,
and Tim Ritter, who chaired the Commission
for four of the past five years. The Planning
Commission does their job so well it’s been
years since the BOS rendered a decision
contrary to their recommendations.
But for space, I could have mentioned over
a hundred names of your township governing
community.
But where do we go from here? We add
services, control costs, make township
volunteering fun – and an HONOR! We
continue to encourage and challenge one
another. To everyone who serves, thanks for
all you do!
Dear Friends,
As many of you are aware, this year I announced my retirement.
I have truly been honored and blessed to have been your state
legislator for these past 34 years. Your confidence in my ability
to serve you faithfully in Harrisburg has been both rewarding and
encouraging.
I am certain our paths will cross as I plan to remain a citizen of
the Upper Bucks communities.
Sincerely,
Paul I. Clymer
PA House of Representatives
145th Legislative District
PAGE 8
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Vendors
Community Day 2014
Richland Township’s 18th Annual Community Day
was held on July 19, 2014.
The Park and Recreation Board would like to thank
the following for their support:
Sponsors
Al Marwa...............................................................Sleepy Hollow Farms
QNB..................................................................... Musical Entertainment
Brunner Insurance Inc............................ Tootsie the Clown & Friends
Kwik Goal...................................................................... Children’s Rides
First Savings Bank of Perkasie................................................... Animals
Donations
Quakertown Family Dental Center
Primerica Financial Services
G&S Fastening Systems, Inc.
Richlandtown Lions Club
Northeast Family Healthcare
Best Cuts
Last Chance Ranch
Richland Fire & Rescue
Yo Fresh
Famous Footwear
Allstate
Trumbauersville Fire Company
WAWA
At Home Certified Senior Healthcare
Hair Cuttery
Jaydor
Upper Tohickon Watershed Assoc.
Kim’s Black Belt Academy LLC
Grand View Hospital Maternity
St Luke’s Healthcare Quakertown
Richland Township Police
Good Shepherd Rehabilitation
Quakertown Fire Department
Springfield Church of the Brethren
Brunner Insurance
Hansen for Senate
Quakertown Christian School
Bucks County SPCA
Cold Stone Creamery
Primerica Financial Services
The Clothing Tree
Congressman Mike Fitzpatrick
First Savings Bank of Perkasie
Richland Twp. Preservation Board
Community Police Liaison Board
Blue Ridge Environmental
Sweeney’s Service Center
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 9
Why Not Plant a Tree?
by Stephen Sechriest
Fall and spring are the best times of the year to plant
trees. Trees are beautiful additions to the landscapes
around our homes, and they provide invaluable benefits
to our communities.
They reduce heat by cooling and shading our homes
and hard surfaces, such as macadam and concrete, which
absorb the sunlight. They decrease the amount of energy
required to cool our homes in the summer and save us
money on the cost of electricity. Mature trees can actually
cut summer cooling costs by 40%.
Trees help clean the air of pollutants and help buffer
our neighborhoods from noise. Trees will also improve
stormwater management by reducing the amount of
stormwater that goes into the storm drains. The roots of
trees help to filter water back into the soil and recharge
the water table.
Studies have shown that trees increase property values.
Planting a tree within 50 feet of a house can increase its
sale price by 10 to 15%.
TreeVitalize, a non-profit organization in southeastern
Pennsylvania, reports that there have been studies that
show the following benefits of trees:
v Reduce annual heating and cooling costs
v Improve air quality by absorbing hundreds of
pounds of air pollutants that affect our health
v Improve water quality and reduce community
flooding by absorbing and intercepting rainfall in their
canopies, thus reducing stormwater that often carries
pollutants to waterways
v Stimulate retail and commercial business districts by
attracting shoppers and increasing sales
v Increase property values by 10 to 15%
v Reduce stress, fatigue, and aggression in humans
v Reduce hospital patient recovery times when there
are views of trees and greenery
v Improve the concentration of children with Attention
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
v Reduce crime and increase social ties
v Reduce exposure to harmful UV rays that are causing
increases in skin cancer and cataracts
For more information on the benefits of trees,
recommendations on types of trees to plant, and planting
instructions, check out the websites for “TreeVitalize” and
“Trees Pay Us Back”.
PAGE 10
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
BCWSA Offers Maintenance Program
BCWSA is offering a Water & Sewer Maintenance Program for Residential and Commercial properties.
This program is designed to help customers offset the cost of repairing the water service line and the
sewer lateral that run from the outside of your home/building to the curb which can typically costs up
to $5000 for residential and up to $10,000 for a commercial property to replace.
Under this program residential properties pay $5.00 a month per service line and commercial $10.00
a month per service line for coverage.
This program is also available to Non-BCWSA customers in Bucks County & Montgomery County
24-7 Emergency coverage with live operators to take your call in the evening or Holidays
Unlimited Service calls
Coverage two year minimum
Repairs are only performed by licensed BCWSA Professionals
Sign up today! It’s easy just go to our website at www.bcwsa.net or call 215-343-2538 Ext 140.
Bucks County Water & Sewer Authority strives to provide affordable services to our customers. Under
this program you will receive professional and prompt service with a personal touch whenever the
need arises. We look forward to serving you.
others.
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
Richland Township Accepts
Online Payments
As a convenience to our residents,
Richland Township accepts
online payments by credit card
(Mastercard, Discover, Visa) and by
check.
The following can be paid online
through the link on our website at
www.richlandtownship.org.
General Municipal Office
Building and Zoning Permits
Pavilion Rentals
Newsletter Ads
Publications (ex: zoning book)
Park and Recreation Fees
Community Day Fees/Donations
Camp Registrations
Golf Outing Fees
Community Garden Fees
Police Department
Parking Tickets
Accident Report Fees
Self-employed LST
Police Department Donations
Fire Code Enforcement Fees
Fire Inspection Permits
Developer Escrow Developer payments on account
There is a convenience fee charged
for each transaction. On credit
card payments, the fee is 2.45%
of the transaction amount with a
minimum of $3.00. For payments
by check online, the fee is $1.50 per
transaction. This convenience fee goes to the
processor and allows this service
to be offered without cost to the
Township. PAGE 11
Financial Tip: Plan Income
and Deductible Expenses
by Rick Orloff
The Federal Tax system assesses
taxes on brackets; as your income
climbs, the next dollar is taxed at
higher rates. Most folks in Richland
are taxed in the 15%, 25% or 28%
brackets. As you move through life,
your taxable income can experience
wide variations. Take advantage of
those variations to reduce your tax
bill.
For example, if you expect a spouse
to quit work (or start work), have a
child, retire, or any event that will
cause a large swing and move your
taxable income into a different bracket,
use that to your advantage. By
advancing or deferring discretionary
deductions, you can make that
deduction when you are in the 15%
bracket or in the 25% bracket. If you
are in the 25% bracket one year, and
you expect to be in the 15% bracket
the next year, pay some of the next
years’ deductions in the current year.
You effectively get a 25% discount as
opposed to 15%, and you save 10%.
Consult your tax preparer for
further details.
Rick Orloff, one of Richland’s
Supervisors, is also a practicing Certified
Public Accountant.
“A government big enough to give you everything you want,
is strong enough to take everything you have.”
~ Thomas Jefferson
PAGE 12
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Interaction Important to Achieve Results
by Congressman Michael Fitzpatrick
I am proud to represent Richland
Township and all the communities
in the 8th Congressional District
and appreciate this opportunity
to contribute to your community
newsletter.
As a former county commissioner
for more than a dozen years, I’m
aware of the importance of interaction
between local municipalities and
federal, state and county governments.
What we do on all levels of
government impacts people like you,
and your families. I am proud of
the work we did on the county level
and the programs that are ongoing;
namely, the commitment to preserve
open space and farmland throughout
Bucks County, including Richland
Township.
In the Congress
throughout
this spring and summer, I have
been working on bills directed at
investment in America’s infrastructure
and increasing access to efficient,
modern transportation. Access to
transportation, be it public transit,
state highways or rural roads, means
access to jobs. Transportation plays a
critical role, not only in the movement
of people, goods and services, but
in helping to ensure the creation of
family-sustaining jobs.
I introduced the Partnership to
Build America, H.R. 2084, with
Congressman John Delaney, D-MD,
which would finance $750 billion
in infrastructure investments using
repatriated corporate earnings with
no appropriated funds. H.R. 2084 is
notable for its bipartisan support in
the House and Senate, reflecting the
realization that we must focus on
transportation realities and challenge
the new normal of inaction.
Your input and opinions on this
and other matters are important to
me and you are invited to contact my
district office for assistance involving
all federal matters and that includes
veterans, military, tax forms, passports
and senior issues (Medicare, Medicaid,
Social Security).
I look forward to hearing from you.
Our constituent advocates are ready
to help, Monday through Friday,
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. The office is
located at 1717 Langhorne-Newtown
Road, Suite 400, Langhorne, PA 19047.
Phone 215-579-8102 or visit us on the
web at www.fitzpatrick.house.gov.
Congressman Mike Fitzpatrick is
serving his third term in the U.S.
House of Representatives. He represents
Pennsylvania’s 8th district which includes
all of Bucks County as well as a portion of
Montgomery County. He is vice chairman of
the House Financial Services Subcommittee
on Oversight and Investigations.
INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING Proud to serve as
Richland Township
Planning Consultant and Inspection Engineer
Stroudsburg
570-629-0300
Doylestown
215-345-9400
An Employee Owned Company
www.bjengineers.com
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
Pictures from Mad Science Camp
PAGE 13
Park & Recreation News
Purchase Ski
Tickets Here
The Township will again offer
discount tickets for the following local
ski resorts:
• Bear Creek
• Big Boulder
• Blue Mountain
• Camelback
• Shawnee Mountain
We have tickets for Adventure
Aquarium, Baltimore Aquarium,
Busch Gardens, Sesame Place, Sea
World, Elmwood Zoo, and the
Philadelphia Zoo until December
31, 2014. Hershey Park tickets are
available for Hershey Park in the Dark
until November 2, and Christmas
Candylane until December 31, 2014.
Remember, we always
have discount movie tickets
for Regal Cinema for $7.50.
These make nice Christmas
gifts!
The township accepts MasterCard
VISA, and Discover credit cards as
well as cash. Personal checks will be
accepted from township residents
only.
PAGE 14
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Richland, QCSD & Pennsylvania, From My Perch
by Supervisor Rick Orloff
Things are pretty stable in Richland, but that’s not good
in the long term. “That which does not grow, whithers away.” –
Author Unknown.
Richland, indeed almost all of Bucks County, is
experiencing a flat to declining population census. Tax
receipts reflect this in that they are down 3% from last year
(through August) and are less now than the same time in
2011. To the good, US Cold Storage is now open and has
hired about 100 workers.
Kudos to my Colleague Tim Arnold: after several years,
movie night has really taken off. The last two flicks (The
Lego Movie and Frozen) attracted well over 500. Free snacks,
outdoor movies, beautiful summer weather; what’s not to
like?
And 24-7 Police Service is on time for deployment in the
very near future.
Open Space Preservation Efforts are almost completed,
though securing grants is a never ending effort.
Under the leadership of Rick Stoneback, PE, the Facilities
& Public Infrastructure Committee looked at a new
township building and community center. Due to the tight
economy, the only thing the committee has recommended
Yesterday.Today. Tomorrow.
QNB
was an engineering concept plan in the 2015 budget.
So fiscally, things continue to remain tight – the sixth
year of a tepid economy. That said, we have over $3 million
in reserves, and our credit rating is still tops! There will be
no tax increase for 2015.
Regarding the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, please
read my article on the state’s Pension Fund on page 8.
Think debacle, catastrophe and incompetence. The nub
of the issue? Roughly speaking, before 2001, teachers and
state workers with 30 years could retire with 60% of their
pre-retirement income. Under Governor Ridge, the benefits
were enriched to 80% of pre-retirement income. And there
were other enhancements. PSERS now deteriorates at a rate
of half a BILLION a month. Area legislators I encounter
(Democrats and Republicans) act as though it does not
exist. The few that do say taxpayers will just have to bear
the burden are the same ones who voted for the problem.
Kudos to Senator Bob Mensch who acknowledges the
problem and has real solutions. Mensch stands alone. I
urge folks to get informed.
And last is QCSD. SBG is gone and homework is back
– among other things. The new Superintendent, Bill
Harner, was finally appointed. Voting “for” were Directors
Stepanoff, Anderson, Landes, Ripper and Shermer, all of
whom represent parts of Richland. Voting against were
Cattie of Richland; and Strunk, Smith and King of Milford.
The adoption of Harner’s contract, a separate vote, was
voted for by all except Smith. Dr. Harner’s first budget
actually came in just under Act One limits – a QCSD first.
Alarmingly, the ENTIRE 2014-15 tax increase was for
the pensions. “About 10% of the entire budget now goes
toward pensions,” says Director Mitch Anderson. Indeed,
the boards of the past two decades prior to 2014 (and
Legislature) have left us with a financial millstone that will
not be easily overcome.
These are not times for the faint of heart. You, the people,
need to do your part as well. Don’t ask government to
do what you should do for yourself. Take responsibility.
We’ll do the best job we can at the township level. Hold
elected officials accountable – and I’m NOT exempt. It’s
a representative government; what you see in the news is
what YOU have chosen.
Yo u r C o m m u n i t y B a n k
Call: 215-538-5600 Click: www.qnbbank.com
Visit: Any of our 11 convenient offices in Colmar,
Coopersburg, Dublin, Pennsburg, Perkasie,
Quakertown, Souderton, Warminster & Wescosville
“I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into
prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and
trying to lift himself up by the handle.” ~Winston Churchill
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 15
QCSD DIRECTOR VOTING RECORDS
by Directors Dwight Anderson & Paul Stepanoff
Below is a compilation of significant roll call votes of the QCSD Board of Directors since
changing the Board of Directors at the December 5, 2013 Reorganization through September 24, 2014.
Vote #
1
2a.
2b.
2c.
2d.
3.
4.
5a.
5b.
6.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Stepanoff
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
For
Region 1
Ripper
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
For
Anderson
Absent
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
For
Strunk
For
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
Against
Region 2
King
For
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
Against
Smith
For
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
Cattie
For
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
Region 3
Shermer
Abstained
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
For
Landes
For
Against
For
Against
For
For
For
For
For
For
QESPA Agreement: Motion to adopt a new Labor Agreement for QCSD support personnel. Motion adopted 6-1.
Reorganization Meeting of December 5, 2013.
a. King nominated for President: Motion defeated 5-4
b. Stepanoff nominated for President: Motion adopted 5-4
c. King nominated for Vice President: Motion defeated 5-4
d. Landes nominated for Vice President: Motion adopted 5-4
Meeting of January 23, 2014: Motion adopting Tech School Budget. Motion adopted 9-0
Meeting of February 27, 2014: Motion to borrow $9.1 million for Tech School Renovation. Motion adopted 9-0
Meeting of May 8, 2014:
a. Adopt preliminary budget for FY 2014-15 to enact a 2.1% tax increase, related to 1.4% spending increase.
Motion adopted 9-0
b. Motion to appoint Nancianne Edwards as Assistant Superintendent: Motion adopted 9-0
Meeting of June 12, 2014: Motion to adopt final 2014-15 budget increasing spending 1.9%, with a commensurate
tax increase. Motion adopted 7-2 with opponents asserting budget and tax increase was too low and that a larger
increase was needed in the current year for pending future year issues such as pensions.
Voting Records on Hiring Dr. William Harner as Superintendent
Author’s Note: Superintendent selection is by far the most important vote a Director will make affecting taxes, programs
and academic success or failure. It reflects on the judgment, management ability and core philosophy of elected Directors.
Vote #
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Stepanoff
For
Against
For
For
Region 1
Ripper
For
Against
For
For
Anderson
For
Against
For
For
Strunk
Against
For
Absent
For
Region 2
King
Against
For
Against
For
Smith
Against
For
Against
Against
Cattie
Against
For
Against
For
Region 3
Shermer
For
Against
For
For
Landes
For
Absent
For
For
Meeting of January 23, 2014: Motion to appoint Dr. Harner as Substitute Superintendent: Motion passed 5-4.
Meeting of March 27, 2014: Motion to engage BCIU to do a search for a Superintendent. Intent was to replace
Dr. Harner. Motion failed 4-4.
Meeting of April 24, 2014: Motion to appoint Dr. Harner as permanent Superintendent effective 7/1/14: Motion
adopted 5-3.
Motion to execute Dr. Harner’s employment contract. Motion adopted 8-1.
PAGE 16
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Richland Township Golf
Outing Special Thanks...
Golf Carts
Dinner
Boucher & James, Inc.
Gilmore & Associates, Inc.
First Savings Bank of Perkasie
Bucks County Water & Sewer Authority
Golf Course
Golf Balls
Kwik Goal
Richland Township Water Authority
Lunch
Cocktail Hour
Treadwell Law Offices PC
Casey’s Place
Hole Sponsors
Hutchinson, Gillahan & Freeh PC
Quakertown Famers Market
Brown, Kerdock & Lynch P.C.
Quakertown Family Dental Center
QNB
Select Properties
Brown & Brown
of the Lehigh Valley
Lopez, Tedosio & Larkin
Charles Shoemaker
The Minnis Group
DHL Machine International, Inc.
LB Water Service, Inc.
Concord Public Financial Advisors
Asphalt Maintenance Solutions
Penn Stainless Products, Inc.
Carroll Engineering Corp.
Door Prize Contributors
McCoole’s
Target Marketing Group
Longwood Gardens
River Country
Arnolds Family Fun Center
LV Paintball
Arts Quest
National Constitution Center
Chaddsford Winery
Sky Zone
Lehigh Valley Zoo
Sesame Place
American on Wheels
Roman Delight Fountainville
TGI Friday
YMCA
Casa Tora Restaurant
Grand Theater
Pep Boys
Allentown Art Museum
Crayola Experience
Copperhead Grille
Iron Pigs
Philadelphia Flyers
Richland Township
The Rose Group
Hair Cuttery
Pines Dinner Theater
James Michener Art Museum
Brick Tavern Inn
Lost River Caverns
Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens
Quakertown Farmer’s Market
Putt U Miniature Golf
Adventure Aquarium
Link Beverages
Mercer Museum & Fonthill Castle
Volunteers
Nancy Buckner
Laura Held
Jim Sulger
Rick Orloff
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 17
Golf Outing Winners
Other Prize Winners:
FIRST PLACE
Kevin Hoffman, Bill Frank, Phil Chant, Jules Dirienzo
SECOND PLACE
Thomas Hontz, Mark Weaver, Mitchell Eisen
Longest Drive Women:
Dianne McLane
Longest Drive Men:
Phil Chant
Closest to Pin Men:
Kevin Hoffman
Closest to Pin Women:
Dianne McLane
PAGE 18
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
State Education Funding
by Senator Bob Mensch, 24th District
Education funding is a responsibility taken seriously by
the legislature, and I believe we need more clarity around
this issue. The 2014-15 Pennsylvania state budget provides
our public schools with more than $10.1 billion in state
taxpayer assistance, representing the largest amount of state
funding for our public schools in Pennsylvania history. The
budget for the 2014-2015 school year includes $5,526,129,000
for the Basic Education Funding appropriation out of a
total appropriation of almost $10.5 billion for PreK-12. As
the PreK-12 chart (right) illustrates, this is more than we
have ever funded. This $5 billion+ is more than 35% of the
state’s total general fund expenditures. To compare that
spending to other departments, medical assistance and
long term living draws roughly 23%, welfare draws 16%,
and the remaining 26% is divvied up between debt service,
corrections and our other departments.
Budget Overview Chart
In 2009-10, after the passage of the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act (otherwise known as the Federal
stimulus package), much of the federal stimulus money
received by PA was used to fund basic education. In 201011, PA received nearly $655 million in federal funds used
to replace state basic education funding. An additional
$388 million in federal stimulus funding was later added
in 2011 to replace general funds spent on basic education
state subsidies, pushing the federal support used for basic
education above $1 billion in 2010-11. Ironically, some
groups began to suggest that with the cessation of stimulus
dollars that somehow education funding was cut by $1
billion. But a close look at the attached charts will show
there was never a $1 billion cut to education.
Education funding is a serious matter, and I hope the brief
information provided helps to clarify the issue. Education
funding should never be a political issue clouded by false
data from special interests. The only way we can have
a useful dialog is with useful, verified data such as the
information presented here.
PENNSYLVANIA STATE BONDED
MESSENGER SERVICE
NOTARY PUBLIC
METAL TEMPORARY
TAGS ISSUED FOR
ANY TYPE VEHICLE
OR TRAILER
INSTANT TAG
RENEWALS
PHONE
215-538-1450
ROHER
COMPLETE SERVICE FOR
REGISTRATIONS
LICENSES
PERMITS
BIRTH CERTIFICATES
ON-LINE
TRANSFER
AUTO TAG SERVICE
FAX
215-538-1427
MON-FRI 11-8 • SAT 10-2
1392 S. West End Blvd. • Rt. 309 • Quakertown, PA 18951
COWAN ASSOCIATES, INC.
Engineers, Geologists, Surveyors,
Landscape Architects, Materials Testing Lab
Serving Business, Government and Industry Since 1958
120 Penn-Am Drive, PO Box 949
Quakertown, PA 18951 • 1-800-492-5649
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 19
Basic Education Funding Chart
On The Humorous Side:
A police recruit was asked,
“What would you do if you had
to arrest your mother?” He said,
“Call for back up.”
“There ought to be one day
-- just one -- when there is open
season on senators.”
~ Will Rogers
“The problem with political jokes
is they get elected.”
~ Henry Cate, VII
PreK-12 State Education Funding Chart
“When I was a boy I was told
that anybody could become President; I’m beginning to believe it.”
~ Clarence Darrow
“Suppose you were an idiot. And
suppose you were a member of
government. But I repeat myself.”
~ Mark Twain
“I don’t make jokes. I just watch
the government and report the
facts.” ~ Will Rogers
“I have come to the conclusion
that politics is too serious a matter
to be left to the politicians.”
~ Charles de Gaulle.
“Politicians are the same all over.
They promise to build a bridge
even where there is no river.”
~ Nikita Khrushchev
Michael B. Schmauder
Supervisor/Owner
821 West Broad Street
Quakertown, PA 18951
Member By Invitation
Selected Independent Funeral Homes
(215) 536-6550
Fax (215) 538-7485
www.crstrunk.com
215-538-1776
PAGE 20
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Garden Plots Available in Spring
by Supervisor Tim Arnold
If you want a garden but do not have the space, we have
the answer for you. Several years ago, the Township started
a community garden located on Station Road. There are
currently 22 lots available.
It’s so simple to get started - all you need to do is call the
Township building at 215-536-4066 after March 1, 2015.
Plots are rented on a first-come first-served basis. We will
assign you a lot and stake it out for you, and then the rest
of the fun of growing your own fruits and vegetables can
begin.
The cost for a 12’ x 20’ plot is $10.00.
No shade producing plants over 4’ tall are permitted
NO CORN IS PERMITTED!
No metal stakes, fencing or plant supports are permitted,
as it may damage the tilling equipment. All metal materials
used will be removed by the Township.
No permanent structures or fencing is permitted.
Tools, supplies, and related gardening equipment left at a
garden plot site are left at your own risk and must be left in
a tidy manner and within your plot limits.
Please clean up after yourself. Richland Township will
not provide trash services.
Plot Maintenance:
Your Responsibility to Fellow Gardeners:
There is no water at the site, so each gardener is
responsible for making his/her own accommodations.
All gardeners are to maintain their plots in a reasonable
manner. Weeds and garden debris can serve as cover and
food for undesirable insects, rodents, and other vermin.
Lots that are not maintained will be considered abandoned.
Gardening is permitted from dawn to dusk.
No fertilizer or commercial pesticides are permitted.
Please do not block garden paths with vehicles,
equipment, or debris.
Highly invasive plants are not allowed.
At no time should you build a structure or plant anything
that will shade or interfere with another plot.
End of Year Responsibilities:
Remove all non-organic materials including: fencing,
stakes, and rain barrels.
phoebe.org/richland | 267.371.4512
PHOEBE RICHLAND
Short Term Rehab
Our short term rehabilitation team provides
one-on-one comprehensive rehab
programming following an illness, surgery,
or injury. We’ll get you home and back to the
things you love.
The Leader in Senior Care
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 21
Richland Historical Society Update
by Vic Stevens, President
Over the years, many in the community have received
newsletters from us, read articles in the newspaper about
us, and stopped in to visit with us. Many times we made
requests for building materials, volunteer labor, and, of
course, money! Well, we want to bring the community up
to date and thank you for what has been accomplished
through your efforts and donations.
What happened with the 1930’s old grain barn?
It’s now the BARN MUSEUM!
• Installed stairs to the second floor
• Rebuilt the second floor into a library
• Divided the first floor into a work room
• Installed a lavatory and a kitchen
• Replaced all the old windows
• Constructed a two story, 20x30 foot addition to the
back of the barn
• Made the first floor a meeting room
• Installed running water (using the well from the old
school pump!)
• Installed a heating system
• Installed air conditioning
• Installed a chair rider to the second floor
• Covered the total exterior with steel siding
What happened in the Shelly School House?
• Installed handicapped sidewalks and ramp from the
Barn Museum to the school
• Replaced all the deteriorated brick and mortar on
the exterior
• Rebuilt and painted the original window shutters
• Painted the exterior wood and windows
Projects that still need attention:
• Repair of the girls’ necessary house
• Completion of landscaping
• Some pieces for the kitchen
As mentioned previously, our guide for this progress is
stated in the Preamble to our Constitution: “to preserve
and maintain the integrity of the Shelly School.”
Three More Farms Added to
Richland’s Open Space Inventory
by Kathy Fedorocsko, Chairwoman, Preservation Board
This summer, the Richland Township Land
Preservation Board completed the preservation of three
more farms, totaling 120 acres. All of the farms are
found in the Upper Tohickon Conservation Landscape
in the updated Natural Areas Inventory of Bucks
County. Besides protecting irreplaceable farmland, each
farm also has a branch of the Upper Tohickon Creek
running through it. Protecting these portions of the
creek helps protect our source of drinking water.
The first farm preserved is located on Gross Road
immediately adjacent to the 55 acres we protected
this past spring through the County’s Natural Areas
program. Almost 100 acres on either side of the
Tohickon Creek will protect the riparian corridor found
here. This farm produces mostly hay crops.
The second farm is on Union Road. Preservation of
this property completes our goal of preserving all the
working farms on Apple and Union Roads, adding
20 acres to the 280 acre greenway we have been able
to establish in this area of the Township. This equine
operation is adjacent to two preserved farms and across
the road from acreage recently donated to the Township.
The last farm consists of two parcels totaling 61 acres
on East Cherry Road. In addition to the acres of pasture
and croplands preserved in perpetuity, there are mature
woodlands and two branches of the Tohickon Creek
being protected. It connects with 103 acres on Pumping
Station Road, providing another valuable greenway from
road to road for plants and animals and helps ensure the
water quality here stays high.
The Preservation Board continues to draw on funds
provided by the Open Space bond passed in 2002. We
have been able to substantially stretch your preservation
tax dollars by using the different County land
preservation programs.
Once again, through the foresight of you, the voters,
and the generosity of the landowners, Richland
Township will be a far better place to live now and in
the future. We have protected forever 30 farms and
significant natural areas, a total of over 1,000 acres. For
information about preserving your property, contact
Rich Brittingham at 215-536-4066.
PAGE 22
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Richland Township’s
Memorial Garden at Veterans Park
COMMEMORATIVE BRICK PAVER PROGRAM
The Richland Township Park & Recreation Board is selling commemorative bricks to be placed
in the walkway to the Veteran’s Memorial Garden. The 4”x8” gray paver can be imprinted with
three lines of up to thirteen characters on each line (including spaces and punctuation).
Bricks will be placed randomly. Corporate/group donations may be accommodated.
The cost is $50.00 for the first two lines and an additional $10.00 for the third line, per brick.
PERSONALIZED BRICK ORDER FORM
Name_________________________________________________________________________________________
Address_______________________________________________________________________________________
City ___________________________________________ State _______ Zip ______________________________
Phone _____________________________ Email _____________________________________________________
Fax _______________________________
My gift donation: $________________
(Make checks payable to: Richland Township Parks & Rec)
PLEASE PRINT YOUR MESSAGE IN THE BOXES BELOW:
FOR MULTIPLE BRICK ORDERS, PLEASE REQUEST EXTRA FORMS. THANK YOU!
Mail form and payment to:
Richland Township
1328 California Road, Suite A
Quakertown, PA 18951
All proceeds will benefit Richland Township’s
Memorial Garden at Veterans Park.
For more information, call 215-536-4066.
Richland Township reserves the right to approve, deny, or change all messages.
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 23
Exciting Changes Coming to RTPD!
by Richard J. Ficco, Chief of Police
It has been an exciting year, as changes continue to occur.
In February of this year, RTPD purchased personal
worn body cameras. Why would our police department
need to have officer worn cameras versus vehicle
mounted cameras? The vehicle mounted video camera is
a technology that has been around law enforcement for
many years. I remember them being installed in police
vehicles in the early 1990s, and I am sure it was around
before that. The vehicle mounted camera has made great
strides over the years. As technology advances for each
of us, so does the offerings that become available to law
enforcement.
The biggest reason RTPD went with the officer worn
video camera is for the flexibility of using such cameras for
evidentiary purposes. Right now, vehicle mounted cameras
will only pick up what is happening right in front of the
police car. With the officer worn camera, we combine the
vehicle mounted camera with the handheld, which will
allow us to video crime scenes and events.
The Pennsylvania Wiretap law will still guarantee
rights to those that we serve, in that an officer cannot use
the camera in your home or hotel room without your
permission. However, if you come across an officer in the
general public, your interaction may be captured on video.
The process to deploy the cameras has been slower than
anticipated, but we hope to have it fully operational in
the very near future. Richland is only the third or fourth
department in the state of PA to deploy this type of camera.
RTPD has also been working on the process of
Accreditation. This is a process of standardizing policies
and meeting those standards on an annual basis. This
process will help us evaluate and improve with the
standards. There are currently over 300 agencies in the
state of Pennsylvania that are registered with the PA Chiefs
Association, which introduced Accreditation in 2001.
Currently, there are 96 agencies that are accredited
through the association. It is a complex task and takes
some time to do, but accreditation sets professional
standards that are attainable by your police department.
We are nearing the point of approving the policy manual
and beginning the process of showing how we will meet
the standards.
With this new policy manual, RTPD will be instituting a
new policy that governs social media and how we can use
it to help our citizens. You will most likely see a Facebook
page and a Twitter page being put in place by the end of
the year. Our hope is to use this to notify people of issues
within their neighborhood or asking for the public’s help in
certain situations.
And more importantly, we are very excited for the
beginning of 2015 and the ability to provide full time police
coverage from RTPD to our citizens. I would like to thank
the Township Supervisors and the multitude of citizens
who have supported this venture.
GRACE BIBLE
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
1811 Old Bethlehem Pike N.
Quakertown, PA 18951
www.quakertownbfc.org
215-536-6096
Ronald L. Kohl, Pastor
David Watkins,
Pastor of Congregational Care
Michael Roberts, Assist. Pastor
Timothy Radcliff,
Minister of Youth
Email:
[email protected]
SUNDAY HOURS: SEPTEMBER - MAY
9:00 am
10:10 am
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
Sunday School for all ages
Worship Service
Evening Worship (except 2nd & 4th Sundays)
Small Group Fellowships (2nd & 4th Sundays)
WEDNESDAYS: SEPTEMBER - MAY
6:30 pm
6:30 pm
7:00 pm
Awana for children
Teens for Christ (7th - 12th grade)
Adult Bible Study & Prayer
SPECIAL MINISTRIES
Brogan Donovan, from Boy Scout Troop 1 in Sellersville, attended a
Board of Supervisors meeting in order to complete his merit badge.
u Grace music - Adult & Children’s Choirs, and Choral Ensembles
(men and women)
u Special Music
u Men’s Small Group Bible Studies & Periodic Breakfast & Speakers
u Tuesday Morning & Evening Ladies’ Bible Study (Sept. - May)
u Vacation Bible Camp for Children in Summer
u “Keenagers”: Senior Adults’ Monthly Luncheon
PAGE 24
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
To Recycle or Not to Recycle -That is the Question
Have you ever held a plastic container and asked
“should this go in the recycling or the trash”? This
common question is simplified by single stream recycling.
All the newspaper, chipboard, cardboard,
metal cans and glass jars and bottles now
go into one recycling bin or cart. All plastic
materials with the number 1 through 7 in
the recycling logo on the bottom can be
recycled.
Thanks to a national initiative by the
Carton Council, cartons can now be added
to the recycling stream. These cartons
include both the aseptic cartons as well as the familiar
gabletop, refrigerated cartons.
However, there are some plastics that can’t be recycled
- including clear rigid plastic food trays, Styrofoam, and
the thin black pots and trays that contained flower or
vegetable plants.
Richland Township receives recycling
performance grants based on the total
annual tons of residential recycling.We
encourage you to recycle everything you
can, but remember to ‘keep trash out of the
recycling and recycling out of the trash’.
Thank you for doing a great job recycling.
For more information on trash and
recycling, visit our website.
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215-536-YMCA ubymca.org
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email: [email protected]
Joseph M. Hafich
President of Operations
[email protected]
Jeffery A.
401 O’Neill Drive / Quakertown, PA 18951-4227
Phone: 215.536.4973 Fax: 215.536.6676
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Funeral and Cremation Service
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QUAKERTOWN, PA 18951
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FUNERAL DIRECTOR/OWNER
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 25
Richland Township
Volunteer Information Application
Name_____________________________________________________ Date _____________________
Address______________________________________________________________________________
City____________________________________________ State _________ Zip __________________
Preferred Phone # ___________________________ E-mail____________________________________
Occupation ______________________________ Employer____________________________________
To volunteer on a Board, Committee, or Commission:
c Check here if you are willing to serve wherever needed
OR
Indicate your interest below by numbering the committee/event in order of preference:
_____ Park & Recreation Board (& Trails Committee) – meets fourth Wed. of the month at 7:00 pm
_____ Community Day
_____ Movie Night
_____ Preservation Board - meets second Wed. of the month at 7:00 pm
_____ Community/Police Liaison Board - meets fourth Tues. of the month at 7:00 pm at the police bldg.
_____ Planning Commission - meets third Tues. of the month at 7:00 pm
_____ Water Authority – meets second Thurs. of the month at 7:00 pm
Please list your skills and experiences relevant to the board or commission you are applying for:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Please explain why you would like to serve as an appointed volunteer on a Township board or
commission and describe your vision for Richland Township’s future:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Please attach a resume and/or letter of interest. Thank you for volunteering your valuable time and talents!
PAGE 26
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Leaf Collection Schedule
October 6 - December 5
Autumn is here and that means it is
time to clean up those leaves.
Richland Township began its leaf
collection program because of the
need to keep stormwater inlets clear,
and to help our residents properly
dispose of leaves. The leaves we
collect are taken to facilities that
recycle them into compost. If you have
a composting lawn mower, you may
want to consider using it to leave the
composting leaves in place to benefit
your lawn instead of piling them up at
the road for collection.
Although we will try to meet the
following schedule, our collections
may be affected by poor weather
or other factors. If we get behind in
our schedule, we will collect leaves
as close to your collection date as
possible.
Leaf collection in developments
with roads dedicated to the
township
Residents who live in developments
with roads dedicated to the township
may place leaves for collection
beginning October 20, 2014, through
December 5, 2014. The leaf collection
vehicle will travel through the
dedicated road developments weekly.
If leaves are placed out late in the
week, they may be collected the
following week. Leaves must be on the
road surface, against the curb. Leaves
on the sidewalk or in yards will not be
collected.
Developments in this group are:
The Elms
Walnut Bank Farms (Walnut Bank
Farm Road, Farm House Lane, Red
Barn Lane and School House Lane)
Richland Mead
Hunters Crossing (including
Timberbrook Drive and Hallmark
Place)
Sweetbriar
Brayton Gardens I
Brayton Gardens II
Tollgate Landing
Richland Court
Regency Manor
Spring Meadows
Academy Place
Richland Station (including
Turntable Circle)
Heather Valley/Richland Farms
Deer Run Estates
Morgan Creek
Leaf collection in developments
with non-dedicated roads
Leaves will be collected two times
in developments with roads that are
privately maintained and not part of
the township road system: November
3 to 7, 2014, and again the week of
November 17 to 21, 2014.
Most of these developments have
parking lots or courts that cannot be
accessed with our equipment because
of space constraints and numerous
parked cars. Place the leaves on the
street, against the curb, on the main
access roads. Leaves on sidewalks,
yards and inaccesible areas will not be
collected.
Developments in this group, and the
streets where leaves may be placed:
Stonegate Village (place leaves on
Stonegate Road)
Beaver Run (place leaves on Beaver
Run Drive, Terrace Drive and Windsor
Court)
Richland Greene
Quakers Green (place leaves on
Quakers Way)
Walnut Bank Farms Condominium
Section (place leaves on Walnut Bank
Farm Road)
Renaissance at Morgan Creek (place
leaves on Memory Lane, Creekside
Lane, and Turtle Creek Lane)
Arbours at Morgan Creek
Leaf collection on rural roads
Because of the large amount of
frontage along rural roads, we must
limit collections on those roads to a
one time collection during the week
specified for your road. Leaves placed
for collection after the specified week
may not be collected.
Pile leaves on the shoulder as close
to the roadway as possible. Our
machine cannot reach farther than the
shoulder so leaves beyond that point
will not be collected.
Please use the following schedule
for a one time collection during your
specified week.
Week of October 6 to 10, 2014:
Route 309
Route 663
E. Cherry Road
Route 313
Paletown Road
Rocky Ridge Road
Thatcher Road
Union Road
Apple Road
Richlandtown Pike
Route 212
Younken Road
Pullen Station Road
Trumbauersville Road
Tollgate Road
Mill Road
N. Old Bethlehem Pike
W. Zion Hill Road
Week of October 20 to 24, 2014:
N. Mine Road
S. Mine Road
Hickon Road
Keystone Road
Gross Road
W. Cherry Road
California Road
Dickert Road
Camp Rockhill Road
Continued on next page
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
Leaf Collection Schedule
Continued from Page 26
Scholls School Road
Yankee Road
W. Rich Hill Road
Whaland Road
E. Rich Hill Road
Muskrat Road
Smoketown Road
S. Old Bethlehem Pike
Station Road
Stoneback Road
Tohickon Road
Shelly Road
Nice Road
E. Zion Hill Road
Week of November 10 to 14, 2014:
E. Rockhill Road
Raub Road
Erie Road
Axehandle Road
Meadow Road
Beck Road
E. Pumping Station Road
W. Pumping Station Road
Heller Road
Reservoir Road
Milford Square Pike
Portzer Road
Franklin Lane
Morris Road
Fairview Avenue
Hellertown Street
Perkasie Avenue
Station Avenue
Cemetery Road
Ambler Street
Woodland Avenue
Penrose Street
Walnut Street
Important information
1). Do not place any other materials
such as sticks, grass, or yard waste
with your leaves. These items clog the
vacuum hose and will not be collected.
2). Do not park vehicles on leaf
piles. We cannot collect leaves that
are under vehicles. Hot mufflers and
exhaust pipes may ignite the leaves
and cause vehicle damage or loss.
PAGE 27
Burning Prohibited in
Richland Township
All open burning is prohibited in
Richland Township. In September
2010, the Richland Township Board
of Supervisors amended the Fire
Prevention Ordinance to prohibit
open burning in the Township.
Although the burning of waste
had previously been prohibited,
there were previously two short time
periods in the spring and fall where
the Township allowed residents to
burn tree branches and brush, if the
weather permitted. This exception
has been eliminated and all burning
is prohibited.
This prohibition to open burning
does not apply to charcoal burners
and other open-flame cooking
devices, or for recreational fires
for pleasure, religious, ceremonial,
cooking, warmth or similar
purposes. However, these allowable
fires must be extinguished if the
Police Department or Code Official
finds that they are creating a
3). A leaf drop-off area is available
for all residents. You may drop them
off in the leaf bin behind the salt
storage shed at the Township Building
at 1328 California Road.
4). WE NO LONGER ACCEPT
LEAVES IN PLASTIC BAGS AT
THE DROP OFF BIN. Dump bags
out on to the pile and take the plastic
bags away. Leaves in paper bags are
accepted.
If you have any questions
concerning these matters, please
contact the Township’s Public Works
Director at 215-536-4066.
hazardous or objectionable situation.
Burning is also allowed for
training of firefighting personnel
when done under the supervision
of the Fire Chief, provided that
atmospheric conditions would not
create offensive or objectionable
smoke or odor on other premises.
Tree branches of not more than
two inches in diameter or more than
four feet in length and brush may be
dropped off anytime during the year
by the mulch pile located behind
the Township’s Municipal Building
located at 1328 California Road. The
branches should be bundled with
string or rope. Do not use wire.
Also, the Township designates one
week in May for the collection of any
yard waste. During that week, the
yard waste will be collected from the
curb or roadside by the Township’s
Public Works Department. Tree
stumps will not be accepted.
Holiday Closings
Richland Township offices
will be closed on the
following dates:
2014
Tues., Nov. 4 - Election Day
Thurs., Nov. 27, & Fri., Nov. 28
Thanksgiving
Wed., Dec. 24, & Thurs., Dec. 25
Christmas
2015
Thurs., Jan. 1 - New Year’s Day
Mon., Feb. 16 - Presidents’ Day
Fri., April 3 - Good Friday
PAGE 28
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
How Can I Dispose of Used CFLs?
by Stephen Sechriest
With extensive marketing of compact fluorescent light
bulbs (CFL’s) has come the question of how to dispose of
the energy savers. Although more expensive than regular
light bulbs, CFL’s are being promoted because of their
longer life expectancy and their energy saving qualities.
In the long run, CFL’s will save us money by lasting
longer and using less electricity. It has been estimated
that if every home in America replaced just one regular
incandescent light bulb with a CFL, in just one year it
would save enough energy to light more than 3 million
homes. This would prevent the release of greenhouse
gases equal to the output of about 800,000 cars.
Unfortunately, there is a downside to the use of CFL’s.
The compact fluorescent light bulbs contain small amounts
of mercury. The average CFL contains about 4 milligrams
of mercury. This amount would only be about as large as
the tip of a ballpoint pen. By comparison, the older style
thermometers that used mercury contained about 500
milligrams of mercury, which would be equal to about 125
CFL’s.
In order to prevent additional mercury from escaping
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into the environment, it is recommended that used bulbs
(yes, they do eventually wear out) be recycled rather than
thrown in the trash. Richland Township’s administrative
office has received several calls from residents asking how
they can dispose of their CFL’s that no longer work.
The general recommendation is that used CFL’s be
recycled. Lowe’s and Home Depot stores collect used
CFL’s for recycling and it is expected that more will do it
in the future.
The web site www.earth911.com identifies local
businesses that collect CFL’s for recycling. After going to
the web site, use the recycling location finder by typing in
CFL and your zip code for a list of current collection sites.
If you must dispose of your used CFL’s in the trash, the
US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends
that you seal the bulb in two plastic bags before adding
it to your trash to be taken to a landfill. CFL’s and other
products containing mercury should never be sent to an
incinerator.
Should the glass of the CFL be broken, the EPA
Continued on next page
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
CFL Disposal
Continued from Page 28
recommends that the following steps be followed:
1. Before Clean-up: Air Out the Room
• Have people and pets leave the room, and don’t let
anyone walk through the breakage area on their way out.
• Open a window and leave the room for 15 minutes or
more.
• Shut off the central forced-air heating/air conditioning
system, if you have one.
2. Clean-Up Steps for Hard Surfaces
• Carefully scoop up glass fragments and powder using
stiff paper or cardboard and place them in a glass jar with
a metal lid or in a sealed plastic bag.
• Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any
remaining small glass pieces and powder.
• Wipe the area clean with damp paper towels or
disposable wet wipes. Place towels in the glass jar or
plastic bag.
• Do not use a vacuum or broom to clean up the broken
bulb on hard surfaces.
3. Clean-up Steps for Carpeting or Rugs
• Carefully pick up glass fragments and place them in a
glass jar with a metal lid or in a sealed plastic bag.
• Use sticky tape, such as duct tape, to pick up any
remaining small glass fragments and powder.
• If vacuuming is needed after all visible materials are
removed, vacuum the area where the bulb was broken.
• Remove the vacuum bag (or empty and wipe the
canister), and put the bag or vacuum debris in a sealed
plastic bag.
4. Clean-up Steps for Clothing, Bedding, etc.
• If clothing or bedding materials come in direct contact
with broken glass or mercury-containing powder from
inside the bulb that may stick to the fabric, the clothing
or bedding should be thrown away. Do not wash such
clothing or bedding because mercury fragments in the
clothing may contaminate the machine and/or pollute
sewage.
“The powers delegated by the proposed
Constitution ... are few and defined. Those
which are to remain in the State governments
are numerous and indefinite.”
~ James Madison
PAGE 29
• You can, however, wash clothing or other materials
that have been exposed to the mercury vapor from a
broken CFL, such as the clothing your are wearing when
you cleaned up the broken CFL, as long as that clothing
has not come into direct contact with the materials from
the broken bulb.
• If shoes come into direct contact with broken glass
or mercury-containing powder from the bulb, wipe them
off with damp paper towels or disposable wet wipes.
Place the towels or wipes in a glass jar or plastic bag for
disposal.
5. Disposal of Clean-up Materials
• Immediately place all clean-up materials outdoors in a
trash container or protected area for the next normal trash
pickup.
• Wash your hands after disposing of the jars or plastic
bags containing clean-up materials.
6. Future Cleaning of Carpeting or Rugs: Air Out the
Room During and After Vacuuming
• The next several times you vacuum, shut off the
central forced-air heating/air conditioning system and
open a window before vacuuming.
• Keep the central heating/air conditioning system shut
off and the window open for at least 15 minutes after
vacuuming is completed.
PAGE 30
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
From the Zoning Office
by Rich Brittingham
Permits are required for:
1. Change of Use of Occupancy
2. Construction of a new building
3. Structural alterations or repairs
4. Signage
5. Adding new structures, additions or dwelling units
6. Sheds, fences, swimming pools, concrete patios,
paver patios, parking lots and driveways
7. Plumbing fixtures, installed or replaced
8. Well drilling
9. Moving or relocating a building
10. Demolition, razing (Ordinance #191)
11. Earth disturbance over 1,000 sq.ft. (Ordinance #210)
All applications for Building and Zoning Permits
should include the following information:
1. Plot plan including lot dimensions, building setbacks,
proposed construction location, existing structures
and easements
2. Description of the proposed construction
3. Estimated cost of construction
4. Type of occupancy (present and proposed use)
5. Name, address, and telephone number of owner,
contractor and authorized agent
Developments Under Construction
1. Renaissance at Morgan Creek
141 Single family (Age Qualified 55+)
101 acres located on the south side of Station Road
2. Arbours at Morgan Creek
134 Townhomes/multiplex units (Age Qualified 55+)
89.2 acres located on the north side of W. Paletown Road
3. Reserve at Hidden Ponds
24 Single family
10.9 acres located on the north side of Station Road
Developments Under Consideration
1. Front Gate Community
13 Mid-rise buildings, 402 units (Age Qualified 55+)
46.26 acres located along Station Road behind Q-mart
2. Reserve at Woodside Creek
75 Single family
101.7 acres located on the south side of Paletown Road
& Rocky Ridge Road
3. Steeple Run
39 Single family
21.1 acres located on the north side of Paletown Road
4. Tollgate Crossing
30 Single family
65.7 acres located on the south side of Tollgate Road
5. Select Properties - Twin Lakes
107 Single family
54.3 acres located on the east side of Old Bethlehem Pike
1.
1.
2.
Commercial/Industrial Projects
under Consideration
Pavillion at Richland
14.06 acres located at the SE corner of N. West End Blvd.
& West Pumping Station Road
Proposed multiple commercial use
Commercial/Industrial Projects
under Construction
US Cold Storage
40.415 acres located at the corner of Heller Road and
E. Pumping Station Road
Proposed G3 warehouse use
Northfield Business Campus (Lot #5)
5.6 acres located on the north side of
E. Pumping Station Road
Flex Building Use
Permits Available Online:
Permit applications are available on our website
at www.richlandtownship.org. These include:
Zoning and Building Permit; Shed, Deck and Pool
Permit (also for fences & patios); and Sign Permit.
Also available are the Subdivision & Land
Development Application, 2014 Fee Schedule,
Escrow Agreement; the Zoning Board Application,
and the Conditional Use Application.
Click on BLDG & ZONING.
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES - FALL 2014
PAGE 31
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With this coupon. May be combined with Tune up coupon.
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PAGE 32
FALL 2014 - RICHLAND TOWNSHIP TIMES
Richland Township
1328 California Road, Suite A
Quakertown, PA 18951
RICHLAND TOWNSHIP MUNICIPAL OFFICES
1328 California Road, Suite A, Quakertown, PA 18951
Phone 215-536-4066 • Fax 215-538-3020 • www.richlandtownship.org
POLICE DEPARTMENT
229 California Road
Quakertown, PA 18951
215-536-9500
WATER AUTHORITY
1328 California Road, Suite D
Quakertown, PA 18951
215-536-4733 • Fax 215-536-0205
EARNED INCOME TAX
Keystone Collections Group
546 Wendel Road
Irwin, PA 15642
888-519-3898
www.keystonecollects.com
REAL ESTATE TAX COLLECTOR
Walter Johnson
P.O. Box 940
Richlandtown, PA 18955
(Office located at 520 Station Road)
215-536-6603
richlandtownshiptaxcollector.webs.com
The Township building is open for business Monday through Friday
from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. All minutes, financial reports, ordinances,
resolutions, contracts, agreements, sub-division plans, etc., for the
Township are available for public inspection. Copies are charged at
$.25 per page.
MEETING SCHEDULES
All meetings are open to the public. The
following meetings are held at 7:00 p.m.
in the Township Building:
Board of Supervisors
Planning Commission
Water Authority
Park and Recreation Board
Trails Committee
Preservation Board
Zoning Hearing Board
Second Monday of the month
Third Tuesday of the month
Second Thursday of the month
Fourth Wednesday of the month
Fourth Wednesday of the month
Second Wednesday of the month
As advertised when required
Community/Police Liaison Board
Fourth Tuesday of the month
7:00 p.m. at the Police Building
`