The mission of United Way of Regina is to “improve... engaging individuals and mobilizing collective action”. RELATIONSHIP AGREEMENT BETWEEN

RELATIONSHIP AGREEMENT BETWEEN
UNITED WAY OF REGINA
AND
(AGENCY)
A.
Preamble
The mission of United Way of Regina is to “improve lives and build community by
engaging individuals and mobilizing collective action”.
To achieve this mission, United Way of Regina maintains relationships with a broad
spectrum of community partners and will provide funding to certain community based
organizations to achieve this mission. These partners share a common vision and goal of
a community where all individuals are provided with access to the supports and
opportunities that will enable them to build upon their individual strengths and achieve
their potential.
This Agreement, together with the Funding Agreement, sets out the expectations and
responsibilities of United Way of Regina and (AGENCY) as partners engaged in mutual
work, as well as the conditions that apply to the allocation of funds to (AGENCY).
B.
Definitions
1.
Community Fund. Funds allocated by United Way of Regina to support a stable
network of service providers.
2.
Allocation. An approved amount of money provided to a funded partner from
United Way of Regina.
3.
Capital Campaigns. A campaign to solicit funds for:
the acquisition of real estate;
the construction of, or major repairs to, buildings or related facilities;
the acquisition of, or major repairs to, significant items of equipment or
furnishings.
4.
Community Priority Areas. The areas identified by the community and adopted
by United Way of Regina as the focus of its investments. See Addenda A for a
description of current community priority areas.
5.
Donor Designation. A contribution made by donors to United Way of Regina who
have specifically designated a funded partner as the recipient of their contribution.
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6.
Funded Partner – An agency whose mission and objectives are aligned with
United Way of Regina and to which United Way of Regina provides financial
support. United Way of Regina and the funded partner may also collaborate on
initiatives designed to address the community priority areas.
7.
Membership Campaign. A membership campaign is the solicitation of the
general public to purchase regular memberships or sustaining memberships
(where the fee is an amount beyond the cost of providing service to members) and
the primary objective of the membership drive is to encourage interest in the
agency.
8.
Outcomes. The benefits or changes for individuals or populations during or after
participating in program activities. Outcomes may be short- to long-term and may
include changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes or values, behaviour, or status.
9.
Provisional Status. Where organizational management or governance concerns
have been identified, a funded partner will be required to address those concerns
within an agreed upon time frame.
C.
Guiding Principles
United Way of Regina will hold itself and the agencies it funds accountable to these
principles. We commit to adhere to the standards set by these principles and we will work
collaboratively to ensure that all initiatives meet these standards. Together, we will
measure the work we do and evaluate our success on the basis of the following principles.
The principles are not listed in order of priority, but rather, constitute a holistic
framework.
Results-Based
United Way of Regina and all funded partners will be accountable for achieving results,
will continually measure the impact of work undertaken in order to improve, and will
endeavour to meet all defined outcomes. United Way of Regina and all funded partners
are committed to demonstrating the impact of our investments and services through
specific, measurable indicators of success and outcomes for our community, and
especially related to the community priority areas.
Stewardship
United Way of Regina and its funded partners recognize that the community has
entrusted us to spend its money wisely. United Way of Regina and all funded partners
demonstrate effective governance and management practices so that we are able to fulfill
our stewardship accountabilities to our donors.
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Collaboration
In recognition of our shared responsibility to promote collaborative involvement in
addressing community needs and future challenges, United Way of Regina and all funded
partners are committed to a multi-sectoral approach to community building. By working
together we strengthen our capacity to address long-term challenges and take advantage
of opportunities.
Leadership and Learning
Our shared work supports a process of dynamic change and growth that maximizes our
relevance, efficiency and effectiveness. United Way of Regina and all funded partners
will be innovative, demonstrating responsible risk-taking and leadership. We recognize
that good leadership must be grounded in an understanding of current theory and
supported by sound evidence. In recognition of this, United Way of Regina and all
funded partners will pursue leadership, decision-making and planning that reflect best
practices and support life-long learning.
Community Capacity Building
All communities have strengths and assets among their individual members and
collectively as a community. United Way of Regina and all funded partners agree to
contribute, each in their own way, to building capacity in our community. Each is
committed to values that support capacity building at individual, family and community
levels and to actions that achieve measurable and meaningful results. Community
development principles are at the core of mutual efforts to build capacity, with the most
effective community development being community-based, community-paced, and
community-directed.
D.
(AGENCY) agrees to:
1.
Ensure its Board of Directors has a working knowledge of the Relationship and
Funding Agreements and assures the agency’s compliance.
Strive to meet the eight key governance goals from the Panel on Accountability
and Governance. (Appendix 1)
Adopt the “Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code” developed by
the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy (now Imagine Canada). (Appendix 2)
Adopt the “Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement” developed by Volunteer
Canada. (Appendix 3)
Adhere to the Guidelines for Fundraising (Section F).
Adhere to the Guidelines for Recognition of United Way of Regina (Section G).
In addition to visual acknowledgement of United Way of Regina support, funded
partners are expected to portray United Way of Regina positively in all its
communications with the community.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
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7.
18.
Provide program reports, annual reports, evaluation materials, annual audited
statements and other materials as requested by United Way of Regina.
Advise United Way of Regina immediately of any organizational changes
(services, programs, governance, staffing or funding) which significantly affect
the organization.
Operate programs, activities and operations lawfully and in full compliance with
applicable laws and regulations and ensure that funds provided under this
Agreement are not utilized directly or indirectly in contravention of any such law
and regulations.
Maintain responsible management guided by a volunteer Board of Directors that
is representative of the diversity among the citizens of Regina and of the needs of
the community served by the funded partner, and who are neither paid for services
nor employees of the funded partner, with the exception of the Chief Executive
Officer.
All financial statements accompanying funding applications must be prepared in
accordance with the accounting standards published by the Canadian Institute of
Chartered Accountants. It is expected that funded partner’s auditors will use these
accounting principles in the formation of a professional opinion on the audited
financial statements.
Indemnify and hold harmless United Way of Regina from any and all third party
claims, demands, or actions for which the funded partner is legally responsible,
including those arising out of negligence, willful harm, or crimes by the funded
partner or the funded partner’s staff or agents.
Maintain compliance with United Way of Regina’s funding eligibility criteria (see
Community Fund Guidelines).
Conduct an internal campaign for donations in support of United Way of Regina’s
annual campaign.
Support United Way of Regina’s resource development efforts by making
available volunteers and/or staff for public speaking; providing case stories and
outcome reports, and providing current information about the funded partner as
requested.
Participate in United Way of Regina efforts and initiatives to advance strategies
related to the community priority areas.
Measurably demonstrate the results its programs and services have on the
community priority areas.
Participate in regular meetings of funded partners.
E.
The United Way of Regina agrees to:
1.
2.
Conduct an annual fundraising campaign in the city of Regina.
Identify (AGENCY) as a United Way of Regina funded partner and interpret to
the public the broad range of services provided by all funded partners.
Provide guidance and support when possible to the funded partner to assist in the
effective planning and overall management of the agency.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
3.
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
F.
Provide regular allocation payments for the amount and term specified in the
Funding Agreement.
Maintain responsible management guided by a volunteer Board of Directors that
is representative of the diversity among the citizens of Regina and of the needs of
the community served by United Way of Regina, and who are neither paid for
services nor employees of United Way of Regina, with the exception of the Chief
Executive Officer.
Make available to the funded partner its annual report, including its audited
financial statements.
Provide promotional items to enable the funded partner to comply with Section G
that may include: electronic and camera-ready logos; door / window decals;
posters; and other materials as available and requested.
Ensure regular and timely communications with funded partners on any matters
that affect the relationship or the terms of the Funding and Relationship
Agreements.
Facilitate regular meetings of funded partners.
Maintain as policy the “Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code”
developed by the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy (now Imagine Canada).
Maintain as policy the “Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement” developed
by Volunteer Canada.
Strive to meet the eight key governance goals from the Panel on Accountability
and Governance.
Facilitate efforts and initiatives to advance strategies related to the community
priority areas.
Measurably demonstrate the results of strategies implemented to address the
community priority areas.
Guidelines for Fundraising
Based on the philosophy of working in partnership with funded partners, this policy seeks
to provide a basis for conduct of fundraising by funded partners within the framework of
United Way of Regina’s fundraising objectives. As a means of expanding the base
support for human services in our community, a more flexible policy in fundraising is
aimed at ensuring that all potential support is achieved through a coordinated, not
competitive, effort.
The basic principles underlying this policy:
1.
2.
3.
The funded partners and United Way of Regina are committed to working
together to meet community needs and wish to work together cooperatively.
Fundraising by funded partners is an accepted means of maintaining and ensuring
an agency’s financial viability where deemed necessary by that agency and its
Board of Directors.
United Way of Regina donors should be protected from additional requests for
general donations. In particular, this policy protects employee groups and
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
individuals from area-wide requests at their place of work, and at home, as well as
protecting corporations and businesses that are contributors to United Way of
Regina.
Funded partners have a strong commitment to protect and enhance the community
image of, and their association with United Way of Regina. Therefore,
fundraising activities should be designed to support and complement both
organizations and United Way of Regina’s annual campaign.
Funded partners have the right to develop independent fundraising strategies
designed to raise funds, develop new sources of income, and to establish a
broader constituency within guidelines.
With a mutual objective of maximizing the funds available to provide needed
services to individuals and families, United Way of Regina and funded partners
have a responsibility to coordinate and cooperate to the greatest extent possible in
all fundraising activities, including the United Way of Regina campaign, agency
operating fund campaigns and capital campaigns.
Fundraising activities by United Way of Regina and funded partners must adhere
to federal, provincial and municipal regulations, and funded partners will adopt
and adhere to Imagine Canada’s “Ethical Fundraising and Financial
Accountability Code”.
United Way of Regina has a responsibility to respect the autonomy of funded
partners. As such, United Way of Regina shall treat as confidential, unless
authorized, all information received from a funded partner.
Restricted Time
Funded partners are restricted from conducting fundraising activities September 15
to November 1 inclusive. During that time funded partners will participate
wholeheartedly in the United Way of Regina campaign, giving all assistance possible.
Fundraising Guidelines
The list of fundraising activities in this document is not meant to be complete. Funded
partners are encouraged to contact United Way of Regina if clarification about proposed
activities is required.
1.
Suggestions for revenue producing activities, which may be done at any time, are
as follows:
seek government grants;
seek gifts from churches, service clubs, and fraternal organizations;
planned giving activity, such as wills, endowments, similar deferred gifts;
seek gifts from foundations (other than those which administer corporate
or business donation budgets, or similar foundations);
provide product for fee (i.e. activities in which goods or services are sold
for a price related to their value and receipts are not issued) as a part of the
regular agency business;
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-
receive fees for service;
conduct renewal membership campaigns;
earn interest on investments;
work bingo’s and casinos;
use posters to promote a fundraising activity in business premises.
2.
These fundraising activities cannot be done at anytime by the funded partner, or
by the provincial or national body of the funded partner:
solicitation for general donations from corporations, business and
corporate foundations that are United Way of Regina supporters and have
requested that funded partners not approach them;
workplace solicitation for general donations of individuals, employee
groups, and employee trust funds;
general area-wide solicitation of households or businesses by mail, by
door-to-door canvassing or by telemarketing.
3.
These fundraising activities may not be done during the restricted period of
September 15 – November 1 but may be done at other times of the year:
campaigns for capital projects (both initial and follow-up solicitation);
solicitations of gifts-in-kind;
solicitation of corporate and business sponsorship funds for program
activities;
area-wide membership campaigns;
lotteries;
special events including holding, advertising, promoting, approaching
sponsors, selling tickets, etc.
Timely advance notice of planned capital campaigns should be forwarded to
United Way of Regina.
4.
The funded partner and United Way of Regina may agree to occasional
exceptions to this policy if an unusual or rare opportunity is presented to the
funded partner. A description in writing of the event will be submitted to United
Way of Regina.
Nationally or Provincially Affiliated Organizations
It is recognized that local chapters do not always have the authority to direct the activities
of affiliated organizations. However, each funded partner should endeavour to encourage
its affiliated organizations, including provincial and national affiliates, to conduct
fundraising activities in accordance with this policy. It would be expected that funded
partners would opt out, if possible, of any fundraising activities conducted by affiliated
organizations which are clearly in contravention to this policy. If it is not possible to opt
out of participation, as soon as possible the funded partner will inform United Way of
Regina.
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G.
Guidelines for Recognition of United Way of Regina
The funded partner agrees to make effective use of United Way of Regina promotional
materials by:
including the United Way of Regina logo and/or acknowledgment on
letterhead, internal and external publications and other print/media
material;
placing United Way of Regina decals on doors and windows with high
public visibility;
placing United Way of Regina posters inside the agency with high public
visibility; and,
placing United Way of Regina posters and/or visual acknowledgment at
agency display booths when in the community.
H.
Financial Reserves Policy
United Way of Regina wants to encourage responsible financial management. This means
that some level of financial reserve will be encouraged, not discouraged. Defining the
reasonableness of such an amount is difficult because funded partners vary considerably
in their programming, nature of expenditures, expenditure cycle, predictability of revenue
and expenses, and many other aspects. This means that every situation must be judged on
its own merits, taking into account an organization’s unique circumstances.
United Way of Regina believes that financial reserves representing the equivalent of
between three –(3) and six –(6) months operating expenses would be reasonable for most
organizations. For the purpose of this calculation:
operating expenses include total operating expenses excluding non-cash
expenses such as depreciation expense and funds disbursed directly to
other agencies;
financial reserves include Unrestricted Net Assets plus Internally
Restricted Net Assets in the deferral method of accounting (this does not
include Net Assets Invested in Capital Assets or Net Assets Externally
Restricted), and in the restricted fund method of accounting include
Unrestricted Fund Balances plus Internally Restricted Fund Balances (this
does not include Capital Fund Balances or Externally Restricted Fund
Balances).
I.
Multi-Year Funding
The Community Fund Allocations Sub-Committee may recommend to the Community
Investments Committee multi-year Funding Agreements for some funded partners.
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Recommendations will be based upon annual allocation reviews and the following
criteria. The funded partner will:
have demonstrated long-term stability through sound management and
governance practices;
have a good working relationship with United Way of Regina; and,
have demonstrated the effectiveness of their services through ongoing
evaluation including outcome measurement.
Agencies must be a United Way funded partner for a minimum of three years to be
eligible for consideration for multi-year funding.
J.
Provisional Status
United Way of Regina is committed to ensuring accountability to its donors for the
investment of funds in effectively managed and governed organizations. United Way of
Regina will provide support to funded partners wherever possible to assist them in
achieving and maintaining good governance and management practices.
A funded partner may be recommended for provisional status when one or more of the
following conditions have been identified by the Community Fund Allocations SubCommittee:
the terms and conditions of the Funding and/or Relationship Agreements
are not being adhered to;
the funded partner is experiencing prolonged management problems; and,
the funded partner is unable or unwilling to demonstrate outcomes related
to one or more of the three community priority areas.
Some examples of management problems are, but are not limited to, an agency’s lack of:
annual financial and program performance information;
proper management of funds;
reasonable unit cost;
legal and ethical accountability;
an ability and willingness to address United Way of Regina
recommendations;
board leadership and involvement;
responsiveness to community demographics and emerging issues; and,
long range strategic planning.
A funded partner on provisional status will not be eligible for an increase in its allocation
amount, nor will it be eligible for a multi-year Funding Agreement.
Process
A funded partner is recommended for provisional status based on concerns identified
during the Community Fund allocations review.
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Within 10 days of approval of provisional status by the United Way of Regina Board of
Directors, the funded partner will be notified in writing.
Within 30 days of approval of provisional status United Way of Regina staff will meet
with the funded partner’s Executive Director and Board Chair to outline concerns and
determine required steps and timelines to address the issues.
While on provisional status, United Way of Regina staff will meet with the funded
partner quarterly to offer assistance and to monitor progress in addressing issues. Every
effort is made to assist the funded partner to remove the provisional status.
The funded partner will be required to meet with the Community Fund Allocations SubCommittee in the following year as part of the Community Fund allocations review
interview schedule.
If upon completion of the provisional status term, remedial conditions are not met or
addressed to the satisfaction of United Way of Regina, the funded partner may be
recommended for Discontinuance of the Relationship Agreement as outlined in Section L
of this agreement.
K.
Funding Reductions
The recommendation for a funding reduction may be based on one or more of the
following:
non-compliance with terms and conditions contained within the Funding
and/or Relationship Agreements;
failure to comply with provisional status conditions; and,
lack of alignment with community priority areas.
The process and timelines for implementation of a funding reduction will be determined
based upon the circumstances recommending the funding reduction.
L.
Discontinuance of Relationship Agreement
Based upon the annual allocations review process, a Discontinuance of the Relationship
Agreement may be recommended for a funded partner. The recommendation may be
based on one or more of the following:
the funded partner failed to submit a funding application within published
deadlines;
failure to abide by the terms and conditions of the Funding and / or
Relationship Agreements;
failure to comply with provisional status conditions;
lack of alignment with community priority areas; and,
termination of the Funding Agreement.
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Discontinuance of the Relationship Agreement will result in the discontinuance of
funding, and may occur either immediately or over a defined time period.
The process and timelines for implementation of the Discontinuance of the Relationship
Agreement will be determined by United Way of Regina in consultation with the funded
partner.
M.
(AGENCY) and United Way of Regina agree that:
1.
This Agreement may be terminated upon United Way of Regina becoming aware
that the funded partner is or has been in breach of any of the terms or conditions
of the Relationship and / or Funding Agreement.
Either party may terminate this Agreement provided 90 days written notice of the
termination is forwarded to the other party.
United Way of Regina will review its community investment policies and the
agencies it funds to ensure accountability to its donors and alignment of
investment strategies with community priority areas.
United Way of Regina or the funded partner is welcome to request a meeting with
the other at any time.
2.
3.
4.
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By entering into this Agreement (AGENCY) and United Way of Regina agree to adhere
to the Guiding Principles that characterize the relationship and to the specific policies,
procedures and guidelines contained herein.
For the Funded Partner
Signed at Regina, Saskatchewan this ______ day of ________________, 20___
______________________________________
Chair Signature
______________________________
Print Name
______________________________________
Executive Director Signature
______________________________
Print Name
For the United Way of Regina
Signed at Regina, Saskatchewan this ______ day of ________________, 20___
______________________________________
Chair Signature
______________________________
Print Name
______________________________________
Chief Executive Officer Signature
______________________________
Print Name
Relationship Agreement Between United Way of Regina and (AGENCY)
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United Way of Regina
Relationship Agreement
Appendix 1
ETHICAL FUNDRAISING AND FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY CODE
The registered charity undertakes to adhere to the standards set out in the Imagine
Canada Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code in its treatment of donors
and the public, its fundraising practices and its financial transparency, and to be
accountable through its Board of Directors for doing so.
A
Donor policies and public representations
1.
The charity prepares and issues official Income Tax receipts for monetary gifts and for
gifts-in-kind pursuant to any policy established and published on minimum amounts to
be receipted and in compliance with all regulatory requirements. The charity will
acknowledge in writing contributions not entitled to be officially receipted, subject to
any policy established and published on minimum amounts to be acknowledged.
2.
All fundraising solicitations by or on behalf of the charity disclose the charity's name
and the purpose for which funds are requested. Printed and on-line solicitations
(however transmitted) will include its address or other contact information.
3.
The charity provides the following information promptly upon request:
•
the charity's most recent annual report and financial statements as approved
by the governing board;
•
the charity's registration number (BN) as assigned by the Canada Revenue
Agency (CRA);
•
any information contained in the public portion of the charity's most recent
Charity Information Return (form T3010A) as submitted to CRA;
•
a copy of the Charity’s Investment Policy relating to its investable assets, if
applicable (see C8);
•
a list of the names of the members of the charity's governing board; and
•
a copy of this Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code.
4.
The charity or those fundraising on its behalf will disclose, upon request, whether an
individual or entity soliciting contributions is a volunteer, an employee or a contracted
third party.
5.
The charity will encourage donors to seek independent advice if the proposed gift is a
Planned Gift and/or the charity has any reason to believe that the proposed gift might
significantly affect the donor's financial position, taxable income, or relationship with
other family members.
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1
6.
The charity will honour donors' requests to remain anonymous in respect to:
•
being publicly identified as a supporter of the organization; and/or
•
having the amount of their contribution publicly disclosed.
[Guidance: In some circumstances, when the source or size of a donation may be
perceived as affecting the independence of the charity, the organization may
negotiate the terms of public disclosure.]
7.
The privacy of donors will be respected. Any donor records that are maintained by the
charity will be kept confidential to the greatest extent possible. Donors have the right
to see their own donor record, and to challenge its accuracy.
8.
If the charity exchanges, rents, or otherwise shares its fundraising lists with other
organizations, a donor’s request to be excluded from the list will be honoured.
9.
Solicitations by or on behalf of the charity will treat donors and prospective donors
with respect. Every effort will be made to honour their requests to:
•
limit the frequency of solicitations;
•
not be solicited by telephone or other technology;
•
receive printed material concerning the charity;
•
discontinue solicitations where it is indicated they are unwanted or a
nuisance.
10. Recognition mechanisms created due to a gift will not be arbitrarily changed or
withdrawn. Unless otherwise negotiated at the time of the gift or changed through a
joint agreement between the charity and the donor or the donor’s family or legal
representative, the original form of the recognition mechanism should be maintained.
If the mechanism cannot be physically retained, it will be changed to another
consistent with the original agreement. If continuation of the recognition creates a
reputational risk for the charity, it may be terminated or altered.
[Guidance: The charity’s Donor Recognition/Gift Acceptance Policy may be
referred to in a gift agreement and may define recognition time limits and/or
establish procedures if maintaining the original form of recognition becomes
impractical or undesirable.]
11. The charity will respond promptly to a complaint by a donor or prospective donor
about any matter that is addressed in this Donor, Fundraising & Financial Practice
Code.
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2
B
Fundraising Practices
1.
Fundraising solicitations on behalf of the charity will:
•
be truthful; and
•
accurately describe the charity's activities and the intended use of donated
funds.
2.
The charity will not make claims that cannot be upheld. It will refrain from using
marketing materials or making representations that could be misleading. The charity
will not exploit its beneficiaries. It will be sensitive in describing those it serves
(whether using graphics, images or text) and fairly represent their needs and how
these needs will be addressed.
3.
When the charity conducts online solicitations its practices will be consistent with or
exceed the provisions of the Canadian Code of Practice for Consumer Protection in
Electronic Commerce, which is downloadable at: http://www.cmcweb.ca/epic/site/cmccmc.nsf/vwapj/EcommPrinciples2003_e.pdf/$FILE/EcommPrinciples2003_e.pdf
4.
When the charity conducts face-to-face solicitations, including but not limited to doorto-door campaigns or street-side fundraising, its practices shall include measures to:
•
provide verification of the affiliation of the person representing the charity;
and,
•
secure and safeguard any confidential information, including credit card
information, provided by donors.
5.
Volunteers, employees and third party consultants/solicitors who solicit or receive
funds on behalf of the charity shall:
•
adhere to the provisions of this Ethical Fundraising and Financial
Accountability Code;
•
act with fairness, integrity, and in accordance with all applicable laws;
•
adhere to the provisions of applicable professional codes of ethics,
standards of practice, etc.;
•
cease solicitation of a prospective donor who identifies the solicitation as
harassment or undue pressure, or who states that he does not wish to be
solicited;
•
disclose immediately to the charity any actual or apparent conflict of interest
or loyalty; and
•
not accept donations for purposes that are inconsistent with the charity's
objects or mission.
6.
The charity will provide, upon request, its best available information on the gross
revenue, net proceeds and costs of any fundraising activity (including the fundraising
costs categorized as education and/or public awareness) it undertakes.
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3
7.
Paid staff or consultants will be compensated by a salary, retainer or fee, and will not
be paid finders' fees, commissions or other payments based on either the number of
philanthropic contributions received or the value of funds raised.
[Guidance: Compensation policies for staff, including fundraisers, providing for
performance-based compensation practices (such as salary increases or bonuses)
will be consistent with the charity's policies and practices that apply to nonfundraising personnel.]
[Guidance: Permissible percentage-based payments:
(i) This provision does not apply to commercial fees, such as commissions or
percentage payments or similar administrative payments for credit card transactions.
(ii) This provision does not apply to administrative fees charged by registered
charities subject to regulation by the Canada Revenue Agency who collect money on
behalf of other charities (such as Community Foundations and United Ways).
(iii) This provision does not apply to cause-related marketing where a percentage of
sales are promised to the charity or to lotteries.]
8.
Charities that undertake cause-related marketing in collaboration with a third party
should disclose how the charity benefits from the sale of products or services and the
minimum or maximum amounts payable under the arrangement. If no minimum
amount is specified, the charity should disclose this.
9.
The charity will not sell its donor list. If applicable, any rental, exchange or other
sharing of the charity's donor list will exclude the names of donors who have so
requested (as provided in section A8, above). If a list of the charity’s donors is
exchanged, rented or otherwise shared with another organization, such sharing will be
for a specified period of time and a specified purpose and must be limited to what is
allowed under Federal and/or Provincial privacy legislations.
10. The charity's governing board will be informed at least annually of the number, type
and disposition of complaints received from donors or prospective donors about
matters that are addressed in this Donor, Fundraising & Financial Practice Code.
C
Financial practice and transparency
1.
The charity's financial affairs will be conducted in a responsible manner, consistent
with the ethical obligations of stewardship and all applicable law.
2.
All donations will be used to support the charity's objects, as registered with CRA.
3.
All restricted or designated donations will be used for the purposes for which they
were given unless the charity has obtained legal authorization to use them for other
purposes. Alternative uses will be discussed where possible with the donor or the
donor’s legal designate. If the donor is deceased or legally incompetent and the
charity is unable to contact a legal designate, the donation will be used in a manner
that is as consistent as possible with the donor's original intent. If necessary, the
charity will apply to the courts or the appropriate regulatory body to obtain legal
authorization to use the donation for other purposes.
Imagine Canada – Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code
www.imaginecanada.ca
4
4.
Annual financial reports are necessary to achieve transparency and accountability to
donors and the public. All charities issuing receipts should produce them and make
them easily accessible. They should:
•
be factual and accurate in all material respects;
•
disclose the gross amount of fundraising revenues (receipted and nonreceipted);
•
disclose the total amount of fundraising expenses (including salaries and
overhead costs);
•
disclose all donations that are receipted for income tax purposes;
•
disclose the total amount of expenditures on charitable activities (including
gifts to other charities);
•
segregate undesignated and designated funds (for aggregate amounts over
$100,000);
•
identify government grants and contributions separately from other
donations (for aggregate amounts over $100,000); and
•
Financial Statements should be prepared in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles and standards established by the Canadian
Institute of Chartered Accountants, in all material respects (or disclose a
discrepancy between the practice and GAAP).
5.
The cost-effectiveness of the charity's fundraising programs will be reviewed regularly
by the governing board. No more will be spent on administration and fundraising than
is required to ensure effective management and resource development. The charity
will disclose its process for evaluating its spending.
6.
The charity will, upon request, disclose the revenue and expense assumptions for its
fundraising activity as approved by its Board in its annual budget.
7.
If the charity has annual revenue in excess of $250,000, the financial statements are
audited by an independent public accountant.
8.
If the charity’s investable assets surpass $1,000,000, an Investment Policy will be
established setting out asset allocation, procedures for investment decisions, and
asset protection issues.
9.
If the charity receives, or anticipates receiving, gifts-in-kind of $100,000 or more in a
year and has annual revenue in excess of $500,000, it will establish a Gift Acceptance
Policy (including valuation issues) for the receipt of gifts-in-kind.
Imagine Canada – Ethical Fundraising and Financial Accountability Code
www.imaginecanada.ca
5
United Way of Regina
Relationship Agreement
Appendix 2
THE ETHICAL FUNDRAISING AND
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY CODE
Introduction
This Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code has been developed by Imagine
Canada (formerly the Canadian Centre for Philanthropy), in consultation with charity leaders
throughout Canada. Its primary purpose is to assure donors of the integrity and
accountability of charities that solicit and receive their financial support.
Charities that adopt this Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code commit to
fundraising practices that respect donors' rights to truthful information and to privacy. They
also commit to manage responsibly the funds that donors entrust to them, and to report their
financial affairs accurately and completely.
Donors or prospective donors who have questions or concerns about fundraising
activities should contact the charity on whose behalf the funds are being solicited.
Charities that adopt the Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code are committed
to deal with such queries promptly and fairly. The Charities Division of the Canada Revenue
Agency (CRA) also provides information and receives complaints about registered charities
at 1-800-267-2384 (English) or 1-888-892-5667 (bilingual).
This Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code complements the professional
codes of ethics and standards of practice to which many fundraisers individually adhere
(such as those of the Association of Fundraising Professionals, the Association for
Healthcare Philanthropy, the Canadian Association of Gift Planners, and other national,
provincial or sectoral organizations).
N.B.: There are some forms of revenue-raising for which official receipts are not issued for
income tax purposes (for example, charitable gaming transactions, proceeds from product
sales, affinity card or product fees, and fair market value charges for charitable benefits,
tournaments, banquets, events or activities). These activities may be governed by specific
legal requirements and/or involve additional ethical considerations that are not addressed in
this Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code.
In order to be recognized by Imagine Canada as having adopted this Ethical Fundraising &
Financial Accountability Code, a charity's governing board must pass the following motion as
a formal resolution:
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Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code
"[Name of charity] hereby adopts Imagine Canada's Ethical Fundraising and Financial
Accountability Code as its policy. In so doing, members of the governing board commit to
being responsible custodians of donated funds, to exercise due care concerning the
governance of fundraising and financial reporting, and to ensure to the best of their ability
that the organization adheres to the provisions of the Code. It is hereby confirmed that each
member of the governing board has received a copy of the Ethical Fundraising & Financial
Accountability Code and that a copy will also be provided to each person who is
subsequently elected to the governing board."
Charities that adopt the Code may be added to the list on Imagine Canada’s website by
completing the registration form at http://www.imaginecanada.ca/adherentregform.asp or by
contacting:
Imagine Canada
425 University Avenue, Suite 900
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1T6
Fax: (416) 597-2294
E-mail: [email protected]
A. Donor's Rights
1. All donors (individuals, corporations, and foundations) are entitled to receive an
official receipt for income tax purposes for the amount of the donation. Donors of
non-monetary eligible gifts (or gifts-in-kind) are entitled to receive an official receipt
that reflects the fair market value of the gift. (Note: The term 'Eligible gifts' is
comprehensively defined by CRA. A full definition can be found in CRA's
Interpretation Bulletin dealing with gifts and official donation receipts. 1 Some
common gifts, such as donations of volunteer time, services, etc. are not eligible to
receive official tax receipts.) The charity's governing board may establish a minimum
amount for the automatic issuance of receipts, in which case smaller donations will
be receipted only upon request.
2. All fundraising solicitations by or on behalf of the charity will disclose the charity's
name and the purpose for which funds are requested. Printed solicitations (however
transmitted) will also include its address or other contact information.
3. Donors and prospective donors are entitled to the following, promptly upon request:
•
•
•
•
the charity's most recent annual report and financial statements as approved by
the governing board;
the charity's registration number (BN) as assigned by CRA;
any information contained in the public portion of the charity's most recent
Charity Information Return (form T3010) as submitted to CRA;
a list of the names of the members of the charity's governing board; and
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Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code
•
a copy of this Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code.
4. Donors and prospective donors are entitled to know, upon request, whether an
individual soliciting funds on behalf of the charity is a volunteer, an employee, or a
hired solicitor.
5. Donors will be encouraged to seek independent advice if the charity has any reason
to believe that a proposed gift might significantly affect the donor's financial position,
taxable income, or relationship with other family members.
6. Donors' requests to remain anonymous will be respected.
7. The privacy of donors will be respected. Any donor records that are maintained by
the charity will be kept confidential to the greatest extent possible. Donors have the
right to see their own donor record, and to challenge its accuracy.
8. If the charity exchanges, rents, or otherwise shares its fundraising list with other
organizations, a donor's request to be excluded from the list will be honoured.
9. Donors and prospective donors will be treated with respect. Every effort will be made
to honour their requests to:
•
•
•
limit the frequency of solicitations;
not be solicited by telephone or other technology;
receive printed material concerning the charity.
10. The charity will respond promptly to a complaint by a donor or prospective donor
about any matter that is addressed in this Ethical Fundraising & Financial
Accountability Code. A designated staff member or volunteer will attempt to satisfy
the complainant's concerns in the first instance. A complainant who remains
dissatisfied will be informed that he/she may appeal in writing to the charity's
governing board or its designate, and will be advised in writing of the disposition of
the appeal. A complainant who is still dissatisfied will be informed that he/she may
notify Imagine Canada in writing.
B. Fundraising Practices
1. Fundraising solicitations on behalf of the charity will:
•
•
•
be truthful;
accurately describe the charity's activities and the intended use of donated funds;
and
respect the dignity and privacy of those who benefit from the charity's activities.
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Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code
2. Volunteers, employees and hired solicitors who solicit or receive funds on behalf of
the charity shall:
•
•
•
•
•
•
adhere to the provisions of this Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability
Code;
act with fairness, integrity, and in accordance with all applicable laws;
adhere to the provisions of applicable professional codes of ethics, standards of
practice, etc.
cease solicitation of a prospective donor who identifies the solicitation as
harassment or undue pressure;
disclose immediately to the charity any actual or apparent conflict of interest; and
not accept donations for purposes that are inconsistent with the charity's objects
or mission.
3. Paid fundraisers, whether staff or consultants, will be compensated by a salary,
retainer or fee, and will not be paid finders' fees, commissions or other payments
based on either the number of gifts received or the value of funds raised.
Compensation policies for fundraisers, including performance-based compensation
practices (such as salary increases or bonuses) will be consistent with the charity's
policies and practices that apply to non-fundraising personnel.
4. The charity will not sell its donor list. If applicable, any rental, exchange or other
sharing of the charity's donor list will exclude the names of donors who have so
requested (as provided in section A8, above). If a list of the charity's donors is
exchanged, rented or otherwise shared with another organization, such sharing will
be for a specified period of time and a specified purpose.
5. The charity's governing board will be informed at least annually of the number, type
and disposition of complaints received from donors or prospective donors about
matters that are addressed in this Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability
Code.
C. Financial Accountability
1. The charity's financial affairs will be conducted in a responsible manner, consistent
with the ethical obligations of stewardship and the legal requirements of provincial
and federal regulators.
2. All donations will be used to support the charity's objects, as registered with CRA.
3. All restricted or designated donations will be used for the purposes for which they are
given. If necessary due to program or organizational changes, alternative uses will
be discussed where possible with the donor or the donor's legal designate. If the
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Ethical Fundraising & Financial Accountability Code
donor is deceased or legally incompetent and the charity is unable to contact a legal
designate, the donation will be used in a manner that is as consistent as possible
with the donor's original intent.
4. Annual financial reports will:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
be factual and accurate in all material respects;
disclose the total amount of fundraising revenues (receipted and non-receipted) 2 ;
disclose the total amount of fundraising expenses (including salaries and
overhead costs) 3 ;
disclose the total amount of donations that are receipted for income tax purposes
(excluding bequests, endowed donations that cannot be expended for at least 10
years, and gifts from other charities) 4 ;
disclose the total amount of expenditures on charitable activities (including gifts
to other charities) 5 ;
identify government grants and contributions separately from other donations;
and
be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and
standards established by the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants, in all
material respects.
5. No more will be spent on administration and fundraising than is required to ensure
effective management and resource development. In any event, the charity will meet
or exceed CRA's requirement for expenditures on charitable activities. (The Income
Tax Act sets out a requirement that all registered charities spend 80% of their
receipted donations from the previous taxation year -- excluding bequests, endowed
donations that cannot be expended for at least 10 years, and gifts from other
charities -- on charitable activities; in addition, charitable foundations are required to
expend 4.5% of their assets in support of charitable programs 6 )
6. The cost-effectiveness of the charity's fundraising program will be reviewed regularly
by the governing board.
Footnotes:
1
Currently, 'Eligible Gifts' are defined in IT110R3 Gifts and Official Donation Receipts.
Total of amounts from lines 100, 102 and 113 of T3010 (CRA's Registered Charity Information
Return, 2001)
3
Amount from line 123 of T3010 (2001)
4
Amount from line 906 of T3010 (2001)
5
Total of amounts from lines 120 and 121 of T3010 (2001)
6
See Section 149.1 of the Income Tax Act
2
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United Way of Regina
Relationship Agreement
Appendix 3
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The Canadian Code for
Volunteer Involvement
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Acknowledgments
Volunteer Canada and the Canadian Administrators of Volunteer
Resources would like to acknowledge the lead writers who provided
their expertise and skills in revising the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement. We thank:
Loisann Hauer, Organizational and Governance Leadership Specialist
Cheryl Humphrey-Pratt, Consultant and Trainer
Nadine Maillot, Consultant and Trainer
Liz Weaver, M. Mgmt., Organizational and Governance Leadership
Specialist
We also recognize the contributions of the following sector leaders who
provided feedback throughout the revision process:
Maria Ariganello; Nathalie Charette; Ann Coburn: Pat Gillis; Kathy
Harrison; Jenn Henneberry; Angela Klassen; Karen Kennedy; Ruth
MacKenzie; Lorraine McGratton; Natalie Muryn, as well as members of
the AGRBQ – Association des gestionnaires de ressources bénévoles
du Québec, Volunteer BC, and Volunteer Canada’s Network of National
Volunteer Involving Organizations.
This revised version of the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
was funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage.
We acknowledge the financial support of the
Government of Canada through the Department of
Canadian Heritage. The opinions expressed in this
publication do not necessarily reflect those of the
Department of Canadian Heritage.
For further information on this subject or others relating to volunteering and volunteer management,
please visit www.volunteer.ca/resource.
© Volunteer Canada, 2006
Également disponible en français
ISBN 1-897135-52-1
Copyright for Volunteer Canada material is waived for charitable and voluntary organizations
for non-commercial use. All charitable and voluntary organizations are encouraged to copy
and distribute this material.
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Table of Contents
1. Background
•
•
•
•
•
Volunteerism and the Voluntary Sector in Canada
Volunteer Canada
Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources
The Partnership
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement: History, Importance and Purpose
2. The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
•
•
•
•
Overview: Elements of the Code
Values for Volunteer Involvement
Guiding Principles for Volunteer Involvement
Organizational Standards for Volunteer Involvement
3. Involving Volunteers: Adopting and Implementing the Code
•
•
Step 1: Why Do Voluntary Organizations Exist?
Step 2: Who Does What in Voluntary Organizations to Involve Volunteers?
•
Step 3: Involving Volunteers in Voluntary Organizations - Organizational Standards Checklist
4. Glossary of Terms
5. Additional Resources
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
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1. Background
Volunteerism and the Voluntary Sector
in Canada
Every day, thousands of people voluntarily give their
time and talent to thousands of organizations across
Canada. They give their time freely and with no
expectation of monetary reward. Their hours of
service ensure that many activities are accomplished and many people are helped. They build
houses for the homeless, care for the elderly, and
provide counseling and support services. They are
youth group leaders, program coordinators, coaches
and fundraisers. They represent every walk of life –
professional, homemaker, student, retiree – as well
as every age and cultural group.
Canadians volunteer for over 161,000 voluntary
organizations in the areas as diverse as health care,
social services, sport and recreation, faith communities, arts and culture, and education. Some of
these voluntary organizations are large, structured
organizations with staff and volunteers who work
collaboratively. Some are smaller grassroots organizations or community groups that are run solely by
volunteers or with very limited paid staff support.
Volunteer Canada
Volunteer Canada is a national organization engaged
in the promotion of volunteerism across Canada. As
a national leader, Volunteer Canada strives to ensure
that volunteer efforts are promoted, recognized,
supported and safeguarded. Volunteer Canada
works in partnership with:
• a network of close to 100 Volunteer Centres in
communities across Canada, as well as a
federation of approximately 110 Volunteer
Centres in Quebec;
• a network of National Volunteer Involving
Organizations that brings together volunteer
development professionals working at the
2
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
national level of Canadian charities, public
institutions and non-profit organizations;
• thirteen Local Networks and Host Organizations
involved in the Canada Volunteerism Initiative
and representing all provinces and territories
across the country;
• a membership base that represents the full
spectrum of the voluntary, public and private
sectors, including managers of volunteers,
Volunteer Centres, non-profit agencies,
community groups, government departments,
corporations and individuals who are interested
in volunteerism.
By developing resources and national initiatives,
Volunteer Canada actively engages in research,
training and promotional campaigns to increase
community participation and provide leadership on
issues and trends in the Canadian volunteer
movement.
Canadian Administrators of Volunteer
Resources
Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources
(CAVR) is a national organization that promotes the
professional administration of volunteer resources
through established standards of practice, a code
of ethics and certification of membership. CAVR
collaborates with provincial, national and international organizations to support and enhance
volunteer resource management in Canada.
The Partnership
Volunteer Canada and CAVR provide leadership in
promoting and enhancing volunteerism in Canada.
They have collaborated on a number of projects
and initiatives in the past. In January of 2005,
Volunteer Canada and CAVR embarked on a new
partnership to consolidate the Canadian Code for
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The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
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5. Additional Resources
Universal Declaration on Volunteering: International
Association for Volunteer Effort
The International Association for Volunteer Effort (IAVE)
adopted a Universal Declaration on Volunteering for all
voluntary organizations. The declaration provides broad
standards for volunteering that can be used by all
organizations.
International Association for Volunteer Effort:
www.iave.org
Universal Declaration on Volunteering:
www.iave.org/resources_udecl.cfm
Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating
www.givingandvolunteering.ca
National Survey of Non-Profit and Voluntary
Organizations
www.nonprofitscan.ca
Volunteer Canada
330 Gilmour Street
Ottawa, Ontario CANADA
K2P 2P6
www.volunteer.ca
Federal and Provincial Human Rights Codes
Volunteer programs are governed by the Canadian
Human Rights Code and provincial human rights codes.
Voluntary organizations should be aware of the content
of these codes and ensure that their programs comply
with the regulations identified in them.
Volunteer Canada’s Safe Steps to Screening
Volunteer Canada has developed a variety of resources
designed to assist organizations in assessing and
managing risk in their volunteer programs. These
resources can be accessed at www.volunteer.ca/screening
and can be ordered online.
Volunteer Canada’s Volunteer Resource Centre
Volunteer Canada has a number of resources that can
be accessed and ordered online through
www.volunteer.ca/resource
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Canadian Administrators of Volunteer Resources
www.cavr.org
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Volunteer Involvement (Volunteer Canada, 2000) and
the CAVR Standards of Practice (CAVR, 2002).
The result is a revised Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement that integrates elements of the original
Code with the Standards of Practice of the CAVR.
Volunteer Canada and CAVR are proud to present this
revised edition of the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement to the voluntary sector.
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement:
History, Importance and Purpose
History of the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
The original Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
was launched in December 2000 as a kickoff to the
International Year of Volunteers (2001). The Code was
targeted at boards of directors of voluntary organizations and intended to promote discussion about the
role volunteers play in their organizations. Across
Canada, many organizations worked to adopt and
implement the Code into their work with volunteers,
and in doing so, created a solid base for involving volunteers in their organizations. Building on this success,
Volunteer Canada and CAVR recognize the importance
of being at the forefront of information delivery and
providing continual leadership to voluntary organizations. This revised Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement enables organizations to enhance their
existing practices and continue to ensure that solid
foundations are in place for involving volunteers in their
organizations.
Importance of the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement
• communicating the values and benefits received
from volunteer involvement;
• providing a framework for decision making, taking
into account organizational values and guiding
principles; and
• developing standards for involving volunteers in
meaningful ways to ensure successful integration
of volunteers for both the organization and its
volunteers.
The revised Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
will continue to support organizations in the same
ways.
Purpose of the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement is a
road map for voluntary organizations, large or small,
that proposes strategies to effectively involve volunteers. In many organizations, support of volunteers
through volunteer programs exists only at the periphery
of the organization. Volunteers are viewed as a “nice to
have” but not as critical components of the organization’s work or success. The Code proposes ways to
integrate volunteer involvement strategically into the
organization, and helps leaders in the organization
understand the value and role of volunteers.
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement is
designed to set the stage for organizations to discuss
how their volunteers are engaged and supported. It is
structured to initiate thought and discussion about the
role volunteers can play in helping the voluntary organization achieve its purpose or mission. This resource
provides a starting point for this kind of thinking and
discussion.
Volunteers and the voluntary sector continue to play a
vital role in Canadian society. Volunteers across
Canada are engaged in delivering services and
programs that improve and enhance the life of the
community. The original Code assisted organizations in:
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2. The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
Overview: Elements of the Code
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
consists of three important elements:
• Values for Volunteer Involvement
Core statement on the importance and value of
volunteer involvement in voluntary organizations
and Canadian society
Volunteer involvement is based on relationships.
• It creates opportunities for voluntary
organizations to accomplish its goals by
engaging and involving volunteers, and it allows
volunteers an opportunity to grow and give
back to the community in meaningful ways
through voluntary organizations.
Guiding Principles for Volunteer Involvement
• Guiding Principles for Volunteer Involvement
Principles that detail the exchange between
voluntary organizations and volunteers.
• Organizational Standards for Volunteer Involvement
Standards that organizations should consider in
developing or reviewing how volunteers are
involved in their organizations.1
Values for Volunteer Involvement
Volunteer involvement is vital to a just and democratic
society.
• It fosters civic responsibility, participation and
interaction.
Volunteers have rights. Voluntary organizations
recognize that volunteers are a vital human resource
and will commit to the appropriate infrastructure to
support volunteers.
• The organization’s practices ensure effective
volunteer involvement.
• The organization commits to providing a safe
and supportive environment for volunteers.
Volunteers have responsibilities. Volunteers make a
commitment and are accountable to the organization.
• Volunteers will act with respect for beneficiaries
and community.
• Volunteers will act responsibly and with integrity.
Volunteer involvement strengthens communities.
• It promotes change and development by
identifying and responding to community needs.
Volunteer involvement mutually benefits both the
volunteer and the organization.
• It increases the capacity of organizations to
accomplish their goals, and provides volunteers
with opportunities to develop and contribute.
1
These standards have consolidated the standards published in the original Code (2000) and the standards adopted by CAVR (2002)
4
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Staff
Individuals who work on behalf of an organization and who receive financial
compensation.
Voluntary Organizations
Organizations whose work depends on: serving a public benefit; on volunteers for at least its governance; on some financial support from individuals
and on limited direct influence by governments, other than in relation to any
tax benefits accruing the organization. A voluntary organization can be a
large, structured organization or a small, community or grassroots
organization.
Volunteerism
Refers to the contribution of time, resources, energy and/or without monetary
compensation.
Volunteering
The most fundamental act of citizenship and philanthropy in our society.
It is the offering of time, energy and skills of one’s own free will.
Volunteer
Any person who gives freely of their time, energy and skills to contribute to
the goals of a voluntary organization.
Volunteer Resources Management
The practice and profession of leading teams of individuals (volunteers)
to support and enhance core programs and services of an organization.
This practice is also a component of human resource management of the
organization and should be closely aligned.
The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
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4. Glossary of Terms
16
Board
Those persons whose responsibility it is to provide leadership and direction
to the organization and govern the affairs of the organization on behalf of
its members. For the purposes of this document, the term “board” is used
to refer to a board of directors, members of the executive, board of
governors or a board of trustees, administrators, clergy, leaders, coaches,
coordinators, officials, parents, participants or anyone else involved in the
governance or decision making of the organization.
Capacity
The human and financial resources, technology, skills, knowledge and
understanding required for organizations to do their work and fulfill what is
expected of them by stakeholders.
Executive Director (ED)
The most senior staff position in the organization. The ED is responsible for
the entire organization and reports directly to the board. The ED’s role is to
support the governance of the board while ensuring that programs and
operations of the organization are delivered.
Leadership Volunteers
Individuals who are mainly responsible for supporting the governance of
the board while ensuring that programs and operations of the organization
are delivered (in the absence of paid staff).
Manager of Volunteers
An administrator of volunteer resources is a professional who applies the
best practices in volunteer management in compliance with nationally
accepted standards to identify, strengthen and effectively maximize
voluntary involvement for the purpose of improving the quality of life of
individuals and of communities. The term “administrator” is used in a
generic way to represent all other titles used in the voluntary sector
(director, coordinator, manager, leader, etc). In some organizations, the title
of the person responsible for managing volunteers may not even reflect
this role. Throughout the Code, the term “Manager of Volunteers” is used.
(CAVR definition)
Mission
The mandate for why an organization exists. The overall goal of the organization, this is often referred to as the “raison d’être” of an organization.
Organizational Standards
Standards that organizations should consider in developing or reviewing
how volunteers are involved in their organizations. This is a basic set of
standards to which all organizations should aspire.
Policies
Specific statements of belief, principle or action that tell us what to do.
Procedures
A series of steps to assist in implementing policy. The steps indicate who
will do the work and how it will be done.
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Organizational Standards for Volunteer
Involvement
Standard 7: Screening
A clearly communicated screening process is adopted
and consistently applied by the organization.
Standard 1: Mission-based Approach
The board of directors, leadership volunteers and staff
acknowledge and support the vital role of volunteers in
achieving the organization’s purpose and mission.
Standard 8: Orientation and Training
Each volunteer is provided with an orientation to the
organization, its policies and practices, including the
rights and responsibilities of volunteers. Each volunteer
receives training customized to the volunteer assignment and the individual needs of the volunteer.
Standard 2: Human Resources
Volunteers are welcomed and treated as valued and
integral members of the organization’s human
resources team. The organization has a planned
approach for volunteer involvement that includes
linking volunteers to the achievement of the mission,
providing the appropriate human and financial
resources to support the volunteer program, and
establishing policies for effective management.
Standard 3: Program Planning and Policies
Policies and procedures are adopted by the organization to provide a framework that defines and supports
the involvement of volunteers.
Standard 4: Program Administration
The organization has a clearly designated individual
with appropriate qualifications responsible for the
volunteer program.
Standard 5: Volunteer Assignments
Volunteer assignments address the mission or purpose
of the organization and involve volunteers in meaningful ways that reflect the abilities, needs and backgrounds of the volunteer and the organization.
Standard 9: Supervision
Volunteers receive a level of supervision appropriate to
the task and are provided with regular opportunities to
give and receive feedback.
Standard 10: Recognition
The contributions of volunteers are consistently
acknowledged with formal and informal methods of
recognition.
Standard 11: Record Management
Standardized documentation and records management practices are followed and in line with relevant
legislation.
Standard 12: Evaluation
The impact and contribution of volunteers and the
volunteer program are continually evaluated to ensure
the needs of the organization are being met in fulfilling
its mandate.
Standard 6: Recruitment
Volunteer recruitment incorporates internal and
external strategies to reach out and involve a diverse
volunteer base.
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3. Involving Volunteers: Adopting and Implementing the Code
Step 1: Why Do Voluntary Organizations Exist?
Strong organizations deliver programs and services
that influence and impact the community. In turn,
the community also influences voluntary organizations through demographics, trends and needs. It is
important to understand how trends in the
community and the voluntary sector can impact
voluntary organizations. By understanding the
influence of trends in the voluntary sector, volunteers can be more effectively involved. Surveys such
as the Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and
Participating (www.givingandvolunteering.ca ) and
the National Survey of Non-Profit and Voluntary
Organizations (www.nonprofitscan.ca) are useful
resources for the identification and analysis of
trends.
Whether formal or informal, voluntary organizations
are made up of individuals who work together to
achieve the purpose or mission of a cause that is
important to them. The mission of an organization
tells us why the organization exists and the nature
of its overall mandate or goal. The mission should
answer the question “Why are we here?” Further, it
is important to ask:
• How does our organization achieve its mission?
• What are the programs and services that
contribute to fulfilling the mission?
By adopting the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement, voluntary organizations make a commitment to not only strengthen their volunteer
programs, but to strengthen the capacity of the
organization to meet both its mandate and the
needs of the community.
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The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
The right track to involving volunteers…
• Trends that are happening in the voluntary
sector at a local and a national level are
understood by the organization.
• The demographic makeup of current volunteers
within the organization can be articulated.
• A core client base has been defined by the
organization and the demographics of the
community are known.
• The organization understands and responds to
the needs of the community.
• Organizational standards for volunteer
involvement adopted by the voluntary
organization have taken into consideration
voluntary sector trends and trends occurring
within the local community (including current
legislations and best practices).
• Values and guiding principles from the
Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement are
reviewed during the strategic and annual
planning process.
• Values and guiding principles from the
Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement are
incorporated within the governance policy of
the organization.
• Values and guiding principles are incorporated
into the organization’s values, vision and
mission statement.
• The organization has a philosophical statement
or policy about volunteer involvement.
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Standard 12: Evaluation
Volunteer involvement should be evaluated regularly
to ensure that involvement of volunteers is contributing
to the organizations mandate. An evaluation of
volunteer involvement should include: reviewing goals
and objectives, identifying results achieved, obtaining
feedback from current volunteers and clients, collecting
and reviewing both quantitative and qualitative data
about volunteer involvement.
The impact and contribution of involving volunteers
and of the volunteer program are continually evaluated
to ensure the needs of the organization are being met
in fulfilling its mandate.
• Performance goals are established annually for the
volunteer program.
• Achievement of performance goals is assessed on
an annual basis.
• Volunteer involvement goals are evaluated regularly
by the board of directors.
• Opportunities exist for volunteers to give feedback
to the organization about their involvement.
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Standard 9: Supervision
Prior to the placement of volunteers, the supervision
level of the assignment should be determined b a s e d
on the complexity and risk of the assignment. Each
volunteer should know who their supervisor is.
Supervision increases the motivation of volunteers,
helps ensure the organization’s mandate is met and
gives volunteers a sense of belonging within the
organization.
Volunteers receive a level of supervision appropriate
to the task and are given regular opportunities to
offer and receive feedback.
• The complexity and risk of each assignment
determines the level of supervision.
• Volunteers are assigned and introduced to their
supervisors at the start of their assignment.
• The performance of volunteers is evaluated on
a regular basis.
• Random spot checks with volunteers (and
clients) are used to verify volunteer
performance.
• Volunteers are given and encouraged to use
mechanisms for providing input to the
organization.
• Situations requiring reprimand and dismissal
follow policies and procedures fairly and
consistently, while respecting the safety and
dignity of all concerned.
Standard 10: Recognition
An effective volunteer program acknowledges
volunteers throughout the year by knowing volunteers
as individuals and providing recognition that is
meaningful on an ongoing basis. In addition, it
is essential that those responsible acknowledge
internally and publicly (where appropriate) the
importance of volunteer involvement to the
organization.
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The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
The contributions of volunteers are consistently
acknowledged with formal and informal methods of
recognition.
• Senior management acknowledges the efforts
of volunteers.
• Formal methods of recognition are delivered
consistently.
• Informal methods of recognition are delivered in
a timely and appropriate manner.
Standard 11: Records Management
Records should be maintained on every volunteer
involved with the organization, using a confidential,
secure system. Records should include application
forms, records of interviews, assignment descriptions,
letters of reference, performance appraisals and
current contact information. Records are also useful
in evaluating the impact of the volunteer program
through the contribution and time donated by
volunteers.
Standardized documentation and records management practices are followed and in line with relevant
legislation.
• Records are kept for each volunteer using a
confidential, secure system respecting the
privacy of personal information.
• Statistical information about the volunteer
program is regularly shared with staff and
volunteers in the organization.
• With appropriate agreement, testimonials about
volunteer involvement are shared within the
organization to promote volunteer involvement.
• The organization keeps informed of new
legislation, Human Rights Codes and other
relevant guidelines for record management,
privacy and confidentiality practices.
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Step 2: Who Does What in Voluntary
Organizations to Involve Volunteers
4.
Voluntary organizations accomplish their goals through
their human resources. Individuals come together to
make positive change in their communities, and are a
critical resource to the voluntary sector. They are
engaged in organizations in a number of different
ways. Each individual contributes to the organization to
help achieve its purpose or mission and has a role to
play in ensuring the successful involvement of volunteers. The following overview of the different roles that
individuals assume in an organization can provide an
understanding of how they can contribute to involving
volunteers.
Manager of Volunteer Resources2
Volunteer programs do not exist in isolation within an
organization. For volunteer involvement to be effective,
there must be acceptance and support from people
within the organization. Many voluntary organizations
have a dedicated staff person responsible for
managing the volunteer program. This person is often
called the Manager of Volunteer Resources. In other
smaller organizations, the Manager of Volunteer
Resources may be a volunteer. Regardless of whether
the managers of volunteer resources are paid staff or
volunteers, their main responsibility is to ensure that
volunteers are recruited and engaged effectively, and
that volunteer involvement standards are consistently
applied within the organization. Increasingly, management of volunteer resources is viewed as a function of
human resource management.
What can Managers of Volunteer Resources do to
assist the implementation of the Code?
1. Review and understand the Canadian Code for
Volunteer Involvement.
2. Discuss the role and expectations of volunteers in
the organization.
3. Review the Organizational Standards Checklist
2
5.
6.
7.
and identify strengths and gaps in your volunteer
resources program.
Ensure that Organizational Standards for volunteer
involvement are consistently applied within the
organization.
Manage and lead volunteers within a supportive
environment and culture for volunteer involvement
excellence.
Identify potential strategies for increasing the
effective involvement of volunteers.
Manage the volunteer resources to ensure
effective integration into the organization.
Board of Directors
Voluntary organizations are governed or led by a
voluntary board of directors. The role of a board can
vary from organization to organization, but in general,
boards are responsible for providing leadership and
strategic direction to the organization based on its
mission/mandate, and for governing the affairs of the
organization on behalf of its members. Some boards
provide input, helping out with the day-to-day operations of the organization, while other boards operate
from a governance position with a focus on the
direction and growth of an organization in partnership
with staff. It is the board that establishes the purpose
or mission, values and governing policies of your
organization.
It is important to understand how a board operates
when adopting and implementing the Canadian Code
for Volunteer Involvement. Some boards may need to
approve the policies associated with each organizational standard for volunteer involvement. Other boards
may just approve the values and guiding principles
associated with involving volunteers, while policy development and implementation is left to senior staff in the
organization.
Board members are volunteers. As such, they have an
essential role to play in demonstrating the value of
volunteer involvement through their actions.
It is recognized that titles vary from one organization or group to another. In this text, reference made to “managers of volunteer resources” should be considered to represent any individual
who has been assigned the administration and management duties relating to volunteer involvement.
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What can the Board of Directors do to assist in the
implementation of the Code?
1. Review the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement.
2. Discuss whether the values are consistent with
the board’s vision for volunteer involvement in
your organization.
3. Review the Organizational Standards Checklist
(provided in Step 3). Discuss whether the
organization currently fulfills these standards
and/or identify any gaps.
4. Make a commitment to adopt the Code.
5. Communicate to all staff and volunteers the
organization’s commitment to making effective
volunteer involvement an integral part of
achieving the organization’s mission.
Executive Director or Leadership Volunteers
Executive Directors are present in many voluntary
organizations. Their role is to support the governance of the board while ensuring that programs
and operations of the organization are delivered.
They also have a role to play in ensuring volunteers
are integrated into the work of the organization and
that volunteer involvement standards are supported
and adopted.
In many grassroots or community based voluntary
organizations, this may be a role that is also part of
the board and performed by leadership volunteers
within the organization.
What can Executive Directors or Leadership Volunteers
do to assist in the implementation of the Code?
1. Review the Canadian Code for Volunteer
Involvement.
2. Discuss the role and expectations of volunteers
in the organization.
3. Review the vision, mission and values of your
organization and discuss how they align with
the values and guiding principles of the Code.
4. Review the Organizational Standards Checklist
(provided in Step 3). Discuss whether the
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The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
5.
6.
7.
8.
organization currently fulfills these standards
and/or identify any gaps.
Create and lead a supportive environment and
culture for volunteer involvement excellence.
Communicate to all staff and volunteers the
organization’s commitment to making effective
volunteer involvement an integral part of
achieving the organization’s mission.
Identify potential strategies for increasing the
effective involvement of volunteers. Strategies
may be directed at either staff or volunteers.
Identify and obtain resources (financial and/or
human) required to effectively involve and
support volunteers.
Volunteers
Regardless of the size or structure of voluntary
organizations, volunteers are individuals who give
freely of their time to help the organization fulfill its
mandate. Volunteers are an important human
resource for any voluntary organization. They bring
a passion for the cause and a commitment to the
purpose, and are highly motivated by their choice of
involvement. It is important that voluntary organizations understand what attracts volunteers to their
organization and how they can best maximize this
vital human resource.
What can Volunteers do to assist in the
implementation of the Code?
1. Understand how volunteer work links to the
organization’s mission.
2. Recognize that volunteers have both rights
and responsibilities as these relate to their
involvement in the voluntary organization.
3. Operate within the Organizational Standards for
volunteer involvement adopted by the
organization.
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Standard 6: Recruitment
Effective recruitment messages are realistic and clear.
They leave an accurate impression of the organization
and its needs. Genuine effort should be made to
recruit and select volunteers from a broad range of
backgrounds. A healthy organization has a mix of age,
gender, ethnicity, and abilities in its volunteer group.
Volunteer recruitment incorporates internal and
external strategies to reach out and involve a diverse
volunteer base.
• Recruitment messages are realistic and clear
about the volunteer assignments and expectations.
• Various techniques are used to recruit volunteers.
• Recruitment messages indicate that screening
procedures are followed in the organization.
• Genuine effort is made to recruit and select
volunteers from a broad range of backgrounds
and experiences to represent the community
served by the organization.
• Selection of volunteers is based on actual
requirements and pre-determined screening
measures.
Standard 7: Screening
Screening is an essential process that lasts for
the duration of a volunteer’s involvement with the
organization. Screening procedures are delivered
consistently with no exceptions made for certain
individuals. Screening protocols are assigned to
positions because of inherent risk; individuals do
not determine screening. Screening should be viewed
as evidence that the organization cares about its
programs and its people.
A clearly communicated screening process is adopted
and consistently applied by the organization.
• Screening is considered to be an essential process
that continues throughout the volunteer’s
•
•
•
•
involvement with the organization.
Policies relating to screening practices are
developed, adopted and clearly communicated to
staff and volunteers.
All volunteer assignments are assessed for level of
risk.
Appropriate screening tools are used according to
the level of risk of the assignment.
Once defined, screening practices are delivered
consistently with no exceptions made for certain
individuals.
Standard 8: Orientation and Training
An orientation clarifies the relationship between volunteers
and the organization. It familiarizes volunteers with the
organization by providing information on the policies
and procedures that influence work and involvement
with others. Volunteers need adequate training to
perform tasks without putting themselves or others at
risk. Training prepares volunteers to do the work
required by the position and to meet the expectations
of their volunteer assignments.
Each volunteer is provided with an orientation to the
organization, its policies and practices (including the
rights and responsibilities of volunteers) and receives
training customized to the volunteer assignment and
individual needs of the volunteer.
• Volunteers receive information on the history,
mission and structure of the organization.
• Volunteers receive information on the policies and
procedures specific to their volunteer assignment.
• Volunteers are given adequate training for
performing their assignment without putting
themselves or others at risk.
• Volunteers are informed of the boundaries and
limits of their assignments.
• Volunteers have ongoing training opportunities to
upgrade their skills and adapt to changes in the
organization.
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Policies and procedures are adopted by the
organization to provide a framework that defines
and supports the involvement of volunteers.
• The organization’s planning process
incorporates volunteer involvement.
• The board has approved the overall goals for
volunteer involvement.
• Governance and operational policies are in
place, are reviewed regularly, and incorporate
volunteer involvement practices.
• Policies and procedures are communicated to
all staff and volunteers.
• Policies and procedures are followed
consistently and equitably.
• Policies and procedures are consistent with
national and provincial/territorial Human Rights
Codes, The Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act, and provincial/territorial
employment standards legislation.
Standard 4: Program Administration
Managing volunteers is both an art and a science.
The job demands a wide range of skills with a high
level of complexity. Regardless of whether they are
staff members or volunteers, managers of volunteers
should have the necessary skills, experience and
support to do the job well.
The organization has a clearly designated individual
with appropriate qualifications responsible for the
volunteer program.
• The designated person has an appropriate level
of education and experience to manage the
volunteer program.
• A written job description for the designated
person is developed and reviewed regularly.
• The designated person is a member of the
management or administrative team or key
leadership volunteer.
• The designated person works collaboratively
with staff, the local Volunteer Centre and other
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The Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement
organizations to encourage the effectiveness of
the volunteer program.
• Professional development opportunities are
provided on a regular basis.
• The performance of the designated person is
reviewed regularly and includes feedback from
both staff and volunteers.
Standard 5: Volunteer Assignments
Assignments should be developed to address the
needs of the organization and the volunteer.
Volunteer assignments should be linked to the
organization’s mission. Individual needs vary
considerably, so successful volunteer programs
adapt volunteer assignments to fit these needs
when possible. It is necessary to periodically review
volunteer assignments to ensure their relevance and
value.
Volunteer assignments address the mission or
purpose of the organization and involve volunteers
in meaningful ways that reflect the abilities, needs and
backgrounds of the volunteer and the organization.
• Volunteers and staff (including bargaining units
of unions where applicable) are consulted when
developing new assignments.
• Volunteer assignments have written
descriptions that include duties, responsibilities,
skills needed, time required and benefits.
• Volunteer assignments are developed to reflect
the needs of the organization and the needs of
volunteers.
• Volunteer assignments are reviewed periodically
with staff, volunteers (and bargaining units of
unions where applicable) to ensure relevance
and value.
• Volunteers with special requirements or
challenges can become involved with the
organization.
• The level of risk is assessed and minimized for
all volunteer assignments.
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Everyone in a voluntary organization has a role to play in ensuring successful volunteer involvement. Too often, the management or oversight of volunteers is left as the responsibility of a single individual or department within the organization. Effective volunteer involvement is everyone’s responsibility.
The right track to involving volunteers…
• Volunteer involvement is included in the annual operating plans with allocated resources.
• The board is aware of the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement and understands how the organization
plans to use it.
• A dedicated individual works with volunteers and has the appropriate skills and knowledge to manage
volunteer resources.
• A current organizational chart outlines the roles and responsibilities of staff and volunteers in the organization.
• Staff and volunteers are empowered to take action on responsibilities and tasks.
• The board and senior management demonstrate a strong commitment and understanding of volunteer
involvement and management.
Table 1 Understanding Who Does What in the Organization (see next page) shows the key roles, responsibilities and
accountabilities within a voluntary organization. It can be adapted for any organization. For large, complex organizations, a
column identifying the roles, responsibilities and accountability of staff working directly with volunteers might be incorporated.
For grassroots organizations, some of the columns might merge, as individuals working for smaller organizations often
play multiple roles. It is important to recognize that each organization is unique; this table provides a frame of reference
for organizations to define who is responsible for what and who is accountable for ensuring that volunteers are effectively involved and able to contribute to the mission and programs of the organization.
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Table 1: Understanding Who Does What in the Organization
Specific Roles in
Organization
Executive Directors
Managers of
Board Members
or Leadership
Volunteers
Volunteer Resources
(paid or volunteers)
Volunteers
Create, lead and
ensure a supportive
environment and
culture for volunteer
involvement
Create and lead a
supportive environment and culture for
volunteer involvement
(Policy and Delivery
Manage and lead volunteers within a supportive environment
and culture for
volunteer involvement
Individually contribute
to support an environment and culture for
volunteer involvement.
(Delivery Focus)
Focus)
(Policy and Delivery
Focus)
(Policy Focus)
• Define and review
vision, mission and
values around
volunteer involvement
• Develop a strategic
plan that considers
integrating volunteer
involvement as a core
function and resource
to support achievement of the mission
• Review vision, mission
and values
• Assist with strategic
plan development
• Develop and manage
operational strategies
and goals and the
annual plan
• Link operational work
to vision, mission and
values
• Manage annual
operating goals and
strategies
• Understand how
volunteer work links to
vision, mission and
values
• Undertake volunteer
work to achieve operational goals and
strategies
Governance Policy
• Identify and develop
governance policies
• Manage to support
governance policies
• Manage to support
g o v e rnance policies
• Follow policies
Programs and
• Develop policies for
program and operations
• Identify and obtain the
resources (human and
financial) required for
programs and operations to be delivered
• Manage the volunteer
resources so that
programs and operations are supported
• Provide volunteer
service and leadership
for effective program
delivery
• Develop a policy
approach to human
resource management and incorporate
the volunteer involvement standards
• Ensure effective management of human
resource strategies in
the organization
• Lead the involvement
of volunteers and the
integration of
volunteer involvement
standards and
practices
• Transfer human
resource management strategies to the
volunteer program
• Ensure that volunteer
involvement standards
are consistently
applied within the
organization
• Operate within and
support the volunteer
involvement standards
for delivery of quality
programs and/or
services.
Vision, Mission, Values
and Strategic Plan
Operations
Human Resources
Management
(Volunteer
Involvement)
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Step 3: Involving Volunteers in Voluntary
Organizations - Organizational Standards
Checklist
Standard 2: Human Resources
A healthy organization encourages volunteers to grow.
By adopting the standards outlined in this resource,
the organization demonstrates a commitment to
understanding and involving volunteers in the work it
does to achieve its mandate. By adopting and implementing the detailed practices outlined for each
standard, organizations send a strong message to volunteers, staff, funders and the community that involvement of volunteers is vital and an integral part of the
strategic plan.
assignments. Volunteers need to be included as equal
members of the team. The definition of team should not
The organizational standards provide a basic set of
standards to which all organizations should aspire.
Standard 1: Mission-based Approach
Volunteers help the organization achieve its mission
and objectives. Volunteer involvement must be aligned
with the organization’s goals and resource allocation.
The board and senior management should understand
and approve of the direction of the volunteer program.
The board of directors, leadership volunteers and staff
acknowledge and support the vital role of volunteers in
achieving the organization’s purpose and mission.
• The board of directors adopts a statement
declaring the vital role of volunteers in achieving
the organization’s mission.
• The organization’s planning process incorporates
volunteer involvement.
• The board has approved the overall strategy for
volunteer involvement.
• A budget is allocated for volunteer involvement.
• Adequate space and equipment are allocated for
volunteers to perform their assignments.
• Appropriate insurance is acquired to minimize
volunteer liability.
• Volunteer involvement goals are evaluated regularly
by the board of directors.
Volunteers are supported and encouraged to become
involved and to contribute in new ways beyond initial
be limited to those who are paid within the organization.
Involved and informed volunteers who feel part of the
team are far more likely to continue contributing their
valuable time and skills.
Volunteers are welcomed and treated as valued and
integral members of the organization’s human resources
team. The organization has a planned approach for
volunteer involvement that includes linking volunteers
to the achievement of the mission, providing the
appropriate human and financial resources to support
the volunteer program, and establishing policies for
effective management.
• Staff is given training and recognition to work
effectively with volunteers.
• Input from volunteers is welcomed and solicited for
the organization’s planning and evaluation.
• Volunteers are encouraged to grow within the
organization.
• Volunteers are included as equal members of the
team.
Standard 3: Program Planning and Policies
Policies and procedures help clarify responsibilities and
ensure consistency. They should be developed and
documented on a broad spectrum, from volunteer
assignments and screening, to grounds for dismissal.
The organization’s board of directors needs to ensure
volunteer policies are congruent with other policies
within the organization. The manager of volunteer
resources is responsible for identifying the specific
policies and procedures required.
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