MINISTRY OF EDUCATION SECONDARY EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

REPUBLIC OF GHANA
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
SECONDARY EDUCATION
IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
(SEIP)
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION MANUAL
(September 29, 2014)
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
LIST OF ACRONYMS
AESL
AESOP
AfDB
ARIC
BECE
BER
CAGD
CAMFED
CENDLOS
CHASS
CQS
CSO
CSSPS
DACF
DEO
DEOC
DFID
DLIs
DLRs
DSSEP
ECOWAS
EEPs
EFA
EMIS
EOI
EPA
ESMF
ESP
ESPR
FAA
FAR
FBS
FM
FPMU
GAS
GCR
GDP
GER
GES
GESCI
GETFUND
GEU
Architectural and Engineering Services Limited
Annual Education Sector Operational Plan
African Development Bank
Audit Review and Implementation Committee
Basic Education Certification Exam
Budget Execution Report
Controller and Accountant General‘s Department
Campaign for Female Education
Centre for National Distance Learning and Open Schooling
Conference of Heads of Assisted Secondary Schools
Selection Based on Consultants‘ Qualifications
Civil Society Organization
Computerized School Selection and Placement System
District Assemblies Common Fund
District Education Office
District Education Oversight Committee
Department for International Development
Disbursement- linked Indicators
Disbursement- linked Results
Development of Senior Secondary Education Project- Education III
Economic Community of West African States
Eligible Expenditure Programs
Education For All
Education Management Information System
Expression of Interest
Environmental Protection Agency
Environmental and Social Management Framework
Education Sector Plan
Education Sector Performance Report
Financial Administration Act
Financial Administration Regulation
Fixed Budget Selections
Financial Management
Funds and Procurement Management Unit
Ghana Audit Service
General Counterfoil Receipt
Gross Domestic Product
Gross Enrollment Rate
Ghana Education Service
Global E-Schools and Communities Initiative
Ghana Education Trust Fund
Girls Education Unit
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
GIFMIS
GLSS
GoG
GPEG
GPN
GSGDA
GSS
IBRD
IC
ICB
ICT
ICU
IDA
IFRs
IGF
INSET
IPSAS
IUFR
LCS
MDG
MOE
MOF
MTEF
NCB
NCCA
NCTE
NESAR
NIB
NITA
NTC
PBME
PIM
PPA
PSC
PTAs
QBS
QCBS
RAP
RBF
RCC
RPF
SBD
SED
SEIP
SEU
SHS
Ghana Integrated and Financial Management Information System
Ghana Living Standards Survey
Government of Ghana
Ghana Partnership for Education
General Procurement Notice
Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda
Ghana Statistical Service
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank)
Individual Consultants
International Competitive Bidding
Information and Communication Technology
Infrastructure Coordination Unit
International Development Agency
Interim Financial Reports
Internally Generated Funds
In-Service Training
International Public Sector Accounting Standards
Interim Unaudited Financial Reports
Least Cost Selection
Millennium Development Goal
Ministry of Education
Ministry of Finance
Medium Term Expenditure Framework
National Competitive Bidding
National Council for Curriculum and Assessment
National Council for Tertiary Education
National Education Sector Annual Review
National Inspectorate Board
National Information Technology Agency
National Teaching Council
Planning, Budget, Monitoring and Evaluation
Project Implementation Manual
Public Procurement Authority
Project Steering Committee
Parent Teachers Associations
Quality Based Selection
Quality and Cost-Based Selection
Resettlement Action Plan
Result-Based Financing
Regional Coordination Council
Resettlement Policy Framework
Standard Bidding Document
Secondary Education Division
Secondary Education Improvement Project
Science Education Unit
Senior High School
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
SPN
SPIP
SPP
SPPP
SRIMPR
STME
STMIE
STEP
TED
TIC
TPV
UNDB
USAID
WAEC
WASSCE
Specific Procurement Notice
School Performance Improvement Plan
School Performance Partnership
School Performance Partnership Plan
Statistics, Research, Information Management and Public Relations
Science, Technology and Mathematics Education
Science, Technology, Mathematics, Innovation Education
Skills Toward Employment and Productivity Survey
Teacher Education Division
Technical Implementation Committee
Third Party Verification
United Nations Development Business
United States Agency for International Development
West Africa Examinations Council
West Africa Senior Secondary Certificate Examination
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table of Contents
LIST OF ACRONYMS ......................................................................................................................................................................... I
LIST OF TABL ES AND FIGURES...................................................................................................................................................... IX
LIST OF ANNEXES............................................................................................................................................................................. X
1.
INTRODUCTION AND PROJECT SUMMARY ..................................................................................................................... 1
1.1.
NATIONAL CONTEXT ......................................................................................................................................................... 1
1.2.
MACRO-ECONOMIC CONTEXT .......................................................................................................................................... 1
1.3.
EDUCATION SECTOR BACKGROUND................................................................................................................................... 1
1.4.
JUSTIFICATION FOR THE PROJECT ...................................................................................................................................... 2
1.5.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION ..................................................................................................................................................... 3
1.5.1. Project Objectives.................................................................................................................................................. 3
1.5.2. Key Perfo rmance Indicators................................................................................................................................. 4
1.6.
PROJECT COMPONENTS.................................................................................................................................................... 4
1.6.1. Component 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality in Senio r High Schools .................... 4
1.6.2. Component 2: Management, Research and Monitoring and Evaluation .................................................... 6
1.7.
PROJECT FINANCING......................................................................................................................................................... 6
1.8.
RESULTS MATRIX ...........................................................................................................................................................11
1.8.1. Disbursement Linked Indicato rs and Results ..................................................................................................11
2.
PROJECT INSTITUTIONAL AND IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS.....................................................................13
2.1.
EXECUTING AGENCY .......................................................................................................................................................13
2.2.
THE PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE ..............................................................................................................................13
2.3.
THE TECHNICAL I MPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE ..............................................................................................................14
2.4.
ROLE OF MINISTRY OF EDUCATION .................................................................................................................................17
2.5.
ROLE OF GHANA EDUCATION SERVICE.............................................................................................................................17
2.5.1. Role of Regional Education Directora te ..........................................................................................................18
2.5.2. Role of District Education Directo rate .............................................................................................................18
2.5.3. Role of Beneficiary Senior High Schools ..........................................................................................................19
3.
IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPONENT 1: SUPPORT TO INCREASE ACCESS WITH EQUITY AND QUALITY IN
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS ................................................................................................................................................................21
3.1 CRITERIA FOR THE SELECTION OF DISTRICTS TO RECEIVE 23 NEW HIGH SCHOOLS...................................................................21
3.1.1. Ten districts without Public SHS ........................................................................................................................21
3.1.2. Additional 13 Districts to Benefit fro m New Senior High Schools ...............................................................22
3.2 CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF 125 EXISTING SHS TO BENEFIT FROM IMPROVEMENT IN FACILITIES AND QUALITY .......................23
3.2.1 Criteria for Selecting 50 Existing SHSs fo r Facilities and Quality Improvement .............................................23
3.2.2
Criteria for Selecting 75 Existing SHSs fo r Quality Improvement ................................................................25
3.3 PILLAR 1: I NCREASE ACCESS WITH EQUITY ............................................................................................................................28
3.3.1
SCHOLARSHIP ...............................................................................................................................................................28
3.3.2
Eligibility fo r Scholarship ....................................................................................................................................30
3.3.3. Scholarship Selection Process............................................................................................................................31
3.3.4. Monitoring by GES, MO E and REO ...................................................................................................................31
3.3.5. Monitoring by GEU..............................................................................................................................................32
3.3.6. Sustainability ........................................................................................................................................................33
3.4 PILLAR 2: I MPROVE THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION IN SELECTED LOW PERFORMING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS.............................33
3.4.1
School Perfo rmance Partnerships Plan............................................................................................................33
3.4.2
Preparation of SPPP ............................................................................................................................................34
3.4.3
Orientation Training for Beneficiary Schools ..................................................................................................35
3.4.4
National Level Science and Mathematics INSET ............................................................................................37
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3.4.5
Monitoring ............................................................................................................................................................37
3.4.6
Review of Quality of Teaching and Learning of Ma thematics and Scien ce ..............................................37
3.4.7.1
Technical Infrastructure ................................................................................................................................41
3.4.7.2
Activities to improve Teaching and Learning using ICT ...........................................................................42
3.4.7.3
Schools Project Team ....................................................................................................................................43
3.4.7.4
The ICT Consortiu m........................................................................................................................................43
3.4.7.5
Monitoring ......................................................................................................................................................44
3.4.8
Leadership and Management Training ...........................................................................................................45
3.4.8.1
Beneficiaries of the Training .......................................................................................................................45
3.4.8.2
Expected Outputs and Outcomes ...............................................................................................................45
4.
IMPLEMENTATION OF CO MPONEN T 2: MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH, MONITORING AN D EVALUATION........48
4.1.
MONITORING AND EVALUATION .....................................................................................................................................48
4.2.
PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS ........................................................................................................................................48
4.3.
I MPACT EVALUATIONS....................................................................................................................................................49
4.4.
MANAGEMENT OF MONITORING AND EVALUATION ........................................................................................................49
4.5.
DISBURSEMENT LINKED I NDICATORS ...............................................................................................................................49
4.6.
RESULTS FRAMEWORK INDICATORS.................................................................................................................................52
4.7.
BASELINE DIAGNOSTIC ANALYSIS .....................................................................................................................................52
4.8.
NOTE ON PDO I NDICATOR TWO: THE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT INDICATOR..................................................................55
4.9.
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES FOR RESULTS FRAMEWORK INDICATOR UPDATES .................................................................55
4.10.
I NDEPENDENT SURVEY FIRMS ..........................................................................................................................................56
4.11.
O NLINE MONITORING TOOL FOR SCHOOL -LEVEL DATA COLLECTION...................................................................................57
4.11.1.
Theme – A ccess ..............................................................................................................................................58
4.11.2.
Theme – quality ..............................................................................................................................................58
4.12.
MONITORING AND SUPERVISION VISITS ...........................................................................................................................59
4.13.
I MPACT EVALUATION .....................................................................................................................................................59
4.14.
SCHOOL MAPPING AND PROFILE.....................................................................................................................................60
4.14.1.
Phase 1 - Website / User-in terface .............................................................................................................60
4.14.2.
Phase 2 – SEIP Schools self-reporting .........................................................................................................61
4.14.3.
Phase 3 – SEIP Schools monitoring and verification ................................................................................61
4.14.4.
Phase 4 - Open-Ended Expansion ................................................................................................................62
4.14.5.
Data Sources, Da ta Collection and Entry ...................................................................................................62
4.14.6.
Feedback from o rdinary co mmunity members .........................................................................................62
4.14.7.
How the pla tform can serve to address issues as they a rise ..................................................................62
4.14.8.
Roles and Responsibilities.............................................................................................................................63
4.15.
RESEARCH AGENDA ........................................................................................................................................................64
5
FINANCIAL MANAGEMEN T PROCEDURES.....................................................................................................................66
5.1 O RGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES.................................................................................................................................66
5.1.1
Organization.........................................................................................................................................................66
5.1.7
Roles and Responsibilities ..................................................................................................................................67
5.2 BUDGETING ARRANGEMENTS...............................................................................................................................................68
5.3 FUNDING AND BANKING ARRANGEMENTS ............................................................................................................................69
5.3.2
Designated Accounts ..........................................................................................................................................69
5.3.3
Opening of Bank Accounts .................................................................................................................................69
5.3.4
Signatories ............................................................................................................................................................69
5.3.5
Funds Flow ............................................................................................................................................................69
5.4 DISBURSEMENT ARRANGEMENTS .........................................................................................................................................71
5.5 POLICIES AND REGULATIONS................................................................................................................................................71
5.5.1
Eligibility fo r Accessing Funds ...........................................................................................................................71
5.5.2
Conditions Precedent to Initial Receipt of SEIP Funds Schools ....................................................................72
5.5.3
Obligations of the Schools .................................................................................................................................72
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
5.5.4
Sanctions for non-co mpliance with Disbursement Policies ..........................................................................72
5.6 REQUESTING FUNDS ............................................................................................................................................................72
5.7 RECEIVING FUNDS ...............................................................................................................................................................73
5.7.1
Detailed Procedures ............................................................................................................................................73
5.8 PREPARATION OF EXPENDITURE W ORKPLANS.......................................................................................................................75
5.8.1
Proposal ................................................................................................................................................................75
5.8.2
Workplans.............................................................................................................................................................75
5.8.3
Approval of Workplans.......................................................................................................................................75
5.9 DISBURSEMENT PROCESSES AT THE SCHOOL LEVEL ...............................................................................................................76
5.9.1
Preparation of Payment Vouchers ...................................................................................................................76
5.9.2
Cheque Preparation/Signing .............................................................................................................................76
5.9.3
Dispersal of Cheques and Supporting Docu ments .........................................................................................77
5.9.4
Accounting For Advances to Officers ...............................................................................................................77
5.10
ACCOUNTING ARRANGEMENTS.............................................................................................................................78
5.10.1
Accounting Policies ........................................................................................................................................78
5.10.2
Reco rds and Books .........................................................................................................................................79
5.10.3
Preparation and Submission of Report ......................................................................................................81
5.10.4
Financial Reporting and Monitoring ...........................................................................................................81
5.10.5
Internal Control and Internal Auditing .......................................................................................................83
5.10.6
Auditing ...........................................................................................................................................................83
6
PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES .........................................................................................................................................85
6.1 I MPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS FOR PROCUREMENT ......................................................................................................85
6.1.1
Use of National Systems.....................................................................................................................................85
6.2 PROCUREMENT ACTIVITIES...................................................................................................................................................86
6.2.1
National Level Pro curement ..............................................................................................................................86
6.2.2
Institution/School Level Procurement..............................................................................................................86
6.3 STANDARD DOCUMENTS TO BE USED AND SOLICITATION.......................................................................................................87
6.4 ADVERTISEMENT .................................................................................................................................................................87
6.5 PROCUREMENT PLANNING...................................................................................................................................................88
6.6 SCOPE OF PROCUREMENT UNDER THE PROJECT.....................................................................................................................89
6.6.1
Procurement of Works........................................................................................................................................89
6.6.2
Procurement of Goods........................................................................................................................................89
6.6.3
Procurement of non-consulting services .........................................................................................................90
6.6.4
Selection of Consultants .....................................................................................................................................90
6.6.5
Capacity Building and Training Progra mmes, Conferen ces and Workshops ............................................90
6.7 REVIEW OF PROCUREMENT BY THE BANK .............................................................................................................................91
6.8 PROCUREMENT METHODS AND PROCEDURES.......................................................................................................................92
6.9 PROCESS STEPS AND GUIDELINES FOR DETERMINING COMPLETION TIMESCALES ....................................................................93
6.10
STRENGTHENING PROCUREMENT CAPACITY ....................................................................................................................96
6.11
PROCUREMENT REPORTS................................................................................................................................................97
6.12
CONTRACT MANAGEMENT .............................................................................................................................................97
6.12.1
Contract Management and Expenditu re Reports ....................................................................................98
6.12.2
Contract Supervision and Administra tion ..................................................................................................98
6.12.3
Payment for Consultant Services .................................................................................................................98
6.12.4
Resolution of Contractual Disputes .............................................................................................................98
6.12.5
Contract Amendment ....................................................................................................................................98
6.13
ETHICS, CODE OF CONDUCT, PROCUREMENT UNDER THE PROJECT...................................................................................99
6.13.1
Conflict of Interest..........................................................................................................................................99
6.13.2
Fraud and Corruption ................................................................................................................................. 100
7.
INFORMATION EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION (IEC).................................................................................... 104
7.1
TARGET AUDIENCE ........................................................................................................................................................... 104
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
8.
TYPES OF MESSAGES ........................................................................................................................................................ 104
MEDIA FOR DISSEMINATION ............................................................................................................................................. 104
SCHOOL MAPPING AND MONITORING W EBSITE ................................................................................................................ 105
I MPLEMENTATION OF COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY.......................................................................................................... 105
ENVIRON MEN TAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMEN T FRAMEWORK............................................................................. 107
8.1
8.2
8.3
I NSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS, RESPONSIBILITIES AND PROJECT O VERSIGHT.................................................................... 109
CAPACITY BUILDING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT ............................................................................. 112
COST OF I MPLEMENTATION............................................................................................................................................... 112
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
1.1:
1.2:
1.3:
1.4:
2.1:
2.2:
3.1:
IDA Project Financing ................................................................................................ 7
Details of SEIP Costs .................................................................................................. 8
Summary of DLIs by Year........................................................................................ 11
Schedule for Disbursements under Component 1..................................................... 12
Entities Responsible for Implementation of the SEIP .............................................. 17
Implementation Arrangements.................................................................................. 19
List of 10 districts with no existing public SHS to receive a new SHS under the SEIP
22
Table 3.2: List of 13 Districts for additional new SHS .............................................................. 23
Table 3.3: List of 50 schools to benefit from facilities and quality improvements ................... 24
Table 3.4: List of 75 additional schools selected to benefit from quality improvements .......... 25
Table 3.5 Projected Scholarship Beneficiaries Under SEIP ......................................................... 29
Table 3.6 Disbursement Linked Indicator and Targets Under the Scholarship Scheme .............. 30
Table 3.7 Implementation Schedule for Scholarship Administration........................................... 32
Table 3.8 Process for SPPP Preparation and Submission ............................................................. 35
Table 3.9 Participants for Beneficiary Schools Orientation ......................................................... 36
Table 3.10 Recommendations of the Committee on Reforming Science and Mathematics
Education in Pre-Tertiary Schools ................................................................................................ 38
Table 3.11 ICT Activities to Improve Teaching and Learning ..................................................... 42
Table 3.12 Schedule of Activities under Leadership and Management Training ......................... 46
Table 4.1 Data sources for independent verification of Disbursement Linked Results ................ 50
Table 4.2 Flexibility in meeting DLIs 2, 3 and 7 .......................................................................... 52
Table 4.3 Results Framework Indicators, timelines and responsibility for updates ..................... 53
Table 4.4 Indicators to be collected by the civil works independent verification consultancy .... 57
Table 4.5 DLIs and Results Framework Indicators to be collected by in-school Survey Firm .... 57
Table 4.6 Data Sources for Tracking Progress of Project Activities ............................................ 59
Table 4.7 Proposed timeline for research activities ...................................................................... 65
Table 5.1: Disbursement Categories .......................................................................................... 71
Table 6.1: Thresholds for Procurement Methods and Prior Review ........................................... 92
Table 6.2: Procurement methods to be used under the Project .................................................. 93
Table 7.1: SEIP Communications Plan .................................................................................... 105
Table 8.1 Organization and Focal Persons for Environmental and Social Safeguards .............. 111
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
LIST OF ANNEXES
ANNEX 1:
PROJECT RESULTS FRAMEWORK ................................................................................................................... 113
ANNEX 2:
PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOO L CONSRUCTION...................................................... 117
ANNEX 3:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE (PSC).......................................... 120
ANNEX 4:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE ............................... 124
ANNEX 5:
DISTRICT AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SELECTION DATA ........................................................................... 126
ANNEX 6:
FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT SITE VISIT INFORMATION............................................................................... 146
ANNEX 7:
GUIDELINES FOR NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION.............................................................. 149
ANNEX 8:
GUIDELINES FOR FACILITIES IMPRO VEMENT .............................................................................................. 156
ANNEX 9:
STUDENT INFORMATION SHEET ON SCHOLARSHIPS................................................................................. 163
ANNEX 10:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SCHOLARSHIP ADVISOR/ADMINISTRATOR ................................... 165
ANNEX 11:
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMMEAPPLICATION FORM ..................................................................................... 171
ANNEX 12:
GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIPS PLAN ............ 175
ANNEX 13:
TEMPLATE FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIPS PLAN..................................... 180
ANNEX 14:
E-TRANSFORM PROJECT AND LIST OF BENEFICIARY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS....................................... 181
ANNEX 15:
DATA FLOW MAP FOR MO NITORING AND EVALUATION ......................................................................... 184
ANNEX 16:
PROJECT DISBURSEMENT LINKED INDICATORS AND RESULTS ................................................................ 185
ANNEX 17:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF CIVIL WORKS ACTIVITIES....... 189
ANNEX 18:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF IN-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES (QUALITY
AND OUTCOMES) ........................................................................................................................................................................ 191
ANNEX 19:
SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE FOR O NLINE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL MO NITORING..................................... 200
ANNEX 20:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SUPERVISION OF NEW CONSTRUCTION........................................ 204
ANNEX 21:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SUPERVISION CONSULTANT OF FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT ..... 208
ANNEX 22:
REPORTING TEMPLATE FO R SUPERVISION CONSULTANTS ...................................................................... 216
ANNEX 23:
TEMPLATE FOR CONDUCT OF NEEDS ASSESSMENT (FACILITIES UPGRADE) ......................................... 217
ANNEX 24:
ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING CHECKLIST................................................................................................... 218
ANNEX 25:
RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN SCREENING FORM ..................................................................................... 222
ANNEX 26:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SAFEGUARDS CO NSULTANT ............................................................ 223
ANNEX 27:
DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR PROJECT COORDINATOR .................................................................. 227
ANNEX 28:
THE E-EDUCATION PLATFORM FOR SCHOO L MAPPING AND MONITORING AND EVALUATION ...... 236
ANNEX 29: PROJECT FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS) .......................................................................................... 240
ANNEX 30: PROJECT CONTACTS ............................................................................................................................................... 245
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
BACKGROUND
This Project Implementation Manual (PIM) sets forth all the operational and procedural steps for
project implementation including detailed description of project components, the roles and
responsibilities of implementing units, review and approval of school performance partnerships
with respective stakeholders. It also includes flow of funds, operational and financial reporting
arrangements, procurement and disbursement processes, standard formats for trimester and
annual reporting and amendment procedures. It should be used in conjunction with the most
recent versions of the Project Appraisal Document (PAD) and Environmental and Social
Management Framework (ESMF).
The primary users of the PIM would be the Project Steering Committee (PSC), Technical
Implementation Committee (TIC), Supervision Consultants, Ghana Education Services (GES)
and relevant Agencies, the Regional Education Directorate, the District Education Directorate
and the Heads of Schools.
The PIM clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the PSC, TIC, (GES, NTC, Regional
Education Directors, District Education Directors, Heads Senior High Schools), and the World
Bank in relation to project implementation where relevant, and should help guide all stakeholders
and assigned oversight responsibilities of the Project.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
1.
INTRODUCTION AND PROJECT SUMMARY
1.1. National Context
Ghana, located on the western coast of Africa has an estimated population of 25 million (2010
Census).Ghana experienced rapid economic growth over the past several years resulting in
substantial progress in reducing income poverty. GDP growth rose from 8 percent in 2010 to
close to 14.5 percent in 2011, making Ghana‘s economy one of the fastest growing on the
continent. By 2012, Gross National Income per capita reached US$1,940, reflecting Ghana‘s
middle-income status. Poverty has been declining steadily, as reflected in the number of people
classified as poor, which dropped from about 8.0 million (i.e. slightly over 50 percent of the
population) in 1992 to 6.3 million in 2006 (less than 30 percent of the population). In spite of
these improvements, inequalities remain in Ghana, and are reflected in significant disparities in
access to economic, social and political opportunities, mainly between the poorer three regions in
the north and the rest of the country.
1.2. Macro-Economic Context
Recent macroeconomic instability is putting at risk the gains in poverty reduction achieved. The
fiscal deficit reached 11.5% of GDP in 2012 and 10.1% in 2013, and the current account deficit
reached 13% of GDP in both years. The government tackled the fiscal imbalances by raising
fuel prices as well as electricity and water tariffs, by around 60% in late 2013. The inflationary
impact of the adjustment was reinforced by the Cedi depreciation. Hence the higher prices imply
a lower income in real terms, which has the risk of pushing many near-poor families into
poverty. The pressure on household budgets and the impact on poor households have
implications on household financing of education
1.3. Education Sector Background
The MOE Education Sector Plan (ESP 2010-2020) seeks to increase equitable access to high
quality education across all levels of service delivery. Prior to the 2010 – 2020 ESP, Ghana had
pursued free and compulsory universal basic education for decades. Since 2008, the policy has
been to provide eleven years of universal basic education (two years of Kindergarten, six years
of Primary, and three years of Junior High). Enrollments have increased rapidly in all the three
sub-cycles of basic education in recent years: between 2002/03 and 2013/14, gross enrollment
rates increased from 49 to 123 percent at Kindergarten, from 76 to 107.3 percent at Primary, and
from 63 to 82 percent at Junior High level. The percentage of girls in primary school has
improved from 47.6 percent in 2002/3 to 48.9 percent in 2011/12, though wider gaps persist in
the rural areas, particularly affecting the last grades of primary school. The dramatic increase in
school enrollments is owing mostly to a concerted effort to build up the supply of schooling
combined with the elimination of school fees and levies charged to parents, and the consequent
introduction of the capitation grant. Government eliminated the last remaining school fees and
levies in 2004, introducing at the same time a capitation grant to compensate schools for the loss
of revenue.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
The progress made, resulting from the strategies pursued at the basic level of education has
driven demand for second cycle education, hence the Government ESP strategies to provide
equitable access to SHS education. The strategies include: making available progressively free
public second cycle education for those eligible; providing boarding on needs basis; ensuring
quality education for all academically eligible students; ensuring that central and outlying girls
education units are functional; and all institutions meet national norms in health, sanitation and
safety. The ESP makes a strong commitment to achieve gender equality by 2015 with full gender
parity, enrollment of hard-to-reach and out-of-school children, ensuring high safety and
sanitation standards in schools and other actions. Among the quality improvement measures, the
key objectives include; providing access to adequate, relevant and up-to-date teaching/learning
materials (including ICTs); school, public and community libraries; and relevant curricula and
continuous in-service training (INSET) for teachers.
1.4. Justification for the Project
Inadequate Access
Demand for SHS education has increased, fueled by increasing population and high completion
rate at the junior high school level. However, there remain inequities in this demand as 3/4th of
the youth typically either does not have adequate qualification to enter SHS or cannot afford to
move or commute to the schools where they are placed by the Computerized School Selection
and Placement System (CSSPS). Either they drop out before reaching the basic education
completion exam (BECE) or about half of those taking BECE do not meet the qualifying grade
enter senior secondary education). Those coming from the poorest 20% of the households, the
most deprived districts and/or from rural areas are about 5 to 6 times less likely to access SHS
programs.
Supply of SHS education has also increased through new public schools, growth of private
education and increasing enrollments to schools. The number of SHSs rose by 68% from 492
schools in 2005 to 828 schools in 2012, out of which 535 are public and 62.8% of the private
senior high schools located in rural areas. The average size of secondary schools has risen from
683 students per school to 1,018 students per school in 2013. There is a significant disparity
between the average size of public and private secondary schools with public schools catering for
1,441 students per school and private schools catering for only 245 students per school.
Importantly, among the public schools there is disparity between: (i) schools that are selective,
preferred by the majority of students, and oversubscribed; and (ii) schools, mainly community
day schools, that remain undersubscribed either because they have less quality inputs, services
and outcomes, or because families may not be able to afford privately provided hostel facilities
or transportation to these schools. In the latter, they have extra space for additional admission
leading to persistent inefficiency. Additional facilities at existing community day schools and
private schools could significantly contribute to the planned expansion.
2
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Quality Issues
Quality of SHS programs shows large disparities between the best 100 schools and the rest of the
schools. The top schools produce the bulk of those entering tertiary education whereas for those
enrolled in the majority of the schools, SHS represents the terminal form of education. 46% of
the students who qualify for tertiary education by successfully sitting for the WASSCE are from
the top twenty percent of Senior High Schools in the country while 8 percent of students from
the bottom 20% of the schools (106 schools) qualify for tertiary education.
1.5. Project Description
The proposed Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP) with funding from the World
Bank would support the implementation of the government‘s Community Day Senior High
School Project (CSHSP) through two components: (i) Support to Increase Access with Equity
and Quality in Senior High Schools; and (ii) Management, Research and Monitoring and
Evaluation.
The SEIP is expected to finance results which demonstrate increased access in targeted districts,
increased enrollment of poorest students and improved learning outcomes for selected low
performing senior high schools. The Government plans to achieve these results through the
construction of new senior secondary schools in underserved areas, rehabilitation and expansion
of existing low performing schools and support for SHS attainment for disadvantaged students.
In addition, activities are planned to improve the quality of selected low performing schools with
a focus on mathematics and science education. The Government plans to do this by: providing
23 new senior high schools in mostly underserved areas; expanding and upgrading support for
125 existing low performing SHSs; providing three-year scholarship support for at least 10,400
needy and qualified SHS students especially girls, and; providing school performance
partnerships in selected 125 schools to improve quality and connectivity to the internet. In order
to achieve and report on the results attained under the project, the SEIP will provide funding and
technical assistance to the implementing agencies and the third party validation agencies. The
development of a research program to better understand constraints and challenges in secondary
education while formulating a national secondary strategy would also be included under the
project. The introduction of a web platform for school reporting and real time monitoring would
increase social accountability and information sharing on the performance of the sector.
1.5.1.
Project Objectives
The Project Development Objective is to increase access to senior secondary education in
underserved districts and improve quality in low-performing senior high schools in Ghana.
The SEIP project is expected to benefit approximately 30,000 new students in secondary
education programs, 150,000 students in low performing schools, 2000 senior high school
teachers, heads of schools, in addition to GES and MOE officials.
3
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
1.5.2. Key Performance Indicators
Access with Equity
 Increased Transition Rates from JHS3 to SHS1 1 in targeted districts
 Increase in SHS educational attainment within two poorest quintiles in targeted districts
Quality of low performing secondary schools
 WASSCE achievement of 6 credits and above 2 within beneficiary schools (disaggregated
by gender)
1.6. Project Components
The Project would support the Government‘s Community Day Senior High School program
through two components: (i) Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality in Senior High
Schools; and (ii) Management, Research and Monitoring and Evaluation.
1.6.1. Component 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality in
Senior High Schools
Component 1 uses a results-based financing (RBF) modality. Disbursements up to a capped
absolute amount will be made against specific line items in the Education sector annual budget,
referred to as eligible expenditure programs (EEPs). These disbursements will be conditioned on
achievement of specified results, as measured by disbursement-linked indicators (DLIs). A
matrix of indicators has been developed to measure performance annually and monitor the
results achieved and is attached as Annex 1.
Policies and interventions to be supported are grouped into two pillars: (i) increasing access with
equity (geographic, gender, poverty, etc.); and (ii) improving quality of selected low performing
SHS.
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity (Total costs including contingencies: US$125.1 million):
The objective of this pillar is to improve access to senior secondary education and improve
equity in underserved districts and provide scholarship to students from low income families,
especially girls.
The SEIP is expected to finance results of the Government‘s priority program to expand space
through the construction of new senior secondary schools in underserved areas, rehabilitation
and expansion of existing low performing schools and through support for SHS attainment of
disadvantaged students. The Government plans include new construction in the 10 districts
where there are no current operating public SHS and no contracts awarded under the Community
Senior High School Project (CSHSP) funded by the Government of Ghana. In addition, using the
agreed selection criteria for eligible student population compared with available school capacity
1
SHS are those schools in upper secondary that prepare students for WASSCE.
WASSCE achievement refers to obtaining a minimum of six credits (three core and three electives) which is
required for entry to tertiary institutions.
2
4
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
(effective demand) combined with district level poverty indicators, an additional 13 districts
have been identified for new SHS construction. These districts have existing public senior high
schools and a high demand for SHS places. The districts selected for new construction will
receive: (i) 23 No. 24-unit Classroom Blocks (E- Blocks ); (ii) 2 No. Technical Blocks; (iii) 3
No. Vocational Blocks; (iv) 23 No. Staff Flats; (v) 23 No. Headmasters' Bungalow; (vi) 23 No.
Canteen Blocks; (vii) 23 No. Security/Gate House; and (viii) Furniture and Equipment for the
above structures. Annex 2 is the perspective view of the new construction facilities. The
ultimate objective is to create new spaces for those demanding seats in SHS and to fill these
spaces with new students coming from previously underserved communities. In addition to new
schools, this pillar would focus on improving existing SHS, particularly those with capacity for
expansion, demand for SHS places, poor learning outcomes, drawing on a needs assessment
which will determine level of deficiency (bathrooms, science labs, computer facilities, etc.) and
scope for upgrading. Approximately 125 existing schools would be supported. This pillar will
improve the Government‘s targeting of resources to support increased access by further
supporting scholarships to students from low income families, especially girls.
Given the operation‘s focus on under-served areas and promoting access with equity,
disbursement will be linked to indicators (DLIs) that measure increases in seat availability in
targeted locations for new construction and increased utilization in existing low-performing
schools where new seats are made available. Targeting resources for students from low income
families, especially girls in underserved communities would further strengthen equity reforms.
Therefore, the release of International Development Association (IDA) credit funds will be
linked to achievement of the following DLIs: (i) selection based on targeting of school expansion
in underserved districts (DLI1); (ii) increase in new seats utilized for SHS students in
underserved districts (DLI 2); (iii) increase in utilized seats in existing selected low-performing
schools (DLI3); and (iv) increased enrolment in selected SHS for students from low-income
families, especially girls (DLI4).
Pillar 2: Improve the quality of education in selected low-performing Senior High Schools (Total
costs including contingencies: US$15 million): The objective of this pillar is to improve the
quality of SHS, with a focus on mathematics and science education in selected low performing
schools3 . The SEIP would also strengthen school management, leadership and expansion of ICT
in the 125 selected low-performing schools. In order to improve quality, the Project will support
the Government‘s program to: (i) strengthen school management, leadership and accountability;
(ii) target interventions to improve the quality of science and mathematics education; and (iii)
introduce School Performance Partnerships (SPPs) based on School Performance Partnership
Plans (SPPPs) to capture quality improvements. The SPPs would develop mutual accountability
between school management and the District Education Offices (DEOs) to improve learning
performance with the commitment from government agencies to provide the necessary resources
and the responsibility of schools to implement quality improvement activities with verifiable
outcomes. In addition to school-based quality inputs, training and financing, this pillar will
support the systematic collection and publication of school data for stakeholders to make
informed decisions about SHS selection, and for MOE/GES to make informed decisions about
planning and financing SHS.
3
Low-performing senior high schools will be selected based on district criteria for poverty and demand for education
and performance ranking as well as size of school population. A needs assessment also would be carried out.
5
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
The focus on mathematics and science is aligned with the Government‘s strategy to encourage
these program areas throughout all education levels. The expansion of ICT wireless connectivity
would also strengthen science, mathematics and other subject education through digital content
for teachers and students. Schools will have access to an education portal4 (i-campus) where
teachers and students can utilize multiple online resources that are expected to support improved
teaching and learning. ICT will be used for intensive in-service support to teachers to improve
content knowledge as well as lesson plan preparation, teaching and learning aids, and videos on
good teaching practices and classroom management. The portal could also serve as a platform
for knowledge exchange with national and international networks and for participation in
relevant discussion forums. The SEIP is expected to provide connectivity to 125 SHS.
As an intermediate result, completion rates in the targeted schools would be expected to increase.
A longer term impact would be an increase in student achievement in learning outcomes (as
measured by performance in the WASSCE) which is also a year 4 DLR. For this pillar, release of
IDA credit funds would be linked to the achievement of the following DLIs: (i) annual
publication of School Performance Report (DLI 5); (ii) School Performance Partnerships (SPPs)
in 125 beneficiary schools (DLI 6); and (iii) improved learning outcomes in targeted selected
schools (DLI 7).
1.6.2. Component 2: Management, Research and Monitoring and Evaluation
This component aims to strengthen the implementation capacity of the MOE and GES and its
related implementing agencies and assist them to achieve the objectives of the Government‘s
SHS strategy. This component will support monitoring and evaluation (M&E), coordination,
planning, communication, financial management, procurement, and safeguards. In addition, it
will support an active and evolving research agenda to continue to inform Government SHS
policy, particularly with regard to financing, social targeting, quality initiatives, teacher
rationalization, and curriculum relevance. This component would complement implementation of
the program pillars with ongoing analyses, strengthening data collection for school mapping, and
establish priorities for new construction, renovations and maintenance. The establishment of a
web platform for school reporting and real time monitoring of all SHS implementation activities
would enhance and strengthen the Education Management Information System (EMIS) and
school mapping in order to help government report on achievement of results. In addition,
funding will be provided to support the independent verification of disbursement linked
indicators and results. Support would also be provided to help the MOE to design and realize
policy reforms, including piloting and evaluating innovative approaches. This component would
finance training, recruitment of short and long-term technical experts, procurement of goods
needed for specific activities, and incremental operating costs.
1.7. Project Financing
Lending Instrument: The proposed project would support senior secondary education in Ghana
through a five-year credit of US$156 million. It will employ an Investment Project Financing
(IPF) instrument which will be executed using a hybrid structure which employs a results-based
4
Education portal is being established with funding from USAID, GoG and planned support from the Ghana e Transform project approved by the Bank Board in 2013.
6
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
funding component (component 1) and a traditional investment technical assistance and
management component (component 2) to support the government‘s overall program. The credit
effectiveness date is expected to be October 1, 2014, and its closing date is November 1, 2019.
The lending approach has three salient features. First, disbursements under Component 1
(results-based) are made against selected (eligible) key budget line items of the GoG‘s annual
budget, referred to as Eligible Expenditure Programs (EEPs), up to capped absolute amounts, and
at specific predictable disbursement dates. Second, credit disbursements are based on the
achievement of pre-specified results, as measured by DLIs. Third, a TA component (Component
2) would finance essential activities to facilitate the implementation of Component 1 by
strengthening the implementation capacity of the MoE and GES to enable them to work towards
meeting the disbursement conditions under the DLIs while availing them of the requisite
monitoring and evaluation tools.
The DLIs under the SEIP reflect government priorities for SHS education as stipulated in the
ESP. They include initial results and intermediate performance targets (Disbursement Linked
Results) that aim to support incremental development changes within a long-term vision for the
Ghana secondary education system.
The DLIs are independent of each other from a
disbursement point of view; i.e., non-compliance with a DLI in a period means that the
disbursement of the funds associated with that DLI will be withheld, but disbursement associated
with other DLIs will not be affected. All DLIs are weighted equally.
The project is composed of 7 DLIs with yearly result targets (DLRs) from year 0 to year 4. The
activities under each of these DLIs, as defined under each of the DLRs, are critical in addressing
the challenges faced by secondary education in Ghana. This results-based financing mechanism
ensures continued progress towards planned achievements and objectives while also
strengthening government capacity in M&E. The SEIP results-based component will have a total
of 30 DLRs for all seven DLIs and resource allocation of US$140.1 million with each DLR
priced at a value of US4.64 million (except for the first DLI which is priced at US$5.54 million).
The DLRs must be met on or before the agreed specified delivery times in order for the
Government to receive the amount allocated for each specific DLRs. The period September to
December, each year, will be selected as the measurement and evaluation period for DLRs and
this would trigger disbursements against the selected eligible expenditure program line –
‗Compensation of Employees – Secondary Education Sub-Function‘.
Table 1.1: IDA Project Financing
Financing source
Component 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and
Quality in Senior High Schools
Component 2: Management, Research, Monitoring and
Evaluation
IDA Total Project Costs
7
US $ (m)
140.1
15.9
156.0
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 1.2: Details of SEIP Costs
COMPONENT 1
Pillars 1 & 2 under Component 1, will increase equitable access to quality secondary education at
a total cost of USD140,100,000.
PILLAR 1
(Objective: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts)
(Total cost: USD$ 125,100,000)
a) Construction of buildings: 23 New SHS including:
i. 23 No. 24-unit Classroom Blocks ( E- Blocks )
ii. 2 No. Technical Blocks
iii. 3 No Vocational Blocks
iv. 23 No. Staff Flats
v. 23 No. Headmasters' Bungalow
vi. 23 No. Canteen Blocks
vii. 23 No. Security Gate House
viii. Furniture and Equipment for the above structures
Support for supervising the new construction and furniture
provision will be financed here.
Total cost
USD$ 98,900,000
b) Rehabilitation and expansion of 50 existing low-performing schools
This will finance the following among others:
 science laboratory
 school library
 program blocks i.e. vocational, technical, business
 additional classrooms
 teachers/staff flat
 school canteen
 toilets and bathrooms
 furniture for classrooms, lab, teachers
 roofing of existing structures
 strengthen structural frames
 enclosing wall, windows and doors
 ceiling, wall furnishing and floor finishing
 decoration of structures
 painting of buildings
 painting of buildings
 Support for supervising the facilities improvement works will be financed under this
sub-component.
Total cost
USD$ 10,000,000
8
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
c)
Scholarships for 10,400 students from low income families especially girls
The scholarship will finance the following among others:
i. Relevant fees (until phased out)
ii. Transport to school or bicycles
iii. Uniforms
iv. House dress
v. PE kits
vi. School shoes
vii. School bags
viii.Sanitary material for girls
ix. Exercise books and note books
x. Relevant stationery items
xi. Supplementary readers, etc.
Support for administering the scholarship will be financed here.
Total cost
Total Contingencies cost
USD$ 15,600,000
USD$
600,000
PILLAR 2
(Objective: Improve Quality in low-performing Senior High Schools)
(Total cost: USD$ 15,000,000)
a) Improve quality of education in 125 existing low-performing schools
School Performance Improvement Plans will finance the following among others:
 INSET training – Science
 INSET training – Maths
 INSET training – ICT
 Provision of ICT package for schools (iCampus)

 ICT Equipment, maintenance

 School Environment Improvements

 Co-curricular activities support including maths/science clinics

 School field trips

 Staff team building and management training

 Renovation of furniture

 Science and Technology Equipment and renovation

 Teaching and Learning materials

 Guidance and Counselling

 Other improvements as the school might find necessary
Total cost
TOTAL COMPONENT 1
USD 15,000,000
USD 140,100,000
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
COMPONENT 2
Project Implementation Management & Supervision at a total cost of USD15,900,000

Project coordinator
 Orientation for schools, DEOs, DEOCs on facilities
improvements and scholarships provision
 Orientation for schools, DEOs, DEOCs on quality
improvements
 Development of maths and science training materials
 Orientation training on ICT package (iCampus)
 Development of materials for Leadership training
 Development of School mapping and monitoring website
 GPS mapping / data collection
 Training for schools and HQ
 Publishing annual brochure format
 Monitoring and supervision of implementation
 New construction
 Facilities improvements
 Scholarship beneficiaries
 Quality improvements
 Financial Audit
 Procurement audit
 Technical audit
 Independent survey to verify Disbursement Linked Results
(construction works verification)
(in-school activities verification)
 Household survey at endline (Results Framework Indicator)
 Impact Evaluations
 Research agenda on Secondary Education
(Public expenditure review)
(Impact of Science and Maths interventions,)
(Impact of scholarships and subsidies)
(Contribution of parents to school costs)
(National Secondary Education Strategy)
 Procurement of goods needed for specific activities
 Data provision and analysis from WAEC on WASSCE results
 Data collection, provision and analysis from GSS on educational
attainment, poverty level, population, out-of-school children.
TOTAL OF COMPONENT 2
USD 15,900,000.00
TOTAL PROJECT COST
USD 156,000,000.00
10
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
1.8. Results Matrix
1.8.1. Disbursement Linked Indicators and Results
A total of seven DLIs are expected to be achieved over the five year period for Component 1.
These DLIs are considered significant indicators of performance that will influence behavioral
and policy reforms required for achieving visible outcomes in senior secondary education access,
quality and equity. With a total resource allocation of US$140.1 million to the component, and
using an equal price per DLR (with 30 DLRs as defined), this translates to US$4.64 million as
the equivalent value of a DLR. On the assumption that the MOE meets the annual DLRs, the
estimated equivalent amount of funds to be disbursed to the Government‘s sub-consolidated fund
for education for the achievement of results in each of the 5 fiscal years (including the retroactive
year, FY 2014) is as follows:
Table 1.3: Summary of DLIs by Year
Fiscal Year
FY 2014(Yr. 0)
FY 2015 (Yr. 1)
FY 2016 (Yr. 2)
FY 2017 (Yr. 3)
FY 2018 (Yr. 4)
Total
Number
DLIs
7
7
7
7
7
7
of Number of DLRs
6
6
6
6
6
30
Disbursement
(US$ million)
28.74
27.84
27.84
27.84
27.84
140.1
amount
Following the project‘s effectiveness, the SEIP will be disbursed the value of the 6 DLRs defined
for Year 0 (amounting to US$28.74 million) upon verification by the Bank during the period
September to December 2014, of their achievement. Along with this, an advance equivalent to
50 percent of the value of the 7 FY 2015 (Year 1) DLIs, equivalent to half of $27.84 million (i.e.
US$14.42 million) would be disbursed in early 2015, based on the potential achievement of the
Year 1 DLRs at verification during the last quarter of FY 2015 calendar year. The World Bank
would allow for an acceptable range in the absolute quantity to determine the indicators
―achieve‖ based on the principle that the spirit of the DLR has been met regardless of a very
slight difference in the absolute figure. For example, if the target is 1,000 utilized seats and
verification confirms 975 seats, the indicator may be considered ―met‖. The range for the
construction related indicators would allow for a 5% differential. This is further elaborated in
section 10.1.1 on the Disbursement Linked Indicators and in the Independent Verification TOR.
At the second and subsequent verification periods in late 2015 and beyond, the value of any prior
period DLRs not met will be recovered from any advances payable, noting however that only
one DLR can remain unmet for a prior period to allow for disbursement of any further
advances against the potential for meeting future period DLRs.
Table 1.4 below presents the allocation of IDA disbursement schedule for Component 1 under
the project. The respective allocated amounts represent the 100 percent capped expenditure
limits from the IDA allocation, on the assumption that DLRs have been met.
11
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 1.4: Schedule for Disbursements under Component 1
Category
Amount of Credit
Allocated in USD
(millions)
First Withdrawal
28.74
Second Withdrawal
13.92
Third Withdrawal
13.92
Fourth Withdrawal
13.92
Fifth Withdrawal
13.92
Sixth Withdrawal
13.92
Seventh Withdrawal
13.92
Eight Withdrawal
13.92
Ninth Withdrawal
13.92
TOTAL AMOUNT
Date on which Withdrawal May be Made
Oct. 1, 2014 or by effectiveness date if said
date is later than Oct. 1, 2014.
January 15, 2015 (First Advance of 50% of
Year 1 – 2015 DLR Values)
Oct. 1, 2015 (Second Final 50% of Year 1
– 2015 DLR Values, netted with values of
Year 1 DLRIs not met)
January 15, 2016 (First Advance of 50% of
Year 2 – 2016 DLR Values), subject to only
1 out of the 6 DLRs for Year 1 (2015)
having not been met.
Oct. 1 2016 (Final 50% of Year 2 – 2016
DLR Values, netted with values of Year 2
DLRs not met)
January 15, 2017 (First Advance of 50% of
Year 3 – 2017 DLR Values), subject to only
1 out of the 6 DLRs for Year 2 (2016)
having not been met.
Oct. 1, 2017 (Final 50% of Year 3 – 2017
DLR Values, netted with values of Year 3
DLRs not met)
January 15, 2018 (First Advance of 50% of
Year 4 – 2018 DLR Values), subject to only
1 out of the 6 DLRs for Year 3 (2017)
having not been met.
Oct. 1, 2018 (Final 50% of Year 4 – 2018
DLR Values, netted with values of Year 4
DLRs not met)
140.1
12
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
2.
PROJECT INSTITUTIONAL AND IMPLEMENTATION
ARRANGEMENTS
2.1. Executing Agency
The implementing agency is the Ministry of Education with the support of its relevant Agencies.
The MOE has overall oversight and is responsible for the project's coordination, procurement,
contract management, financial management, compliance with safeguards policies, and delivery
of results. The Monitoring and Evaluation unit in MOE is responsible for all sector level
monitoring and evaluation with support provided by Ghana Statistical Service, WAEC, National
Inspectorate Board and other key agencies.
Oversight of SEIP implementation is in the MOE with the GES providing their mandated
implementation role for service delivery. The GES will oversee all activities related to
scholarships, senior secondary institutional leadership and teacher training, preparation of
SPPPs, resourcing of schools for quality improvements, improvement of senior secondary school
programs and ICT interventions. The Regional and District Directorates for Education will
supervise all SHS related interventions with respect to SHS institutional heads and will monitor
the activities of SHSs in their districts and regions.
The Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP) implementation covers a five year period
from 2014 to 2019.
2.2. The Project Steering Committee
As with previous education projects, a Project Steering Committee (PSC) will provide high level
oversight and guidance to facilitate cross sectoral/agency/division coordination on
implementation activities. The PSC is responsible for inter alia: (i) providing strategic guidance
and overseeing project implementation; (ii) reviewing progress made in the implementation of
the SEIP; (iii) facilitating the prompt resolution of key cross sectoral/agency/division
implementation challenges and bottlenecks; (iv) ensuring coordination among key
implementation sectors, agencies and divisions; (v) the project‘s coordination, procurement,
contract management, financial management, and compliance with safeguards policies; and (vi)
such other functions as necessary. It will be chaired by the Minister of Education with the
Deputy Minister (Pre-Tertiary) as Vice Chair and with representatives of relevant MMDAs and
key technical experts. The PSC will meet quarterly. The TOR of the PSC is attached as Annex
3.
Membership of the PSC is as follows:
i. Hon. Minister for Education as Chairperson
ii. Deputy Minister (Pre-Tertiary) as Vice Chair
iii. Chief Director
iv. Representative, Ministry of Finance
v. Representative, GETFund
13
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
x.
xi.
xii.
xiii.
xiv.
The Director General, GES
Director of Accounts, MOE
The Financial Controller, GES
Representative, Conference of Heads of Assisted Secondary Schools (CHASS)
The Project Coordinator
Head of Civil Works Team
Head of the Quality & Outcomes Team
Representative, Regional Education Directorates
Representative, District Education Oversight Committee (DEOC)
2.3. The Technical Implementation Committee
The Technical Implementation Committee (TIC) will have responsibility for the day to day
oversight of project implementation and is chaired by the Chief Director, who will report to the
Minister for Education. The TIC comprises a Project Coordinator5 and key officers assigned to a
Project Civil Works Team and a Project Quality and Outcomes Team.
Infrastructure supervision consultancy firms will be hired and directly supervised by the Project
Civil Works team and will also directly supervise various contractors. The Civil Works Team
will include experts in infrastructure planning, Infrastructure Coordination Unit of PBME, GES,
FPMU, Environmental and Safeguards consultants, SRIMPR, Technical Director of the
GETFund, and the Project Coordinator. The Civil Works Team will oversee new construction
and facilities improvements.
The Quality and Outcomes Team will comprise a team of staff from the PBME, Secondary
Education Division, Teacher Education, Girls Education Unit, GES ICT Unit, National Teaching
Council, NCCA/CRDD, CENDLOS, NITA, National Inspectorate Board, WAEC and GSS to
oversee quality improvements, scholarships, training, school performance partnerships, and
policy development. In addition, the Quality and Outcomes Team will oversee all nonconstruction activities as well as the monitoring of the DLIs, DLRs and the Results Framework.
The Terms of Reference (TOR) of the TIC outlining the scope and responsibilities related to the
SEIP is attached as Annex 4.
Membership of the TIC is as follows:
i. Chief Director
ii. The Financial Controller, GES
iii. Director of Accounts, MoE
iv. The Project Coordinator
v. GETFund representative
vi. Head of Civil Works Team; (i) ICU (MOE), (ii) FPMU, (iii) Civil Engineer, (iv) Quantity
Surveyor, (v) Architect, and (vi) Environmental and Safeguards Consultant
vii. Head of the Quality & Outcomes Team
5
Project Coordinator will be recruited to coordinate the implementation of the SEIP.
14
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
viii. MoE and GES (M&E team)
ix. SED representative
x. GEU representative
xi. GES ICT representative
xii. NTC representative
xiii. NCCA/CRDD representative
xiv. NIB representative
xv. CENDLOS representative
xvi. GSS representative
xvii. WAEC representative
xviii. Scholarship Advisor/Administrator
15
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Figure 2.1 SEIP IMPLEMENTATION/INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS
PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE
TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE
PROJECT COORDINATOR
Civil Works Team
Quality Outcomes Team
MOE & GES - Monitoring and Eval
RCC
MOE-PBME - Research/Studies
Project Supervision
Consultancy Firms
GES ICT - Web Based School Profiles
GES SED – SPPPs, Leadership
Contractors
GES SEU – Science/Maths
Contractors
NIB,-SHS Performance monitoring
NCTE/NTC - Teacher Training
District Education Office/
District Assembly-District
Education Oversight
Committee (DEOC)
NCCA/CRDD - Curriculum Reform
WAEC- Examinations/Data
GSS- Poverty indicators/Data
NITA - ICT connectivity
CENDLOS – ICT for learning
GEU and Scholarships Advisor/
Administrator
School Performance Partnership Management
New Construction
New SHS
New SHS
Facilities Improvement
New SHS
Existing SHS
16
Quality Improvement
Existing SHS
Existing SHS
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
2.4. Role of Ministry of Education
The Ministry‘s responsibility includes: (i) coordination and support of all implementing
departments of the SEIP; (ii) reporting on progress against the indicators and DLIs, DLRs,
EEPs and TAs; (iii) ensuring timely and comprehensive reporting of results for
disbursements; (iv) procurement; (v) overseeing financial management aspects of the Project
under the GES; (vi) ensuring compliance with the applicable safeguard instruments; (vii)
ensuring timely planning and communication of project activities to all stakeholders; and
(viii) such other technical, administrative, organizational and financial functions. Table 2.1
below sets out the entities responsible for the implementation of the SEIP.
Table 2.1: Entities Responsible for Implementation of the SEIP
Results Area
Implementing Entity
COMPONENT 1
1. Increase access with equity and quality
School expansion in underserved districts
School expansion and improvement in existing SHSs
Incentives for equitable access to SHS
MOE, PBME (ICU), (Procurement), GES
MOE, PBME (ICU), (Procurement), GES
GES, DEOs, CSOs, Scholarship
Administrator/Advisor, GEU
2. Improve quality in low-performing SHS
Annual publication of school performance report
School Performance Partnerships
Improve Mathematics and Science teaching, curriculum
Improve ICT capacity in SHSs for improved learning
GES (ICT), PBME (EMIS), GES (FM), (SED)
GES (FM), (SED), PBME, DEOs, SHSs
GES (TED), NCTE, NTC NCCA,
MOE, NITA, GES (SED), (FM), (ICT), PBME,
EMIS, CENDLOS
COMPONENT 2
3. Management, Research, Monitoring and
Evaluati on
Secondary Education Strategy
Monitoring and Evaluation
Web-based monitoring
Web-based school profile, performance
Research
School mapping
Independent verification of DLIs
Advisory for Scholarship Administration
Impact Assessment/Evaluations
MOE
PBME, GES (M&E), GES (SED)
GES, Consultant
MOE, GES, Consultant or Firm
GES, Consultant
MOE, GES, Consultant or Firm
MOE, GES, Consultant or Firm
MOE, GEU, Scholarship /Advisor
MOE, GES, Firm
2.5. Role of Ghana Education Service
Under the SEIP, the GES‘s role will include: (i) science, mathematics and ICT teacher
training; (ii) institutional leadership training; (iii) preparation and implementation of school
performance partnership plans; (iv) resource management programs; (v) improvement of
mathematics and science teaching; (vi) improvement of SHS programs and ICT
interventions; (vii) implementation of scholarship scheme and (viii) ensuring timely
implementation of project activities at district and school levels.
The GES Financial Management team will also ensure timely submission of Credit
Withdrawal Application, ensure that Bank fiduciary (financial reporting, procurement)
17
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
regulations and requirements are followed. On monitoring and evaluation, the relevant GES
teams will support the MOE M&E unit for effective monitoring and evaluation under the
SEIP. The GES will lead in the training of SHSs on the information and data requirements
and the preparation of SPPPs.
2.5.1. Role of Regional Education Directorate
The Regional Directors‘ role is to coordinate and help supervise activities under the SEIP.
They will monitor projects in the beneficiary senior high schools in their regions by liaising
with the districts and heads of senior high schools in monitoring the activities of SHS in their
districts and regions.
The Regional Education Directorate will, with the support of the Regional Coordinating Councils
(RCCs):
1) Co-ordinate and monitor sub-national activities.
2) Provide capacity support and technical assistance to the districts as needed
3) Collect, review and consolidate district reports as necessary
2.5.2. Role of District Education Directorate
The SEIP sub-programs to implement School Performance Partnerships in 125 beneficiary
schools will be managed and supervised at the district level. The District Director of
Education will sign MOUs with selected SHSs and work with the District Education
Oversight Committees and the District Assemblies in ensuring that sites are ready for school
construction. The District Assembly will ensure that social and environmental safeguards
guidelines are adhered to and Environmental Management Plans (EMP) are employed during
project implementation. The District Director of Education will communicate information on
the social and environmental safeguards and the EMPs to the PSC and the TIC.
The District Education Office will provide the first level of collation of school level data and
lead the sensitization, communication and outreach to stakeholders on the SEIP. District
Directors of Education and their teams in the selected districts will have key responsibilities
to (i) work with the District Education Oversight Committees (DEOC) to ensure that sites are
ready for new SHS construction; (ii) assist in undertaking the needs assessment for selected
secondary schools to benefit from rehabilitation and other facilities and quality improvement;
(iii) assist in the preparation of detailed plans for rehabilitation and other facilities
improvement in selected SHSs; (iv) assist in the dissemination of minimum standards for
SHS; (v) review facilities maintenance plan; (vi) Assist GEU to apply criteria for identifying
needy and qualified students to benefit from scholarships and other incentives; (vii)
collaborate on SHS data for school mapping; review and validate SHS online profile
information and data on school performance; (viii) lead activities on school performance
partnership to identify scope of needs; collate school performance partnership plans for
submission to GES; (ix) witness/sign SPP MOU with beneficiary SHSs (x) participate in
consultative workshop to determine improved science and mathematics curriculum; (xi)
participate in roll-out of training modules for science and mathematics; (xii) collate ICT
school improvement packages for selected SHS for onward transmission to GES; and (xiii)
establish monitoring system to track information on SHS in their District.
18
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
2.5.3. Role of Beneficiary Senior High Schools
At the senior secondary education level, selected senior high schools, School Governing
Boards and Parent-Teacher Associations (PTAs) are expected to play important roles in
implementing various aspects to the SEIP. The responsibility of the selected senior highs
schools are to: (i) respond to needs assessment request from MOE and districts speedily; (ii)
provide school site plans for construction and rehabilitation of key facilities on the school
compound; (iii) participate in environmental and social safeguards training; (iv) contribute to
determining and agreeing on minimum standards for SHS; (v) assist the districts and GEU in
identifying needy and qualified students to benefit from scholarships and other incentives;
(vi) provide SHS data for school mapping; review and validate online school profile
information/data about school performance; (vii) provide data/information on school
performance partnerships and provide scope of needs for quality improvement; (viii) sign
SPP with DED; (ix) identify science, mathematics and ICT teachers to benefit from science
and mathematics training; (x) provide data/information on scope of ICT needs for quality
improvement; (xi) respond to all school level data requests speedily; (xii) sensitize Governing
Boards, PTA, and all stakeholders on SEIP; and (xiii) undertake enrollment and sensitization
drives targeted at potential students from catchment junior high schools.
Table 2.2: Implementation Arrangements
Tasks
Implementing Agency(s)
COMPONENT 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and
Quality in Senior High Schools
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education
in underserved districts
DLI 1: Targeting of school expansion in underserved districts

M OE
PBM E/Infrastructure Coordination
Unit
GES/Secondary Education Division

Select school sites for new construction in: (i) districts with no operating SHS;
district prioritization based on the following objective targeting criteria: (a)
demand for SHS places; (b) district size; and (c) district poverty index
Select existing low performing schools for rehabilitation/upgrading based on
specified criteria, targeting methods and needs assessment.
DLI 2: Increase in new seats utilized for S HS students in underserved districts
M OE
PBM E/Infrastructure Coordination
Unit

Preconstruction requirements met for new construction and Safeguards compliance
achieved through ESM F and RPF guidelines/actions.

Complete and package final bidding documents for new construction in line with
appraised design.

Define, agree on and disseminate minimum standards for SHS
M OE; Procurement Unit
GES, Secondary Education
Division/PBM E
DLI 3: Increased utilized seats in existing low-performing schools
M OE;PBM E/GES Financial
M anagement/Secondary Education
Unit

Prepare detailed plans and scope of rehabilitation/ expansion of schools developed,
including: types of facilities needed/eligible based on design and technical standards
agreed upon between the GoG and Bank
Infrastructure Coordination Unit/
FPM U GES Secondary Education
Division/PBM E


Facilities M aintenance Plan
Number of schools upgraded and number of utilized seats
19
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Implementing Agency(s)
Tasks
DLI 4: Increased enrolment in S HS in selected districts and schools (for students
from low-income families, especially girls)
GES Secondary Education Division,
GEU, CSOs



Identify Scholarship administrator/advisor to administer scholarships
Agree on criteria for selecting scholarship beneficiaries
Administer scholarships to needy and qualified SHS students in beneficiary schools.
Pillar 2: Improve the quality of low-performing SHS
DLI 5: Annual publication of S chool Performance Report
GES ICT unit/EM IS
GES FM / Secondary Education
Division



School mapping and data collection completed for all SHSs in Ghana
Publish online and in brochure SHS information and performance data
Select schools for quality improvements based on needs assessment

Sensitize, communicate and reach-out to stakeholders including guardians and wards
at JHS level
DEO, DEOC
DLI 6: S chool Performance Partnerships in 125 beneficiary schools
GES FM / Secondary Education
Division
GES Financial
M anagement/Secondary Education
Unit/PBM E
DEO, DEOC, Selected SHSs






School Performance Partnerships to identify scope of needs and incorporate learning
into implementation
Training for selected schools in school improvement p lanning and implementation.
Prepare and distribute guidelines for School Performance Partnership Plans to
selected schools including-- scope of quality improvements of selected schools
developed, including details on: competencies, strategy for improving in-service
teacher training (including performance evaluation), networking, mentoring and
needs for training materials
Vet, submit and implementation of School Performance Partnerships Plans
Signing of School Performance Partnership M OU between DEO and SHSs.
Transfers released to schools based on their SPPPs.
DLI 7: Improved learning outcomes in low performing schools
GES, Teacher Education Division
(TED)/ NTC; Secondary Education
Division/ University of Cape Coast/
University of Winneba/CENDLOS





Hold consultative workshop to review curriculum and teacher training
Develop and design and establish in-service teacher training curriculum based on
required teaching competencies for mathematics and science
Roll-out training modules and curriculum for mathematics and science teachers from
senior high schools in targeted districts
ICT plan implemented in targeted schools
Select distance education content to further strengthen science and mathematics
teaching methodologies
Component 2: Management, Research and Monitoring and
Evaluation
Monitoring and Evaluation
M OE/PBM E/M &E Unit
GES Secondary Education Division













Establish monitoring system to track information on all SHSs in Ghana
M anagement: training, research agenda and capacity building, audits, operating costs
Independent verification/validation consultancies
Household survey at end-line, Impact assessment/evaluation
Research agenda on secondary education—Public Expenditure Review, Secondary
Education Strategy, impact of scholarships, subsidies, private costs of education,
math and science interventions
Web-based monitoring site
Web-based school profile, performance
GPS school mapping and data collection
Orientation/Training for SHSs, DEOs, DEOCs, on facilities and quality
improvement, scholarship scheme, ICT packages, school mapping and monitoring
websites
Development of science/math training materials, leadership training modules
M onitoring and supervision of new construction, facilities improvement, scholarship
beneficiaries, quality improvement
Financial, procurement and technical audits
Data collection, analysis from GSS, WAEC
20
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.
IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPONENT 1: SUPPORT TO
INCREASE ACCESS WITH EQUITY AND QUALITY IN
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Component 1 uses a results-based financing (RBF) modality. Disbursements up to a capped
absolute amount are made against specific line items in the Education sector annual budget,
referred to as eligible expenditure programs (EEPs). These disbursements are conditioned on
achievement of specified results, as measured by disbursement-linked indicators (DLIs). A
matrix of indicators in Annex 1 has been developed to measure performance annually and
monitor the results achieved.
Policies and interventions to be supported under the first component of SEIP are grouped into
two pillars: (i) increasing access with equity (geographic, gender, poverty, etc.); and (ii)
enhancing quality of selected low performing SHS.
The key groups to benefit under component 1 are as follows:
a) 23 districts will benefit from construction of new SHS under pillar 1 (see section 3.1
for selection criteria and process)
b) 125 existing schools to benefit from quality improvements under pillar 2, and out of
those 50 schools will also benefit from facilities improvements under pillar 1 (see
section 3.2 for selection criteria and process).
c) 10,400 SHS students will benefit from a three-year scholarship under pillar 1.
3.1 Criteria for the Selection of Districts to receive 23 New High Schools
The criteria for selecting sites for the new senior high schools are two-fold. The first
criterion is to site new senior high schools in districts without public senior high schools.
The second criterion is to site new SHS in Districts with public SHS where demand for
additional places is high.
3.1.1. Ten districts without Public SHS
Currently 13 out of 216 districts are without public senior high schools. Three out of the 13
Districts are beneficiaries under the Government of Ghana‘s Community Day Senior High
School Project (CSHSP). The three Districts are Sekyere Afram Plains in the Ashanti
Region, Krachi Nchumuru in the Volta Region, and Wa West in the Upper West Region.
The remaining ten Districts were selected to receive new SHS under SEIP. The ten districts
are outlined in Table 3.1
21
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 3.1: List of 10 districts with no existing public SHS to receive a new SHS under
the SEIP
Region
Western
Western
Northern
Northern
Greater Accra
Upper East
Central
Upper East
Greater Accra
Greater Accra
District
Rank
Wassa Amenfi Central
Bia East
Mion
North Gonja
Kpone Katamanso
Pusiga
Awutu Senya East Municipal
Binduri
Adenta Municipal
Ga East Municipal
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
3.1.2. Additional 13 Districts to Benefit from New Senior High Schools
Additional 13 districts6 were selected to receive new SHS construction in order to bring the
total number of new SHSs to 23. The criteria for selecting the additional 13 districts is based
on the following variables: poverty index7 , effective demand8 , and population size.
i.
ii.
iii.
50% to effective demand (JHS3 enrolment divided by SHS1 enrolment)
25% to the population of 15-17 year olds
25% to the multi-dimensional poverty index
The districts with the highest rank – i.e. most in need – are those with high demand, high
population and high poverty index. The weighting on effective demand was greatest because
of the need to ensure that schools are sited in locations where they can attract most students.
A. Any districts where the Government of Ghana had already contracted a firm to
commence construction of structures under the Community SHS Project were
removed from the ranking. (For example, high ranking districts which are already
receiving a new SHS under CSHSP include Upper Denkyira West, Kwahu Afram
Plains North, Kintampo South, Pru, Builsa South and Lambussie Karni.)
B. The first 13 districts in the remaining list, according to the ranking of most in need,
were selected to receive a new SHS under SEIP. The full data used in the ranking of
senior secondary schools is given in Annex 5.
6
The list of 13 additional Districts excluded Districts supported under the CSHSP and Districts without senior
high school.
7
Poverty index was based on non-monetary poverty indicators such as years of schooling, maternal mortality,
cooking fuel, electricity source, water source etc.
8
Effective demand is defined as the ratio of JHS 3 enrolment to SHS 1 enrolment.
22
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 3.2: List of 13 Districts for additional new SHS
Region
Ashanti
Brong Ahafo
Upper West
Eastern
Ashanti
Volta
Northern
Ashanti
Brong Ahafo
Brong Ahafo
Eastern
Western
Volta
District
Kumasi Metropolis
Sene East
Wa East
Kwahu Afram Plains South
Offinso North
Adaklu
Gonja Central
Ahafo Ano South
Kintampo North Municipal
Atebubu Amantin
Ayensuano
Sefwi Akontombra
Krachi East
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
3.2 Criteria for selection of 125 existing SHS to benefit from improvement in
Facilities and Quality
The project will support an additional 125 existing SHSs. Out of the 125 existing SHSs, only
50 SHSs will benefit from facilities improvements. All 125 schools will benefit from quality
activities. In order to select existing schools to benefit from the project, schools were chosen
out of districts in need of SHS expansion and quality improvements. The ranking of 216
districts using poverty index, demand for SHS and district population was applied, as above.
After removing districts with no public SHS, the 100 districts ranked as most in need were
selected and all 221 public SHSs in these districts were eligible to be ranked.
3.2.1 Criteria for Selecting 50 Existing SHSs for Facilities and Quality Improvement
To benefit from facilities and quality improvements the school must have enrolment less than
1,400. This is because the facilities improvements aim to increase access and therefore
enrolment, and very large schools would not be encouraged to expand beyond the GES
norms9 .
Schools were ranked according to the proportion of their classrooms needing major work,
using EMIS 2013-14 data. This was calculated as (permanent classrooms needing major
repair + temporary + uncompleted classrooms) / (permanent + temporary + uncompleted
classrooms).
The bottom (worst) 50 schools, along with the next 8 (making 58 total), were visited by
MOE/GES teams to verify the EMIS data and suitability of the schools for expansion. After
the visit the 50 schools were selected in order of need, and where a school was deemed
inappropriate for expansion according to the visit the school was skipped. The information on
the site visit of 50 selected schools for facilities improvement and the reasons for de-selecting
9
The GES norm for senior secondary school size is 1500 students per school. There are however some
exceptions in schools which have greater capacity to expand.
23
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
some schools is provided in Annex 6. The 50 schools selected to benefit from facilities and
quality improvements are shown in Table 3.3.
.
Table 3.3: List of 50 schools to benefit from facilities and quality improvements
s/n
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
Region
Western
Upper West
Western
Central
Brong Ahafo
Volta
Volta
Volta
Central
Western
Volta
Ashanti
Upper East
Brong Ahafo
Upper West
Northern
Central
Central
Upper West
Greater Accra
Northern
Ashanti
Volta
Upper East
Ashanti
Ashanti
Upper East
Central
Upper West
Central
Ashanti
Brong Ahafo
Volta
Greater Accra
Brong Ahafo
Ashanti
Eastern
Central
Upper East
Western
Upper East
Ashanti
Central
Western
Brong Ahafo
Northern
Ashanti
District
PRESTEA HUNI VALLEY
WA EAST
BODI
ASSIN SOUTH
PRU
KETU SOUTH
ADAKLU AYINGBE
NORTH TONGU
ASSIN SOUTH
SEFWI AKONTOMBRA
KETU SOUTH
EJURA SEKYIDOMASE
BONGO
BANDA
NADOWLI
SAWLA-TUNA-KALBA
ASSIN NORTH MUNICIPAL
AWUTU-SENYA
DAFFIAMA-BUSSIE-ISSA
ACCRA METROPOLITAN
SABOBA
AMANSIE WEST
AGORTIME ZIOPE
KASSENA-NANKANA MUNICIPAL
OFFINSO MUNICIPAL
ADANSI NORTH
BONGO
UPPER DENKYIRA WEST
JIRAPA
ASIKUMA-ODOBEN-BRAKWA
BOSOME FREHO
JAMAN NORTH
NKWANTA SOUTH
ACCRA METROPOLITAN
PRU
OFFINSO NORTH
AFRAM PLAINS (KWAHU NORTH)
AWUTU-SENYA
BONGO
AOWIN
KASSENA-NANKANA MUNICIPAL
ADANSI NORTH
TWIFO HEMANG-LOWER DENKYIRA
WASSA EAST
TAIN
CENTRAL GONJA
AMANSIE CENTRAL
24
School name
ST. AUGUSTINE'S SENIOR SECONDARY SEC. BOGOSO
FUNSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BODI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN NSUTA AGRIC. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
YEJI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KLIKOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ADAKLU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DORFOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NYANKUMASI AHENKRO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AKONTOMBRA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SOME SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SEKYEDOMASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ZORKOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BANDAMAN SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KALEO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
TUNA SENIOR HIGH SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASSIN NORTH SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OBRACHIRE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
DAFFIAMA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRESBYTERIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL-OSU
E/P SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, SABOBA
ESAASE BONTEFUFUO SEC. TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AGOTIME SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AWE SENIOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ST. JEROME SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FOMENA T.I AHMADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GOWRIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
DIASO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ULLO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ODOBEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOSOME SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL-ASIWA
GOKA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NTRUBOMAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
HOLY TRINITY CATH. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRANG SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKENKAASU SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL
S.T. FIDELIS SENIOR HIGH TECH. SCHOOL
SENYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NANA BRENTU SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OUR LADY OF LOURDES SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
BODWESANGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUKWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DABOASE SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
MENJI AGRICULTURAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUIPE . SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
JACOBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
48
49
50
Northern
Brong Ahafo
Brong Ahafo
3.2.2
EAST GONJA
TAIN
DORMAA WEST
T. I. AHMADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BADU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NKRANKWANTA SEC/TECH
Criteria for Selecting 75 Existing SHSs for Quality Improvement
From the public SHS in the 100 selected districts, any school already chosen to receive
facility and quality improvements was removed from the list. All other schools were eligible
(i.e. including those with enrolment over 1,400 or who were rejected from facilities
improvements in the verification visit). Schools were ranked according to their WASSCE
performance10 . The lowest performing 75 schools were selected. The full data used for the
ranking of senior secondary schools is attached in Annex 5. The list of additional SHSs
selected for quality improvement is given below in Table 3.4.
Table 3.4: List of 75 additional schools selected to benefit from quality improvements
S/N
1
Region
Northern
District
KARAGA
School name
KARAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
2
3
Northern
Western
NANUMBA SOUTH
WASA AMENFI WEST
WULENSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
4
5
Northern
Northern
TATALE SANGULI
BUNKPURUGU-YUNYOO
TATALE E/P AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUNKPURUGU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
6
7
Upper East
Northern
BUILSA SOUTH
WEST MAMPRUSI
FUMBISI SENIOR SECONDARY AGRIC SCHOOL
WULUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
8
Brong Ahafo
WENCHI MUNICIPAL
9
Ashanti
SEKYERE CENTRAL
KOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
BEPOSO GHANA MUSLIM MISSION SENIOR HIGH
SCHOOL
10
11
Brong Ahafo
Western
TAIN
BIA WEST
NSAWKAW STATE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIA SENIOR HIGH TECH SCHOOL
12
13
Ashanti
Brong Ahafo
ADANSI NORTH
NKORANZA NORTH
DOMPOASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUSUNYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
14
15
Upper West
Northern
JIRAPA
GUSHIEGU
JIRAPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GUSHEGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
16
17
Brong Ahafo
Northern
SENE WEST
BUNKPURUGU-YUNYOO
KWAME DANSO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
NAKPANDURI BUSINESS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
18
19
Northern
Brong Ahafo
KPANDAI
ATEBUBU-AMANTIN
KPANDAI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AMANTEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
20
21
Ashanti
Eastern
SEKYERE CENTRAL
AKYEMANSA
NSUTAMAN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AYIREBI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
22
Ashanti
AHAFO ANO SOUTH
MANKRANSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
23
24
Central
Brong Ahafo
ASSIN SOUTH
ASUNAFO NORTH MUNICIPAL
ADANKWAMAN SECONDARY/COMMERCIAL SCHOOL
AHAFOMAN SENIOR HIGH/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
25
26
Western
Brong Ahafo
WASA AMENFI EAST
ASUNAFO SOUTH
AMENFIMAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUKUOM AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
27
28
Volta
Central
NORTH TONGU
GOMOA WEST
AVETIME-BATTOR SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL
GOMOA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
10
The proportion of candidates achieving a credit pass (A1 to C6) in all of the four core subjects: English,
Mathematics, Integrated Sciences and Social Studies, in 2013.
25
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
29
Ashanti
AMANSIE WEST
MANSO ADUBIA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
30
31
Northern
Northern
BOLE
NANUMBA NORTH
32
33
Eastern
Central
AYENSUANO
ASSIN NORTH MUNICIPAL
BOLE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIMBILLA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KRABOA COALTAR PRESBY SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
SCHOOL
ASSIN STATE COLLEGE
34
35
Ashanti
Volta
ATWIMA MPONUA
NORTH TONGU
NYINAHIN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
MEPE ST. KIZITO SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
36
37
Volta
Upper East
AKATSI NORTH
BAWKU WEST
AVE SENIOR SECONDARY, AVE-DAKPA
KUSANABA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
38
39
Brong Ahafo
Eastern
NKRORANZA SOUTH
UPPER WEST AKIM
KWABRE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ADEISO PRESBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
40
41
Ashanti
Northern
ATWIMA MPONUA
SAVELUGU NANTON
MPASATIA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SAVELUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
42
43
Eastern
Ashanti
AFRAM PLAINS (KWAHU NORTH)
ASANTE-AKIM SOUTH
DONKORKROM AGRIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOMPATA PRESBYTARIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
44
45
Eastern
Volta
UPPER MANYA KROBO
NKWANTA NORTH
ASESEWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KPASSA SENIOR HIGH /TECHNICAL SCHOOL
46
LAMBUSSIE-KARNI
HOLY FAMILY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
47
Upper West
Greater
Accra
ACCRA METROPOLITAN
KINBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
48
49
Western
Brong Ahafo
SUAMAN
WENCHI MUNICIPAL
DADIESO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ISTI QAAMA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
50
51
Ashanti
Upper East
ADANSI SOUTH
BUILSA NORTH
NEW EDUBIASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SANDEMA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
52
53
Brong Ahafo
Central
KINTAMPO SOUTH
ASSIN NORTH MUNICIPAL
JEMA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GYAASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
54
55
Central
Volta
UPPER DENKYIRA EAST MUNICIPAL
NKWANTA SOUTH
DUNKWA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NKWANTA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
56
Ashanti
ASANTE-AKIM SOUTH
OFOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
57
58
Ashanti
Western
KUMASI METROPOLITAN
WASA AMENFI WEST
KUMASI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
59
60
Central
Ashanti
AGONA EAST
SEKYERE SOUTH
AGONA KWANYAKO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA S.D.A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
61
Ashanti
SEKYERE SOUTH
62
63
Central
Upper East
EKUMFI
BUILSA NORTH
ADU GYAMFI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, JAMASI
EKUMFI T.I AHMADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL,
ESSARKYIR
SANDEMA SEC/TECH SCHOOL
64
Volta
KETU SOUTH
THREE-TOWN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
65
66
OFFINSO MUNICIPAL
LAMBUSSIE-KARNI
NAMONG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
PIINA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
67
Ashanti
Upper West
Greater
Accra
ACCRA METROPOLITAN
KANESHIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
68
69
Brong Ahafo
Eastern
NKORANZA NORTH
AKYEMANSA
YEFRIMAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AKOKOASO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
70
71
Brong Ahafo
Western
SENE EAST
PRESTEA HUNI VALLEY
KAJAJI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRESTEA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
72
Ashanti
ADANSI SOUTH
AKROFUOM SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
26
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
73
Northern
EAST GONJA
SALAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
74
Volta
Greater
Accra
NORTH TONGU
BATTOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACCRA METROPOLITAN
ACCRA WESLEY GIRLS HIGH
75
27
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.3 Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity
The objective of pillar one is to improve access to senior secondary education and improve
equity in underserved districts and subsidize students, especially girls from low income
households through:
(a) Construction of 23 new community Day SHSs
(b) Improvement in facilities for at least 50 existing SHSs
(c) Provision of a three-year scholarship for 10,400 SHS students
Guidelines for the construction of 23 new community day SHS are given in Annex 7.
Guidelines for the improvement of facilities are given in Annex 8. The beneficiary schools
for construction and facilities improvement will also benefit from quality improvements
under Pillar 2.
3.3.1 Scholarship
The scholarship scheme under the SEIP will address the low level of participation of students
from poor communities, especially girls. The total amount for scholarships is estimated at
$15.0 million and will support 10,400 students at the rate of US$1,500 a year per student for
a period of three years of SHS. The scheme supports students who are placed in the 50
schools benefiting from facilities and qualities and 75 benefiting for qualities only. Students
from the 23 new constructions will join the scheme as and when a construction is completed
so long as they will complete the three-year cycle The amount was determined based on the
need to cover such costs as school fees, examination fees, uniforms, textbooks, stationery,
footwear, school bag, sanitary materials, transport cost and other student essentials. The
funds will be transferred directly to SHSs to cover the cost of eligible items like school fees,
uniforms, textbooks, exercise books, examination fees. The remaining funds will be given to
the students to meet their other needs. A student remains on the scholarship until they
complete the three years of SHS, however, they must attend at least 80% of the school year.
Given the gender focus of the scholarships, a proportion of 60% will be awarded to girls and
40% for boys. A student information sheet outlining the eligibility and process is attached as
Annex 9. A more detailed outline of the scholarship process will be provided once the
Scholarship Administrator is recruited. A draft TOR for the scholarship advisor/administrator
is also attached as Annex 10.
The Girls Education Unit will lead the implementation of the Scholarship scheme with
technical support from a scholarship advisor/administrator. The Girls‘ Officers in the District
Education offices will monitor the disbursement to student beneficiaries and report to the
District Director.
3.3.1.1. Reporting
The scholarship advisor/partner will present reports as specified in the TOR. GEU will report
also report on the various aspect of their work for monitoring and verification. The report will
include the following:


Report on selection process and outcomes.
Number of beneficiaries and their profile (gender, programme, date of birth, eligibility
criteria, residence/distance from school)
28
SEIP PIM 2014-2019






Beneficiaries‘ record of school attendance and academic performance
Tracking of beneficiaries on the scholarship scheme
Provide information for those not selected for Government monitoring and evaluation
databases.
Action plan for next phase
Recommendations
Challenges
The reports from the districts will be submitted to the officer appointed at the GEU Unit at
GES headquarters for submission to the Director-General and copies to the SEIP Project
Coordinator, Qualities and Outcomes at the Secondary Education Division and Regional
Directors of the beneficiary schools. The reports will be submitted twice in the academic year
3.3.1.2. Responsibilities of the Regional Director
The Regional Director of the beneficiary districts will supervise and monitor the
disbursement of funds to beneficiary students to ensure that schools and districts comply with
criteria for selection.
The scholarship will last for three school years per cohort. It is expected that 2357 student
will benefit in the first year of 2014/15. In 2015/16 academic 5208 students will benefit from
the scheme cumulatively. In year 2016/17 10, 331 students will benefit from the scholarship
cumulatively. There will be no new additional beneficiaries in 2017/18 since they will not
complete the three- years SHS schooling cycle by the end of the project. The table below
shows the cumulating of beneficiaries by close of the project cycle.
Table 3.5 Projected Scholarship Beneficiaries Under SEIP
ENROLMENT
Existing Schools (50 for facilities
improvement)
TOTAL
First Year Students in Existing 50 SHSs
First Year Students in additional 75 SHSs
and/or Newly Constructed 23 SHSs
First Year Students eligible for
Scholarships
20% scholarship Beneficiaries (Total
enrolment)
SEIP Yr1
2014/15
SEIP Yr2
2015/16
SEIP Yr3
2016/17
SEIP Yr4 SEIP Yr5
2017/18 2018/19
35,000
42,350
51,244
62,005
75,026
35,000
11,666
42,350
14,116
59,524
17,081
78,565
20,668
99,866
25,008
0
0
8,280
8,280
8,280
11,666
14,116
25,361
28,948
33,288
2,356
20.2
2,852
20.2
5,123
20.2
0
The total number of first year students eligible for scholarships will be 20% of all first years
in the 50 selected schools for ―facilities improvement‖ The actual cumulative number of
students on scholarships per year will be SEIP Yr.1- 2,356 students; SEIP Yr, 2 – 5,208
students; and SEIP Yr.3 – 10,331 students. No scholarships will be started in SEIP years 4
and 5 because at present the policy is to ensure that each student on scholarship completes
SHS by the project closing.
The annual outputs in line with DLI 4: Increased enrollment in selected SHSs for students
from low income families especially girls are indicated in the table below:
29
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 3.6 Disbursement
Linked Indicator and Targets Under the Scholarship Scheme
Result Focus Indicator
Year 0
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
Demand side DLI 4:
DLR1: Selection DLR2: At
DLR3: At
DLR4: At
interventions
Increased
and contracting
least 2,000
least 4,000
least 6,000
to encourage enrolment
of implementing SHS
SHS
SHS students
enrollment
in selected partner to
students
students
receiving
and
SHS for
administer
receiving
receiving
scholarship
completion of students
scholarships
scholarship
scholarship
in selected
SHS
from low
completed and
in selected
in selected
schools
income
criteria for
schools.
schools.
(cumulative)
families,
selection of
(cumulative)
especially
beneficiaries of
girls
scholarships
developed
Year 4
DLR5: At
least 10,000
SHS students
receiving
scholarship
in selected
schools(cumu
lative)
3.3.2 Eligibility for Scholarship
Scholarships will be provided to eligible students in the targeted SHS. All eligible students
will receive an information sheet about the scholarship scheme. Prospective beneficiaries will
complete application forms which will be reviewed by a scholarship committee. Scholarship
beneficiaries will need to be placed in the target SHS by CSSPS.
All applicants must satisfy the following criteria to qualify for consideration. S/He must:
i.
be a Ghanaian
ii.
be needy and qualified
iii.
be in JHS 3 or have completed JHS and written the BECE in the past three years
iv.
have selected a school benefiting from the SEIP.
The prospective beneficiary must be within at least one of the following criteria:











An orphan without support
A student who takes care of herself/ himself
A student with special needs (eg. Blind, deaf, intellectual disability, physical
disability etc.)
A student living with HIV/AIDS
A student in a household with income below the minimum wage
A student from a LEAP beneficiary household
A student from a single parent family with low income
A student, whose parents or guardians are all unemployed, (must be seeking
employment)
A student whose parents or guardians have special needs or serious illness
A student from a large household unable to afford to send all children to school
A teenage mother without support and willing to go back to school
Priority will be given to girls and students studying science, technical and agricultural
programmes. Students already receiving support from any other scholarship program or
organization are not eligible for this scheme. A scholarship application form is attached as
Annex 11.
30
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.3.3. Scholarship Selection Process 11
The beneficiary District Director of Education shall constitute a Scholarship Assessment and
Selection Committee. This committee shall comprise the following:
 District Director of Education
 District Education Oversight Committee Member
 Head (Beneficiary School[s])
 Girls Education Officer
The application process will commence in June each academic year. This will enable both
JHS final year students pending their selection and placement in the beneficiary school, and
BECE graduates who have completed JHS in the two past years and have applied to enroll in
the beneficiary senior secondary schools to apply. The final determination of beneficiaries
will be completed in September when BECE results will have been released and students
placed in the respective schools. Applicants must fill scholarship application forms to be
submitted to the school-based facilitator (to be identified and trained) for onward submission
to the scholarship committee for consideration.
When BECE results are released applicants will submit their result slips, printed from WAEC
website and submit to the officer at the GEU in the district for submission to the panel. The
heads of beneficiary schools will confirm the placement and acceptance of school for final
confirmation and compilation of beneficiaries.
Finalized lists of beneficiaries, certified by the District Director of Education shall be
forwarded to the GEU, GES Headquarters for analysis and collation. GEU will then submit
the data to the Director-General, GES through the Coordinator, Qualities and Outcomes,
SED.
Applicants who are not successful have one month to appeal for consideration. The appeal
will be submitted to the Regional Director who will call for a second assessment of
applicants‘ request.
3.3.4. Monitoring by GES, MOE and REO
Monitoring teams comprising officers from GES headquarters, MOE and Regional Education
offices of beneficiary schools will monitor and evaluate the scholarship scheme. This is
meant to confirm reports from the advisor/partner and GEU. The team will include, but not
be limited to:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
j)
11
An officer from SED, GES Headquarters
An Officer form the GEU GES headquarters
Two officers from the MOE in charge of monitoring
An officer from the Girls‘ Education Unit, GES headquarters
An Officer from the Welfare Unit, GES headquarters
The Guidance and Counseling officer for the particular region.
The Guidance and Counseling Coordinator for the particular District
District Director for Education‘s representative
Girls‘ Education officer from the beneficiary district.
Representative of District Assembly/DEOC from beneficiary District
Please refer to Scholarship Terms of Reference
31
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
These officers will be in groups to verify number of scholarships and the number of low
income students receiving scholarship. The groups will submit their report to the TIC who
will subsequently submit to the PSC for evaluation. Independent verification will be
conducted by the Bank.
3.3.5. Monitoring by GEU
The GEU will be responsible for monitoring and providing data on the following:





Baseline data on educational attainment in the beneficiary schools before the award of
scholarships. (This will be used to determine the impact on enrolment and
performance after the project phases out).
Number of beneficiaries and their profile (gender, programme, date of birth, eligibility
criteria, residence/distance from school)
Beneficiaries‘ record of school attendance and academic performance
Tracking of beneficiaries on the scholarship scheme
Provide information for those not selected for Government monitoring and evaluation
databases.
In order to get feedback on scholarship implementation, monitoring teams from MOE and
will visit beneficiary schools and submit report to the TIC who will subsequently submit to
the PSC.
Year 1
Table 3.7 Implementati on Schedule for Scholarship Administration
Deliverable
Subject
Contract
Contract Signature
10/2014
10
Instrument
Draft SEIP Scholarship Application Form
10/2014
5
Survey
Survey to assess the status of potential
scholarship beneficiary
11/2014
30
11/2014
25
12/2014
15
Termly
10
12/2014
5
01/2015
10
03/2015
10
11/2015
30
11/2015
25
12/2015
15
Termly
10
Monitoring Report
Selection of Scholarship Beneficiaries for
Sept. 2014
Transfer of Scholarship Funds to support
Beneficiaries
Follow up on students attendance and
performance
Final Report
Submission of Final Report and Lessons
Learned
List of School. Beneficaries
Bank Transfers
Preparatory Stakeholder
Meetings
Follow up Scholarship
Beneficiaries
Year 2
Timeline
% of Annual
Administrative
Fee
Survey
Participatory Learning Appraisal with
stakeholders
Report on students who received
scholarships
Survey to assess the status of potential
scholarship beneficiary
List of School. Beneficiaries
Selection of Scholarship Beneficiaries for
Sept. 2015
Bank Transfers
Monitoring Report
Transfer of Scholarship Funds to support
Beneficiaries
Follow up on students attendance and
performance
32
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Final Report
Submission of Final Report and Lessons
Learned
12/2014
5
3.3.6. Sustainability
The targeting and administration of the scholarship scheme under the SEIP will be closely
monitored to understand costs, efficiency and effectiveness of the program. The lessons
learned will inform the government strategy to (i) continue the programme after the project
closes; (ii) scale up the government‘s current scheme in a more targeted and objective
manner; and/or (iii) seek additional resources from development partners to expand the
program. In addition, lessons from previous activities will also be applied i.e. key activities
under World Bank funded projects such as the Ghana Education Sector Project (2003-2009)
and the EFA-FTI projects (2008-2011), have been sustained because investments were
focused on targeted beneficiaries and/or districts to ensure more equitable financing in the
sector to those localities and populations previously underserved. It is expected that activities
under the SEIP including the scholarship program will be sustained if lessons from ongoing
and previously implemented projects are applied and if targeted programs are developed
based on a long term vision to make secondary education gradually universal and
progressively free, a requirement of Ghana‘s Constitution.
The government's strategy to increase equitable access and improve the quality of secondary
has significant fiscal implications for both investment and recurrent costs. The SEIP aims to
encourage greater rationalization of expenditures and prioritization of investments. With
facilities and quality improvement of existing SHSs, the government is introducing
efficiencies which will allow more students to access SHS in existing facilities. As part of its
program, the Government plans to initiate an expenditure review which will recommend
efficiency measures to improve the sustainability of the senior secondary sub-sector. Better
schools may attract more students which may improve the utilization rate in under subscribed
SHSs and indirectly lead to the decongestion of over-subscribed SHSs.
3.4
Pillar 2: Improve the Quality of Education in Selected Low Performing
Senior High Schools
3.4.1 School Performance Partnerships Plan
The School Performance Partnership (SPP) is the process of supporting schools to strengthen
teaching and learning and further defines the relationship between the school and the District
Education Directorate, with oversight responsibility by the Regional Director of Education.
The SPPP is an agreed plan of activities with expected outputs and outcomes.
The main objective of the SPPP is empower senior high schools to make their own decisions
and take responsibility for the implementation of activities to improve teaching and learning
leading to increase in performance. The SPP therefore provides a platform on which schools
are held accountable for what is taught, how it is taught and how it helps students to learn
effectively. Schools thus will do needs assessment, identify areas of teaching and learning
that need support and develop plans to improve upon these areas. Eligible activities to be
funded under the SPPPs should be focused on improving learning outcomes in areas
determined as priority.
33
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
The SPPP must target activities that will improve outcomes in performance and enrolment. It
will include but not be restricted to the following:
 Improvement in teaching and learning mathematics, science and ICT
 Leadership
 Support for weak students and low learners
 Procuring laboratory materials
 Teaching and learning materials.
These are mandatory and must be catered for in the SPPP. Other activities that may be
considered include student enrolment drive, educational field trips, rehabilitation of minor
facilities among others.
3.4.2 Preparation of SPPP
In July of each year, the GES will direct heads of selected SHSs to initiate the SPPP
preparation process and ensure the involvement of all stakeholders. Head of Schools are
required to rally all teaching and non-teaching staff, the SRC, School Board, and
representatives of PTA to determine activities to be implemented during the year. All SPPPs
should have been completed by the end of August of the year. The Guidelines for the
Preparation of the Senior High School Performance Partnership Plan is attached as Annex 12.
The 125 agreed signed plans will be submitted to the GES Headquarters for disbursement.
Following the clearance, initial funds will be transferred to the schools for activity
implementation in October.
A signing ceremony will take place in September between the District Education Directorate,
and head of school with a member of the DEOC as witness. The Regional Director will
supervise the signing ceremony and receive a copy of the SPPP which will be used to monitor
progress of activities in the school. The amount of SPP transfer will be determined by school
size/enrolment. Selected SHSs will be required to open a separate SPPP account for the
transfer of funds. Schools will be required to post their approved SPPPs on the school notice
board for public information. Implementation of activities can commence as soon as funds
are released. The first six months of implementation will be followed by a review meeting to
resolve any initial problems of implementation, funds flow, accounting, procurement etc.
This review meeting will be organised by the GES in April of each year. After a second six
months of implementation, another review meeting will be organised by the GES in October
of each year. The second review meeting will require heads of schools to report on verifiable
initial outputs and outcomes. There will also be mobile monitoring of execution of the SPPPs
and qualitative audit of the SPPPs (school survey) to better capture details on how schools
improve quality. The template for the school performance partnership plan is attached as
Annex 13.
34
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 3.8 Process for SPPP Preparation and Submission
Time
frame
Activity
Nov., 2014
Nov., 2014
Orientation for school heads on SPPP
Heads meet with their staff and their Boards to determine
objectives for improving teaching and learning as well as
access
Schools prepare their SPPPs signed by teacher
representative, Board Chair and Head of School
Signing Ceremony at District Assembly
Submit SPPPs to Director-General, GES
Opening of a separate bank account for SPP
Release first tranche of funds to SHSs and service providers
Begin implementation of activities
Mid-year review meeting
Submit report on mid-year review to TIC through DG
End of year review
Collate report for submission to TIC through DG
Decision taken for the next cycle
Nov., 2014
Nov., 2014
Dec., 2014
Dec., 2014
Jan., 2015
Jan., 2015
Apr., 2015
Apr., 2015
Jul., 2015
Jul., 2015
Aug., 2015
Responsibility
SED, GES
Heads of SHSs
Heads of SHSs
District Director
District Director
Heads
Financial Controller
School Head
District Director
District Director
District Director
District Director
Chief Director
3.4.2.1 School Level Outputs and Outcomes
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Enrolment of students to SHS increased
Enrolment of girls opting for science increased
Enhanced ICT facilities
Enhanced/friendly learning environment
Leadership improved
Improved learning outcomes, particularly for math and science
Increased retention
3.4.2.2 Relevant DLRs for SPPPs
Year 0. DLR1: Guidelines on preparation of school performance partnerships (SPPs)
developed and distributed to selected schools.
Year 1. DLR2: Training on school improvement planning and implementation provided for
125 selected schools.
Year 2. DLR3: 80 selected schools signing performance partnerships
Year 3. DLR4: 100 selected schools signing performance partnerships
Year 4. DLR5: 125 selected schools signing performance partnerships
3.4.3
Orientation Training for Beneficiary Schools
Orientation training will be led by the Secondary Education Division, GES in two groups for
125 beneficiary schools – one group of 50 and another group of 75. The orientation for the 50
schools will address arrangements for managing facilities and quality improvements
35
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
(including the SPPPs). The orientation for the 75 schools will address quality improvements
only (including the SPPPs). The participants for orientation training will include school
management, officers from the District Education Office and the District Assembly – these
three actors are required to work together in planning, implementing and monitoring the
school-level activities of the SEIP.
Table 3.9 Participants
50 schools
for Beneficiary Schools Orientation
75 schools
School Head
School Head
Assistant Head (1)
Assistant Head (1)
District Education Office (2)
District Education Office (1)
District Assembly (2)
District Assembly (1)
The orientation will be a two-day training and will provide an introduction to the SEIP and its
activities, focusing on those relevant to the participating group.
3.4.3.1 Training
The schools will receive training in the following areas among others to enable them identify
and prioritize their needs
Planning
Leadership
Procurement
Financial Accounting
School inspection
The training will emphasize the required results of the project, particularly those which the
schools are responsible for achieving.
3.4.3.2 Improving Teaching and Learning of Mathematics and Science
The objective of Component 1 pillar 2 is to improve the quality of teaching and learning in
125 selected low-performing senior high schools with a focus on mathematics, science and
ICT education. Specifically, with interventions in Science and mathematics, 50 of the low
performing schools will benefit from facility improvements and quality improvements and an
additional 75 schools will benefit from quality improvements. In the third year of the
program when the 23 new schools construction is completed, these will also be supported to
improve the teaching and learning of mathematics and science.
Under the SPPP, schools will identify activities to meet their needs to improve school
performance. Activities to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics and Science
might include:

provision of teaching and learning materials which will include mathematical models,
science equipment and consumables and computers
36
SEIP PIM 2014-2019

in-service training activities for teachers and laboratory assistants, depending on the
needs of teachers

curriculum enrichment activities in Science and mathematics such as Clubs and
projects, participation in STMIE Camps, STME Clinics, Competitions, Fairs,
Festivals, open source contents for e.g. Khan Academy etc. and Olympiads.
3.4.4 National Level Science and Mathematics INSET
The National Teaching Council (NTC)/Science Education Unit (SEU, GES) will administer a
questionnaire to Science and Mathematics teachers to assess their needs in pedagogy and
teaching methodologies. In-service training modules and manuals will be developed by
NTC/SEU in collaboration with Science/Mathematics Educators from UCC and UEW, based
on the teachers‘ needs identified. Training manuals, teachers and technicians guides will be
procured by the Supplies and Logistics Division of the GES. This will be completed within
year 1 of the project. The GES will provide training facilities.
SEU will organize INSET workshops for selected teachers in beneficiary schools as part of
their SPPPs. This will be mandatory for schools under the SPPP from year 2 of the project
onwards. When schools are preparing their SPPPs for 2015/16, guidelines will be provided
on the dates and costs of the Science and Mathematics INSET. Schools are also encouraged
to organize their own INSET for Science and Mathematics teachers in addition to the central
workshops.
3.4.5 Monitoring
Status reports based on needs assessment of beneficiary schools will provide baseline
information that will be used for assessing impact. Schools will report regularly by filling in
online questionnaires as discussed in the section on M&E.
3.4.6 Review of Quality of Teaching and Learning of Mathematics and Science
In 2014 the Ministry set up a committee to focus on improving the quality of mathematics
and science education in Basic schools. To build on this, the committee will now focus on
improving the teaching and learning of mathematics and science with ICT orientation (icampus) at the SHS level. The recommendations of the committee are attached in Table 3.10
37
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 3.10 Recommendations of the Committee on Reforming Science and Mathematics Education in Pre-Tertiary Schools
Recommendations
Responsibility
Source of
Finance
Timeframe
1. Resource Science Education Unit of the GES with experienced science and mathematics
educators and teaching/learning materials to ensure strong leadership, coordination,
collaboration and integration to enable it to perform its functions.
MOE
National
budget
2014-2015
2. Set up National Science Committee to:
MOE
i. develop a coherent strategy to promote science and mathematics education in basic schools
ii. provide sensitisation for all education leaders – including assembly leaders, DDE officers,
and SMCs - on unique issues and best practices in achieving excellent science and
mathematics education
National
budget
2014
3. Sensitise DDEs to ensure that:
i. Circuit Supervisors are well trained and resourced
ii. MMDAs make funds available for school supervision in their annual budget
National
Budget, SEIP
2014-2015
4. Set up an agenda to ensure:
MOE, MESTI
i NCCA, NIB and NTC are working and giving greater attention to basic science and
mathematics;
ii better coordination and alignment of the MOE and MESTI
N/A
2014
5. Set up agenda to ensure greater involvement and participation of Non-Government MOE
Organizations (NGOs) in basic science and mathematics education delivery
N/A
2014
6. Set up a National Committee of Experts in science and mathematics to:
MOE, NCCA
i. re-define integrated science
ii. review the basic school science and mathematics curricula to reduce content and overlaps
iii. develop standards for science and mathematics at all levels of basic education
iv. revise the guidelines on School Based Assessment (SBA) and design pupil‘s cumulative
record book for each grade
N/A
2014
7. Set up a national committee of experts to review the early grades literacy curricula (L1 and L2)
curricula to incorporate as much phonic words as possible to any Ghanaian children to be able
N/A
2014
38
GES
MOE, NCCA
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
to read by primary 2
8. Assure that the literacy curricula are aligned with the numeracy and environmental science
curricula
NCCA
National
Budget
2014-2015
9. Set up a national committee of science and mathematics experts to develop guidelines to
overhaul the various teacher education programmes for training basic teachers of science and
mathematics and in mentoring
MOE/NTC
SEIP
2014
10. Mandate and assist the teacher education universities and science-biased colleges of MOE, NCTE,
education to:
NTC, COEs
i. progressively increase their capacity to recruit and train at least 20,000 excellent teachers
of basic school science and mathematics by 2020
ii. expand and improve the distance education teacher-upgrading in-service training
programmes to admit more teachers specializing in basic school science and mathematics
National
Budget, DPs
2014-2015
11. Fund a scholarship scheme for high performing SHS graduates to specialize in basic science MOE, NCTE,
and mathematics teaching
NTC, COEs
National
Budget, DPs
2014-2019
12. Provide teacher education universities and colleges of education with well-resourced science MOE, GES
laboratories and resources for teaching mathematics including basic school science and
mathematics textbooks and DVD/MP4 video clips on best practices in teaching science and
mathematics
National
Budget, DPs
2014-2019
13. Develop guidelines to:
MOE, GES
i. progressively increase the ratio of science and mathematics textbooks per pupil at the
basic level to at least 0.5 by 2015 and 1.0 in 2020
ii. encourage private participation in deployment of science and mathematics kits for basic
schools to make teaching hands-on and minds-on
iii. progressively increase the computers to basic school ratio to 1:10 to ensure ICT
integration in science and mathematics
iv. arrange for teachers to own and use computers in their teaching
National
Budget, DPs
2014-2019
14. Organise Workshops on inquiry teaching and learning to support practicing teachers to switch MOE, GES
to active, constructive, inquiry teaching and problem solving approaches in order to excite
SEIP
2014-2019
39
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
and inspire pupils
15. Set up a national committee of experts in science and mathematics to revise the guidelines on MOE, GES
SBA so as to emphasise assessment for learning
SEIP
2014-2015
16. Align SBA with Minimum national standards to be developed
MOE, GES
2014-2015
17. Design new pupil‘s cumulative record booklets based on Minimum national standards
MOE
National
Budget
National
Budget
40
2014
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.4.6.1 Relevant Disbursement Linked Results
Year 0: DLR 1: Report on review of the quality of teaching and learning for mathematics and
science
Year 1: DLR2: Training modules rolled out for mathematics and science teachers and ICT
based instruction developed for school use in selected SHSs
Year 4: DLR5: Increase in number of 6 credits and above WASSCE scores on average in
total selected SHS.
3.4.7 Using ICT to Improve Teaching and Learning
Under







the SEIP, activities to improve the use of ICT in teaching and learning will include:
a readiness survey of the SHS,
installation of iCampus in 125 SHS,
review of the ICT curriculum,
development of a digital content evaluation framework,
identification of ICT competencies for teachers in SHS,
identification of digital learning resources,
development of an implementation manual for pedagogical integration of ICT and the
internet in teaching and learning,
 development of a robust M&E framework for the iCampus project.
The iCampus is a system developed with the purpose of increasing access to information and
communication technology education for students by providing and supporting innovative
system to SHS. It contains educational content relating to the curriculum, including lessons,
exercises, additional materials and the ability to interact with other users.
The project will run over the period October 2014 to November 2019. The USAID, MOE,
CENDLOS, GES, GESCI and Vodafone are the implementing partners. The committee on
the ICT activity will provide the technical assistance and oversee the implementation of the
project to ensure that all deliverables are realized.
Apart from the SEIP, the Government, supported by the World Bank, is implementing the
eTransform project. This will benefit additional senior high schools other than the SEIP
beneficiary schools. A summary on the eTransform project and list of beneficiary schools
under the eTransform project is attached as Annex 14.
3.4.7.1 Technical Infrastructure
Most of the SHS have the computers with LAN infrastructure. As part of this SHS iCampus
project, each of the 125 SHS will be provided with iCampus system to interface into the
existing LAN of the beneficiary schools. The system informs and guides students as they
progress through the content/course, taking into consideration their current position inside a
lesson and what needs to be done to complete it. Implementation will require:


Establishment and hosting of an e-learning platform that will maintain a dedicated
learner-friendly web site.
Project Hardware – an iBox set provided to each SHS, which contains an appreciable
level of content even when not connected to the internet.
41
SEIP PIM 2014-2019






Content Development, including learner text, audio-visual lessons and e-interactive
practical lessons. Content development is done by a team of teachers, students,
production houses, related Agencies, Departments etc. of the Ministry. The public are
also involved. Each lesson entails read-write notes, self-assessed/tutor-marked quizzes
and tests. It also includes learner-centered teacher presentation in video format.
Where applicable, there is a hands-on interactive practicals work.
Training / Orientation for Schools - Two master ICT trainers will be identified from
each selected school (250 in total) and trained by CENDLOS/GES ICT. The master
trainers will then train six teachers per school in the first year of the project and
provide ongoing support. 38 master trainers will be trained to further train on the
integrated components.
Studio
o ICT Studio for live streaming
o Multipurpose demonstration system centres (SPIS)
o A studio/room fully equipped with internet connectivity, networked computers
for use by booked-in lesson experts or demonstration students.
Power Equipment to ensure stable and continuous reliable power, each school will
have a power bank. It can be charged on electricity as and when necessary.
Servicing/Maintenance, including hardware service/upgrade, content upgrade, studio,
vehicles, power equipment and hotline.
Monitoring
3.4.7.2 Activities to improve Teaching and Learning using ICT
The specific activities to be achieved in the implementation of the project in SHS are outlined
in Table 3.11.
Table 3.11 ICT Activities to Improve Teaching and Learning
Time frame
Activity
Responsibility
Nov., 2014
Orientation for school heads on ICT integration
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
Nov., 2014
Ascertain the readiness of the schools for ICT integration
in teaching and learning—Needs assessment
Schools prepare their SPPPs to include school level ICT
training and ICT interventions signed by teacher
representative, Board Chair and Head of School
Identify ICT competency standards for teachers in SHS
Train master trainers on ICT integration
Train all teachers in ICT Integration in the selected senior
high schools
Develop an implementation plan for the ICT competency
standards
Develop a digital content evaluation framework
Facilitate the identification of digital learning resources
Integrate ICT and the iCampus in teaching and learning
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
Interface iCampus to the ICT infrastructure across 125
schools
Evaluate and develop mid-year report with appropriate
recommendations
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
Nov., 2014
Dec., 2014
Dec., 2014
Jan., 2015
Jan., 2015
Jan., 2015
Jan., 2015
Jan-Sep., 2015
Jan-Sep., 2015
Mar., 2015
42
Heads of SHSs, Teachers
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Apr., 2015
Apr., 2015
Aug., 2015
Sept., 2015
Sept., 2015
Sept., 2015
Mid-year review meeting on ICT package implementation
with stakeholders
Submit report on mid-year review to TIC through DG
Evaluate and develop end of year report with appropriate
recommendations
End of year review on ICT package implementation with
stakeholders to among other things provide framework for
sustainability of ICT interventions in schools
Collate report for submission to TIC through DG
Decision taken for the next cycle
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
NITA, GES ICT, MOE, CENDLOS
PSC
3.4.7.3 Schools Project Team
Heads of schools will be responsible for the implementation of the project with support from
the district. There will be two teachers, one responsible for technical issues (systems
administration) and the other one for both e-resource development and teacher professional
development.
3.4.7.4 The ICT Consortium
a. The ICT Consortium will be responsible for the review of all iBox hardware
installation, iCampusgh platform deployment, interactive content configuration and
the need for more detailed information/functionality;
b. They will be responsible for preparing user-studies to determine the class/ICT
laboratory profiles at the various schools;
c. They will monitor the teacher and learner activities on the platform to safeguard
prevailing ethics.
d. They will be responsible for the overall administration of the iCampus and iBox
systems.
e. They will be ultimately responsible for the quality of the content and hardware
deployed.
f. They will handle queries submitted by schools, teachers, learners and other
stakeholders related to hardware and content.
g. They will review the periodic monitoring and evaluation reports submitted by the
schools and design the appropriate solutions and innovations.
h. They will make arrangements for monthly monitoring, online and on-site
contacts/visits with/to end-users, schools and the administrators of the systems.
i. They will review all technical claims submitted by the Headmaster/Headmistress and
ICT Coordinator.
j. They will make recommendations on connectivity and broadband requirements for
schools and individuals
k. They will be responsible for the preparation of school term-end status reports for
submission to the MOE/GES
43
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.4.7.5 Monitoring
Monitoring of project implementation will be on a continuous basis by the respective project
teams. At the regional level, the master trainers will be provided with appropriate
instruments to measure project progress on a continuous basis.
Instruments will be developed for monitoring project implementation at the district and
school level. At the district level, monitoring will specifically be on the training at district
and school level. At the school level, monitoring will be in the classroom on iCampus usage,
use of digital education resources in teaching and learning and teachers competencies in
using ICTs in teaching and learning. Monthly reports from the project team (school project
team) will feed into a quarterly project report.
3.4.7.6 Relevant Disbursement Linked Indicators
Year 2: DLR3: ICT based instruction rolled out in about 50% of selected SHS.
Year 3: DLR4: ICT based instruction rolled out in all selected SHS.
Year 4: DLR5: Increase in number of 6 credits and above WASSCE scores on average in
total selected SHS.
44
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
3.4.8 Leadership and Management Training
In order to strengthen school leadership and management, Secondary Education Division
(SED) and the National Teaching Council (NTC) in collaboration with the University of
Cape Coast (UCC) and University of Education, Winneba (UEW) will facilitate the
development and delivery of modules of a training package for heads and assistant heads
from the beneficiary schools, supported under Component 2. The NTC and SED will be
responsible for the following specific activities:





Developing and printing of modules.
Determining and facilitating number of central training sessions
Communicating with beneficiary schools on training needs, dates and costs for
inclusion in SPPPs
Distributing modules to beneficiary schools and stakeholders to use in their own
INSET.
Reviewing the modules and ensuring regular updates.
The training would cover the following topics:





Planning (Identification of priorities, solutions, challenges and needs of the school)
Leadership, Governance and Management (School and the Environment,
communication)
Efficient and optimum use of school resources (people, material, finance and
procurement)
Monitoring and evaluation and reporting
Information, communication and technology (ICT)
3.4.8.1 Beneficiaries of the Training




Heads of Schools
Assistant School Heads
Accountants
Department Heads
The SEIP will support the Secondary Education Division to collaborate with the National
Teaching Council to develop a national framework for professional competencies of
educational leaders in secondary institutions.
3.4.8.2 Expected Outputs and Outcomes
•
•
•
•
•
•
SHS heads will be able to build on existing strengths to become reflective
practitioners and high achieving quality educational leaders in their schools
SHS management will become gender sensitive and responsive
SHS heads will utilize ICT facilities for enhanced administrative services, accurate
record keeping, and evidence-based data management for decision making
Understanding and utilizing established cutting-edge structures of educational quality
and global best practices – applying wide range of relevant ideas and best practices
Improved leadership styles, communication, and participatory governance
Improved professional engagements by enhancing community resources
45
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
•
•
•
Effective financial management to achieve desired quality education outcomes
Skills in project design, management, and implementation
Effective Supervision of Instruction for quality outcomes
Table 3.12 Schedule of Activities under Leadership and Management Training
Year 1 (2014/15)
Year 2 (2015/16)
Year 3 (2016/17)
Year 4 (2017/18)
•
November 2014: NTC Executive Secretary leads in organizing
national consultative forum for core components of best practices
in secondary school leadership with key stakeholders (SED, NTC,
CHASS, GES, NCTE, NAB, UCC, UEW, Legon, GIMPA, UPSA,
Teacher Unions, UDS, GNECC, EI).
• February 2015: National framework of quality indicators for
secondary school heads developed through expert consultancy
under NTC leadership
• June 2015: Modules for building management competencies for
quality leadership developed and digitized by (NTC & in
collaboration with the SED, CENDLOS and UCC/UEW).
• July 2015: Conduct Part I of leadership training for beneficiary
personnel based on needs of the schools
• October 2015: Conduct Part II of leadership training for
beneficiary personnel based on needs of the schools
• Super Goal: NTC Leadership collaborates with GES Regional
Directors to implement school based mentoring and coaching
exercises for effective integration of Leadership lessons for
secondary heads
• October 2015: Secondary heads are paired in formal mentoring
relationships to develop competencies to meet quality expectations
of national framework
• November 2015: Formal mentoring begins. Each relationship
assessed through journaling, reflective practices, and effective
professional leadership practices
• May 2016: Submission of insights gained and evaluation of new
competencies on the leadership framework by NTC (evaluating for
quality of transformed school leadership and administrator
licensing)
• July 2016: Determining the range of secondary school leaders :
Novice, Emerging, Proficient, and Distinguished
NTC and SED will lead in conducting follow-up leadership training for
beneficiary personnel based on needs of Novice, Emerging, Proficient,
and Distinguished secondary leaders
NTC and SED will enhance training provided in the Transfer of learning
and leadership development towards succession planning
National Teaching Council will collaborate with the Secondary Education Division to
facilitate training on leadership and management. Schools will be required to participate in
the training as part of their SPPPs. This will be mandatory for heads and assistant heads
under the SPPP in year 1 of the project. When schools are preparing their SPPPs for 2014/15,
NTC will provide guidelines on the dates and costs of the leadership and core components of
the management training. In the same year NTC will develop a national framework of
46
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
professional competencies for school leadership. Modules for school-based training on
leadership and resource management will also be developed to support the schools in running
their own future training programs.
47
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
4. IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPONENT 2: MANAGEMENT,
RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Component 2 provides the resources for the comprehensive project management and
implementation of the activities in Component 1, as well as support for monitoring and
reporting on project processes, outputs and outcomes, and evaluation of impacts. In addition
to this, there are funds for improving sector monitoring and accountability through
establishment of a school profiling platform which can be updated through mobile monitoring
and from which extracts will be published in brochure format annually. Component 2 will
also support a research agenda to inform secondary education strategy in Ghana.
Under the project management of activities to increase equitable access and quality of
education in SHS, component 2 will provide the necessary funds for:





Training workshops – for example initial orientation training for schools and district
staff, detailed training in facilities improvements, SPPP and scholarships
implementation arrangements, training in use of the iCampus. There will also be
training on financial management, procurement and safeguards for construction
works;
Procurement operational costs;
Printing and distribution of materials giving guidance/manuals on implementation;
General communications costs
Needs assessments and monitoring and site visits.
4.1. Monitoring and Evaluation
Monitoring and evaluation under the SEIP shall be undertaken to track performance of the
various pillars and specific activities on a regular and on-going basis. Regular monitoring will
collect relevant data on process and output indicators to track the delivery of key goods,
services and works. The regular monitoring and analysis is intended to enable the M&E Unit
of MOE undertake the necessary analysis and evaluate progress against critical targets to
assure the attainment of project DLIs and objectives. A data flow map for monitoring and
evaluation is attached as Annex 15.
The M&E Unit of the Ministry shall constitute a composite monitoring team to include
representatives of all implementing unit of the Ministry. The composite M&E approach is
intended to facilitate effective coordination of M&E activities of the various pillars and
activities under the project. The team will collectively design templates for use by
implementing units in reporting and for monitoring to captures data on critical deliverables
under the project. The templates will be designed to cover activities under both facilities
improvement and quality and outcomes.
4.2. Performance Assessments
The M&E Unit will undertake performance assessment following monitoring activities to
analyse monitoring data, identify areas where follow-up is required and highlight successes.
These performance assessments shall feed into the annual project report to be submitted to
the World Bank.
Prior to the submission of the annual project report, the PBME will facilitate an annual
review of the overall progress of the project. The review will be used to assess performance
48
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
of the various units and activities towards the attainment of project objectives. It will also
form the basis for the review of the project implementation strategies.
4.3. Impact Evaluations
Key activity under M&E will be to conduct rigorous impact evaluations of the project pillars
and sub-activities to determine whether results could be attributable the project interventions.
Further, the impact evaluations will be used to assess the impact on educational access,
quality and management by project interventions to inform policy by the Ministry.
The Ministry will undertake mid-term evaluation of the project. In addition, the impact
evaluation will be done on the SPPPs to assess impact on secondary education management.
Assessment will also be done on scholarship beneficiaries to assess their backgrounds and
their academic progress among others.
4.4. Management of Monitoring and Evaluation
The M&E Unit of the PBME Division will lead with project monitoring and evaluation,
including all results reporting. MOE will be responsible for providing: (i) status reports on
project implementation by activity, including description of outputs and outcomes achieved at
the school- and district levels; (ii) status reports on the progress made on all PDO and
intermediate-level indicators specified in the results framework (RF); (iii) level of
achievement for the various DLRs within each DLI; and (iv) consolidated annual progress
reports, (v) supervise the design and implementation of assessments.
The project will track input, process, output and outcome indicators under each of the activity
areas of the SEIP. Some of these indicators fall under the Disbursement Linked Results, some
are under the Results Framework, and others are of interest to the Technical Implementation
Committee and stakeholders in order to monitor progress of the project against expectations.
The collected indicators can be used to understand the status of implementation and areas
with success or challenges, and identify opportunities to improve the programme. This can
then also be used in annual reports, mid-term review and final report.
4.5. Disbursement Linked Indicators
Given the results-based approach to managing the SEIP, disbursement of funds is linked to
performance. Accordingly, there are 7 Disbursement Linked Indicators under the project,
with 30 Disbursement Linked Results. The DLRs need to be independently verified in order
to qualify for credit disbursements. The full set of DLRs and their verification protocol are
shown in Annex 16. Table 4.1 below shows how the indicators will be verified.
Under DLIs 2, 3 and 7 the DLR specifies a number/quantity to be achieved, and the World
Bank will allow some flexibility in meeting these indicators. The verified result needs to
reach no less than 5% below the official target to be considered met. Table 4.2 below shows
the levels that in practice indicators must fall at or above:
49
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 4.1
Data sources for independent verification of Disbursement Linked Results
Results Focus
Expansion of
S HS
Data source
/Independent
verification
Expansion of
S HS
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
DLI 1: Targeting of
Agreed targeting criteria
school expansion and
applied to identify list of
improvement in
Districts and schools for
underserved districts
expansion and improvement
and selected low
under the Project
performing schools
Report given to WB setting
out data, ranking, indices,
final selection reported
DLI 2: Increase in new
seats for SHS students
in underserved districts
Data source
/Independent
verification
Expansion of
S HS
DLI 3: Increase in
utilized seats in existing
low-performing schools
DLI 4: Increased
enrolment in selected
SHS for students from
low income families,
DLR2: About 30% of all
construction works
completed (aggregated)
YEAR 4
DLR3: About 80% of all
construction works
completed (aggregated)
DLR4: About 5,000 new
seats created in
underserved districts
(cumulative)
DLR5: About 15,000 new
seats created in
underserved districts
(cumulative)
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
Final bidding documents
submitted to WB. EPA
document showing ESM F
requirements adhered to.
Independent verification
firm to monitor civil
works
Independent verification
firm to monitor civil
works
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
DLR1: Pre-construction
requirements met for
upgrading of selected
schools
DLR2:About 500 seats
utilized
DLR3: About 1,000
utilized seats (cumulative)
DLR4: About 3,000
utilized seats (cumulative)
DLR5: About 5,000
utilized seats (cumulative)
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
DLR2: At least 2,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools.
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
DLR3: At least 4,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools. (cumulative)
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
DLR4: At least 6,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools (cumulative)
Enrolment records
submitted to HQ for
subsidy collection.
Independent verification
firm for in-school
activities to verify
enrolment records
DLR5: At least 10,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools (cumulative)
EPA document showing
ESM F requirements
adhered to. Report of needs
assessment carried out.
Data source
/Independent
verification
Demand side
interventions
to encourage
enrollment and
DLR1: Pre-construction
requirements met for new
construction in 23 selected
districts.
YEAR 3
DLR1: Selection and
contracting of implementing
partner to administer
scholarships completed and
50
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
completion of
S HS
especially girls
Data source
/Independent
verification
criteria for selection of
beneficiaries of scholarships
developed
Contract signed
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
DLR1: School mapping of
all SHS completed
DLR2: Publication of
updated school
performance data for FY
2016 online and in
brochure
DLR3: Publication of
updated school
performance data for FY
2017 online and in
brochure
DLR4: Publication of
updated school
performance data for FY
2018 online and in
brochure
School mapping/profile
website showing
completed mapping
School mapping/profile
website
School mapping/profile
website
School mapping/profile
website
DLR2: Training on school
improvement planning
and implementation
provided for 125 selected
schools.
DLR3: 80 selected
schools signing
performance partnerships
DLR4: 100 selected
schools signing
performance partnerships
(cumulative)
DLR5: 125 selected
schools implementing
performance partnerships
based on SPPPs
Training report
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
DLR3: ICT based
instruction rolled out in
about 50% of selected
SHS.
DLR4: ICT based
instruction rolled out in
all selected SHS
DLR5: Increase in
number of 6 credits and
above WASSCE scores
on average in total
selected SHS.
Contractors report of
iCampus installation.
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
Contractors report of
iCampus installation.
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities
WAEC
Pillar 2: Improve quality in low-performing senior high schools
Improve the
quality of
teaching and
learning in
selected lowperforming
secondary
schools
DLI 5: Annual
publication of School
Performance Report
DLI 6: School
Performance
Partnerships in 125
beneficiary schools
Data source
/Independent
verification
Improvements
in teaching and
learning in
targeted
schools
Data source
/Independent
verification
DLI 7: Improved
learning outcomes in
125 selected SHS (with
quality package)
DLR1: Guidelines on
preparation of school
performance partnerships
(SPPs) developed and
distributed to selected
schools.
Guidelines included in PIM,
report of orientation for
selected schools
DLR1: Report on review of
the quality of teaching and
learning for mathematics
and science in SHS
Report given to WB
DLR2: Training modules
rolled out for mathematics
and science teachers and
ICT based instruction
developed for school use
in selected SHSs
Independent survey firm
for in-school activities.
Curriculum/reports on
ICT based instruction
available to WB
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 4.2
DLI
Under
DLI2
Under
DLI3
Under
DLI7
Flexibility in meeting DLIs 2, 3 and 7
DLR
About 30% of all construction works completed (aggregated)
About 80% of all construction works completed (aggregated)
About 5,000 new seats created in underserved districts (cumulative)
About 15,000 new seats created in underserved districts (cumulative)
About 500 seats utilized
About 1,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
About 3,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
About 5,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
ICT based instruction rolled out in about 50% of selected SHS.
Minimum
requirement
to be met
28.5%
76%
4,750
14,250
475
950
2,850
4,750
47.5%
4.6. Results Framework indicators
The Results Framework sets out the indicators by which the success of the project will be
assessed. There are four Project Development Objective indicators to assess achievement against
the main outcomes of the project, and then intermediate level indicators to assess progress
against the sub-components and activities of the SEIP. The full Results Framework with annual
targets is shown in Annex 1.
The data for the indicators will come from existing sources (EMIS, WAEC), activity and
implementation reports, and school monitoring (questionnaires for schools submitted via an
online portal – see below). There is one indicator which will require an endline survey to be
reported on – the educational attainment from the two poorest quintiles in the target districts (as a
follow-up to the household survey results from 2013).
4.7.
Baseline diagnostic analysis
The Results Framework will be updated to include the baseline data and associated targets which
apply to the specific schools and districts targeted under the project. This requires use of data
from EMIS, WAEC and GSS. The Development Partner Coordination Unit will lead on
completing this update which will be finished by December 2014. A thorough analysis of the
baseline for targeted schools and districts, and sector-wide data, will inform the Secondary
Education Strategy. In addition the Ministry will not be limited to only monitoring the indicators
for sub-groups as shown here, but will also report indicators (such as transition rates) for all
districts to compare beneficiaries with those not benefiting and look at the performance of the
sector as a whole.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
The timeline and responsibilities for updating the indicators are shown in Table 4.3 below.
Table 4.3 Results Framework
Indicator
Indicator One: Increase
in Transition Rates from
JHS3 to SHS1 in targeted
districts
Indicator Two: Increase
in SHS educational
attainment within the two
poorest quintiles in
targeted districts
(disaggregated by gender )
Indicators, timelines and responsibility for updates
Scope and definition Timeline and source Responsibility
for updates
Districts containing the
23 new SHS and 50
facilities SHS. For the
baseline SHS1/JHS3 for
2013/14 will be used but
in future years SHS1t /JHS3t-1 will be available.
Districts containing the
23 new SHS and 50
facilities SHS.
Update in August each
year using the new EMIS
census
SRIMPR to provide the
data to PBME. PBME
to analyse.
Baseline to be updated by
December 2014. Endline
survey to be carried out in
early 2019.
PBME to provide the
baseline. GSS and
SRIMPR to collaborate
with PBME on
designing and
implementing endline
survey.
Baseline using 2013
results to be updated by
November 2014. Update
WAEC to provide
in February each year
results to PBME
using previous July's
exam results.
Update in August each
PBME to collate
year using new EMIS
reports from SPPP
Indicator Four: Direct
census and triangulate
coordinator, online
project beneficiaries
against SPPP reporting at
monitoring platform,
(students, teachers,
end-of-year review in
EMIS census in
institutional leaders)
July and online school
August. Collate from
(disaggregated by gender)
monitoring. Independent
independent
verification in October to
verification in
further triangulate
November.
Intermediate -level Results Indicators Component 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality
in SHS
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
The 23 new SHS
PBME to collate
Intermediate Result
Update in August each
reports from GES
Indicator One: New
year using EMIS census,
subsidy applications,
(additional) SHS seats
results from online school online monitoring
created and utilized by
monitoring and subsidy
platform, EMIS census
SHS students in the
applications. Independent in August. Collate
targeted schools
verification in October to
from independent
(cumulative)
further triangulate
verification in
November.
The 50 SHS receiving
PBME to collate
facilities improvements
Update in August each
reports from GES
Intermediate Result
year using EMIS census,
subsidy applications,
Indicator Two: Increase
results from online school online monitoring
in seats created and
monitoring and subsidy
platform, EMIS census
utilized within low
applications. Independent in August. Collate
performing beneficiary
verification in October to
from independent
SHS schools (cumulative)
further triangulate
verification in
November.
Indicator Three:
WASSCE achievement of
6 credits and above within
beneficiary schools
(disaggregated by gender)
Results for 125 existing
schools. 2014 results will
be reported in 2015 but
will not be attributed to
SEIP interventions.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Update in August each
year using scholarship
PBME to collate
administrator
reports from
Intermediate Result
reports/database, results
scholarship
Indicator Three:
from online school
administrator and
Scholarships are
monitoring. Independent
online monitoring
distributed to low income
verification in October to
platform in August.
students in the
further triangulate.
Collate from
participating districts and
Database and independent independent
schools (cumulative)
verification should
verification in
indicate the criteria for
November.
students‘ selection.
Pillar 2: Improve Quality in low-performing senior high schools
125 existing schools and
Update in August each
PBME to collate
23 new schools once
year using results from
Intermediate Result
reports from training
opened.
online school monitoring.
Indicator One: Teachers
providers and online
Collect training reports
participating in training to
monitoring platform in
from SED/SEU where
upgrade or acquire new
August. Collate from
face-to-face INSET is
skills in Mathematics or
independent
provided. Independent
Science (cumulative)
verification in
verification in October to
November.
further triangulate
125 schools and 23 new
Intermediate Result
schools if they have a
Indicator Two: Increase
cohort of completers.
Update in August each
SRIMPR to provide the
in completion rates in
Schools will be included
year using the new EMIS
data to PBME
targeted schools
only where data for the
census
(disaggregated by gender) starting cohort (SHS1t-2 ) is
available.
Intermediate Result
125 existing schools and
PBME to collate
SED to provide reports on
Indicator Three:
23 new schools once
reports from SED in
SPPPs signed in August
Number of Performance
opened.
August. Collate from
each year. Independent
Partnerships for Learning
independent
verification in October to
with beneficiary SHSs
verification in
further triangulate
established (cumulative)
November.
125 existing schools and
Update in August each
PBME to collate
23 new schools once
year using results from
reports from
Intermediate Result
opened.
online school monitoring
CENDLOS/ GES ICT
Indicator Four: SHS
and activity reports on
and online monitoring
ICT packages
roll-out from
platform in August.
implemented in
CENDLOS/ GES ICT.
Collate from
beneficiary schools
Independent verification
independent
(cumulative)
in October to further
verification in
triangulate
November.
Component 2: Management, Research and Monitoring and Evaluation
Initial school mapping
Intermediate Result
completed by August
Indicator One:
2015. Online monitoring
PBME to collate report
Monitoring system
questionnaires in use by
on school mapping and
established and
July 2015, updated each
present summary
functioning to annually
January and July. Mobile
reports from the online
track data and publish
monitoring tool to be in
platform.
information on all SHS
use by March 2015.
schools in Ghana
School profile (using
EMIS, WAEC data)
54
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
available online by
August 2015.
Intermediate Result
Indicator Two: Research
and Sector analyses
conducted to inform
elaboration of Secondary
Education Strategy
(cumulative)
Update in August each
year
PBME to report on the
progress of research
activities
4.8. Note on PDO Indicator Two: the educational attainment indicator
The baseline for this indicator will be calculated using the GLSS6 data and mapping it over the
2010 Population and Housing census data. At project endline, data will come from a new
household survey. The survey will need to have a large enough sample of households to give
significant numbers in each sub-group when disaggregated by income status, gender and age
group. In order to compare progress of the target districts against non-beneficiary districts, the
survey would need to include these other districts also. Funds from Component 2 will be used to
carry out the survey.
4.9. Roles and responsibilities for Results Framework indicator updates
PBME

The PBME Division has responsibility for collating all reports and data required to
update the Results Framework indicators.

The Development Partner Coordination unit will lead on collating data from GSS and
WAEC.

The M&E unit will lead on collating reports from implementing partners (e.g. Science
Education Unit, Secondary Education Division, training providers). They will also lead
the online school monitoring tool which includes initiating responses from schools and
collating responses into reports.
SRIMPR

SRIMPR Division has responsibility for providing the school-level data for SHS, and
district level data for JHS, to the PBME division as part of the sector‘s existing
monitoring processes. The data is expected to be provide in May each year.

SRIMPR will collaborate with PBME in designing and implementing an endline
household survey to establish educational attainment in the two poorest quintiles in target
districts.
Ghana Statistical Service
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019

GSS are responsible for making GLSS6 and 2010 Population and Housing Census data
available to the PBME for calculation of baseline indicators, including the education
attainment of income groups and gender in target districts.

GSS will collaborate with the PBME division in designing and implementing an endline
household survey to establish educational attainment in the two poorest quintiles in target
districts.

GSS will provide other advisory support as necessary.
West African Examinations Council

WAEC are responsible for providing the raw WASSCE results data to PBME each year.

WAEC will support PBME in calculation of proportion of students in target schools
achieving at least six credit passes, disaggregated by gender.
GES Secondary Education Division and Science Education Unit

The SED and SEU are responsible for providing activity and output reports on
scholarships, SPPPs, Science and Mathematics Training. Where relevant these would be
collated from external providers.
CENDLOS and GES ICT

Responsible for providing activity reports on ICT roll-out, detailing the installation and
training on the iCampus, but also tracking the use in the schools.
4.10.
Independent survey firms
In order to independently verify the DLRs, two consultants will be contracted to carry out
surveys.
i.
One consultancy firm will be contracted to verify the DLRs relating to civil works – i.e.
the level of construction and facilities upgrading completed in the 23 new SHS and 50
existing schools. A draft terms of reference for independent verification of civil works is
given in Annex 17. The data to be collected by this firm is given in Table 4.5 below.
ii.
Another consultant will be contracted relating to educational outputs in schools – referred
to as the ‗in-school‘ verification. This firm will carry out an annual survey of the 125
existing schools which will collect data on the DLRs, the relevant Results Framework
indicators, and other indicators which are self-reported by schools so would benefit from
independent verification. They will also visit the 23 new schools from year 3 of the
project onwards to verify enrolment records (DLR 2). The minimum requirements for the
56
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
data they will collect are given in the table below, and further information for their survey
can be developed. The survey will need to be carried out annually in time for DLR
verification in the last quarter of each financial year. A draft terms of reference for the
independent verification survey firm for in-school activities is attached as Annex 18.
Table 4.4 Indicators
to be collected by the civil works independent verification consultancy
Data
DLI or Results Framework
Proportion of construction works completed in the 23 new SHS. Consultant will
DLI – years 1 and 2
verify that construction is completed according to agreed standards.
Table 4.5 DLIs
and Results Framework Indicators to be collected by in-school Survey Firm
Data
DLI or Results Framework
Increase in number of seats used (enrolment) in 23 new schools
DLI - Year 3 onwards
Increase in number of seats used (enrolment) in 50 existing SHS benefiting
DLI – Year 1 onwards
from facilities improvements
Number of scholarship beneficiaries (in 50 schools, and later the new
schools). This data collection will require verifying the numbers of
beneficiaries, that beneficiaries have received their scholarships, the
selection criteria which related to each beneficiary on application and any
update to their personal circumstances (relating to income).
DLI - Year 1 onwards
Number of SPPPs signed and copy held in the school
DLI - Year 2 onwards
Number of ICT packages implemented in the school
ICT roll-out. This requires verifying that the iBox has been installed in the
school, the iBox is functioning and acts as the iCampus when connected to
DLI - Year 2 onwards
internet, staff members trained in using the iBox and ICT-based instruction,
and actual use of the iBox in student learning and teacher development.
Number of students in the school, by programme
Results Framework
Number of teachers in the school
Results Framework
Number of teachers trained - disaggregated for Maths and Science
Results Framework
4.11.
Online monitoring tool for school -level data collection
A centralised monitoring tool will be developed as part of the school mapping and school profile
platform. This platform will have a user interface in which the schools can log-in with a
password and input information. The data to be collected will refer to monitoring indicators that
the Technical Implementation Committee will track in order to review progress of the project
against expectations. The tool will be managed by MOE-M&E and GES ICT units together. The
tool will facilitate the collation and analysis of data from the 148 beneficiary schools. Capacity
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
building for MOE and agency staff should be sufficient to allow further moderations and to the
questionnaires. A sample questionnaire for on-line senior high school monitoring is attached as
Annex 19.
Questionnaires to be included on the monitoring platform include:
4.11.1.
Theme – Access
The 50 existing schools will complete this questionnaire once per year. The 23 newly
constructed schools will complete this questionnaire once per term in their first two years of
opening. Sub-questions under this theme include:







Enrolment - by year group, programme, gender
Number of scholarship beneficiaries, by gender
Staff establishment - teaching, non-teaching, by gender
Enrolment capacity for current year (maximum number of students, given to CSSPS)
Enrolment capacity for next year (maximum number of students, given to CSSPS)
Completion rate (EMIS)
Education attainment (GSS)
4.11.2.
Theme – quality
The 125 existing schools benefiting from quality improvements will complete this questionnaire
twice per year, in July and January. The newly constructed schools will also complete this
questionnaire once they are completed and operational. Some of these questions will be directly
relevant to tracking SEIP implementation but others will be for information about the school.
Sub-questions under this theme include:







SPPP execution against plan – actual costs and outputs of the SPPP activities which can
be compared with the planned costs and outputs.
Science training - number of teachers trained (face-to-face workshop, iBox)
Maths training - number of teachers trained (face-to-face workshop, iBox)
Number of staff given leadership/management training
Installation, function and use of the iBox.
Connectivity to internet
WAEC pass rate (WAEC)
Detailed monitoring plans of specific sub-components will be developed and carried out by the
responsible implementing teams.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 4.6 Data
Sources for Tracking Progress of Project Activities
Activity
New construction / new
schools
Existing schools receiving
facilities improvements
Scholarship
School Performance
Partnership Plans
Management and
leadership training
Science and Mathematics
training
ICT roll-out
School profiling
4.12.
Sources of data
Supervision consultants12 – collating
from contractors
School questionnaire
EMIS
Supervision consultants13 – collating
from contractors
School questionnaire
EMIS
Scholarship Administrator
School questionnaire
School questionnaire
Training provider reports
School questionnaire
Feedback evaluation forms
Training provider reports
School questionnaire
Feedback evaluation forms
School questionnaire
iCampus information system feedback
Website
Number of hits on website
Additional verification
Independent survey firm –
civil works
Independent survey firmcivil works
Independent survey firm –
in-school activities
Monitoring and supervision visits
The indicators outlined above are a source of monitoring information for the project coordinators
at headquarters. In addition to this, teams from the TIC will make supervision visits to
beneficiary schools at periodic intervals. The Civil Works Team will visit the construction and
facilities improvement sites. Multi-functional teams (e.g. Secondary Education Division,
ICT/EMIS and Science Education Unit) will visit the existing schools to monitor the
implementation of scholarships and school performance improvement plans, in order to get a
sense of the issues and dig deeper into possible challenges. These visits will be to samples of
schools and will be organised so as to minimise burden on the school staff.
4.13.
Impact Evaluation
Component 2 will support an impact evaluation of the project. This will inform the Ministry on
how effective the interventions have been at meeting the intended outcomes of the project:
equitable access and quality in SHS. An impact evaluation will help the Ministry in deciding
which aspects are value for money and could be scaled up to national level.
The impact evaluation will benefit from looking at impact across various groups: schools
benefiting only from quality improvements, those with quality and facilities, and those who also
12
13
Draft TOR for Supervision Consultant for New SHS Construction is attached in Annex 20.
Draft TOR for Supervision Consultant for Facilities Improvement in SHS is attached in Annex 21.
59
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
have scholarship beneficiaries. The final group to be considered are schools and districts outside
of the SEIP, acting as a comparison control group. The impact evaluation will identify the
additional impact on target indicators of the project under access, equity and quality. The impact
evaluation will look at estimating the additionally of the project, what can be attributed to the
SEIP interventions, and make adjustments for any displacement activity. The evaluation should
look specifically at:

The impact of scholarships on attendance and performance.

The impact of iCampus roll-out on teaching and learning.

The impact of Science and Mathematics activities on teaching and learning.

The impact of SPPPs on quality of teaching and learning.
The Ministry is also interested to find out the impact of the school profiling and mapping
website, to see whether it changes public perception and awareness.
PBME will develop TORs giving more details on the specific questions, methodology and
expectations where additional data collection will be needed.
4.14.
School Mapping and Profile
Under the SEIP a website will be developed to show profiles of all SHS in Ghana and their
geographical location. The website is intended to provide and improve access to information for
the public, as well as educational planners.
A school mapping involving a Geographical Information System (GIS) will be used to identify
and locate the Secondary institutions across Ghana. MOE will be fully equipped to host and
manage the platform. The school mapping will be implemented in phases as follows:
4.14.1.
Phase 1 - Website / User-interface
The end-user output of the school profiling and mapping exercise will be a website, hosted at
www.ghanaschoolsinfo.org. On this website users will find a map of Ghana in which all SHS,
both public and private, are marked. This might for example be shown by a dot on the map
(perhaps different colours for public or private). When the user hovers the mouse over the dot a
basic profile will be shown on the screen, for example school name, enrolment and WASSCE
performance. When the dot is clicked it takes the user to a more detailed profile for the school.
This profile will include:
School name
Number of teachers
Availability of places (CSSPS)
Name of head
Number of trained teachers
Number of applicants (CSSPS)
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Year of establishment
Teacher to student ratio
Photos of the school
Enrolment (by
programme/class/gender)
Mixed / single sex
Distance from district capital
Courses offered
Day / boarding
School facilities
WASSCE performance
Hostel / dormitory
Public / private
Region
District
Town
4.14.2. Phase 2 – SEIP Schools self-reporting
Phase 2 of the school profile website will be a monitoring tool used to capture data from the
project beneficiaries. Here within the same website schools will be able to log-in with a
username and password to complete templates of data collection required under the project.
More detail on this is given in the M&E section. The Head of the school will have responsibility
for submitting accurate and timely data, with support from the school ICT Coordinator as
necessary. This self-reported monitoring data will be captured at regular intervals (some data
termly, some annually).
4.14.3.
Phase 3 – SEIP Schools monitoring and verification
Phase 3 of the mechanism will be for monitoring activities and verification of reports from
schools and contractors. In this case, when supervision visits are carried out, the data collected is
entered directly into the smart phone app and linked up with the school profile. Regional or
district ICT officers will be provided with the smart phones and this will be particularly
important for monitoring the construction aspects of component 1 pillar 1. The monitoring
officer (perhaps accompanied by a district engineer) can take photos of the construction which
the Project Civil Works team will use to verify the level of progress of a project before arranging
payments to contractors. For officers from the headquarters M&E team, a template on the app
will be used to collect general information relating to the project activities, to be cross-checked
against what the schools have self-reported.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
4.14.4. Phase 4 - Open-Ended Expansion
At a later stage, this mechanism could be used for the following:
 Additional data collection at schools using the smart phone app, such as submitting up-todate photos of the school

Mapping and creating profiles for newly created schools

Creating monitoring templates and user log-in details for all SHS in the country (not just
125 SEIP beneficiaries) as a data collection method, for regular monitoring (e.g. number
of day students versus boarding students) or ad-hoc queries.

Expanding the mapping and profiles to basic schools.
4.14.5. Data Sources, Data Collection and Entry
The school profiles will be matched to the mapping based on school codes, as given in EMIS.
The mapping exercise will be carried out using an application developed for use on Android
smart phones. The app allows the phone-user to capture the GPS coordinates of the location, to
take photos and enter them to that location, and enter any additional data which is required and
not already available from secondary data sources. This mapping exercise will be carried out by
district ICT officers with training and supervision from a local consultant.
Existing secondary data sources will be matched to the school coordinates and photos to
complete the rest of the school profile mentioned above. These data sources include but may not
be limited to EMIS (annual school census), WAEC WASSCE results (annual), and GSS
socioeconomic data. The School Profiles will be updated annually when the new EMIS and
WAEC data become available (by end August each year).


Annual Publication
The school profiles will be published by GES annually in December in a brochure and
distributed to districts.
4.14.6.
Feedback from ordinary community members
Ordinary community members can provide feedback or register their grievances by either
sending a text message to a dedicated SMS number (to be acquired) linked to the platform, or by
submitting comments on individual reports. The complaint is publicly viewable on the website. It
then becomes the responsibility of GES‘ M&E team to coordinate with the complainant,
response teams, and other agencies to ensure that the issue/grievance is rectified. Details on the
corresponding action taken and status of complaint must be articulated by GES on the website.
4.14.7. How the platform can serve to address issues as they arise
The platform has an automatic email notification feature which can immediately apprise
concerned officials of any issue/report relevant to any SHS. The platform will continue to send email notifications (as reminders) until the issue has been addressed and labelled as ‗Finished‘.
The platform permits real-time data visualization and geo-spatial analysis (similar to GIS), which
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
can help users delineate systemic issues or trends that can assist stakeholders in understanding
and addressing more macro-level obstacles
4.14.8. Roles and Responsibilities
PBME Monitoring and Evaluation Unit

Lead coordination and oversight of the school mapping and profiling and monitoring tools,
all hosted on www.ghanaschoolsinfo.org

Collect and coordinate data from the various sources: WAEC, SRIMPR/EMIS, GSS.

Report to the TIC and PSC on progress of the activity.
GES ICT Unit

Integrate existing data sources on to the platform, matched by EMIS codes.

Manage the back-end of the website.

Implement any changes or customisation of the platform or the smartphone app.

Arrange any follow-up training for district or school staff in use of the app or website.

Publish and distribute the brochure.
SRIMPR (MOE), WAEC, GSS

Make data available to the profile team

Collaborate on data management and cleaning to streamline and match schools.
GES Regional and District ICT officers

Conduct initial mapping exercise, by visiting schools with the smart phones.

Regional officers to attend and support this exercise.

Later monitoring (Phase 3) may be carried out by district and regional officers.

Later expansion and updates (Phase 4) may be carried out by district and regional officers.
Heads of Schools

Facilitating district and monitoring officers to enter the school for data collection and
mapping.

Ensuring the project data is entered on the website in an accurate and timely manner. This
may mean tasking the ICT coordinator to do the actual entry but the Head is responsible for
ensuring this happens and the school is accountable for project reporting.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
4.15.
Research Agenda
Under Component 2 of the project the Ministry will develop and implement a research agenda to
influence the Government‘s Secondary Education Strategy. This will be the responsibility of the
PBME Division, led by the Development Partner Coordination Unit.
At a workshop in May 2014, specialists from MOE and its Agencies developed some initial ideas
on research questions and topics for research under SEIP. These included the following:
Access




What impact does the SHS subsidy have on access and enrolment? How could it be
improved?
What is the situation in Mission schools? What are they doing, how will this chance,
how should they be regulated?
What effect does being a day student, as opposed to boarding or hostel student, have on
attendance and performance?
What are the barriers to access – enrolment and completion? At what point do students
drop out, and why?
Quality





Science and Mathematics education – have interventions such as provision of equipment
and Science camps improved teaching and learning? Is the perception that boys perform
better than girls a myth or reality?
ICT education – does the provision of computer labs impact student learning?
What qualifications do SHS teachers have, particularly English, Mathematics and
Science teachers?
What are the perceptions of teachers of their own teaching performance? How self-aware
are they?
How relevant is the curriculum to the demands of industry?
Technical and Vocational Education and Training

Why does technical education have a negative reputation? How can we tackle this?
School management and financing





What is the extent of financial incentives taken by teachers from students? What is there
impact on teacher motivation?
What collaboration is there between schools and parents? Do PTA fees impact quality
outcomes?
What causes examination malpractices in the WASSCE?
What are the transitional issues for staff moving from SHS teachers to school leaders?
What are the community‘s perceptions of school Heads in high performing schools?
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Sector financing and management


Public expenditure review – what are the unit costs of SHS and wider education in
Ghana, how do they compare internationally? Where could the sector improve
efficiency? What are the sources of funding – how does the private sector contribute?
How does teacher management and deployment (e.g. study leave with pay) affect quality
of teaching and learning? To what extent does absence due to sandwich programmes
contribute to falling standards in SHS?
PBME will lead on further engagement with Government and external colleagues to define the
research questions, priorities, and methods for solicitation of research. A review of research and
evidence which already exists will also be necessary, to help highlight the gaps and prevent
duplication. The Ministry is keen to engage Ghana‘s academic community in conducting
research, calling for proposals to respond to the Ministry‘s questions. Where specialist skills are
needed then consultancy procurement with well-defined terms of reference will be carried out.
Also under the research agenda the Government will conduct impact evaluation of the project
itself (see section 4.3) and a baseline diagnostic analysis (see section 4.7).
A proposed timeline for the research activities is as follows:
Table 4.7
Proposed timeline for research activities
Output
Define questions, methodology and expected outputs of the project
Impact Evaluation
Conduct workshop to identify major research questions to be posed
to the academic community and consultancies.
PBME conduct a baseline diagnostic analysis of the secondary
education sector.
Review existing evidence on research questions
Timeline
November 2014
December 2014
December 2014 – March 2015
January 2015
Finalise TORs for project Impact Evaluation
January 2015
Prioritise research questions and determine solicitation methods and
February 2015
timelines
Begin procurement of Impact Evaluation
March 2015
Finalise TORs/call for proposals for immediate research questions
March 2015
Begin solicitation of research outputs
April 2015
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5 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES
Project Financial Management is a process which brings together planning, budgeting,
accounting, financial reporting, internal control, auditing, procurement, disbursement and
physical performance, of the Project with the aim of managing Project resources properly to
achieve the Project‘s development objectives.
The primary objective of the Project‘s financial management system is to track resources and
expenditures of the Project and generate timely financial information, prepared in a transparent
and consistent format, which facilitates better planning and control, by the management in
implementing the Project.
The requirements of the SEIP‘s financial management and reporting system is to establish a
sound financial management and reporting system that is capable of generating:




Financial Monitoring Reports (FMR‘s);
Annual financial statements and audit reports in compliance with internationally accepted
accounting standards and World Bank guidelines;
Information regarding adequacy of resources in the annual budget;
Information disbursement of the loan proceeds to implementing agencies
The system must be consistent with GES‘s financial management policies and aligned Ministry
of Education‘s existing financial management system. In establishing the financial management
system, attention has been given to:




Project objective and components as outlined in the Project Appraisal Document (PAD);
The mechanism within which participating agencies interact; expenditure categories;
Sources of financing; the procurement profile of project expenditures; and,
Other pertinent information.
The implementation of the financial management (FM) arrangements under this results-based
IPF will be anchored by the use of country systems under the respective oversight
responsibilities of the Ministry of Finance (MOF), Controller and Accountant General‘s
Department (CAGD), Ministry of Education (MOE), and the Ghana Education Services (GES).
Thus the project‘s financial management arrangements will to the extent feasible follow the full
use of country systems for Component 1 and adopt some aspects of the country systems for
Component Two.
5.1 Organization and Responsibilities
5.1.1 Organization
Financial Management shall be centralized at the Ministry of Education under the oversight and
supervision of the Chief Director of the Ministry of Education (MoE). The Director of Accounts
(MOE) and the Financial Controller (FC) of GES working in collaboration with staff of the
CAGD, will be responsible for various aspects of the project‘s financial management
arrangements. The Director of Accounts (MOE) and the Financial Controller (FC) of GES will
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
be responsible for overall fiduciary aspects of the Project. These responsibilities are to ensure
that throughout implementation there are adequate FM arrangements in place at all levels of
project implementation which can report adequately on the use of project funds, and that the
project complies with the financial covenants detailed in the Financing Agreement. Their work
will be complemented by the assignment of dedicated Principal Accountants responsible for the
routine day-to-day transaction processing and reporting. Specific accounting issues such as
recording and processing of payment vouchers etc. will be handled by the Accounts Units of the
MOE and GES. The Accounts Unit, which will be responsible for the day-to-day financial
management of the project, will be supervised by the Director of Accounts of MOE and the
Financial Controller of GES. Presently the MOE/ GES have full complement of accounts staff
qualified to manage the project accounts. However, their technical capacities and numbers will
be assessed periodically during implementation and where necessary, additional staff will be
recruited.
5.1.7
Roles and Responsibilities
The organization and responsibilities of the MoE/GES for the effective implementation of the
Funds is set out below:
MOE
Chief Director

Monitor the implementation of the Education Strategic Plan.

Set the sector policy framework;

Issue annual guidelines for the implementation of the framework;

Ensure proper planning, budgeting and resource allocation to reflect sectoral priorities
and the role of each of the implementing agencies in fulfilling these priorities;

Determine monitoring indicators with the GES.
Director of Accounts

To maintain proper books of accounts and other records of all transactions pertaining to
MOE under the agreement of this grant.


To ensure the compliance with all requirements under the financing agreement
To account for all funds received and utilized under this agreement in a consolidated
form.

To provide financial and other information required by management to control the
effective implementation of the whole project
GES
Director-General


Provide overall leadership in the implementation of the Education Strategic Plan
Ensure the preparation of the School Performance Partnership Plans (SPPPs)
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019

Supervise the work of Divisions, Regions and Districts towards the attainment of the
targets as set in the Education Strategic Plan
Financial Controller

To maintain proper books of accounts and other records of all transactions pertaining to
GES under the agreement of this grant

To ensure the compliance with all fiduciary requirements under this agreement

To account for all funds received and utilised at GES under the financing agreement

To provide financial and other information required by management to control the
effective implementation of the SPPPs
Regional/District Directorates/School Heads

Ensure proper preparation of SPPPs

To ensure the effective utilization of project funds

To implement the activities as provided in the SPPPs

To ensure the proper accountability of all funds received and utilized in the Schools
Internal Audit

Ensuring that the instructions contained in this manual are understood and correctly
followed by cost centre managers.

Continually reviewing the system with a view to recommending improvements to the
system
5.2 Budgeting Arrangements
The MOE and the GES follow the budget preparation guidelines according to the Financial
Administration Act (2003), the Financial Administration Regulation (2004) and also the annual
budget guidelines issued by the Ministry of Finance (MOF). The budgeting arrangements are
derived from the IDA allocations which serve as a basis for determining all allocations and also
for preparing the SPPP incorporating the activities to be undertaken under the various
components. Individual budgets, SPPP, and procurement plans will be collated and consolidated
at the MOE and reviewed jointly by key project staff. GES Headquarters will co-ordinate SPPPs
and budgets at lower levels and forward consolidated copies to MOE for final consolidation to be
forwarded to the Bank for review and endorsement.
Once the budgets are endorsed copies will be provided to the Director General of GES and the
Chief Director of MOE to enable monitoring and adequate budgetary controls over expenditure.
Project management will ensure that all units and component activities are correctly reflected in
the SPPPs and budget.
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5.3 Funding and Banking Arrangements
5.3.1 Cash Planning
The MoE/GES will prepare periodic cash flow statements to guide the disbursement of funds to
support the SPPP. The cash flow statements will indicate the breakdown of requests of the
contribution and also indicate the required timing of the next period‘s disbursement. The GES
will be responsible for disbursement to the schools on the basis of periodic spending projections.
5.3.2 Designated Accounts
The MOE and the GES will open separate Designated Accounts for components 1 and 2 of the
project with two separate banks and with two sets of signatories. Funds from the components
will be lodged in these accounts. Schools would also operate separate Bank Accounts solely for
the implementation of the SEIP where funds for the project would be lodged and operated from.
Where schools have dormant accounts they could seek clearance from the Director-General to
activate them for use under the project. It is believed that this arrangement would allow for easy
reconciliation.
5.3.3 Opening of Bank Accounts
Authority to open a current account for the purpose of handling the receipt and disbursement of
public funds rests solely with the CAGD (FAR Section 345) Schools should forward a written
request to the Director General citing, inter alia, the need and reason for the new account, the two
primary signatories, an alternate signatory, a specimen of each signatory and the conditions
under which the account shall be operated.
5.3.4 Signatories
MOE/GES officials/employees responsible for committing, certifying, or authorizing the
receipt/disbursement of public funds shall be considered a fiduciary of the public trust and,
accordingly, shall judiciously and honestly carry out their duties in the best interest of the
MOE/GES. For this and other control reasons, two signatures are required on all cheques drawn
on MOE/GES-controlled bank accounts.
For all offices at the regional level and below, the two primary signatures for all accounts shall
be those of the Director/Head of Institution and the Accountant. At the Headquarters, the Chief
Director (MOE) or his representative and the Director General (GES) shall assume primary
signatory responsibilities for all accounts. Meanwhile the Director Administration and
Finance/Director Accounts (MOE) and the Financial Controller/Chief Accountant (GES) shall be
alternate signatories for the Chief Director and the Director General respectively.
5.3.5 Funds Flow
With respect to Component 1 (Disbursements for EEPs ), disbursement will be made to the subconsolidated Fund Account of the MOF held with an acceptable financial institution and the
funds coded against a budget line created under GIFMIS. The request for funds will be done
based on Withdrawal Applications duly signed by representatives from MOF, CAGD and MOE,
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
which will be supported by Interim Unaudited Financial Reports (IUFRs) using the report based
modalities.
Figure 5.1: Funds Flow and Reporting under the SEIP
SEIP
Designated
Account (USD)
Regional
Educational Office
Accounts
School
Account
School
Account
Funds Flow
School
Account
School
Account
School
District
Account
Account
School
District
Account
Account
Reporting on FundUse
Budget Execution Reports (BERs) generated from the GIFMIS together with forecast
expenditures against achievement of DLRs.
Funds flow for disbursements under Component 2 will follow the standard World Bank
procedures using a dedicated and segregated Designated Account operated and maintained by the
GES and managed by the Director-General with prior approval of all transactions by the Chief
Director.
Notes:
i.
There will be one designated account for component 2 and it will be maintained by
the Ghana Educations Service (GES).
ii.
Funds will be transferred to two lower levels i.e. to the Regional Educations Offices
for monitoring and supervisory purposes and to the Schools for actual
implementation of their approved SPPPs Transfers to these sub accounts at the
Regional and School Level will be based on demand and in tranches based on the
approved SPPPs .
iii.
Periodically or based on rate of usage, Schools will report on fund use to the GES
Headquarters and these will be consolidated and used as part of the supporting
documentation for replenishment of the Designated Accounts.
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5.4 Disbursement Arrangements
Proceeds of the facility will be used for eligible expenditures as defined in the Financing
Agreement. Disbursement arrangements have been designed in consultation with the Recipient
after taking into consideration the assessments of GES‘s financial management and procurement
capacities, the procurement plan, anticipated cash flow needs of the operation. The project has
two broad disbursement categories as represented in the table below:
Table 5.1: Disbursement Categories
Expenditure Category
Results Based Expenditure Program Component 1:
Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality
in Senior High Schools (Eligible Expenditure
Program)
Investment Component 2: Management, Research
and Monitoring and Evaluation (Goods,Works,
Consulting Services, Training, Research, Operating
Expenses)
TOTAL
Amount (US$ Million)
140.1
15.9
156.0
5.5 Policies and Regulations
5.5.1 Eligibility for Accessing Funds
School Performance Partnerships (SPPs)
To be eligible for disbursement of funds under the SPP mechanism the School must:






Have been registered by the Ghana Education Service (GES) as a public school and
possess a Registration Certificate to that effect.
Have been selected in accordance with the criteria developed by the Government for
selecting which Schools will benefit from the SPP mechanism under the SEIP.
Be in a district that has a District Education Oversight Committee (DEOC) in place.
An Approved School Performance Partnership Plan (SPPP) based on Government‘s
priorities identified under the Education Strategic Plan (ESP) and the Annual Education
Sector Operational Plan(AESOP.
Have signed a School Performance Partnership Agreement to comply with the
requirements of the Financing Agreement and to discharge its obligations under the
project.
Have an SPP account set up for the transfer of SEIP Funds
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019

Have a list of Authorized Signatories of the School Account14 .
5.5.2 Conditions Precedent to Initial Receipt of SEIP Funds Schools
The initial release of funds to participating Schools will be upon;



Opening of a Bank Account and notifying the GES of the Account particulars,
Submission of an approved Budget, School Performance Partnership Plan, and Cash
Flow.
Submission of Request for Funds.
5.5.3 Obligations of the Schools
The School is obliged to ensure that it:



Applies Project Funds judiciously and for the intended purposes, and in accordance with
the Financing Agreement and applicable Laws of Ghana.
Maintains proper books of Account and prepares periodic reports.
Prepares School Performance Partnership Plan (SPPP) and Budget, Procurement Plans
and Cash-flow forecast.
5.5.4 Sanctions for non-compliance with Disbursement Policies
Schools which fail to meet their obligations under the Project would face one or more of the
following sanctions depending on the nature and extent of non-compliance:





A freeze on all disbursements in the case of delays of more than twenty-one (21) working
days in Queries.
The name of the defaulting School will be published in the Public Media.
Schools found to have misappropriated funds may be prosecuted in accordance with the
Financial Administration Act.
Continued under-spending of funds will lead to funds being reallocated into the following
financial year and the succeeding year‘s allocation will be automatically forfeited. In this
context under-spending represents disbursement below 60% of annual allocation. Funds
that remain un-disbursed at the beginning of the final year of the project will be forfeited
and re-allocated to other participating Schools.
Any other appropriate sanctions as recommended by the Director-General, including
removal of the Head of Institution.
5.6 Requesting Funds
Schools are given the responsibility for managing funds provided from SEIP program. They shall
also ensure that recorded budget figures reflect the entire period indicated in the SPPPs. For
control purposes, however, funds shall be transferred / remitted to Schools on demand and also
14
The appointment of the Signatories should be consistent with existing Legislations and Policies of the GES .
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
on the basis of an Estimate of Quarterly Cash Requirements in the form of tranches.
Upon the approval of their SPPPs and their procurement plans, Schools will be given clearance
to begin the process for all procurements based on the procurement plan. Upon successful
completion of the contract the School Head will then request for funds with the support of the
necessary documentation.
Funds meant for other service activities will be released on the basis of an estimate of Quarterly
Cash Requirements in the form of quarterly tranches. As general rule, all estimates should be
based on the projected costs of operational activities for each period. The Estimate should not be
based on the premise that all expenses will be incurred evenly (i.e., 25% per quarter) throughout
the year. It should be noted that transfers of funds to Schools from the Headquarters will not be
an automatic occurrence. Subsequent transfers will be based on submission of acceptable returns
and other necessary supporting documents as requested by GES. Finally, it is the responsibility
of the Head of School to monitor the School‘s quarterly cash requirements and, whenever these
change significantly, to document the necessary revision by submitting an amended Estimate of
Quarterly Cash Requirements for the balance of the year. In the interest of proper cash
management, the Financial Controller will also periodically review the cash position of
individual Schools relative to the estimated and actual amounts expended. Any material gaps or
discrepancies found may result in subsequent headquarters-imposed adjustments to the quarterly
estimates for the School(s) in question.
5.7 Receiving Funds
Assuming that Schools are in compliance with the financial reporting requirements set forth
herein, the primary responsibility for ensuring the smooth and uninterrupted flow of funds to
Schools from the Special account maintained at center rests with the Financial Controller.
Likewise, it is the Financial Controller‘s responsibility to ensure that:
 all stakeholders, including World Bank, receive financial reports in a timely manner, and
that
 funds from SEIP flow into the GES in an equally smooth and uninterrupted manner.
Accordingly, the Financial Controller shall refer directly to the financing agreement for guidance
on the timing of funds flow.
5.7.1
Detailed Procedures
Headquarters
At the Headquarters the process of transferring/remitting SEIP funds to Schools shall involve the
following steps:


verify compliance with reporting requirements,
preparation of Payment Vouchers and cheques, and forward these to Schools.
On or shortly after that cut-off date, a member of the GES should review compliance with the
financial reporting requirements by Schools, and inform the Accounts Staff in writing of those
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
eligible to receive the next transfer of funds.
Using the list provided, a designated member of the Accounts Staff should proceed with

preparing Payment Vouchers and cheques based on the requirements presented in each
schools‘ estimated Cash Requirements,

obtaining necessary signatures, and

recording these in the Cash Book (i.e., for the headquarters‘ Special Account) against the
account entitled to Schools.
School level





The project will follow the existing procedures put in place. These imply that the Schools
initiate expenditures. This is checked by the District Education Directorate for
verification to ensure that the school has funds under that expenditure category.
The relevant procurement process takes place leading to the issuance of a contract or an
LPO. When an item is supplied and taken into stores, Stores Receipt Vouchers are issued
and payment is processed. Before items are received into stores, the Internal Auditor
should verify the items and pre-audit the payment voucher before payments are effected.
Cheques, signed by the authorized signatories, are then issued. These are then recorded in
books of the school and finally reported on their financial statements. Schools must
ensure that all payments are properly receipted.
The financial management responsibility at the School is vested in the School Head. The
accounting system must be documented in an Accounting Procedures Manual, taking into
account the provisions of the FAA and Local Government Regulations.
Additional and continuous training in financial management and World Bank
Disbursement requirement will be carried out to achieve an improved financial
management system of the school. This will also be done in close collaboration with
other projects being implemented at the school level.
Within the School, the cheque received from headquarters should be routed to the School
Accountant who, in turn should request a member of the Cashier Staff to prepare a General
Counterfoil Receipt (GCR) and a pay-in slip.
Next, the pay-in slip and cheque should be taken to the bank (and deposited) by a designated
member of the Cashier Staff who, in turn, will give the authenticated slip and GCR to a member
of the Accounts Staff for entry into the Cash Book (i.e., for the School‘s SEIP Account).
The process concludes with the Original of the GCR being forwarded to the Financial Controller,
and the pay-in slip being filed in the appropriate file by the Cashier Staff member.
The Internal Audit Unit should regularly verify compliance with financial reporting requirements
for each School.
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5.8 Preparation of Expenditure Workplans
5.8.1
Proposal
For each tranche of funds received by a School, they are expected to prepare a Workplan to
support the disbursement. The Workplan is based on the Approved SPPP. These Workplans
should comply with the following:

The activities should have been catered for under SEIP Funding in the Approved SPPP.
Activities which are not listed in the Approved SPPP should not be covered under this
programme.

Activities selected should be prioritised such as to be covered by the total funds available.

The cost of activities should not exceed the total cost as provided in the budget under the
Approved SPPP except where appropriate approvals are obtained.
5.8.2
Workplans
All Schools are required to prepare expenditure plans for each tranche of funds received. These
plans are to be prepared using approximations of expenditure requirements based on an analysis
of the timing of the activities to be implemented.
To develop the cash requirements, each School is to estimate the proportion of the total
allocation required during the month, supported by detailed activity costing.
The preparation of the Workplan should involve:

Reviewing the outputs and activities in the Approved Proposal

Identifying which months the activities will be implemented (assess the start date,
implementation period and completion date)

Assessing when the expenditure is required and payments to be made for the activity
planned for that month.

Ensuring that the total expenditures are within total estimates as contained in the
Approved plans.
5.8.3
Approval of Workplans
Workplans will be approved as part of the authorisation/approval process for proposals both
at national and sub-national levels.
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5.9 Disbursement Processes at the School Level
Eligible Expenditures
These are expenditures which conform to approved budget in the School Performance
Partnership Plan (SPPP), as well as annual procurement plans which should agree to
procurement procedures.
5.9.1
Preparation of Payment Vouchers
Payment Vouchers (PV‘s) are raised only on receipt of complete documentation that related
expenditure has been authorized and approved. Such documentation will include the following:
In the case of supplies and material purchases
i.
Activity and expenditure initiation form
ii
duly approved local purchase order (LPO)
iii suppliers invoice with full particulars of the consignment
iv stores receipt advice/note signed by the storekeeper
v
waybills endorsed by the storekeeper as having received the goods.
In circumstances where payment is required to be made prior to delivery, a supplier‘s proforma
invoice and LPO shall be sufficient documentation for payment. However, such payment is to
be debited to the supplier‘s account which account is to be credited on receipt of invoices and
stores receipt documentation.
In the case of locally procured services
i
activity and expenditure initiation form
ii
supplier‘s invoice
iii duly signed contract or letter of engagement
iv certificate issued by a duly authorized officer that the service invoiced has been
provided.
In the case of staff requests for advances/re-imbursements and claims
An activity and expenditure initiation form and a memorandum requesting the advance and in
respect of claims and re-imbursements, a statement of claim with supporting documentation
approved by the Head of School.
5.9.2
Cheque Preparation/Signing
1. After the preparation of the payment voucher:

A cheque is drawn
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019

The payment voucher and all supporting documentation are stamped with a dated ―paid‖
stamp.

The cheque/payment vouchers/supporting documentation are submitted to the cheque
signatories.
2. All cheques are to be signed by the following signatories:

The Head of School

The School Accountant
In the absence of the Head of School, the Assistant Head – Administration, may sign with the
School Accountant.
Before signing the cheque, each signatory:
(i)
satisfies himself that:





(ii)
the
the
the
the
the
cheque is properly drawn
payee is the same as that on the payment voucher
amount of the cheque agrees with the total of the payment vouchers for that payee
cheque number and date have been inserted on the payment voucher
supporting documents have been crossed.
initials the payment voucher and cheque stub.
5.9.3
Dispersal of Cheques and Supporting Documents
After the cheque has been signed and entries made in the cash book and the cheque register, the
School Accountant disperses the documents as follows:
(a)
the cheque to the payee
(b)
the payment voucher is filed in rotation order with the supporting documents. Rotation
number is given by reference to the last number in the cash book.
5.9.4
Accounting For Advances to Officers
Responsibilities
(a)
The Head of School has the responsibility for ensuring that all funds are
properly accounted for.
(b)
Schedule Officers have the responsibility for properly accounting for all
advances received.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
(c)
School Accountants have the responsibility for ensuring that all advances are
properly documented.
Accounting for Advances
(a)
Advances are to be granted for approved activities under the workplan.
(b)
After the performance of an activity, the schedule officer is to account for the
funds within a period of three (3) working days.
(c)
Accounting for advances granted are to be made by an Accountable Advances
Form and entries made in the Advances Register.
Uncommitted Funds
Headquarters may take into account the extent of any uncommitted funds in
determining the cash releases to the Schools. Any unutilized funds at the end of the
year would be deducted from the following year‘s releases.
5.10 ACCOUNTING ARRANGEMENTS
In terms of accounting and reporting, the GIFMIS will be the primary basis for transaction
recording to enable the timely preparation of monthly budget execution reports and other
financial reports relating to the projects. Currently, the internal control features within the GOG
provides for pre-auditing of government expenditure transactions. This form of expenditure
validation, as part of the payment processing arrangements, will continue and will cover all
expenditures, prior to their approval, including those under the project. In addition the
expenditure initiation and related controls will follow the authorization and approval processes as
within the MOE/GES. The MOE/GES have functioning internal audit units which help to ensure
a sound control environment for transaction processing.
5.10.1 Accounting Policies
Responsibilities
The Financial Controller is responsible for the GES accounting policies and ensuring that they
are implemented.
The policies to be in force are given in the following paragraphs. These policies are formulated
in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAPs).
Fundamental Principles
The fundamental principles adopted are as follows:
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Basis of Accounting
The GES accounts are prepared in accordance with the historical cost convention and same will
apply to the financial statements of the project.
Revenue
Revenue comprises Government of Ghana funds and other grants. These are recorded on cash
basis.
Expenses
All current operating expenses are accounted for in the period incurred.
Foreign Currency Transactions
Transactions denominated in currencies other than United States dollars are translated in US
dollars at the rate of exchange prevailing at the date of transaction. Balances denominated in
currencies other than US dollars are translated into US dollars at rate prevailing at the balance
sheet date. Gains or losses resulting from foreign currency are taken into the income and
expenditure account in the year in which they arise.
Accounting will be employed and recorded in the notes to the financial statement accrual where
accrual accounting is not easily achievable. No depreciation shall be charged on fixed assets until
full accrual accounting has been attained.
Stocks will be expressed at the time of purchase for the time being until full accrual accounting
is achieved.
Funds are accounted for on cash basis
5.10.2 Records and Books
5.10.2.1 Basic Recording
Each transaction is to be prepared through an integrated system. This means that, information on
each activity with regards to the budget estimate; financial accounts and returns are all provided
from one source.
Books of Account
The following books of accounts are to be maintained by each school office:




Cash Book
Cheque Register
Advances Register
Income & Expenditure Ledger.
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Cash Book
The School Accountant is responsible for maintaining a cash book in which are entered details of
all cheques drawn as supported by the payment vouchers.
The School Accountant enters in the cash book the information required by the column headings
listed below:









Date
Payee
Description
Activity Number
Receipt/Voucher Number
Cheque Number
Amount
Balance
Analysis
At the end of each month, the Accountant:

totals and rules off all columns

checks that the cross addition of analysis column agree with the balance on the
amount column.
The cash book is used:

to prepare bank reconciliation statements

as the basis for posting to the income and expenditure ledger.
Cheque Register
The School Accountant maintains a cheque register and enters in it sequential order, all cheques
issued with columns for the signature of the recipient of the cheque.
Advances Register
This register is to be kept as a check on all advances granted to staff for activities and suppliers
for materials and supplies. A key feature in this register is a comparison of the expected date for
accounting for the advances and the actual date the advances were accounted for.
Income and Expenditure Ledger
At the end of each month, the School Accountant is to ensure that transactions in the cash book
are posted to the relevant portions of the Income and Expenditure ledger. This ledger would
assist the district in deriving the following:
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019



comparison of approved estimates with actual expenditure for each activity;
comparison of approved estimates with funds released for each activity;
comparison of funds released with actual expenditure for each activity.
5.10.2.2 End of Month Closing
All books and ledgers maintained must be formally closed before the weekend immediately
following the closed period. The School Accountant and other Heads of Finance must have
reasonable assurance that all Accounts staff have maintained books and records completely and
accurately.
Accordingly, the Heads of Finance should perform internal verifications as a personal
endorsement of the overall integrity of the accounts.
5.10.3 Preparation and Submission of Report
Reports are required for the purposes of monitoring:




cash/funds management
budget/programme implementation
the result of operations
the financial position of each district.
The returns to be prepared are:


Financial Report
Activity Report
5.10.4 Financial Reporting and Monitoring
As part of the reporting requirements under the project, quarterly financial statements (in the
form of Budget Execution Reports) will be prepared by the MOE showing the uses of funds
according to the pre-defined eligible expenditure element financed by the Government of Ghana
(component 1). For component 2, specific IUFR templates will be used for reporting.
The Director of Accounts/Financial Controller, working on behalf of the Chief Director/Director
General will prepare and submit separate quarterly IFRs to account for activities funded and also
request for funding under this credit. Financial reporting under the program will be report based
and it is expected that the unit will maintain adequate filing and archival system of all relevant
supporting documents for review by the Bank‘s FM team during supervision mission and also for
audit purposes.
Standard reporting templates have been designed and these reports are adequate and have the
necessary supporting schedules and attachments. In addition on a quarterly basis the Finance
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Monitoring Team of the GES will visit the school to assist with the preparation and validation of
returns.
IFRs for the project are expected to be submitted to the World Bank not later than 45 days after
the end of each half year. However, participating schools are required to submit quarterly
financial returns (reports) not later than 21 days after the end of a quarter. The financial reports
have been designed to provide relevant and timely information to the project management,
implementing agencies, and various stakeholders monitoring the project‘s performance.
A. Periodic financial statements
MOE/GES shall prepare and submit half yearly monitoring reports comprising:
 Sources and Uses of Funds Statement
 Bank Reconciliation Statement
 Physical and Financial Project Progress Report
B. Financial Returns
The financial reports include:
 Financial Management Report
 Expenditure Returns
 Analysis by Expense Heading
 Analysis by Activity/Programme
 Trial Balance
 Funds Reconciliation
 Bank Reconciliation Statement
The financial reports must be based on the closing figures contained in the books and ledgers
maintained by the districts.
C. Activity Reports
The activity report may cover (For each activity undertaken):







Objective
Target group
Location
Dates
Contents
Limitations
Future issues to be considered.
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D. Non/Late Submission of Returns
Requests for release of funds will not be met unless all returns have been submitted.
5.10.5 Internal Control and Internal Auditing
Consistent with the decision to adopt some aspect of the use of country systems (UCS) for
implementation, the project‘s internal controls will rely on the government established
accounting and internal control guidelines as documented in the Financial Administration Act
(2003) and the Financial Administration Regulation (2004), and informed by the Internal Audit
Agency Act (2003). In addition the expenditure initiation and related controls will follow the
authorization and approval processes as pertains within the MOE/GES. The GES internal audit
unit will help to ensure a sound control environment for transaction processing. The project will
provide some operational support to enable the unit include donor funded activities as part of its
oversight functions. The role of the internal audit will be regularly assessed during project
implementation support missions by reviewing their reports and GES management
responsiveness to their findings. This will ensure that the role of the internal audit unit is not
limited to transactional reviews (pre-auditing) but adds value to the overall control environment.
As part of its mandate the Internal Audit Department is required to visit schools, District
Education Offices and other beneficiaries to periodically review the control environment. As an
additional oversight of the fiduciary controls, all DEOs are required to have in place Audit
Review and Implementation Committee (ARIC) to ensure compliance and also to follow up on
audit findings. It has also been agreed that not later than 24 months after implementation, and
certainly before the midterm review, the project shall engage a private consultant to undertake a
validation and verification of the flow of funds to beneficiary agencies, districts and schools.
5.10.6 Auditing
In line with its mandate as per the Ghana Audit Service Act (Act 584) the Auditor General is
solely responsible for the auditing of all funds under the Consolidated Fund and all public funds
as received by government ministries, agencies and departments. In this regard, and consistent
with the use of country FM systems, the Ghana Audit Service (GAS) will conduct the audit of
the project‘s financial statements and furnish copies to IDA within 6 months of the end of each
fiscal year of the GoG. The capacity of the GAS is considered satisfactory. However as is the
practice, due to capacity constraints, it is usual for the auditor general to subcontract the audit of
donor funded project to private firms. It is expected that once the project is signed and declared
effective, the GES will formally inform the GAS so that a decision is made on whether the GAS
will appoint an auditor or have firms competing for the audit of the project subject to the Bank‘s
necessary procurement and technical clearance of the terms of reference (TOR) for the
engagement of the audit firm. This is to ensure that there are no delays in meeting the financial
covenants for submission.
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In the event of recruiting a private sector auditor, an independent and qualified auditor
acceptable to the IDA would carry out the annual financial audit of the project. The financial
auditors would be in place by effectiveness of the project. The auditors‘ reports and opinions
including the Managements letter of the annual financial audit would be furnished to the IDA
within six months of the close of each fiscal year.
An additional mechanism for periodic financial reviews of all participating districts will be
established for effective monitoring purposes. The district financial review, in addition to the
normal financial systems work, will cover the district compliance with all agreed procedures
including project eligibility criteria and procurement rules. The selection of all auditors and
financial consultants shall be on competitive basis in accordance with the Bank‘s rules and
guidelines.
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6
PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES
6.1 Implementation Arrangements for Procurement
Procurement for the SEIP will be carried out in accordance with the World Bank‘s ―Guidelines:
Procurement of Goods, Works, and Non-Consulting Services under IBRD Loans and IDA
Credits & Grants by World Bank Borrowers‖ dated January 2011 and revised July 2014; and
―Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants under IBRD Loans and IDA Credits &
Grants by World Bank Borrowers‖ dated January 2011 and revised July 2014; the Ghana Public
Procurement Act 663 of 2003; and the provisions stipulated in the Financing Agreement. All the
procurement will be linked with the disbursement indicators. A procurement plan will be
prepared by MOE and GES, agreed upon and cleared by the Bank. The procurement plan will be
updated at least annually or as required to reflect the actual project implementation needs and
improvements in institutional capacity.
6.1.1 Use of National Systems
All works and goods contracts are to be procured through National Competitive Bidding and
other lower value procurement procedures (shopping/price quotation/price comparison and
smaller works contracts) will follow the Ghana Public Procurement Act 663 of 2003 with the
following exceptions:
(i)
Procuring entities shall use appropriate standard bidding documents acceptable to the
Association.
(ii)
Foreign bidders shall be allowed to participate in National Competitive Bidding procedures
and foreign firms shall not be required to associate with a local partner in order to bid as a
joint venture, and joint venture or consortium partners shall be jointly and severally liable
for their obligations.
(iii) Bidders shall be given at least 30 days to submit bids from the date of the invitation to bid
or the date of the availability of bidding documents, whichever is later.
(iv) No domestic preference shall be given for domestic bidders and for domestically
manufactured goods.
(v)
15
16
Each bidding document and contract financed out of the proceeds of the Financing shall
include provisions on matters pertaining to fraud and corruption as defined in paragraph
1.14(a) of the Procurement Guidelines15 . The Association16 will sanction a firm or an
individual, at any time, in accordance with prevailing Association sanctions procedures,
including by publicly declaring such firm or individual ineligible, either indefinitely or for
a stated period of time: (1) to be awarded an Association-financed contract; and (2) to be a
nominated sub-contractor, consultant, manufacturer or supplier, or service provider of an
otherwise eligible firm being awarded an Association- financed contract.
The Procurement Guidelines refers to the World Bank Procurement Guidelines
Association refers to the World Bank
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In accordance with paragraph 1.16 (e) of the Procurement Guidelines, each bidding document
and contract financed out of the proceeds of the project shall provide that: (1) the bidders,
suppliers, contractors and subcontractors shall permit the World Bank, at its request, to inspect
their accounts and records relating to the bid submission and performance of the contract, and to
have said accounts and records audited by auditors appointed by the World Bank; and (2) the
deliberate and material violation by the bidder, supplier, contractor or subcontractor of such
provision may amount to an obstructive practice as defined in paragraph 1.16 (a) (v) of the
Procurement Guidelines; and (3) The Association may recognize, if requested by the Borrower,
exclusion from participation as a result of debarment under the national system, provided that the
debarment is for offenses involving fraud, corruption or similar misconduct, and further provided
that the Association confirms that the particular debarment procedure afforded due process and
the debarment decision is final.
6.1.2 Standard Bidding Documents
As a result of the above exceptions, MOE and GES shall prepare acceptable Standard Bidding
Documents (SBDs) for all categories of procurement to be managed by SEIP using the Ghana
PPA standard documents as a base and incorporating the exceptions enumerated above. These
modified SBDs shall be submitted to the Bank for no objection before they can be used, and all
participating institutions/schools shall be given copies to use for their procurement. No
implementing body shall use any other bidding documents for procurement under the project
except that which has been approved by the Bank.
6.2 Procurement Activities
Procurement activities under the SEIP will be undertaken at the (i) National level and (ii) School
level. Under each level, items will be bulked into sizeable bid packages whenever possible, to
make procurement more cost-effective.
6.2.1
National Level Procurement
At the National Level, The Ministry‘s Procurement Unit in collaboration with the Ghana
Education Service (GES) Supplies and Logistics Division will handle all major procurement of
goods, works and services in consultation with beneficiary institutions/schools. The MOE and
GES will directly oversee the construction of new schools, rehabilitation of existing
institutions/schools, consultancy services and strengthening procurement capacity.
6.2.2
Institution/School Level Procurement
At this level, the beneficiary institutions/schools will procure only small ticket items using the
appropriate procurement methods and seeking for the required approvals from relevant bodies
prescribed by the Ghana Public Procurement Act 663 (2003).
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6.3 Standard Documents to be used and Solicitation
The Bank‘s standard bidding documents (SBD) will be used for procurement under International
Competitive Bidding (ICB) and for Non-consulting services. For National Competitive Bidding
and other lower value procurement procedures (shopping/price quotation/price comparison and
smaller works contracts), the Ghana PPA Standard Tender Documents shall be used after
incorporating the exceptions enumerated in Section 6.1.1 above, which should be reviewed and
approved by the World Bank. Such documents would be prepared by the MOE and GES which
after approval from the World Bank would be circulated to be used by all decentralised
implementing institutions/schools.
For all consultancy contracts, the Bank‘s Standard Request for Proposal document will be used
in the selection of consulting firms. Shortlists of consultants for consulting services contracts
estimated to cost less than $300,000 equivalent per contract may be composed entirely of
national consultants in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 2.7 of the Consultant
Guidelines. Selection of individual consultants shall follow Bank‘s procedures.
Implementing entities shall use only the official standard documents agreed with or approved by
the Bank. In preparing the specific tender document or request for proposals, the entity must
respect all the requirements provided in the Bank Guidelines or the PPA 663 as the case may be.
The criteria required shall be proportionate and strictly related to the nature and value of the
contract. The procurement unit of the implementing entity shall be fully responsible for the
preparation of tender documents, qualification requirements and evaluation criteria, whereas the
technical specifications shall be prepared by the relevant technical unit within the implementing
entity with the required skills in the object to be procured, or outside the implementing entity
when there is a lack of expertise. After the preparation of tender documents, the Head of the
implementing entity shall authorize the publication of the contract notice. The contract notice
must clearly indicate the time, date and place for the submission and for the opening of tenders.
6.4 Advertisement
A General Procurement Notice (GPN) (this is mandatory) will be published in the UN
Development Business and in Development Gateway Market (dgMarket) as provided under the
Guidelines. For goods and works to be procured under ICB and all consulting services estimated
to cost US$300,000 or more, the following guidelines shall be strictly adhered to:

Specific Procurement Notices (SPN) will be required for contracts to be procured under
ICB and NCB procedures. All ICBs for goods and works and consultant contracts
estimated to cost US$300,000 or more will be advertised in Development Business online
and in dgMarket. Sufficient time will be allowed (not less than six weeks for ICB and not
less than 30 days for NCB).

For consultancy services contracts (estimated to cost more than US$100,000)
Expressions of Interest (EOI) must be advertised prior to the preparation of the shortlist.
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Consultants should be allowed at least 14 days to prepare documents and respond
appropriately.

For consultancy services contracts below US$100,000, the shortlist may be drawn from
an existing database, otherwise EOIs must be advertised prior to the preparation of the
shortlist.

The SPNs will (as a minimum) be published in a newspaper of wide national circulation.
6.5 Procurement Planning
Procurement planning is an important tool for guiding and monitoring procurement. It is critical
to the success of project implementation. A Procurement Plan has been prepared and agreed
with the Bank for the first 12 months of project implementation and includes relevant
information on all goods, works, non-consulting services, and consulting services agreed at
inception to be undertaken under the Project as well as the scheduling of each milestone in the
procurement process.
The procurement plan shows the step-by-step procedures and processing times for procurement
including:





Contract packages for goods, consultant services;
Estimated cost;
Procurement or consultant selection method or bidding type,
Evaluation and contract award; and
The activities which follow contract signature to delivery and completion.
The preparation of a procurement plan should take into account the budget cycle, stakeholders
involved in the process, the human skills required, and administrative procedures and required
approvals e.g. clearance with a bid committee or obtaining the World Bank‘s non-objection.
It is important to note that the procurement plan will be used as a tool for monitoring, forecasting
and tracking overall implementation performance.
The procurement plan will be updated by the Procurement Team in agreement with the other
beneficiary institutions annually or as required to reflect the actual project implementation needs.
In updating the procurement plans, each beneficiary agency will be guided by the annual work
plan that will indicate items requiring procurement, and the level at which the procurement will
take place. MOE through the Procurement Team will then consolidate these into a single project
procurement plan and submit it to the Bank or the PPA (as appropriate) for review.
The procurement plan and subsequent updates and changes should consist of a minimum of the
following details: (i) a brief description of required goods, works, non-consulting and consulting
services; (ii) estimated cost; (iii) proposed method of procurement; (iv) review types from the
World Bank; (v) time schedule for the key activities.
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Updated procurement plans shall require the concurrence of the Bank, after which it shall be
published on the Bank's external website and the PPA website (as appropriate) by the
Procurement Team.
6.6 Scope of procurement under the Project
All procurement financed under Component 2 of the project is subject to the World Bank‘s
guidelines and thresholds for review. Under Component 1 any procurement activities will be
subject to the Government of Ghana‘s procurement guidelines as in the PPA 663 (2003) and
exceptions as in section 6.1 above, and will not require prior-review by the World Bank.
6.6.1
Procurement of Works
Under the results based component of the Project , all procurement shall use the Country System
ie. The Ghana Public Procurement Act , 2003 (Act 663) with the modifications below in the
tender process and tender documents. Procurement for international competitive bidding will be
done using the Bank‘s Standard Bidding Documents (SBD) and that for National Competitive
Tendering using the PPA NCT documents with modification satisfactory to the Bank. Relevant
NCB works contracts, which are deemed complex and/or have significant risk levels, will be
prior-reviewed. Such contracts will be identified in the tables and also in the procurement plans.
While using the NCB, the project must ensure that: (i) foreign bidders shall be allowed to
participate in NCB procedures without any restrictions; (ii) bidders shall be given at least one
month to submit bids from the date of the invitation to bid or the date of availability of bidding
documents, whichever is later; (iii) no domestic preference shall be given for domestic bidders;
and (iv) in accordance with paragraph 1.16(e) of the Procurement Guidelines, each bidding
document and contract financed out of the proceeds of the Financing shall provide that: (a) the
bidders, suppliers, contractors and subcontractors shall permit the Association, at its request, to
inspect their accounts and records relating to the bid submission and performance of the contract,
and to have said accounts and records audited by auditors appointed by the Association; and (b)
the deliberate and material violation by the bidder, supplier, contractor or subcontractor of such
provision may account to an obstructive practice as defined in paragraph 1.16(a)(v)(aa) of the
Procurement Guidelines.
Contracts would be procured using shopping procedures based on a model request for quotations
satisfactory to the Bank. Direct contracting may be used where necessary, but it will be subject
to Bank‘s no objection.
6.6.2 Procurement of Goods
The procurement will be done using the Bank‘s SBD for all ICB and National SBD for all NCB
agreed with or satisfactory to the Bank. Procurement may be done under NCB and Shopping
depending on the thresholds. However, relevant NCB goods contracts, which are deemed
complex and/or have significant risk levels, will be prior-reviewed. Such contracts will be
identified in the tables and also in the procurement plans. Again, under the NCB, the project
must ensure that: (i) foreign bidders shall be allowed to participate in NCB procedures without
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any restrictions; (ii) bidders shall be given at least one month to submit bids from the date of the
invitation to bid or the date of availability of bidding documents, whichever is later; (iii) no
domestic preference shall be given for domestic bidders; and (iv) in accordance with paragraph
1.16(e) of the Procurement Guidelines, each bidding document and contract financed out of the
proceeds of the Financing shall provide that: (a) the bidders, suppliers, contractors and
subcontractors shall permit the Association, at its request, to inspect their accounts and records
relating to the bid submission and performance of the contract, and to have said accounts and
records audited by auditors appointed by the Association; and (b) the deliberate and material
violation by the bidder, supplier, contractor or subcontractor of such provision may account to an
obstructive practice as defined in paragraph 1.16(a)(v) of the Procurement Guidelines.
Contracts would be procured using shopping procedures based on a model request for quotations
satisfactory to the Bank. Direct contracting may be used where necessary, but it will be subject
to Bank‘s no objection.
6.6.3
Procurement of non-consulting services
Procurement of non-consulting services will follow procurement procedures similar to those
stipulated for the procurement of goods, depending on their nature.
6.6.4
Selection of Consultants
Consultancy services would be provided under the project and includes the following categories:
financial, technical and procurement audits, economic and technical feasibility and design
studies, supervision of construction works, institutional studies, monitoring and evaluation
studies and technical assistance to the implementing ministries. In accordance with the threshold,
methods of procurement will include Quality and Cost-Based Selection (QCBS); Selection
Based on Consultants‘ Qualifications (CQS); while selection under Quality Based (QBS);
Selections under Fixed Budget (FBS) and Least Cost Selection (LCS) methods will be applied in
the circumstances as respectively described under paragraphs 3.5 and 3.6 of the Consultants
Guidelines. For all contracts to be awarded following QCBS, LCS and FBS the Bank‘s Standard
Request for Proposals will be used. Procedures of Selection of Individual Consultants (IC) would
be followed for assignments that meet the requirements of paragraph 5.1 and 5.3 of the
Consultant Guidelines. LCS procedures would be used for assignments for selecting the auditors.
Single-Source Selection (SSS) procedures would be followed for assignments that meet the
requirements of paragraphs 3.10-3.12 of the Consultant Guidelines and will always require the
Bank‘s prior review regardless of the amount.
Assignments estimated to cost the equivalent of US$300,000 or more would be advertised for
expressions of interest (EOI) in Development Business (UNDB), in DG Market and in at least
one newspaper of wide national circulation. In addition, EOI for specialized assignments may be
advertised in an international newspaper or magazine. Foreign consultants who wish to
participate in national selection should not be excluded from consideration.
6.6.5
Capacity Building and Training Programmes, Conferences and Workshops
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All training and workshops will be carried out on the basis of the project‘s Annual Work Plans
and Budget which will have been approved by the Bank on a yearly basis, and which will
interalia, identify: (i) the envisaged training and workshops; (ii) the personnel to be trained; (iii)
the institutions which will conduct the training and selection methods of institutions or
individuals conducting such training; (iv) the justification for the training, how it would lead to
effective performance and implementation of the project and/or sector; (v) the duration of the
proposed training; and (vi) the cost estimate of the training. A report will be required of the
trainee upon completion of training.
Implementation of training activities (other than by engaging consultants) will be different from
the conventional procurement process. There are various methods by which training may be
implemented:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Individuals going for training to acquire certificates, diplomas, etc.
Training organized by the relevant institution for a large group of individuals;
Meetings/seminars/workshop/consultations; and
Local and overseas study tours.
Among other things, training expenditures may include:
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Tuition/registration fees;
Cost of transport, meals, accommodation and other allowances, medical insurance;
Rental of facilities; and
Cost of production of training materials, etc.
In cases where training is to be contracted out through a consultancy firm, the procedures shall
follow selection and employment of the consultant described in the relevant sections of the
Guidelines. If such an arrangement is used, the conventional procurement method for selection
of consultants will be applied.
Operating Costs
Operating Costs, including office supplies, operation and maintenance of vehicles, maintenance
of equipment, communication, rental, utilities, consumables, transport and accommodation, and
travel costs and per diem, will be managed according to regular government procedures.
6.7 Review of Procurement by the Bank
Procurement is fundamentally the responsibility of MOE and GES. However, supervision
(review) by the WB involves the following main tasks in relation to Procurement:

Review of the Procurement Plan;

Prior review of Procurement transactions under Component 2. Such prior review
transactions shall be set out as prior review in the approved procurement plan;
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
Post review of contracts, on a sample basis, to be conducted yearly and to review
contracts that were not reviewed by the WB prior to be signed; and

Review of Terms of References (ToR), short-list, Request for Proposal (RFP) documents
and technical evaluation reports, combined evaluation report, minutes of Negotiations
and draft Negotiated Contract.
The table below highlights procurement thresholds for both procurement methods and prior
review of contracts. The thresholds shall be observed during the implementation of the Project.
For all prior review contracts, documents covering every step of the procurement or consultancy
selection process will have to be cleared by the Bank before proceeding with required actions. It
must be noted that all direct contracting and single source selection above $100,000 will be
subject to IDA prior review. Contracts which are not subject to prior review are nevertheless
expected to follow all required procedures and will be selectively reviewed by the Bank during
project implementation.
Table 6.1: Thresholds for Procurement Methods and Prior Review
Prior Review Threshold
Consultants
RISK RATING
SUBSTANTIAL
Works
Goods
≥$10 Mil ≥$1 Mil
IT Systems+
Non Con.
Serv
≥$1 Mil
ICB
NCB
Individua
ls
Works
Goods +
Non Con.
Serv
≥$0.5 Mil ≥$0.2 Mil
≥$15 Mil
≥$3 Mil
Firms
All-National
Shortlist of
Consultants
Procurement Method Threshold
Shopping
Goods +
Goods +
Works Non Con. Works Non Con.
Serv
Serv
≤$0.3 Mil (All)
<$15 Mil <$3 Mil <$0.2 Mil <$0.1 Mil ≤$0.5 Mil (Engr+
Contract Spn)
*The thresholds will be revised periodically in agreement with the World Bank based on
reassessment of the project procurement risks.
6.8 Procurement Methods and Procedures
Consistent with the provisions of the Financing Agreement, the following procurement methods
would be used under the Project for procurement of the goods, works, non-consulting services
and consulting services:
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Table 6.2: Procurement methods to be used under the Project
Methods of Procurement of Goods/Nonconsulting services and Works
International competitive bidding
National competitive bidding
Shopping (Request for Price Quotation)
Direct contracting
Methods for Selection of Consulting Services
Quality and cost based selection (QCBS)
Quality based selection (QBS)
Selection under a fixed budget (FBS)
Least-cost selection (LCS)
Selection based on consultants‘ qualification (CQS)
Selection of individual consultants
Single-source selection (SSS) of Firms/Individual
Consultants
6.9 Process Steps and Guidelines for Determining Completion Timescales
Estimated lead times for ICT (Goods)
1.
Preparation of Tender Documents
-
1-6 weeks
2.
Prior review/ETC/TRB approval
-
1-2 weeks
3.
Adverts/Tender Invitation
-
6weeks minimum
4.
Tender Close/Opening
-
same date
5.
Tender Evaluation and Report Submission
-
2-4 weeks
6.
Approval by ETC/TRB
-
1-2 weeks
7.
Contract Award
-
0-2 weeks
8.
Contract Signature
-
1-4 weeks
9.
Letters of Credit (Goods)
-
2-4 weeks
10. Delivery
-
6-16 weeks
11. Inspection and Acceptance
-
0-4 weeks
If there is the need for the Prequalification of Suppliers or Contractors then total time for the
delivery of the goods or works will have to be expanded by 7-13 weeks to allow for the
completion of the prequalification procedures.
Estimated lead times for NCT (Goods)
1.
Preparation of Tender Documents
-
1-3 weeks
2.
Prior review/ETC/TRB approval
-
1-2 weeks
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3.
Adverts/Tender Invitation
-
Minimum 4 weeks
4.
Tender Close/Opening
-
same date
5.
Tender Evaluation and Report Submission
-
1-2 weeks
6.
Post Review/No objection
-
1-2 weeks
7.
Contract Award
-
0-2 weeks
8.
Contract Signature
-
1-3 weeks
9.
Letter of Credit
-
1-4 weeks
10. Delivery
-
As per contract
11. Inspection and Acceptance
-
0-1 week
Estimated lead times for ICT (Works)
1.
Preparation of Tender Documents
-
2weeks minimum- 4weeks
2.
Prior review/ETC/TRB approval
-
1-2 weeks
3.
Adverts/Tender Invitation
-
6-8 weeks
4.
Tender Close/Opening
-
same date
5.
Tender Evaluation and Report Submission
-
2-4 weeks
6.
Post Review/ETC/TRB Approval
-
1-2 weeks
7.
Contract Award
-
1-2 weeks
8.
Contract Signature
-
2-3 weeks
9.
Mobilization (Advance Payment)
-
2-4 weeks
10. Completion Period
-
As per contract
11. Final Acceptance
-
24-52 weeks
Estimated lead times for NCT (Works)
1.
Preparation of Tender Documents
-
2weeks minimum
2.
Prior review/ETC/TRB approval
-
1-2 weeks
3.
Advertising/Tender Invitation
-
Minimum 4 weeks
4.
Tender Close/Opening
-
same date
5.
Tender Evaluation and Report Submission
-
2-4 weeks
6.
Post Review/ETC/TRB Approval
-
1-2 weeks
7.
Contract Award
-
1-2 weeks
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8.
Contract Signature
-
1-3 weeks
9.
Mobilization (Advance Payment)
-
2-4 weeks
10. Completion Period
-
As per contract
11. Final Acceptance
-
24 weeks
Estimated lead times- Request for Quotation
1.
Preparation of documents
-
0-1 week
2.
Invitation or Solicitation letter
-
0-2 weeks
3.
Tender Close/Opening
-
same date
4.
Evaluation and Submission of Report
-
0-1 week
5.
Award of Contract
-
0-1 week
6.
Contract Signature
-
1 week
7.
Delivery/Completion period
-
1-4 weeks
8.
Inspection and Acceptance
-
0-1 week
9.
Final Acceptance (works)
-
As per Contract
Consultancy Services
The procurement of consultancy services will include the following steps.
1.
Preparation of the Terms of Reference (TOR) to be approved by the Bank.
2.
Preparation of a cost estimate, to be approved by the Bank
3.
Advertising for expressions of interest (if appropriate) or preparation of the shortlist of
consultants.
4.
Preparation and issue of the Request for Proposals (RFP), including:

Letter of Invitation (LOI);

Information to Consultants (ITC);

Draft contract.
5.
Receipt of proposals.
6.
Evaluation of technical proposals in accordance with the evaluation criteria stated in the
RFP.
7.
Evaluation of financial proposals.
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8.
Final evaluation according to the criteria stated in the RFP.
9.
Negotiations and Award of the contract to the selected firm.
These procedures and guidelines are based on the standard QCBS process of selection other
selection methods will be used in appropriate circumstances in accordance with the Bank
guidelines.
Timelines
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Terms of Reference (TOR)
IDA ―No Objection‖ for TOR
Request for Expression of Interest (REOI)
EOI Analyses (report) and Short list
IDA‘s ―No Objection‖ on short-list
Letter of Invitation
Submission and opening of Technical Proposal
Technical Evaluation Report
―No Objection‖ from the World Bank on Technical
Evaluation Report
Opening of Financial proposals
Final Combined Technical & Financial Evaluation
Report
Minutes of Negotiations and draft negotiation contract ―No objection‖ from IDA for the Minutes of Negotiation
and draft negotiated contract
Contract award letter
Publication of the contract award information
-
6.10
3-6 weeks
0.5-2 weeks
Minimum 2 weeks
1-2 weeks
0.5-2 weeks
1-2 weeks
Min. 4 weeks, Max. 3 months
2-3 weeks
0.5-2 weeks
1-2 weeks
1-2 weeks
1-2 weeks
0.5-2 weeks
0.5-1 weeks
1 week
Strengthening Procurement Capacity
To overcome the challenge of inadequate experience with procurement under a World Bank
project and to provide an appropriate level of support and oversight to other beneficiary
agencies, the MOE and GES shall be responsible for procurement issues under the project. The
Ministry of Education and Ghana Education Service, including all the proposed implementing
institutions/schools will be augmented with capacity training to ensure the existence of required
capacity for smooth project implementation. MOE and GES will organize a number of practical
procurement training sessions to ensure that participating beneficiary institutions/schools (i)
understand the guidelines for procurement and planning of their needs under the project; (ii)
implement procurement activities efficiently to help achieve set targets in a timely manner; and
(iii) monitor and evaluate procurement actions being implemented and associated outputs. The
Project will therefore:
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019

Identify specific capacity gaps within the MOE and GES including all beneficiary
institutions/schools.

Develop and implement a focused capacity building programme to address the identified
capacity gaps.

Organize procurement training workshops by first quarter of project implementation, to
explain/train/raise awareness of relevant project procurement procedures and
responsibilities within implementation agencies.

Conduct close monitoring of procurement plans on a monthly basis and closely monitor
and exercise quality control on all aspects of the procurement process, including
evaluation, selection, award and delivery.
6.11
Procurement Reports
Each beneficiary agency will be required to submit Quarterly Procurement Reports to the MOE
and GES Procurement Team. These reports will be compiled by the Procurement Team for the
preparation of the Quarterly Project Management Report (PMR). The procurement reports will
be submitted in a tabular format providing the following information:
i.
Activity number (the same as that in the Approved Work Plan and Budget);
ii.
Description of Activity;
iii.
Rationale (the output to which the activity is contributing);
iv.
Performance Indicator (original for Activity);
v.
Revised Performance Indicator (if any);
vi.
Status of Implementation
vii.
Updated Procurement Plan (with dates and information of actual procurement activities)
viii.
Summary Table of Procurement execution under each category (Goods, Works, NonConsulting Services, and Consulting Services) in terms of total numbers and amounts (for
―Completed Contracts‖, ―On-going Contracts‖, ―Pre-Contract Procurement Stage‖,
―Procurement yet to be initiated).
NB: Borrower shall also submit to the Bank for comments and advice Procurement Progress
Reports a week before start of implementation support missions.
6.12
Contract Management
In all cases, the Project Coordinator at the Ministry of Education will ensure that beneficiary
agencies give the IDA and other financing donor agencies the opportunity to comment on draft/
final reports.
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6.12.1 Contract Management and Expenditure Reports
Effective management of contracts is essential to ensure that the objectives of the procurement
process are achieved and that all contractual obligations and activities are completed efficiently
by both parties to the contract. The Procurement Team or the Technical team concerned must
ensure that routine monitoring of all current contracts is maintained so that swift remedial
measures can be taken when problems arise, or preventive action taken when problems are
foreseen.
6.12.2 Contract Supervision and Administration
Contract supervision, administration and monitoring shall be led by the Procurement Manager
designated in the respective contract whose team shall comprise the relevant technical team, the
procurement team and relevant beneficiaries/stakeholders.
This will ensure that potential
problems are identified as early as possible, and allow the Service Providers to be notified in
writing requesting rectification of any deficiencies in required performance standards.
A
reporting template for supervision consultants is attached as Annex 22.
6.12.3 Payment for Consultant Services
For release of any advance payment or subsequent invoices approved by the Head of Entity, the
Head of the Procurement Unit will complete a Payment advice and forward to the Accounts
department. They must ensure the deduction of any advance payments already made, and any
contractual penalties incurred by the Service Provider.
6.12.4 Resolution of Contractual Disputes
Most minor disputes may be resolved by discussion and agreement between the Project (led by
the Project Coordinator or the designated Project Manager in the respective contract) and the
Service Provider to rectify the cause of complaint.
Any formal written complaints received from a Service Provider should be fully investigated and
referred to the Head of the Procurement Entity to authorize correspondence or formal
negotiations with the Consultant. If there is no resolution to the issue, then arbitration may be
sought according to the provisions in the contract. The Ghana Public Procurement Act 663
Section on Resolution as well as the Bank Guidelines will be applicable at all times.
6.12.5 Contract Amendment
Contract amendment may become necessary as a result of the resolution of disputes, additional
or reduced requirements by the Procurement Entity, agreements to extend the time schedule, or
from accepted increases or decreases in prices, replacement of personnel. The contract may also
allow the Procurement Entity to modify contract values by a pre-determined contingency
percentage when this is in the public interest and essential for the work of the Procurement
Entity. All such changes in the contract in accordance with Bank Guidelines after evaluation and
recommendation by the implementing agency will formally be sent to the approving authority
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(NB. Post Review-Country System; Prior Review-Bank), for review and clearance and the
contract shall be formally Amended in the form of Addendum or Variation/Change Orders as
applicable to the type procurement category.
6.13
Ethics, Code of Conduct, Procurement under the Project
All procurement entities as well as bidder and service providers i.e. suppliers, contractors and
consultants shall observe the highest standard of ethics during the procurement and execution of
contracts financed under the project. This must be in accordance with paragraph 1.14 and 1.18 of
the Procurement Guidelines and paragraph 1.22 and 1.23 of the Consultants Guidelines, in
addition to the relevant Articles of the Ghana Public Procurement Act which refers to Ethics,
Fraud, Coercion, Corruptions and Conflict of interest.
In addition to the above, the general code of ethics in public procurement identifies three main
categories as follows:
a) Confidence in the public procurement process;
b) Professionalism of employees;
c) Quality of execution.
To accomplish these goals, the project expects the fundamental basic principles of impartiality,
independence and integrity to apply, and should be followed at all times. This means that:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
No suspicion of conflict of interest should be existent;
Perceived corrupt practice should be immediately reported;
No impression should be given that actions will be influenced by a gift or favour;
Dealings with bidders must be honest, fair and even-handed.
All implementing entities‘ employees involved directly or indirectly in the procurement process
are subject to the following:
a) They shall not engage in personal, business or professional activity nor hold a financial
interest that conflicts with the duties and responsibilities of their position.
b) They shall not solicit, accept or agree to accept any gratuity for themselves, their families
or others, which results in personal gain, and which may affect their impartiality in making
decisions on the job.
c) They shall not directly or indirectly use, take, dispose of, nor allow the use, taking or
disposing of any property or resources belonging to any Contracting Authority.
6.13.1 Conflict of Interest
Bank policy requires that a firm participating in a procurement process under Bank-financed
projects shall not have a conflict of interest. Any firm found to have a conflict of interest shall be
ineligible for award of a contract.
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A firm shall be considered to have a conflict of interest in a procurement process if:
(a)
such firm is providing goods, works, or non-consulting services resulting from or directly
related to consulting services for the preparation or implementation of a project that it
provided or were provided by any affiliate that directly or indirectly controls, is controlled
by, or is under common control with that firm. This provision does not apply to the various
firms (consultants, contractors, or suppliers) which together are performing the contractor‘s
obligations under a turnkey or design and built contract17 ; or
(b)
such firm submits more than one bid, either individually or as a joint venture partner in
another bid, except for permitted alternative bids. This will result in the disqualification of
all bids in which the Bidder is involved. However, this does not limit the inclusion of a firm
as a subcontractor in more than one bid. Only for certain types of procurement, the
participation of a Bidder as a subcontractor in another bid may be permitted subject to the
Banks‘ no objection and as allowed by the Bank‘s Standard Bidding Documents applicable
to such types of procurement; or
(c)
such firm (including its personnel) has a close business or family relationship with a
professional staff of the Borrower (or of the project implementing agency, or of a recipient
of a part of the loan) who: (i) are directly or indirectly involved in the preparation of the
bidding documents or specifications of the contract, and/or the bid evaluation process of
such contract; or (ii) would be involved in the implementation or supervision of such
contract unless the conflict stemming from such relationship has been resolved in a manner
acceptable to the Bank throughout the procurement process and execution of the contract;
or
(d)
such firm does not comply with any other conflict of interest situation as specified in the
Bank‘s Standard Bidding Documents relevant to the specific procurement process.
6.13.2 Fraud and Corruption
It is the Bank‘s policy to require that Borrowers (including beneficiaries of Bank loans), bidders,
suppliers, contractors and their agents (whether declared or not), sub-contractors, subconsultants, service providers or suppliers, and any personnel thereof, observe the highest
standard of ethics during the procurement and execution of Bank-financed contracts18 . In
pursuance of this policy, the Bank:
(a)
defines, for the purposes of this provision, the terms set forth below as follows:
(i)
17
―corrupt practice‖ is the offering, giving, receiving or soliciting, directly or indirectly,
of anything of value to influence improperly the actions of another party19 ;
See paragraph 2.4.
18
In this context, any action to influence the procurement process or contract execution for undue advantage is
improper.
For the purpose of this sub-paragraph, ―another party‖ refers to a public official acting in relation to the procurement process
or contract execution. In this context, ―public official‖ includes World Bank staff and employees of other organizations taking or
reviewing procurement decisions.
19
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
(ii) ―fraudulent practice‖ is any act or omission, including a misrepresentation, that
knowingly or recklessly misleads, or attempts to mislead, a party to obtain a
financial or other benefit or to avoid an obligation 20 ;
(iii)
―collusive practice‖ is an arrangement between two or more parties designed to
achieve an improper purpose, including to influence improperly the actions of another
party21 ;
(iv) ―coercive practice‖ is impairing or harming, or threatening to impair or harm, directly
or indirectly, any party or the property of the party to influence improperly the actions
of a party22 ;
(v)
―obstructive practice‖ is
(aa)
deliberately destroying, falsifying, altering or concealing of evidence material
to the investigation or making false statements to investigators in order to
materially impede a Bank investigation into allegations of a corrupt,
fraudulent, coercive or collusive practice; and/or threatening, harassing or
intimidating any party to prevent it from disclosing its knowledge of matters
relevant to the investigation or from pursuing the investigation, or
(bb)
acts intended to materially impede the exercise of the Bank‘s inspection and
audit rights provided for under paragraph 1.16(e) of the procurement
guidelines.
(b)
will reject a proposal for award if it determines that the bidder recommended for award, or
any of its personnel, or its agents, or its sub-consultants, sub-contractors, service providers,
suppliers and/or their employees, has, directly or indirectly, engaged in corrupt, fraudulent,
collusive, coercive or obstructive practices in competing for the contract in question;
(c)
will declare mis-procurement and cancel the portion of the loan allocated to a contract if it
determines at any time that representatives of the Borrower or of a recipient of any part of
the proceeds of the loan engaged in corrupt, fraudulent, collusive, coercive or obstructive
practices during the procurement or the implementation of the contract in question,
without the Borrower having taken timely and appropriate action satisfactory to the Bank to
address such practices when they occur, including by failing to inform the Bank in a timely
manner at the time they knew of the practices;
(d)
will sanction a firm or individual, at any time, in accordance with prevailing Bank‘s
sanctions procedures23 , including by publicly declaring such firm or individual ineligible,
For the purpose of this sub-paragraph, ―party‖ refers to a public official; the terms ―benefit‖ and ―obligation‖ relate to the
procurement process or contract execution; and the ―act or omission‖ is intended to influence the procurement process or contract
execution.
20
For the purpose of this sub-paragraph, ―parties‖ refers to participants in the procurement process (including public officials)
attempting either themselves, or through another person or entity not participating in the procurement or selection process, to
simulate competition or to establish bid prices at artificial, non competitive levels, or are privy to each other‘s bid prices or other
conditions.
21
22
For the purpose of this sub-paragraph, ―party‖ refers to a participant in the procurement process or contract execution.
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either indefinitely or for a stated period of time: (i) to be awarded a Bank-financed contract;
and (ii) to be a nominated24 sub-contractor, consultant, supplier or services provider of an
otherwise eligible firm being awarded a Bank-financed contract;
(e)
will require that a clause be included in bidding documents and in contracts financed by a
Bank loan, requiring bidders, suppliers and contractors, and their sub-contractors, agents,
personnel, consultants, service providers or suppliers, to permit the Bank to inspect all
accounts, records and other documents relating to the submission of bids and contract
performance, and to have them audited by auditors appointed by the Bank; and
(f)
will require that, when a Borrower procures goods, works or non-consulting services
directly from a United Nations (UN) agency in accordance with paragraph 3.10 of the
procurement Guidelines under an agreement signed between the Borrower and the UN
agency, the above provisions of paragraph 1.16 regarding sanctions on fraud or corruption
shall apply in their entirety to all suppliers, contractors, service providers, consultants, subcontractors or sub-consultants, and their employees that signed contracts with the UN
agency. As an exception to the foregoing, sub-paragraphs 1.16(d) and (e) will not apply to
the UN agency and its employees, and sub-paragraph 1.16(e) will not apply to the contracts
between the UN agency and its suppliers and service providers. In such cases the UN
agencies will apply their own rules and regulations for investigating allegations of fraud or
corruption subject to such terms and conditions as the Bank and the UN agency may agree,
including an obligation to periodically inform the Bank of the decisions and actions taken.
The Bank retains the right to require the Borrower to invoke remedies such as suspension
or termination. UN agencies shall consult the Bank‘s list of firms and individuals
suspended or debarred. In the event a UN agency signs a contract or purchase order with a
firm or an individual suspended or debarred by the Bank, the Bank will not finance the
related expenditures and will apply other remedies as appropriate.
With the specific agreement of the Bank, a Borrower may introduce, into bid forms for contracts
financed by the Bank, an undertaking of the bidder to observe, in competing for and executing a
contract, the country's laws against fraud and corruption (including bribery), as listed in the
bidding documents25 . The Bank will accept the introduction of such undertaking at the request of
23
A firm or individual may be declared ineligible to be awarded a Bank financed contract upon: (i) completion of
the Bank‘s sanctions proceedings as per its sanctions procedures, including inter alia cross-debarment as agreed with
other International Financial Institutions, including Multilateral Development Banks, and through the application the
World Bank Group corporate administrative procurement sanctions procedures for fraud a nd corruption; and (ii) as a
result of temporary suspension or early temporary suspension in connection with an ongoing sanctions proceeding.
See footnote 14 and paragraph 8 of Appendix 1 of these Guidelines.
24
A nominated sub-contractor, consultant, manufacturer or supplier, or service provider (different names are used
depending on the particular bidding document) is one which has either been: (i) included by the bidder in its pre qualification application or bid because it brings specific and critical experience and know-how that allow the bidder
to meet the qualification requirements for the particular bid; or (ii) appointed by the Borrower.
25
As an example, such an undertaking might read as follows: ―We undertake that, in competing for (and, if the
award is made to us, in executing) the above contract, we will strictly observe the laws against fraud and corruption
in force in the country of the [Purchaser] [Employer], as such laws have been listed by the [Purchaser] [Employer]
in the bidding documents for this contract.‖
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the Borrowing country, provided the arrangements governing such undertaking are satisfactory
to the Bank.
Implementing entities shall reject a tender, or a request to participate, if:
a)
The bidder or candidate gives, or promises to give, directly or indirectly, to any current
officer a gratuity in any form, an employment or any other good or service of value, as an
inducement with respect to an act or decision of, or procedure followed by, the entity in
connection with the awarding procedure.
b)
The bidder or candidate is in circumstances of conflict of interest. Such rejection and the
reasons therefore shall be recorded in procurement proceedings and promptly communicated
officially to the candidate or bidder concerned, with a copy to the Bank. The decision may
be subject to judicial review under the Ghana Public Procurement Act. Decisions taken by
the implementing entity are without prejudice of any obligation to file a complaint with the
prosecuting authorities, when the action concerned is considered a criminal offence under
criminal law.
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7. INFORMATION EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION (IEC)
The Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP) will employ a communications strategy
to respond to issues that target groups may raise on the design, implementation, monitoring and
evaluation of the project. The strategy identifies the following media tools for deployment:
community radio, print media, social networks and monitoring websites. The justification for a
communications strategy is in part borne out of the public misunderstanding prior to the
Parliamentary approval of the SEIP. The Ministry of Education and the Ghana Education
Service would like to ensure that information and messages on the SEIP are readily available and
consistent to prevent the key messages from being subsumed by peripheral messages and to
ensure that key stakeholders have the correct information at all times.
7.1 Target Audience
The target of such messages would be but not restricted to the following:
i. Beneficiary SHSs including teaching, non-teac
ii. hing and other stakeholders at the school level
iii. Beneficiary Districts including District Education Officials, District Assembly Officials,
unit committee members, community members, schools, opinion leaders as well as other
stakeholders at the District level
iv. The general public
7.2 Types of Messages
The scope of messages will comprise the following information: (i) the objectives, components
and expected results of the SEIP; (ii) implementation process and update for eg. Selection of
beneficiary Districts and schools; (iii) monitoring and evaluation requirements for eg. Updates
on the website; (iv) social and environmental safeguard requirements and decisions; (v) financial
management and procurement information and updates, (vi) achievements and challenges of
implementation; and (vii) responding to questions and queries from stakeholders.
7.3 Media for Dissemination
The full list of beneficiary Districts for new construction and SHSs for facilities improvement
and for quality improvement will be published in the print media and on the MOE and GES
websites. The implementation progress in each district will also be discussed in English and the
local languages on community radio with programs in at least each quarter of implementation.
The notice boards in the District Education Office and the District Assembly will provide a full
outline of the funds allocated in each quarter for construction, facilities improvement, quality
improvement, school performance partnerships, scholarships etc.
At the Beneficiary School level, the construction and facilities plan as well as the types of quality
improvement being undertaken, the costs, roles and responsibilities and time lines will also be
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circulated on the notice board. The costed School Performance Partnership plan and schedule of
implementation as well as the names of scholarship recipients will also be made public.
7.4 School Mapping and Monitoring Website
Under the project a school mapping and school profile platform will be developed first and
foremost as a tool for information sharing about implementation at the school level. The
information tool will be managed at the national level but updated at all levels and hosted on a
website as part of the school mapping and school profile platform. This platform will have a user
interface in which the schools and other stakeholders can log-in with a password and input
information.
7.5 Implementation of Communications Strategy
A communication plan, roles and responsibilities and schedule for roll-out is attached in Table
7.1.
Table 7.1: SEIP Communications Plan
Activity
Purpose
Timing
Media and CSOs
Briefing with
Education Team
(including livestreaming)
Educate General Public on WBG
support to Education Sector, and
SEIP; correct miscommunication
and manage expectations
Parliamentary Approval;
Signing; Launch;
Implementation
MOE
Print Media;
Electronic Media
Project Signing
Provide detailed financial
information on SEIP
July 30, 2014
MOF; MOE
Public Signing;
Electronic and
Print Media
Parliamentary
Briefing
Discuss monitoring role of
Parliament
May 2014 – April 2015
MOE; MOF
Presentations
Provide concise information on
SEIP, correct miscommunication
and manage expectations
July 15
MOE
PIM, Website;
Print Media
Q&A
Answer all relevant questions;
correct miscommunication and
manage expectations
Sept. 2014 – Sept. 2019
MOE; WB
Website; Print
Media
Dissemination of
ISR and Aide
Memoire
Promote Social Accountability
and M&E
Sept. 2014
WB
Usual Channels
Project Launch
Highlight Implementation issues;
correct miscommunication and
manage expectations
MoE to determine
MOE
Public Launch;
Electronic and
Print Media
Development of
Communications
Strategy for SEIP
Ensure adequate communications
through project cycle; promote
social accountability; enhance
September-October 2014
MOE
SEIP Project
Implementation
Manual
Fact Sheet; FAQs
26
26
Responsibility
Remarks
FAQs and responses is attached in Annex 29.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
stakeholder participation; use
communication as a tool for
achieving desired objectives
District and
Community Level
Provide information on list of
beneficiary districts and schools;
fund allocation; etc.
Ongoing
District Director;
District
Assembly,
School Head
District Notice
Board,
Community
Radio
School Level
Post SPPP; Facilities and Quality
Improvement Plan; Scholarship
beneficiaries etc.
Ongoing
School Head
School Notice
Board; PTA and
School Board
Meetings
Funding
The dissemination of information about the SEIP and its implementation will be funded under
the project‘s component 2.
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8. Environmental and Social Management Framework
An Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF)27 and a Resettlement Policy
Framework (RPF)28 covering environmental, social, legal and institutional arrangements have
been developed to guide project implementation of the Secondary Education Improvement
Project. The ESMF and RPF provide guiding principles and procedures for mitigating identified
environmental and social impacts and risks as a result of implementing the project. The
Safeguards section of the Project Implementation Manual (PIM) summarizes the guidance to
project implementation operatives, beneficiary districts and senior secondary schools, contractors
and other stakeholders under the project.
Activities which the government plans to implement under the SEIP and which are likely to
trigger guidance from the designed and adopted Environment and Social Framework documents
include: (i) construction of 23 new senior high schools in districts which currently have no SHSs
and in districts which have SHSs but have high demand for SHS places; (ii) upgrading,
expansion and rehabilitation of 50 existing SHSs selected for facilities improvement; (iii) certain
activities implemented in 125 existing SHSs selected for quality improvement.
The construction of new SHSs will require land acquisition of 5 to 25 acres depending on the
future planned size of the SHS and the availability of land for education activities. SHSs which
run Agricultural Programs will require land for demonstration and practical teaching and those
which run Science Programs will require safe disposal of residual chemicals, etc. Schools which
run Vocational Programs may require sites for the mining of clay (ceramics for e.g.). Civil
works under the project will comprise classroom, science and ICT laboratory, library,
course/program facilities, headteacher‘s residence, staff residential flats, multipurpose hall and
sports area. Gender and disability facilities such as separate changing rooms and toilets and
access for persons for disability have also been considered.
Potential environmental and social concerns and impacts at the site-selection, pre-construction
and constructional stages include concerns about the siting of the SHS facilities in sacred groves
or burial grounds, on disputed land, in ecologically sensitive areas, or simply on land that has not
been fully agreed on by affected stakeholders. Construction phase impacts may include air
quality impact from dust generation of excavation, noise generation from construction activities,
public health and safety from unconsolidated material left at the construction site, occupational
health and safety effects on construction sites which may endanger site workers or passers-by
e.g. uncovered wells, non-disposal of construction materials etc.
To help identify and assess these potential environmental and social impacts associated with the
construction and renovation works, a subproject screening checklist must be completed by a
trained and technically competent person for each subproject work during the identification
stage. The Environmental Screening checklist is attached as Annex 23. The outcome of this
checklist form will inform the level of E&S assessment required prior to the actual construction
phase (EPA Form 1, ESIA, EMP, (A)RAP). Copies of the completed subproject screening forms
27
28
ESMF is available on MOE, GES and World Bank website.
RPF is available on MOE, GES and World Bank websites
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must be kept for records at either the national or/and district level. Any site specific ESIA, EMP,
(A)RAP that will be developed following the subproject screening stage will require consultation
with affected stakeholders and public disclosure in Country and Bank Infoshop prior to
commencement of works. As good practice an Environmental and Social Due Diligence
checklist form29 should be completed. A resettlement action plan screening form is attached as
Annex 25.
Mitigation measures may include selecting sites on unencumbered land and in ecologically
acceptable areas, agreeing with stakeholders on siting of SHS facilities, and proper planning of
SHS to ensure proper organization of facilities especially where facilities are being improved in
existing SHSs. In cases where people are inevitably affected through (i) relocation or loss of
shelter; (ii) loss of assets or access to assets; (iii) loss of income sources or means of livelihood,
the arrangements within the adopted RPF will be implemented to comply with both Country and
World Bank policies.
Other mitigation measures will include community sensitization and
involvement at all stages of implementation, site preparation and timing which must not leave
land susceptible to erosion, destruction of crops, staggering site clearing for school construction
facilities. The ESMF is appropriate for the following reasons:






Wide geographical area of intervention in all 10 regions of Ghana covering 23 districts
where new construction will be undertaken and 100 districts where senior secondary
schools facilities will be improved.
Duration of implementation will be five years from 2014 to 2019.
Cross sectoral involvement and scope covering various Ministries, Departments,
Agencies and Senior Secondary Schools at national, regional and district levels.
Site specific activities from land acquisition, land preparation, construction of school
facilities including water and sanitation—boreholes, solar energy, etc. Site specific
activities will be determined based on the location and situation of site.
Provides a site screening checklists in Annexes 23 and 24 of the PIM.
Is incorporated into the bidding documents for construction solicitation and also in
contracts to ensure mitigation action plans are costed and addressed.
In order to ensure proper management of the environmental and social concerns, responsibilities
and roles of focal persons, monitoring mechanisms, training and capacity building are detailed in
the ESMF and RPF. Oversight of SEIP implementation will be in the Ministry of Education
(MOE) with the Ghana Education Service providing their mandated implementation role for
service delivery. The institutional arrangements will facilitate environmental and social
soundness and sustainability. A Steering Committee and Project Management Team will be
established to coordinate and oversee implementation. The Project Management Team will
derive from the Project Implementation Committee at the national level and will assume project
control and monitor civil works executed in the four (4) zones of the country. The PMT will
include 2 environmental and social safeguards consultants; 1 procurement specialist (MOE); 1
technical advisor (MOE); 4 architects (FPMU + 3 others); 4 quantity surveyors (FPMU,
GETFund and 2 others); 4 civil engineers (FPMU + 3 others); 1 electrical engineer (on retainer
basis) and a Project management consultancy firm (providing other needed capacity). The
implementation and monitoring of the ESMF and RPF, the identification of affected persons and
29
See Environmental Screening Checklist attached in Annex 24.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
compensation levels, the payment of compensation and dispute resolution roles include the
Project Management Team, the District Education Office, the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA), and the Project Steering Committee. A draft TOR for the safeguards consultant is
attached as Annex 26.
8.1 Institutional Arrangements, Responsibilities and Project Oversight
A Steering Committee and Project Management Team of the MOE will be established to
coordinate and oversee implementation.
The Project Steering Committee (PSC) will:

Provide guidance on strategic, policy and implementation issues;

Coordinate activities of the ministries, agencies and other stakeholders involved in the
project implementation;

Review and approve annual work plans, budget and annual reports;

Review and discuss quarterly and annual project progress reports and make necessary
recommendations; and

Assess the progress towards achieving the project‘s objectives and take corrective action
if necessary.

Resolving cross-sectoral and issues above the Project Management Team.
The Technical Implementation Committee
The Technical Implementation Committee‘s main functions are to (i) assume project control, (ii)
monitor the actual construction of work executed; (iii) review complaints and claims on
safeguard issues; (iv) review reports submitted by the supervising consultant and Environmental
consultant and bring issues up to the Project Steering Committee for resolution; (v) liaise with
the District Education Offices and Assemblies to ensure their full participation in the supervision
and environmental and social management of the project; (vi) prepare and update the schedule of
activities/procurement plans to be executed under the project; (vii) vet claims submitted by the
consultants on behalf of the contractors; (viii) vet consultancy claims submitted by the
supervising consultants; (ix) agree on design modification to suit topography of the land; (x)
prepare bi-monthly briefs to the Ministerial leadership; (xi) follow up and ensure that contractors
and consultants are paid for properly prepared claims; (xii) review any recommendations for the
payment of fluctuations/variations and for advice to the PSC; (xiii) take over completed
structures and commission them for usage by the schools; and (xiv) accompany Ministerial
leadership on monitoring in the respective zones.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Figure 8.1: Organizational Framework for Environmental and Social Management
Project Steering
Committee
T echnical
Implementation
Committee
Environmental and
Social Mgt. T eam
District
Director of
Education
District
Environmental
Officer
District
Engineer
Environmental
Consultants
District
Planning
Officer
Land
Valuation
Board
Heads of
SHSs
The Environmental and Social Management Team
The Environmental and Social Management Team will coordinate all issues on environmental
and social safeguards. They will liaise with national level as well as with the district and schools
levels.
The Environmental and Social Management Team will include the following:








2 environmental and social safeguards consultants
1 procurement specialist (MOE)
1 technical advisor (MOE)
architects (FPMU + 3 others)
quantity surveyors (FPMU, GETFund and 2 others)
civil engineers (FPMU + 3 others)
1 electrical engineer (on retainer basis
Project management consultancy firm (providing the others)
The two environment consultants to be recruited as part of the PMT will be required as part of
their TOR to strengthen the capacity of the district and school level officials.
The roles, focal persons and jurisdiction on environmental and social safeguards are outlined in
Table 8.1.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Table 8.1 Organization and Focal Persons for Environmental and Social Safeguards
Organization
Technical
Implementation
Team
(National Level)
Role
Responsible for
implementing various
activities required for
safeguard compliance
under the ESMF and
RPF.
Environmental
and Coordinate to ensure
Social Management effective
Team
implementation of all
(National Level)
agreed
Safeguard
arrangements.
District Level
Responsible for project
implementation in
collaboration with the
beneficiary
communities as well as
site screening and
reporting to the DEOC.
School Level
Responsible for school
sub-project
implementation in
collaboration with
district level and
reporting to District
Director of Education
Focal Person
Project Coordinator
Jurisdiction
Ministry of Education
Environmental
and Ministry of Education
Social
Management
Focal Person
District
Beneficiary Districts
Environmental/Soc
ial
Officer/District
Directors
of
Education
School Head
Beneficiary Schools
The Role at the District Level
The District Director for Education will coordinate efforts at the district level and will liaise with
the Districts Assembly to address safeguard issues during project implementation. The District
Assemblies (DAs) are empowered under Act 462 of 1993 to be responsible for the development,
improvement and management of human settlements and the environment in their districts. In
order to facilitate the work of the District Assembly in this regard, the District Education
Oversight Committee (DEOC) which has the District Director of Education as secretary and the
Municipal Chief Executive (MCE) or the District Chief Executive (DCE) chairing will provide
steering on safeguards issues. The DEOC membership includes the (i) District Environmental
Officer; (ii) District Engineer; (iii) District Planner; and (iv) representative from the Land
Valuation Division of the Lands Commission. The District Environmental/Social Officer will be
responsible for site screening and reporting under the guidance of the Environmental Consultant
at the national level. There will be the need for capacity building at all levels to ensure that
environmental and social safeguards issues are clearly understood and roles of various players
are clearly outlined. The District Engineer will lead in the monitoring and supervision of
contractors both for new construction and facilities improvement of SHSs and will recommend
the signing of work certificates against work done.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
The Role of the School Level
At the school level, the school head will be responsible for all school level sub-project and will
ensure that siting for facilities improvement is done according to the overall physical plan of the
school. S/he will coordinate with the School Board and the PTA on issues relating to
environmental and social safeguards and report to the District Director of Education on these
issue.
8.2 Capacity Building for Environmental and Social Management
Project specific training will be organized for the safeguards team within the PSC at the national
level and the District Directors of Education/Planners at the District level to increase awareness
of agreed safeguard arrangements for the project and introduce delegates to the E&S subproject
screening checklist and due diligence forms.
8.3 Cost of Implementation
The cost of ESMF implementation for the duration of three years is estimated at GHC1,657,520
(approx. US$635,000). This will be funded under component 2.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
ANNEX 1: PROJECT RESULTS FRAMEWORK
Project Development Objective (PDO): The project development objective is to increase access to senior secondary education in underserved districts and
improve quality in low-performing senior high schools in Ghana.
Indicator
Indicator One:
Increase in T ransition
Rates from JHS3 to
SHS1 in targeted
districts
Indicator Two:
Increase in SHS
educational
attainment within the
two poorest quintiles
in targeted districts
(disaggregated by
gender)
Indicator Three:
WASSCE
achievement of 6
credits and above
Core
GHANA: Secondary Education Improvement Project (P145741)
Unit of
Measure
Percentage
Baseline
Cumulative Target Values
2014 30
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
28%31
T BD
T BD
T BD
T BD
33%
Estimated at
Percentage
Male: 10%
Estimated at 8% for
the 106 lowest
performing
schools(disaggregate
Me thodology
T BD
T BD
T BD
T BD
Male:15%
EMIS
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
End of
Project
Population and
Housing Census
(2010), GLSS 6
(2013) and end
line survey
measuring the
highest level of
education
completed by 1921 year-olds
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
HQ; GSS
Female:13%
T otal:10%
T otal:12%
T otal:14%
WAEC/
Annual
T otal:8%
T otal:8%
Male: T BD
Male: T BD
Male: T BD
Re sponsibility
for Data
Colle ction
Annual
Estimated at
Female: 8%32
Percentage
Data Source /
Fre que ncy
EMIS Annual
WASSCE league
MoE (PBME);
WAEC
30
Baseline data will be established once the beneficiary districts and schools are selected.
Baseline data currently based on 50 districts with lowest transition rates. Data will be updated once districts are selected.
32
Based on the Population and Housing Census data for the three regions in the North.
31
113
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
within beneficiary
schools
(disaggregated by
gender)
Indicator Four:
Direct project
beneficiaries
(students, teachers,
institutional leaders)
(disaggregated by
gender)
d baseline by gender
not yet available)
Male: T BD
Male: T BD
Female: T BD
Female: T BD
Female: T BD
Female: T BD
Female: T BD
table
MoE,
Male: 0
Number
T BD
T BD
T BD
T BD
150,000
Annual
Female: 0
Independent
Verification end
line Survey
Report
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
HQ
Intermediate-level Results Indicators
Component 1: Support to Increase Access with Equity and Quality in SHS
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
Intermediate Result
Indicator One:
New (additional) SHS
seats created and
utilized by SHS
students in the
targeted schools
Number
0
0
0
5,000
15,000
15,000
Annual
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
Annual
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
(cumulative)
Intermediate Result
Indicator Two:
Increase in seats
created and utilized
within low performing
beneficiary SHS
schools (cumulative)
Number
0
500
1,000
3,000
5,000
10,000
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Intermediate Result
Indicator Three:
Scholarships are
distributed to low
income students in the
participating districts
and schools
(cumulative)
Number
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
10,000
10,000
Annual
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE,
PBME,SRIMPR,
GES
Annual
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR, GES
Annual
School
Registry/
EMIS
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR; GES
Annual
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR, GES
Pillar 2: Improve Quality in low-performing senior high schools
Intermediate Result
Indicator One:
T eachers participating
in training to upgrade
or acquire new skills
in Mathematics or
Science (cumulative)
Number
Mathematics
Number
Science
Mathematics: 0
Science: 0
Mathematics:
0
Mathematics:
120
Mathematics:
240
Mathematics:
360
Mathematics:
360
Science: 0
Science: 100
Science: 250
Science: 500
Science: 500
T BD
T BD
T BD
T BD
T BD
Cumulative
Intermediate Result
Indicator Two:
Increase in
completion rates in
targeted schools
(disaggregated by
gender)
Percentage
T BD
Intermediate Result
Indicator Three:
Number of
Performance
Partnerships for
Learning with
beneficiary SHSs
established
(cumulative)
Number
0
0
80
100
125
125
115
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Intermediate Result
Indicator Four:
SHS ICT packages
implemented in
beneficiary schools
(cumulative)
Number
0
0
70
125
125
125
Annual
M&E Report,
Web-based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR, GES,
NIT A
Annual
M&E Report,
Web-based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR, GES
M&E Report
Web based
school
monitoring
MoE, PBME,
SRIMPR, GES
Component 2: Management, Research and Monitoring and Evaluation
Intermediate Result
Indicator One:
Monitoring system
established and
functioning to
annually track data
and publish
information on all
SHS schools in Ghana
Yes/No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Intermediate Result
Indicator Two:
Research and Sector
analyses conducted to
inform elaboration of
Secondary Education
Strategy (cumulative)
Number
0
0
1
2
3
5
116
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
ANNEX 2: PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
CONSRUCTION
E-Block (Multi-Purpose)
8 – unit Block of Staff Flats
117
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Canteen Block
Headmaster‘s Bungalow
Security Gate House
118
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
Technical Block
Vocational Block
119
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
ANNEX 3: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR PROJECT
STEERING COMMITTEE (PSC)
Functions
The Project Steering Committee (PSC) is responsible for providing high- level oversight and
guidance to facilitate inter-divisional co-ordination for implementation. The Project Steering
Committee shall be responsible for; inter alia
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
Providing strategic guidance and overseeing Project Implementation
Reviewing and approve progress made in project implementation, including
activity level outputs, financial status, and reporting against the Disbursement
Linked Results and the Results Framework
Oversee disbursements
Facilitating the prompt resolution of implementation challenges & obstacles
(v)
(vi)
Coordinate and harmonize activities of agencies involved in project implementation.
Review and approve annual work plans and reports.
(vii)
Other functions as they arise
(viii)
(ix)
(x)
(xi)
(xii)
(xiii)
(xiv)
(xv)
(xvi)
(xvii)
(xviii)
(xix)
(xx)
(xxi)
(xxii)
List of members
The Hon. Minister - Chairperson
The Hon Deputy Minister (Pre-Tertiary)- Vice Chairman
The Chief Director
The Minister of Finance/His Representative
The Administrator of the GETFund/His Representative
The Director-General of the Ghana Education Service (GES)
The Director of Finance of the MOE
The Conference of Heads of Assisted Schools (CHASS)
The Project Co-ordinator
The Head of the Civil Works Team
The Head of the Quality & Outcomes Team
Regional Representative of the Ministry of Education
District Representative of the Ministry of Education
The PSC, at its discretion, shall invite other project staff to attend meetings as observers. The
role of the PSC is to provide implementation oversight. Its responsibilities are to:
Frequency of meeting
The Project Steering Committee shall meet once in a quarter to review the progress of project
implementation and discuss issues raised by the Technical Implementation Committee or as
often as issues warrant it to.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
TABLE A3.1:
S/No
RESPONSIBILITY M ATRIX OF PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE (PSC)
TITLE
RESPONSIBILITY
1
Hon. Minister
Chairs PSC meetings and gives approval to
implementation issues on the advice of the PSC. Briefs the
Presidency on the project status at regular intervals.
2
Hon. Dep.
Minister( P/T)
Chairs PSC meetings in the absence of the Hon. Minister.
3
4
5
6
S/No
7
Convener of meetings of the PSC; Reports to the PSC on
behalf of the Technical Implementation Committee (TIC).
Facilitates the resolution of any implementation challenges
between MOE and other Agencies /Ministries. Ensures that
Chief Director
the Ghana Audit Service conducts an audit of the Project
Financial Statements as part of the MOE Annual Audit and
ensures that the reports are submitted to the Bank and
Parliament in a timely manner.
Coordinator of all project activities as elaborated in the
Project Appraisal Document. Ensures that project is
implemented in accordance with the Project
Implementation Manual (PIM). Reports to the Chief
Director, he supports the Project Civil Works Team
Project
(PCWT) and Project Quality and Outcomes Team (PQOT).
Coordinator
Convener/ Secretary of meetings of the TIC; convenes
meetings for the PCWT and PQOT; Prepares Project
Status Reports for PSC meetings; Ensures that
measurement and evaluation of DLR’s are carried out
from September to December each year.
Ensures that all reports from Supervising Consultants are
available in a timely manner and prepares a report on civil
works activities as defined in the PIM; Organises
Head, Civil
monitoring to verify reported status of all civil works; Vets
Works Team
certificates and claims submitted by the Supervising
Consultants; Facilitates the preparation of upgrading
documents and all tendering issues.
Supervises all activities related to Senior Secondary
Institutional Leadership and teacher training up to
Head, Quality monitoring and evaluation. Will provide a status report on
and
project implementation by activity with description on
Outcomes
outputs and outcomes achieved at the school and district
Team
levels; provides status report on progress made on all
PDO and intermediate level indicators specified in the
results framework.
TITLE
Director
General, GES
RESPONSIBILITY
Facilitates the execution of all activities related to Senior
Secondary Institutional Leadership and teacher training;
preparation of School Performance Partnerships (SPP’s);
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
8
Regional
Directors
9
District
Directors
S/No
TITLE
10
CHASS
President
11
Selected SHS
resourcing of schools for quality improvements;
improvements of Senior Secondary School programs, ICT
interventions and M & E.
Coordinate and supervise all school-level activities. The
Regional Coordinating Council (RCC) will also monitor
various projects in Senior High Schools in their regions.
(i) work with the District Education Oversight Committees
(DEOC) to ensure that sites are ready for new SHS
construction; (ii) assist in undertaking the needs
assessment for selected Secondary Schools to benefit from
rehabilitation and other facilities and quality improvement;
(iii) assist in the preparation of detailed plans for
rehabilitation and other facilities improvement in selected
SHSs; (iv) assist in the dissemination of minimum
standards for SHS; (v) review facilities maintenance plan;
(vi) work with the Scholarship Administrator to apply
criteria for identifying needy and qualified students to
benefit from scholarships and other incentives; (vii) collate
SHS data for school mapping; review and validate SHS
online profile information and data on school performance;
(viii) lead activities on School Performance Partnership to
identify scope of needs; collate School Performance
Partnership plans for submission to GES; (ix) witness/sign
SPP MOU between SHS and the DEO; (x) participate in
consultative workshop to determine improved Science and
Mathematics curriculum; (xi) participate in roll-out of
training modules for science and mathematics; (xii) collate
ICT school improvement packages for selected SHS for
onward transmission to GES; and (xiii) establish
monitoring system to track information on SHS in Ghana
RESPONSIBILITY
Facilitates the implementation of all directives issued by the
PSC to the various school Heads in consultation with the
District and Regional Directors.
(i) respond to needs assessmentrequest from MOE and
districts speedily; (ii) provide school site plans for
construction andrehabilitation of key facilities on the school
compound; (iii) participate in environmental andsocial
safeguards training; (iv) contribute to determining and
agreeing on minimum standards forSHS; (v) assist the
districts and Scholarship Administrator in identifying needy
and qualified students to benefit from scholarships and other
incentives; (vi) provide SHS data for school mapping;
review and validate online school profile information/data
about school performance; (vii)
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
12
13
14
MOE Director
of Finance &
Financial
Controller, GES
MOF
Representative
GETFund
Representative
provide data/information on school performance partnerships
and provide scope of needs for
quality improvement; (viii) sign SPP with DEO; (ix) identify
science, mathematics and ICTteachers to benefit from
science and mathematics training; (x) provide
data/information on scopeof ICT needs for quality
improvement; and (xi) provide all school level data requests
speedily;(xii) sensitize Governing Boards, PTA, and all
stakeholders on SEIP; and undertake enrollmentand
sensitization drives targeted at potential students from
catchment junior high schools.
Responsible for the projects’ compliance with all Financial
Management policies outlined in the PIM ;ensure timely
submission of Credit Withdrawal Applications and ensure that
the Bank’s fiduciary (Financial reporting and procurement
regulations) and requirements are followed.
Facilitates activities leading to draw down of project proceeds
in a timely manner.
Facilitate activities connected with any GOG funding.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
ANNEX 4: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR TECHNICAL
IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE
The Technical Implementation Committee (TIC) is responsible for the day-to-day oversight
of project implementation. It has two sub-components: Civil Works and Quality and
Outcomes.
The Civil Works Technical Team has the responsibility for:








ensuring that all civil works are procured according to the Guidelines in the Project
Implementation Manual (PIM) with regard to obtaining the necessary approvals;
ensuring the use of standard templates;
preparing bidding documents and overseeing procurement of supervision consultants
and civil works contractors;
managing/overseeing the supervision consultants‘ contracts to keep track of progress
of new construction, furniture and equipment provision and facilities improvements;
contributing to project monitoring and evaluation through random site visits, input to
and use of output of the school mapping and profiling platform; and submitting
relevant and timely data to the M&E team, wider TIC and PSC;
ensuring the Disbursement Linked Results relating to civil works are met and
verified on time;
managing/overseeing the independent verification firm who will be verifying the
Disbursement Linked Results relating to civil works; and
generally ensuring that all civil works contracts progress on schedule and the outputs
are to the highest quality.
The Quality and Outcomes Technical Team is responsible for





collaborating with the civil works team on educational matters relating to new
construction and facilities improvements; for example prioritization of facilities after
a needs assessment, establishment of relevant systems and inputs (staffing,
equipment) for opening of new schools;
implementing the Scholarships programme
implementing all aspects of Quality improvement in the beneficiary schools under the
project namely:
o School Performance Partnerships;
o Improvement in Science and Mathematics teaching and learning including
activities at the school level (under SPPs) and system-wide (e.g. training
materials, curriculum review as appropriate)
o Improvement in use of ICT for teaching and learning (through roll out of the
iCampus, information provision/advice to schools on other ICT purchases,
training)
implementing the School mapping exercise and combining it with a wider school
profile platform, combining data from EMIS, WAEC and other sources; organising
publication of the school profiles;
ensuring the Disbursement Linked Results relating to scholarships and quality
improvements are met and verified on time;
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019



Training for beneficiary schools as both orientation and detailed implementation
arrangements under the project;
Policy development;
oversight of all monitoring and evaluation under the project, and specifically
including:
o managing a website (linked to the school profile platform) on which
beneficiary schools submit reports via standard templates to track progress;
o conducting random visits to beneficiary schools and districts to verify progress
and sense-check reports;
o collate all data submitted by schools and collected from monitoring visits,
keep systematic records; submit relevant data to wider TIC, PSC and World
Bank;
o managing/overseeing the independent verification firm who will be verifying
the Disbursement Linked Results relating to in-school activities and school
mapping/profiling
o collating all DLR verification data/reports and submitting to the World Bank;
o collecting and reporting data for indicators in the Results Framework;
o planning and managing research projects including impact evaluation and
wider secondary education research agenda.
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SEIP PIM 2014-2019
ANNEX 5: DISTRICT AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SELECTION DATA
This annex provides the full data set used to select beneficiary districts and schools under the project.
DIS TRICT S ELECTION DATA
Districts were ranked according to a combined index involving three variables: demand for SHS, the population of the statutory SHS-aged cohort, and the poverty level of the district. The
districts with the highest rank when using the combined index – i.e. most in need of expansion of quality SHS – were given preference under the project.
For construction of new SHS, the 13 districts with no existing public SHS were prioritized – three of which are already receiving a new SHS under the Government‘s Community SHS
Programme (CSHSP) – leaving 10 to benefit under SEIP. Thirteen further districts were selected to receive new SHS, taking those with the highest rank which were not already receiving a new
SHS under CSHSP.
For existing schools to benefit, the first 100 districts according to the ranking which do contain a public SHS were chosen t o provide the pool of SHS to be eligible under the project.
TABLE A5.1:
RANKED DISTRICT SELECTION DATA BASED ON POVERTY CRITERIA
District
District
Code
Notes
Districts with no public SHS
Wa West
Sekyere Afram Plains
Wassa Amenfi Central
Bia East
Mion
Krachi Nchumuru
120
183
226
222
205
219
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Greater than 1
indicates excess
demand for SHS
1= greatest
unmet demand
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
Population of 1517 year olds 35
9,649
1,825
4,790
1,842
5,126
4,951
Population
Index
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
1= most
populated
1= greatest
poverty
1=greatest
poverty
1 = most in
need
0.07
0.00
0.03
0.00
0.03
0.03
0.32
0.32
0.30
0.30
0.28
0.26
0.88
0.89
0.79
0.80
0.69
0.64
0.74
0.72
0.70
0.70
0.68
0.67
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
33
Demand is calculated as the enrolment in JHS3/enrolment in SHS1 in 2013-14 from the 2013-14 EMIS. It includes enrolment in both public and private schools. A ratio of
greater than 1 implies excess demand: there are JHS leavers who do not move into SHS1 in the district. For example a ratio of 5 means for every 5 JHS leavers, only 1 is in
SHS1 in the districts. It means there are excess JHS leavers who could be absorbed into SHS in that district.
n/a refers to where districts had no SHS and therefore no enrolment (either public or private), which made the calculation impossible.
34
Indices are calculated as (value-minimum)/(maximu m-minimu m). This means that the highest value observed will have an index of 1.
35
Population of 15-17 year olds in 2013, from the GSS population projections based on the 2010 PHC.
36
Multi-dimensional poverty comes from the GSS using data from the 2010 PHC.
37
Combined index calculated as a combined average of the three indices, giving 50% weight to dema nd, 25% to poverty and 25% to population.
38
Districts in which the Government is already constructing a new SHS under the Community SHS Project are given a ‗1‘.
126
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
North Gonja
Kpone Katamanso
Pusiga
Awutu Senya East Municipal
Binduri
Adenta Municipal
Ga East Municipal
206
199
212
189
209
166
84
n/a
254.7
88.0
44.5
5.6
4.0
10.5
1.000
0.849
0.292
0.147
0.017
0.012
0.034
3,202
5,954
2,796
7,297
3,064
4,115
7,801
0.01
0.04
0.01
0.05
0.01
0.02
0.05
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.22
0.16
0.25
0.20
0.25
0.16
0.14
Districts with public SHS39
Upper Denkyira West
Kumasi Metropolis
Sene East
Kwahu Afram Plains North
Wa East
Kintampo South
Kwahu Afram Plains South
Pru
Offinso North
Gonja Central
Adaklu
Builsa South
Ahafo Ano South
Kintampo North Municipal
Atebubu Amantin
Ayensuano
Lambussie Karni
Sefwi Akontombra
Krachi East
East Gonja
Atwima Mponua
Accra Metropolis
Adansi South
Kasena Nankana West
Asunafo South
Wassa East
Kpandai
Ejura Sekye Dumasi
Sene West
Sekyere Central
Sawla-T una-Kalba
161
26
187
64
119
41
195
43
152
89
216
210
15
40
35
193
173
179
131
90
21
81
12
172
33
144
170
25
44
154
100
121.5
1.7
2.1
4.6
6.3
2.7
6.7
3.4
2.4
2.6
2.5
1.2
5.1
4.2
2.0
4.5
2.2
7.3
1.6
1.3
4.8
2.7
2.9
1.6
3.7
9.6
4.6
2.6
3.5
2.1
1.9
0.404
0.004
0.006
0.014
0.020
0.008
0.021
0.010
0.007
0.007
0.007
0.003
0.016
0.013
0.005
0.014
0.006
0.023
0.004
0.003
0.015
0.008
0.008
0.004
0.011
0.031
0.014
0.007
0.010
0.005
0.005
4,117
125,618
4,088
7,059
7,416
5,626
7,614
10,324
3,958
5,659
2,734
1,876
7,984
7,334
8,029
4,896
5,907
5,333
7,829
9,609
7,458
97,232
7,847
3,767
6,509
5,300
7,376
6,428
4,353
4,930
6,944
0.02
1.00
0.02
0.05
0.05
0.03
0.05
0.07
0.02
0.03
0.01
0.00
0.05
0.05
0.05
0.03
0.04
0.03
0.05
0.07
0.05
0.77
0.05
0.02
0.04
0.03
0.05
0.04
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.25
0.16
0.34
0.33
0.33
0.33
0.32
0.32
0.33
0.32
0.33
0.33
0.31
0.31
0.31
0.31
0.31
0.30
0.30
0.30
0.30
0.14
0.30
0.31
0.30
0.29
0.29
0.30
0.30
0.30
0.29
39
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.45
0.17
0.55
0.32
0.59
0.18
0.09
0.62
0.48
0.29
0.17
0.16
0.06
0.05
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
0.59
0.15
1.00
0.95
0.93
0.96
0.88
0.88
0.92
0.90
0.92
0.93
0.85
0.84
0.84
0.85
0.84
0.81
0.82
0.81
0.80
0.08
0.79
0.83
0.79
0.75
0.76
0.78
0.79
0.79
0.77
0.36
0.29
0.26
0.26
0.25
0.25
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Districts ranked from 1 to 100 were selected for their schools to be eligible for quality and facilities improvements under SEIP.
127
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
Bole
T ain
Asikuma-Odoben Brakwa
Aowin
Nkwanta North
Jirapa
Bia west
Upper West Akyem
Bodi
Bunkpurugu Yonyoo
North Tongu
Asutifi South
Ewutu Senya
T alensi
T ano South
Banda
Nkoranza North
Saboba
Garu T empane
Sekyere Kumawu
Ahafo Ano North
Bosome Freho
Wassa Amenfi East
Amansie Central
Nanumba North
Offinso Municipal
Bongo
Suaman
Asunafo North Municipal
Amansie West
Jaman North
Upper Manya
Nabdam
Nkoranza South
Dormaa West
Sissala West
Nanumba South
Kasena Nankana East
Ketu South
Gushiegu
Savelugu Nanton
Nzema East
Wassa Amenfi West
87
46
54
139
176
113
140
196
223
88
221
184
159
112
48
185
156
98
110
153
14
151
137
16
96
29
108
225
32
18
38
165
211
42
186
117
97
111
130
92
99
145
138
2.0
1.1
2.6
6.1
2.3
1.3
11.6
2.3
11.6
2.8
1.9
1.3
7.5
1.7
1.6
4.6
3.7
3.1
4.7
0.9
2.2
21.7
5.4
5.8
3.1
1.7
1.8
4.5
3.3
5.1
2.0
1.8
1.0
2.1
2.9
4.5
2.4
1.1
2.0
1.4
1.8
1.6
2.9
0.005
0.002
0.007
0.019
0.006
0.003
0.037
0.006
0.037
0.008
0.005
0.003
0.024
0.004
0.004
0.014
0.011
0.009
0.014
0.002
0.006
0.071
0.017
0.018
0.009
0.004
0.005
0.014
0.009
0.015
0.005
0.005
0.002
0.006
0.008
0.014
0.007
0.002
0.005
0.003
0.005
0.004
0.008
4,030
6,478
7,798
7,807
4,378
9,702
5,740
6,081
3,512
8,481
7,003
3,906
6,304
3,960
5,719
1,465
4,778
4,576
6,493
4,702
6,734
4,032
5,683
5,866
9,179
5,613
4,392
1,657
9,212
9,211
7,071
5,082
1,616
7,260
3,334
5,660
6,435
5,557
10,726
6,714
8,828
4,528
6,620
0.02
0.04
0.05
0.05
0.02
0.07
0.03
0.04
0.02
0.06
0.04
0.02
0.04
0.02
0.03
0.00
0.03
0.03
0.04
0.03
0.04
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.06
0.03
0.02
0.00
0.06
0.06
0.05
0.03
0.00
0.05
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.03
0.07
0.04
0.06
0.02
0.04
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.30
0.29
0.29
0.28
0.29
0.28
0.27
0.28
0.28
0.28
0.28
0.29
0.27
0.29
0.28
0.28
0.28
0.28
0.27
0.28
0.28
0.25
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.28
0.28
0.28
0.27
0.26
0.27
0.27
0.28
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.26
0.27
0.26
0.27
0.26
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.78
0.76
0.73
0.71
0.76
0.72
0.67
0.73
0.69
0.71
0.72
0.75
0.69
0.74
0.72
0.73
0.71
0.71
0.68
0.72
0.70
0.58
0.68
0.67
0.66
0.69
0.70
0.71
0.64
0.63
0.67
0.68
0.72
0.66
0.68
0.65
0.65
0.67
0.62
0.65
0.63
0.66
0.63
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.20
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.19
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.18
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
128
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
Adansi North
Assin North Municipal
Builsa North
T wifoAti Morkwa
Karaga
Agona East
Asante Akim South
Wenchi Municipal
T wifo Heman Lower Denkyira
Assin South
Bawku West
Daffiama Bussie
Juabeso
Upper Denkyira East Municipal
Nkwanta South
Akatsi North
Gomoa West
Mamprusi West
Agotime Ziope
Nadowli-Kaleo
Akyem Mansa
T echiman Municipal
Ekumfi
Prestea/Huni Valley
Sekyere South
T atale
Kwahu East
Krachi West
Zabzugu
Ningo Prampram
Birim South
Mampong Municipal
Lawra
Fanteakwa
Asante Akim North
West Akim Municipal
Central T ongu
West Gonja
Ahanta West
Chereponi
Yendi Municipal
Ajumako-Enyan-Essiam
Nandom
11
55
109
62
93
158
20
50
191
56
106
213
143
63
133
217
59
95
121
115
162
49
190
178
13
208
164
132
104
202
163
31
114
73
181
66
134
91
136
171
103
53
214
3.0
2.6
0.8
3.2
0.9
0.9
4.1
1.7
2.9
2.4
2.1
1.5
2.7
1.6
2.0
2.5
1.6
1.5
1.5
1.6
6.4
4.2
2.1
3.7
0.8
1.6
0.6
0.8
1.3
3.2
1.9
1.3
1.0
1.5
1.0
1.7
1.7
0.8
2.6
1.3
1.8
1.8
2.1
0.009
0.007
0.001
0.009
0.002
0.002
0.012
0.004
0.008
0.007
0.006
0.004
0.008
0.004
0.005
0.007
0.004
0.004
0.004
0.004
0.020
0.013
0.006
0.011
0.001
0.004
0.001
0.001
0.003
0.009
0.005
0.003
0.002
0.004
0.002
0.004
0.004
0.001
0.007
0.003
0.005
0.005
0.005
7,618
11,824
2,924
4,405
5,024
6,059
7,748
6,713
4,120
7,712
4,597
3,884
3,987
5,305
7,662
2,466
9,753
8,121
2,035
7,688
6,948
11,218
3,811
10,682
7,360
4,416
5,240
3,296
4,327
4,649
8,972
6,193
6,061
7,898
4,744
7,776
4,498
3,169
7,488
3,378
7,989
9,851
4,990
0.05
0.08
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.05
0.04
0.02
0.05
0.03
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.07
0.05
0.00
0.05
0.04
0.08
0.02
0.07
0.05
0.02
0.03
0.01
0.02
0.03
0.06
0.04
0.04
0.05
0.03
0.05
0.02
0.01
0.05
0.02
0.05
0.07
0.03
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.26
0.25
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.27
0.26
0.26
0.27
0.26
0.26
0.27
0.26
0.26
0.26
0.26
0.25
0.25
0.26
0.25
0.25
0.24
0.26
0.24
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.26
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.25
0.24
0.25
0.25
0.24
0.25
0.24
0.24
0.25
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.62
0.59
0.67
0.64
0.65
0.64
0.60
0.63
0.64
0.61
0.64
0.64
0.63
0.62
0.60
0.63
0.58
0.59
0.63
0.59
0.55
0.53
0.60
0.53
0.57
0.59
0.59
0.60
0.59
0.57
0.55
0.57
0.57
0.55
0.58
0.55
0.57
0.58
0.53
0.58
0.53
0.51
0.55
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
129
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
South T ongu
Abura-Asebu-Kwamankese
Jaman South
Ada West
Sefwi Wiawso
Ellembelle
Asutifi North
Sissala East
T ano North
Mpohor
Sefwi Bibiani-Ahwiaso Bekwai
Sekyere East
Atwima Kwanwoma
Birim North
Dormaa Central Municipal
Asokore Mampong Municipal
Biakoye
Kwahu South
Jomoro
Komenda-Edina-Egyafo-Abirem
Municipal
Jasikan
Afigya Kwabre
Sunyani West
Ada East
South Dayi
T echiman North
Atiwa
Shama
Suhum Municipal
Bekwai Municipal
Bolgatanga Municipal
Ketu North
Kumbumgu
Dormaa Municipal
Kadjebi
Gomoa East
Ejisu Juaben Municipal
Shai Osudoku
Bawku Municipal
Yilo Krobo
Keta Municapal
Akatsi
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
135
51
39
197
146
177
34
116
47
224
141
30
150
71
155
182
174
75
142
2.0
1.4
2.1
2.0
4.3
2.3
2.3
1.0
1.1
4.1
3.1
1.3
3.8
2.3
3.1
3.0
2.3
1.1
3.0
0.005
0.003
0.006
0.005
0.013
0.006
0.006
0.002
0.002
0.012
0.009
0.003
0.011
0.006
0.009
0.009
0.006
0.002
0.009
6,274
8,745
7,392
4,011
10,432
6,848
3,613
6,577
5,934
2,814
9,494
4,495
6,132
5,522
3,588
22,607
4,505
4,996
10,922
0.04
0.06
0.05
0.02
0.07
0.04
0.02
0.04
0.04
0.01
0.06
0.02
0.04
0.03
0.02
0.17
0.02
0.03
0.08
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.25
0.23
0.24
0.25
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.23
0.24
0.23
0.23
0.24
0.20
0.24
0.24
0.22
60
1.9
10,457
0.07
128
149
157
82
125
188
70
180
79
17
107
175
203
37
129
160
24
83
105
80
123
122
2.4
3.1
1.6
1.7
1.7
1.4
3.0
3.5
1.5
1.3
1.9
3.0
1.8
2.0
1.7
3.7
1.2
1.3
1.5
2.3
1.1
3.2
3,868
9,168
6,098
4,530
3,287
4,534
7,490
6,061
6,412
8,341
6,866
7,049
2,442
8,337
4,042
13,895
9,959
3,189
5,027
6,208
10,797
6,880
0.02
0.06
0.04
0.02
0.01
0.02
0.05
0.04
0.04
0.06
0.04
0.04
0.01
0.06
0.02
0.10
0.07
0.01
0.03
0.04
0.08
0.04
0.005
0.007
0.009
0.004
0.004
0.004
0.003
0.009
0.010
0.004
0.003
0.005
0.008
0.005
0.005
0.004
0.011
0.003
0.003
0.004
0.006
0.002
0.009
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.54
0.52
0.53
0.55
0.48
0.52
0.55
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.48
0.52
0.49
0.50
0.51
0.36
0.51
0.51
0.45
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.15
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
0.14
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
0.23
0.46
0.14
137
0.24
0.22
0.23
0.23
0.24
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.23
0.22
0.23
0.22
0.23
0.21
0.22
0.23
0.23
0.22
0.22
0.22
0.50
0.45
0.48
0.49
0.50
0.50
0.46
0.47
0.47
0.46
0.47
0.45
0.50
0.45
0.49
0.39
0.44
0.49
0.47
0.45
0.42
0.43
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.13
0.12
0.12
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
130
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
Akwapim South
Mfantsiman
Akwapem North
T olon
Birim Municipal
Mamprusi East
T amale Metropolis
Atwima Nwabiagya
Denkyembuor
Bosumtwi
Kwaebibirem
Mamprugu Moagduri
Kwahu West Municipal
Wa Municipal
Agona West Municipal
Afadzato South
Asante Akim Central Municipal
Berekum Municipal
T arkwa Nsuaem Municipal
East Akim Municipal
Kwabre East
Ga South Municipal
Ho West
Nsawam Adoagyiri Municipal
Asuogyaman
Lower Manya
Sekondi T akoradi Metropolis
Sagnerigu Municipal
Obuasi Municipal
Effutu Municipal
North Dayi
Ashaiman Municipal
Kpando Municipal
Ga West Municipal
Hohoe Municipal
Sunyani Municipal
Ga Central Municipal
Ledzokuku/Krowor Municipal
Cape Coast Metropolis
T ema Metropolis
La Nkwantanang Madina Municipal
Ho Municipal
New Juaben Municipal
192
61
67
102
72
94
101
22
194
23
74
204
76
118
52
215
19
36
148
65
27
168
218
68
69
77
147
207
28
57
220
167
124
85
127
45
198
169
58
86
201
126
78
0.4
1.4
0.6
1.8
1.4
2.1
1.6
1.4
2.3
2.7
2.5
0.7
3.1
1.4
2.5
2.9
1.3
1.4
3.2
0.9
1.2
2.4
1.2
1.9
0.8
0.8
1.2
1.3
4.1
1.5
1.1
5.9
1.0
3.8
2.6
1.7
2.1
3.3
0.6
2.4
1.8
1.1
0.7
0.000
0.003
0.001
0.005
0.003
0.006
0.004
0.003
0.006
0.007
0.007
0.001
0.009
0.003
0.007
0.008
0.003
0.003
0.009
0.002
0.003
0.007
0.003
0.005
0.001
0.001
0.003
0.003
0.012
0.004
0.002
0.018
0.002
0.011
0.007
0.004
0.006
0.010
0.001
0.007
0.005
0.002
0.001
2,521
13,441
9,784
4,486
11,144
8,281
15,216
10,575
6,073
6,415
8,508
3,006
7,162
12,588
8,439
6,450
5,172
10,267
6,188
12,977
8,372
22,764
5,953
5,879
7,414
7,200
40,703
10,561
13,358
4,758
2,664
11,203
3,774
12,147
11,333
9,128
6,392
12,941
10,335
16,694
6,691
12,312
13,581
0.01
0.10
0.07
0.02
0.08
0.05
0.11
0.07
0.04
0.04
0.06
0.01
0.05
0.09
0.06
0.04
0.03
0.07
0.04
0.09
0.06
0.17
0.04
0.04
0.05
0.05
0.32
0.07
0.10
0.03
0.01
0.08
0.02
0.09
0.08
0.06
0.04
0.09
0.07
0.12
0.04
0.09
0.10
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.23
0.21
0.22
0.22
0.21
0.22
0.20
0.21
0.22
0.22
0.21
0.22
0.21
0.20
0.21
0.21
0.21
0.20
0.21
0.20
0.20
0.17
0.20
0.20
0.19
0.19
0.13
0.18
0.17
0.19
0.19
0.17
0.19
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.16
0.15
0.15
0.13
0.15
0.14
0.13
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.49
0.39
0.42
0.45
0.40
0.42
0.36
0.40
0.42
0.42
0.40
0.44
0.38
0.35
0.37
0.38
0.40
0.36
0.38
0.33
0.35
0.22
0.34
0.32
0.30
0.30
0.03
0.24
0.20
0.29
0.30
0.19
0.27
0.17
0.17
0.18
0.16
0.10
0.13
0.02
0.11
0.06
0.03
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.12
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.11
0.10
0.10
0.10
0.09
0.09
0.09
0.09
0.08
0.08
0.08
0.08
0.08
0.07
0.07
0.07
0.06
0.05
0.05
0.05
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.03
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
131
SEIP PIM 2014-2019
District
District
Code
Demand
J3/SHS133
Demand
Index 34
Population of 1517 year olds 35
Population
Index
La Dade Kotopon Municipal
200
1.4
0.003
10,183
0.07
Multidimensional
Pove rty 36
0.13
Pove rty
Inde x
Combined
Inde x 37
Rank
0.00
0.02
203
Ne w
GoG
SHS 38
132
RANK OF PUBLIC SHS IN THE 100 SELECTED DISTRICTS BASED ON THEIR NEED FOR FACILITIES WORK ON CLASSROOMS
This table ranks the SHS according to the proportion of classrooms needing major improvement (either major repairs, complete replacement because they
were temporary, or completion of a structure in progress). Schools with enrolment greater than 1,400 were excluded from eligibility for facilities
improvement, and area shown at the bottom of the table for completeness.
TABLE A5.2:
S/N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
RANKED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SELECTION DATA BASED ON FACILITIES
District
Prestea Huni Valley
Wa East
Bodi
Assin South
Pru
Ketu South
Adaklu Ayingbe
North Tongu
Assin South
Sefwi Akontombra
Akyemansa
Ketu South
Ejura Sekyidomase
Bongo
Banda
Nadowli
Sawla-Tuna-Kalba
Assin North M unicipal
Awutu-Senya
Daffiama-Bussie-Issa
S chool Name
ST. AUGUSTINE'S SENIOR SECONDARY SEC. BOGOSO
FUNSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BODI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN NSUTA AGRIC. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
YEJI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KLIKOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ADAKLU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DORFOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NYANKUM ASI AHENKRO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AKONTOMBRA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AYIREBI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL43+
SOM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SEKYEDOM ASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ZORKOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BANDAM AN SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KALEO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
TUNA SENIOR HIGH SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASSIN NORTH SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OBRACHIRE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
DAFFIAM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
100%
100%
100%
99%
94%
92%
91%
88%
86%
82%
81%
80%
79%
78%
73%
72%
67%
67%
67%
64%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
1*
1*
1*
4*
5*
6*
7*
8*
9*
10*
11*
12*
13*
14*
15*
16*
17*
17*
17*
20*
Enrolment
42
947
151
351
753
1050
384
489
731
937
453
319
1367
1098
677
413
1238
1289
1181
755
892
40
This was calculated from the EMIS 2013-14 data. The calculation takes the number of permanent classrooms needing major repair, plus temporary classrooms, plus
uncompleted classrooms; all divided by the total number of classrooms.
41
*A verification visit was carried out to the first 50 schools plus the next 8 to verify the EMIS data and their need for facilities improvements and the potential for enrolment
expansion. n/a refers to schools which had enrolment greater than 1,400 so were not eligible for expansion based on GES norms.
42
Total SHS enrolment from the EMIS 2013-14. Schools with enrolment greater than 1,400 were not considered eligible for facilities improvements since they are too large
to expand.
43
* Working down from the first school (ranked 1), the first 50 were selected for facilities and quality improvements. There were four scho ols which were deemed not
appropriate for facilities improvements – in these cases the school was skipped and the next was chosen. See note below about these four schools.
133
S/N
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
District
Accra M etropolitan
Saboba
Amansie West
Agortime Ziope
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Offinso M unicipal
Adansi North
Bongo
Upper Denkyira West
Jirapa
Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa
Bosome Freho
Jaman North
Nkwanta South
Accra M etropolitan
Pru
Offinso North
Nkroranza South
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Awutu-Senya
Bongo
Aowin
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Wenchi M unicipal
Adansi North
Twifo Hemang-Lower Denkyira
Wassa East
Tain
Central Gonja
Amansie Central
East Gonja
Tain
Assin North M unicipal
Dormaa West
Sekyere South
Bunkpurugu-Yunyoo
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Accra M etropolitan
Accra M etropolitan
Twifo Hemang-Lower Denkyira
S chool Name
PRESBYTERIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL-OSU
E/P SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, SABOBA
ESAASE BONTEFUFUO SEC. TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AGOTIM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AWE SENIOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ST. JEROM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FOM ENA T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GOWRIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
DIASO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ULLO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ODOBEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOSOM E SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL-ASIWA
GOKA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NTRUBOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
HOLY TRINITY CATH. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRANG SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKENKAASU SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL
KWABRE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL+
S.T. FIDELIS SENIOR HIGH TECH. SCHOOL
SENYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NANA BRENTU SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OUR LADY OF LOURDES SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
NCHIRAA SENIOR HIGH+
BODWESANGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUKWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DABOASE SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
M ENJI AGRICULTURAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUIPE. SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
JACOBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
T. I. AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BADU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OBIRI YEBOAH SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL+
NKRANKWANTA SEC/TECH
KONADU YIADOM SEC.
NAKPANDURI BUSINESS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DONKORKROM AGRIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KANESHIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ST. M ARY'S SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TWIFO HEM ANG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
134
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
63%
63%
62%
61%
61%
60%
59%
58%
56%
55%
53%
53%
52%
52%
52%
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
50%
49%
48%
48%
47%
47%
46%
45%
42%
42%
42%
42%
40%
40%
40%
40%
40%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
21*
21*
23*
24*
25*
26*
27*
28*
29*
30*
31*
32*
33*
34*
35*
36*
36*
36*
36*
36*
36*
36*
36*
36*
45*
46*
47*
48*
48*
50*
51*
52*
52*
54*
55*
56*
56*
56*
56
56
Enrolment
42
1186
1341
724
793
1115
715
977
1050
204
890
973
518
925
906
1057
970
675
367
396
958
1225
1287
779
111
1065
1017
557
205
358
689
1119
775
1367
894
866
981
636
1147
762
258
S/N
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
District
Tatale Sanguli
Asunafo South
Nkoranza North
Akatsi North
Kintampo South
Nzema East M unicipal
Krachi East
Nanumba South
Atwima M ponua
Accra M etropolitan
Amansie West
Amansie West
Jaman North
Bawku West
Savelugu Nanton
Sekyere Kumawu
Kintampo North M unicipal
Lambussie-Karni
Sene East
Tano South
Assin North M unicipal
Ahafo Ano North
Asunafo South
North Tongu
Kpandai
Ayensuano
Asante-Akim South
Agona East
Ekumfi
Accra M etropolitan
Agortime Ziope
Jaman North
Asante-Akim South
North Tongu
Adansi South
Jaman North
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Kassena-Nankana West
Wasa Amenfi West
Assin South
S chool Name
TATALE E/P AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUKUOM AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUSUNYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AVE SENIOR SECONDARY, AVE-DAKPA
JEM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AXIM GIRLS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASUKWAKAW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WULENSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NYINAHIN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACCRA HIGH SCHOOL
M ANSO ADUBIA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ANSOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NAFANA PRESBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ZEBILLA SEC/TECH. SCHOOL
PONG-TAMALE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BANKOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KINTAM PO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PIINA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KAJAJI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRESBYTERIAN SECONDARY/COM M ERCIAL SCHOOL
GYAASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ABANG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SANKORE SENIOR HIGH
M EPE ST. KIZITO SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KPANDAI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KRABOA COALTAR PRESBY SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
OFOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AGONA KWANYAKO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
EKUM FI T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, ESSARKYIR
ACCRA WESLEY GIRLS HIGH
ZIOPE SENIOR HIGH
DIAM ONO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOM PATA PRESBYTARIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AVETIM E-BATTOR SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL
AKROFUOM SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SUM AM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. JOHN INTEGRATED SENIOR SEC./TECH. SCHOOL
CHIANA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ADANKWAM AN SECONDARY/COM MERCIAL SCHOOL
135
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
39%
39%
38%
38%
38%
38%
36%
36%
36%
36%
35%
35%
35%
34%
34%
33%
32%
31%
31%
30%
29%
28%
28%
27%
26%
25%
25%
25%
23%
22%
22%
22%
21%
20%
20%
20%
20%
20%
19%
19%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
61
61
63
63
63
63
67
68
68
68
71
72
72
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
82
84
85
86
86
86
89
90
90
90
93
94
94
94
94
94
99
100
Enrolment
42
1127
936
687
641
1194
82
552
1319
656
1354
1220
862
1118
1206
1318
310
1211
913
849
886
161
793
786
735
1291
560
513
1247
1240
1022
609
248
765
817
608
524
775
1071
707
449
S/N
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
District
Wenchi M unicipal
Asante-Akim South
Sene West
Bawku West
Accra M etropolitan
Nadowli
Nzema East M unicipal
Adansi North
Kumasi M etropolitan
Jirapa
Atwima M ponua
Builsa South
Ahafo Ano South
Prestea Huni Valley
Sekyere Central
North Tongu
Wenchi M unicipal
Sekyere Central
Tain
Bia West
Adansi North
Atebubu-Amantin
Asunafo North M unicipal
Wasa Amenfi East
Assin North M unicipal
Lambussie-Karni
Suaman
Nkoranza North
Akyemansa
Gomoa West
Jirapa
Prestea Huni Valley
Sekyere Central
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Techiman M unicipal
Kassena-Nankana West
Kassena-Nankana West
Sawla-Tuna-Kalba
Nadowli
Sissala West
S chool Name
ISTI QAAM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUASO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KWAM E DANSO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
KUSANABA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. M ARGARET M ARY SEC/TECH SCHOOL
QUEEN OF PEACE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ANYE ACADEM Y SHS
ASARE BEDIAKO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. HUBERT SEM INARY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JIRAPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M PASATIA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
FUM BISI SENIOR SECONDARY AGRIC SCHOOL
M ANKRANSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRESTEA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NSUTAM AN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BATTOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
BEPOSO GHANA M USLIM M ISSION SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NSAWKAW STATE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIA SENIOR HIGH TECH SCHOOL
DOM POASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AM ANTEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AHAFOM AN SENIOR HIGH/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AM ENFIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN STATE COLLEGE
HOLY FAM ILY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DADIESO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
YEFRIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AKOKOASO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
M OZANO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. FRANCI S GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
HUNI VALLEY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KWAM ANG PRESBYTERIAN SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NOTRE DAM E SEM INARY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OUR LADY OF M T. CARM EL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL
M IRIGU SENIOR HIGH
PAGA SENIOR HIGH
SAWLA SENIOR HIGH
TAKPO SENIOR HIGH
HILLA LIM ANN SENIOR HIGH
136
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
19%
19%
17%
17%
17%
17%
17%
14%
14%
14%
13%
13%
11%
10%
9%
5%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
101
101
103
103
103
103
103
108
108
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
117
Enrolment
42
602
736
1105
914
977
741
128
1099
550
734
1370
1288
1234
808
1009
422
717
511
281
379
704
621
846
1268
238
113
562
348
408
1052
1143
1301
674
290
223
179
225
373
226
397
S/N
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
District
Gomoa West
Techiman M unicipal
Builsa North
Karaga
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Upper Denkyira East M unicipal
Accra M etropolitan
Nanumba North
Offinso M unicipal
Asutifi South
Bunkpurugu-Yunyoo
Kumasi M etropolitan
Sekyere South
Kumasi M etropolitan
Accra M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Gomoa West
Sekyere South
Nabdam
Ketu South
Offinso M unicipal
Nkroranza South
Assin South
Nkwanta South
Builsa North
Tano South
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Ejura Sekyidomase
West M amprusi
Kumasi M etropolitan
Savelugu Nanton
Offinso North
Upper M anya Krobo
Ahafo Ano North
Ketu South
Sekyere Kumawu
Sekyere South
Juaboso
S chool Name
COLLEGE OF M USIC – M OZANO
GYARKO COM M UNITY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SANDEM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KARAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUM ASI HIGH SCHOOL
NAVRONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DUNKWA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ACCRA GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIM BILLA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NAM ONG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
HWIDIEM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUNKPURUGU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
ASANTEM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ADU GYAM FI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, JAM ASI
KUM ASI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KINBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
KNUST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, KUM ASI
APAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA S.D.A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
THREE-TOWN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DWAM ENA AKENTEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKORANZA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN M ANSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKWANTA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SANDEM A SEC/TECH SCHOOL
PRESBYTEIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, BECHEM
KUM ASI ANGLICAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OSEI KYERETWIE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
EJURAM AN ANGLICAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WULUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUM ASI GIRLS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SAVELUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AKUM ADAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASESEWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TEPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. PAUL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, DENU
DADEASE AGRICULTURAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OKOM FO ANOKYE SEC SCHOOL
JUABOSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
137
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
0%
0%
150%
73%
73%
67%
64%
63%
62%
60%
57%
52%
51%
51%
50%
48%
46%
45%
44%
43%
43%
42%
41%
41%
40%
40%
40%
36%
35%
33%
32%
32%
31%
31%
30%
30%
29%
29%
29%
29%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
117
117
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Enrolment
42
12
341
2071
1608
1967
1815
1567
1834
1607
2230
1508
1502
2380
3045
2252
1408
1992
2035
2333
1632
1707
2236
1416
1580
1505
1911
2342
3390
2712
1554
2000
2386
1804
1574
1608
2328
1432
2010
3279
1894
S/N
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
District
Kumasi M etropolitan
Upper West Akim
Nkwanta North
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Garu-Tempane
East Gonja
Gushiegu
Talensi
Atebubu-Amantin
Accra M etropolitan
Sekyere Kumawu
Accra M etropolitan
Accra M etropolitan
Tain
Wenchi M unicipal
Sekyere South
Nzema East M unicipal
Kumasi M etropolitan
Agona East
Kumasi M etropolitan
Bole
Kumasi M etropolitan
Gomoa West
Adansi South
Wasa Amenfi West
Upper Denkyira East M unicipal
Twifo Ati-M orkwa
Asunafo North M unicipal
Kumasi M etropolitan
Techiman M unicipal
West M amprusi
Kassena-Nankana West
Asutifi South
Agona East
Accra M etropolitan
Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa
Krachi East
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
S chool Name
ARM ED FORCES SEC./ TECH. SCHOOL
ADEISO PRESBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KPASSA SENIOR HIGH /TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KUM ASI WESLEY GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL
ADVENTIST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TEM PANE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SALAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GUSHEGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOLGATANGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ATEBUBU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
EBENEZER SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TWENEBOA KODUA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACCRA ACADEM Y
ACHIM OTA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKORANM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, SEIKWA B/A
WENCHI M ETHODIST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NSEIN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, KUM ASI
NSABA PRESBYTERIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ISLAM IC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOLE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PREM PEH COLLEGE
GOM OA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NEW EDUBIASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOA AM PONSEM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TWIFO PRASO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M IM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SERWAA NYARKO GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TECHIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WALEWALE SEC./TECH. SCHOOL
SIRIGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACHERENSUA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SWEDRU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WESLEY GRAM MAR SCHOOL
BREM AN ASIKUM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OTI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
YAA ASANTEWAA GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. LOUIS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
138
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
27%
26%
25%
25%
23%
23%
23%
18%
16%
14%
14%
12%
12%
10%
10%
9%
9%
7%
6%
6%
6%
6%
4%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Rank on
classrooms 41*
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Enrolment
42
1947
1544
1639
2129
2133
1768
1526
2236
2365
1702
1488
2137
1864
2393
2262
1860
1691
1845
2546
1954
2280
1794
2657
1423
1750
1800
1783
1669
1529
1464
2257
2020
1428
1402
2104
1650
1820
2032
2048
1818
S/N
221
District
Kumasi M etropolitan
Proportion of
rooms needing
improvement40
0%
S chool Name
OPOKU WARE SECONDARY, KUM ASI
Rank on
classrooms 41*
n/a
Enrolment
42
2572
Notes:
* Schools which were visited for verification of data and appropriateness for expansion.
+ The verification visits highlighted four schools which were not deemed appropriate for facilities improvements. The reasons were as follows:
 Ayirebi SHS already had modern academic facilities that could take over 1,100 students but was operating far below this capacity.
 Kwabre SHS was currently working from very poor and dilapidated facilities on rented land across two sites. However a whole new site was being
constructed by GETFund which will provide excellent new facilities for the school upon completion.
 Nchiraa SHS was currently working out of a very small converted Basic School. Although the school is basic, there was no space on the current site
for expansion and though a new site has been earmarked for a new school construction by the District Assembly, the site has been abandoned to
move to a new site (with land already acquired) a whole new site construction would be necessary, which is beyond the scope of the facilities
improvement sub component of the SEIP.
 Obiri Yeboah Secondary/Technical School had good facilities but lacks the physical capacity to expand.
n/a Schools with enrolment greater than 1,400 were not considered eligible for facilities improvements.
Note on the verification visits
Nine teams were sent out to visit the 58 eligible schools across the ten regions of Ghana. Each team met with the Head of the School or where he/she was not
available the Assistant head or other staff members representing the Head. The teams all completed the same questionnaire which sought to confirm EMIS
2013-14 data on enrolment, teaching staff and numbers of classrooms. The questionnaire also collected information on the school‘s facilities, the catchment
area of the school, its enrolment capacity and how enrolment could be increased. The teams also took photos of the schools to allow the full de-briefing to
compare observations across schools.
139
RANK OF PUBLIC SHS IN THE 100 SELECTED DISTRICTS BASED ON THEIR WASSCE PERFORMANCE
This table ranks the SHS according to their performance in the 2013 WASSCE. Performance was measured as the proportion of candidates achieving a credit
pass (A1 to C6) in all four of the core subjects: English, Mathematics, Integrated Sciences and Social Studies.
TABLE A5.3:
S/N
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
RANKED SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SELECTION DATA BASED ON WASSCE PERFORMANCE
District
Karaga
Nanumba South
Wasa Amenfi West
Tatale Sanguli
Bunkpurugu-Yunyoo
Builsa South
West M amprusi
Wenchi M unicipal
Sekyere Central
Tain
Bia West
Adansi North
Nkoranza North
Jirapa
Gushiegu
Sene West
Bunkpurugu-Yunyoo
Kpandai
Atebubu-Amantin
Sekyere Central
Akyemansa
Ahafo Ano South
Assin South
Asunafo North M unicipal
Wasa Amenfi East
Asunafo South
North Tongu
S chool Name
KARAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WULENSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
TATALE E/P AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUNKPURUGU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
FUM BISI SENIOR SECONDARY AGRIC SCHOOL
WULUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
BEPOSO GHANA M USLIM M ISSION SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NSAWKAW STATE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIA SENIOR HIGH TECH SCHOOL
DOM POASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BUSUNYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JIRAPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GUSHEGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KWAM E DANSO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
NAKPANDURI BUSINESS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KPANDAI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AM ANTEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NSUTAM AN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AYIREBI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ANKRANSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ADANKWAM AN SECONDARY/COM MERCIAL SCHOOL
AHAFOM AN SENIOR HIGH/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AM ENFIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUKUOM AGRICULTURE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AVETIM E-BATTOR SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL
44
WAS S CE
Result44
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
3%
Rank on
WAS S CE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
28
29
31
36
Receiving facilities
improvement45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The proportion of candidates achieving grades A1 to C6 in the four core subjects: English, Mathematics, Integrated Sciences a nd Social Studies. n/a refers to schools
which had not yet been approved by WAEC to sit the WASSCE so there were no WASSCE results under that school.
45
Schools already selected to be in the 50 to receive facilities and quality improvements are given a ‗1‘ and are shown at the end of the table. For completeness their rank on
WASSCE (where they place in the rank against all the 221 schools) is shown.
140
S/N
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
District
Gomoa West
Amansie West
Bole
Nanumba North
Ayensuano
Assin North M unicipal
Atwima M ponua
North Tongu
Akatsi North
Bawku West
Nkroranza South
Upper West Akim
Atwima M ponua
Savelugu Nanton
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Asante-Akim South
Upper M anya Krobo
Nkwanta North
Lambussie-Karni
Accra M etropolitan
Suaman
Wenchi M unicipal
Adansi South
Builsa North
Kintampo South
Assin North M unicipal
Upper Denkyira East M unicipal
Nkwanta South
Asante-Akim South
Kumasi M etropolitan
Wasa Amenfi West
Agona East
Sekyere South
Sekyere South
Ekumfi
Builsa North
Ketu South
Offinso M unicipal
Lambussie-Karni
Accra M etropolitan
Nkoranza North
S chool Name
GOM OA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
M ANSO ADUBIA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOLE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BIM BILLA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KRABOA COALTAR PRESBY SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASSIN STATE COLLEGE
NYINAHIN CATHOLIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M EPE ST. KIZITO SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AVE SENIOR SECONDARY, AVE-DAKPA
KUSANABA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KWABRE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ADEISO PRESBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M PASATIA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SAVELUGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DONKORKROM AGRIC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BOM PATA PRESBYTARIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASESEWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KPASSA SENIOR HIGH /TECHNICAL SCHOOL
HOLY FAM ILY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KINBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
DADIESO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ISTI QAAM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NEW EDUBIASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SANDEM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JEM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
GYAASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DUNKWA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NKWANTA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OFOASE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KUM ASI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASANKRANGWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA KWANYAKO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA S.D.A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ADU GYAM FI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, JAM ASI
EKUM FI T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, ESSARKYIR
SANDEM A SEC/TECH SCHOOL
THREE-TOWN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NAM ONG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
PIINA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KANESHIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
YEFRIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
141
WAS S CE
Result44
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
4%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
5%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
7%
7%
7%
7%
8%
8%
8%
8%
8%
8%
8%
9%
9%
Rank on
WAS S CE
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
68
69
72
73
75
76
78
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
Receiving facilities
improvement45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
S/N
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
District
Akyemansa
Sene East
Prestea Huni Valley
Adansi South
East Gonja
North Tongu
Accra M etropolitan
Garu-Tempane
Ahafo Ano North
Asutifi South
Assin North M unicipal
Sekyere South
Upper Denkyira East M unicipal
Jaman North
Kintampo North M unicipal
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Gomoa West
Savelugu Nanton
Accra M etropolitan
Twifo Ati-M orkwa
Asunafo North M unicipal
Nkroranza South
Kassena-Nankana West
Ejura Sekyidomase
Kumasi M etropolitan
Bawku West
Asunafo South
Accra M etropolitan
Agona East
Sekyere Kumawu
Techiman M unicipal
Assin South
West M amprusi
Offinso North
Adansi North
Kassena-Nankana West
Wenchi M unicipal
Asante-Akim South
Asutifi South
Nadowli
Krachi East
S chool Name
AKOKOASO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KAJAJI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRESTEA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AKROFUOM SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SALAGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BATTOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACCRA WESLEY GIRLS HIGH
TEM PANE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ABANG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
HWIDIEM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OBIRI YEBOAH SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
KONADU YIADOM SEC.
BOA AM PONSEM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SUM AM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KINTAM PO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. JOHN INTEGRATED SENIOR SEC./TECH. SCHOOL
M OZANO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PONG-TAMALE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. M ARGARET M ARY SEC/TECH SCHOOL
TWIFO PRASO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M IM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKORANZA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
CHIANA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
EJURAM AN ANGLICAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SERWAA NYARKO GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ZEBILLA SEC/TECH. SCHOOL
SANKORE SENIOR HIGH
EBENEZER SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NSABA PRESBYTERIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BANKOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TECHIM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN M ANSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WALEWALE SEC./TECH. SCHOOL
AKUM ADAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASARE BEDIAKO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SIRIGU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WENCHI M ETHODIST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUASO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ACHERENSUA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
QUEEN OF PEACE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASUKWAKAW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
142
WAS S CE
Result44
9%
11%
11%
11%
11%
12%
12%
12%
12%
12%
13%
13%
14%
14%
14%
15%
15%
15%
15%
15%
16%
16%
16%
16%
16%
16%
17%
18%
18%
18%
19%
20%
20%
21%
21%
21%
22%
24%
26%
28%
29%
Rank on
WAS S CE
92
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
103
104
105
106
108
109
110
112
113
115
116
118
119
120
122
123
124
126
127
131
132
133
134
135
136
138
139
140
144
145
146
147
148
Receiving facilities
improvement45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
S/N
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
District
Jirapa
Agona East
Sekyere Kumawu
Offinso M unicipal
Accra M etropolitan
Tano South
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa
Ketu South
Accra M etropolitan
Amansie West
Krachi East
Accra M etropolitan
Nabdam
Atebubu-Amantin
Sekyere South
Prestea Huni Valley
Kumasi M etropolitan
Talensi
Sekyere Central
Tano South
Kumasi M etropolitan
Nzema East M unicipal
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Nzema East M unicipal
Accra M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Gomoa West
Tain
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Jaman North
Juaboso
Accra M etropolitan
Sekyere Kumawu
Sekyere South
S chool Name
ST. FRANCIS GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SWEDRU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
TWENEBOA KODUA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DWAM ENA AKENTEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
WESLEY GRAM MAR SCHOOL
PRESBYTERIAN SECONDARY/COM M ERCIAL SCHOOL
NAVRONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BREM AN ASIKUM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. PAUL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, DENU
ACCRA HIGH SCHOOL
M ANSOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OTI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ACCRA GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ATEBUBU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AGONA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
HUNI VALLEY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ARM ED FORCES SEC./ TECH. SCHOOL
BOLGATANGA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KWAM ANG PRESBYTERIAN SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
PRESBYTEIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, BECHEM
KUM ASI GIRLS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AXIM GIRLS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ISLAM IC SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KUM ASI ANGLICAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NSEIN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. M ARY'S SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OSEI KYERETWIE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASANTEM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
APAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKORANM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, SEIKWA B/A
KNUST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, KUM ASI
ADVENTIST SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, KUM ASI
KUM ASI WESLEY GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL
YAA ASANTEWAA GIRLS' SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NAFANA PRESBY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUABOSO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ACHIM OTA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DADEASE AGRICULTURAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OKOM FO ANOKYE SEC SCHOOL
143
WAS S CE
Result44
30%
31%
31%
31%
31%
32%
32%
33%
34%
34%
34%
36%
36%
37%
37%
40%
41%
41%
43%
46%
47%
49%
50%
51%
52%
54%
54%
54%
58%
63%
63%
63%
64%
65%
69%
70%
71%
72%
73%
77%
81%
Rank on
WAS S CE
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
157
158
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
171
172
173
174
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
186
187
189
190
191
192
193
195
197
Receiving facilities
improvement45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
S/N
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
District
Accra M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kumasi M etropolitan
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Kumasi M etropolitan
Ahafo Ano North
Kumasi M etropolitan
Techiman M unicipal
Wenchi M unicipal
Twifo Hemang-Lower Denkyira
Agortime Ziope
Jaman North
Nzema East M unicipal
Kassena-Nankana West
Kassena-Nankana West
Sawla-Tuna-Kalba
Nadowli
Sissala West
Gomoa West
Techiman M unicipal
Twifo Hemang-Lower Denkyira
Tain
Pru
Saboba
Upper Denkyira West
Pru
Offinso North
Sawla-Tuna-Kalba
Daffiama-Bussie-Issa
Jirapa
Accra M etropolitan
Ketu South
Assin North M unicipal
East Gonja
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Adansi North
Amansie West
Adaklu Ayingbe
Awutu-Senya
Nadowli
S chool Name
ACCRA ACADEM Y
KUM ASI HIGH SCHOOL
ST. LOUIS SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PREM PEH COLLEGE
NOTRE DAM E SEM INARY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OPOKU WARE SECONDARY, KUM ASI
TEPA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. HUBERT SEM INARY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OUR LADY OF M T. CARM EL GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL
NCHIRAA SENIOR HIGH
TWIFO HEM ANG SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ZIOPE SENIOR HIGH
DIAM ONO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ANYE ACADEM Y SHS
M IRIGU SENIOR HIGH
PAGA SENIOR HIGH
SAWLA SENIOR HIGH
Takpo Senior High
HILLA LIM ANN SENIOR HIGH
COLLEGE OF M USIC - M OZANO
GYARKO COM M UNITY SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUKWA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
M ENJI AGRICULTURAL SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PRANG SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
E/P SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, SABOBA
DIASO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
YEJI SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NKENKAASU SECONDARY HIGH SCHOOL
TUNA SENIOR HIGH SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
DAFFIAM A SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ULLO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
HOLY TRINITY CATH. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KLIKOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ASSIN NORTH SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
T. I. AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
S.T. FIDELIS SENIOR HIGH TECH. SCHOOL
BODWESANGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ESAASE BONTEFUFUO SEC. TECHNICAL SCHOOL
ADAKLU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
SENYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
KALEO SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
144
WAS S CE
Result44
83%
84%
84%
84%
87%
89%
93%
94%
98%
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
1%
1%
1%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
3%
3%
3%
4%
4%
5%
6%
6%
6%
7%
7%
7%
Rank on
WAS S CE
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
13
17
18
27
30
32
33
34
35
37
38
48
49
59
67
70
71
74
77
79
Receiving facilities
improvement45
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
S/N
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
District
Agortime Ziope
Bongo
Tain
Ketu South
North Tongu
Wassa East
Accra M etropolitan
Awutu-Senya
Bongo
Assin South
Asikuma-Odoben-Brakwa
Offinso M unicipal
Bodi
Aowin
Sefwi Akontombra
Prestea Huni Valley
Adansi North
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Bongo
Jaman North
Bosome Freho
Ejura Sekyidomase
Kassena-Nankana M unicipal
Nkwanta South
Assin South
Dormaa West
Amansie Central
Wa East
Banda
Central Gonja
S chool Name
AGOTIM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ZORKOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BADU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
SOM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DORFOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
DABOASE SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
PRESBYTERIAN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL-OSU
OBRACHIRE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
BONGO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ASSIN NSUTA AGRIC. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ODOBEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. JEROM E SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BODI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NANA BRENTU SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
AKONTOMBRA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
ST. AUGUSTINE'S SENIOR SECONDARY SEC. BOGOSO
FOM ENA T.I AHM ADIYYA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
OUR LADY OF LOURDES SECONDARY/TECHNICAL
GOWRIE SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
GOKA SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
BOSOM E SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL-ASIWA
SEKYEDOM ASE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
AWE SENIOR SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
NTRUBOM AN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NYANKUM ASI AHENKRO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
NKRANKWANTA SEC/TECH
JACOBU SECONDARY/TECHNICAL SCHOOL
FUNSI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
BANDAM AN SENIOR HIGH TECHNICAL SCHOOL
BUIPE . SECONDARY TECHNICAL SCHOOL
+ Schools with this symbol had not yet been approved by WAEC to take WASSCE in 2013.
145
WAS S CE
Result44
7%
9%
9%
10%
10%
12%
13%
15%
15%
15%
16%
16%
17%
17%
18%
20%
22%
22%
22%
33%
34%
44%
50%
63%
66%
75%
81%
+
+
+
Rank on
WAS S CE
80
90
91
93
94
102
107
111
114
117
121
125
128
129
130
137
141
142
143
156
159
170
175
185
188
194
196
n/a
n/a
n/a
Receiving facilities
improvement45
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ANNEX 6: FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT SITE VISIT INFORMATION
S/N
DECISION ON
SELECTION FOR
FACILITIES
IMPROVEMENT
COMMENT
NAME OF SCHOOL
DISTRICT
1
Fomena T.I. Ahmadiyya SHS
Adansi North
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
2
Bodwesango SHS
Adansi North
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
3
Esaase Bontefufuo Sec. Tech
Amansie West
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
4
Bosome Sec. Tech
Bosome Freho
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
5
Sekyedomase SHS
Ejura Sekyedumase
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
6
St. Jerome SHS
Offinso Municipal
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
7
Nkenkaasu SHS
Offinso North
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
8
Konadu Yiadom SHS
Sekyere South
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
8
Bandaman Sec. Tech
Banda
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
9
Goka Sec. Tech
Jaman North
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
10
Yeji Sec. Tech
Pru
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
11
Prang SHS
Pru
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
12
Menji Agric SHS
Tain
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
13
Odoben SHS
Asikuma Odoben Brakwa
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
14
Assin North Sec Tech
Assin North
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
Obiri Yeboah Sec. Tech
Assin North
Low Priority
Meet selection criteria
15
Assin Nsuta Agric SHS
Assin South
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
16
Nyankomasi Ahenkro SHS
Assin South
Acceted
Meet selection criteria
17
Obrachire Sec. Tech
Awutu Senya
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
18
Senya SHS
Awutu Senya
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
19
Jukwa SHS
Twifo Hemang Lower Denkyira
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
20
Diaso SHS
Upper Denkyira West
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
146
Donkorkrom Agric SHS
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Meet selection criteria
St. Dominic's Sec. Tech
Kwahu East
Meet selection criteria
21
Presbyterian SHS-Osu
Accra Metro
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
22
Holy Trinity Catholic SHS
Accra Metro
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
Kaneshie Sec. Tech
Accra Metro
Undecided.
Meet selection criteria
23
Buipe Sec. Tech.
Central Gonja
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
24
E/P SHS
Saboba
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
25
Tuna Sec. Tech.
Sawla Tuna Kalba
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
26
Adaklu SHS
Adaklu Ayingbe
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
27
Agotime SHS
Agortime Ziope
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
28
Klikor Sec. Tech.
Ketu South
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
29
Some SHS
Ketu South
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
30
Ntroboman SHS
Nkwanta South
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
31
Dorfor SHS
North Tongu
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
32
Nana Brentuo Sec. Tech
Aowin
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
33
Bodi SHS
Bodi
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
34
St. Augustines SHS
Prestea Huni Valley
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
35
Akontombra SHS
Sefwi Akontonbra
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
36
Daboase Sec. Tech
Wassa East
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
37
Zorkor SHS
Bongo
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
38
Gowrie Sec. Tech.
Bongo
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
39
Bongo SHS
Bongo
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
40
Awe Sec. Tech.
Kasena Nankana
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
41
Our Lady of Lourdes Sec. Tech
Kasena Nankana
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
42
Dafiama SHS
Daffiama Bussie Issa
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
43
Ullo SHS
Jirapa
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
44
Kaleo Sec. Tech.
Nadowli
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
45
Funsi SHS
Wa East
Accepted
Meet selection criteria
REPLACEMENT SCHOOLS
46
Jacobu Sec. Tech.
Amansie Central
Accepted
147
47
T.I. Ahmadiyya SHS
East Gonja
Accepted
48
St. Dominic Secondary Technical School
Kwahu East
Accepted
49
Badu Sec. Tech
Tain
Accepted
50
Nkrankwanta Sec. Tech
Dormaa West
Accepted
REJECTED SCHOOLS
Kwabre SHS
Nkoranza North
Rejected
New Site being developed
Nchiraa SHS
Wenchi
Rejected
St Fidelis Sec. Tech.
Afram Plains (Kwahu North)
Rejected
Ayirebi SHS
Akyemansa
Rejected
No room for expansion
School has adequate facilities to increase
enrolment
School has adequate facilities to increase
enrolment
Armed Forces SHS
Accra Metro
Rejected
Adequate facilities
148
ANNEX 7: GUIDELINES FOR NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
CONSTRUCTION
GUIDELINES FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION UNDER THE SEIP
Introduction
The Secondary Education Improvement Project will fund the construction of new structures in
twenty-three (23) districts including the provision of furniture and equipment in the structures in
order to increase enrollment to Senior Secondary Education in those districts. The new
construction will be in districts where there are currently no SHS. The Project will fund the
construction of a 24-unit Classroom Block with science laboratories, libraries and other ancillary
facilities (E-Block); technical and vocational block as per the programme offered by the school,
an 8-unit Block of two bed room Staff flats; a Canteen Block; a Headmaster‘s Bungalow and a
Security Post with ancillary external civil works at each District.
Process for the Selection of site for construction of new SHS
The following process (with some minor deviations) would have to be followed by the
implementation team to acquire the site:
1. Meet
with
the
various
stakeholders
at
the
district
level
i.e.
Metropolitan/Municipal/District Chief Executive (MMDCEs); District Director of
Education; Chiefs; Opinion Leaders etc to brainstorm on where to site the project to
benefit the maximum number of JHS graduates taking into consideration available land
and suitability.
2. Agree on transfer of land ownership and registration of land in the name of the
Metropolitan/Municipal/District Assemblies (MMDAs ) with the Lands Commission
3. Ministry of Education and the Ghana Education Service (Headquarters) verify/confirm
land transfer and ownership
4. Safeguards screening and site inspections, RAPs need to be prepared
5. Mitigation Action Plans prepared and inserted in Bidding documents
149
Procurement of contractors for new construction
Procurement of Contractors will be in accordance with the provisions in the Ghana Public
Procurement Act (Act 663) Adverts for new construction will be placed in newspapers of wide
circulation in the country. Contractors interested in the procurement activity will submit their
tenders within a submission period. The tenders will be evaluated by an Evaluation Panel
constituted by the Technical Implementation Committee (TIC). The Tender Evaluation Report
will be presented to the Entity Tender Review Board, and thence to the Central Tender Review
Board (CTRB) as necessary for their approval after which contractors will be notified of award
of contract to them.
Supply of furniture and equipment will also follow a similar procedure. It is envisaged that
construction of new structures under the project will take 18 months. Please refer to Tables 4 and
5.
TABLE A7.1:
IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION
Activity
Time-Frame
Responsible Agency
1
Conduct site screening and review safeguards
measures
Nov 2014
Environmental and Safeguards
Specialist
1.
Advertise for tenders to construct the work at each
school site
Nov2014
Head of Civil Works Team, MOE
Procurement Specialist,
2.
Open tenders received for the work
Dec 2014
Procurement Specialist,
Evaluation Team
3.
Evaluate Tenders received
Dec2014
Evaluation Team
4.
Seek approvals for recommendations for contract
awards
Dec. 2014
Chairman, Technical
Implementation Committee;
Project Coordinator; Procurement
Specialist
5.
Notify Contractors of contract award
Jan 2014
Technical Implementation
Committee
6.
Organise orientation Workshop for Regional Coordinating Council and District Assembly Staff;
contractors and District Education Office Staff on
safeguards; contract administration; reporting
channels and funds flow / certification mechanism
Feb. 2015
Civil Works Team;
Environmental and Safeguards
Specialist
7.
Contractors submit Securities
Feb 2015
Head, Civil Works Team
8.
Hand over sites to recommended contractors
Feb. 2015
Supervision Consultants; M&E
Team, Civil Works Team
9.
Supervise construction Work;
Feb. 2015
Supervision Consultants, District
Engineer; District Director of
Education; Independent Verifier
for Civil Works
10. Organise Site meetings and manage contract
Monthly
Supervision Consultants
11. Report on construction progress including
implementation of safeguards measures using
template
Monthly
Supervision Consultants
12. Hand over completed project to District Director
June 2016
Supervision Consultant; Civil
150
of Education
Works Team, District Chief
executive; District Director of
Education
13. Submit Project Completion Report
TABLE A7.2:
Civil Works Team; Supervision
Consultant
IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE FOR THE SUPPLY OF FURNITURE AND
EQUIPMENT
Activity
1.
July 2016
Determine the needs for furniture and equipment
Time-Frame
Responsible Agency
Apr. 2015
Civil Works Team, Quality and
Outcomes Team and Procurement
Specialist
2.
Prepare tender documents
Aug. 2015
Civil Works Team, Quality and
Outcomes Team and Procurement
Specialist
3.
Advertise for tenders
Sept. 2015
Procurement Specialist
4.
Receive tenders for furniture and equipment
Oct. 2015
Procurement Specialist
5.
Evaluate the tenders
Nov. 2015
Evaluation Committee
6.
Approve the tender evaluation report
Nov. 2015
Technical Implementation
Committee / Project Steering
Committee and Ministerial
Tender Board / Central Tender
Review Board
7.
Notify suppliers of award of contract
Dec. 2015
Technical Implementation
Committee
8.
Suppliers to submit securities for mobilization and
performance
Jan. 2016
Procurement Specialist
9.
Supply, distribute and install furniture and
equipment at beneficiary schools
June, 2016
Technical Implementation
Committee
July, 2016
Technical Implementation
Committee
10. Close contract
Procurement of supervision consultants for new construction
Procurement of Consultants will be in accordance with the provisions in the Ghana Public
Procurement Act (Act 663) . Adverts for Expression of interest in supervising the new
construction will be placed in newspapers of wide circulation in the country. Consultants
interested in the procurement activity will submit their Expressions of Interest within a
submission period. The Expressions of Interest will be evaluated by an Evaluation Panel
constituted by the TIC. The Proposal Evaluation Report will be presented to the Entity Tender
Review Board for approval after which the Financial proposals will be opened. The combined
Proposals Evaluation Report will be presented to the MTRB/CTRB for their concurrent approval
after which Consultants will be invited for negotiations on their proposals. Selected Consultants
151
will subsequently be notified of the award of contract and be invited to sign Consultancy
contracts. Please refer to Table 6.
TABLE A7.3:
RECRUITMENT OF SUPERVISION CONSULTANT
Activity
1.
Request for Expression of Interest (EOI) from the
supervision consultants
Time-Frame
Responsible Agency
Sept. 2014
Civil Works Team and
Procurement Specialist
2.
Receive and Evaluate Expressions of Interest
Oct. 2014
Civil Works Team and
Procurement Specialist
3.
Approve EOI evaluation report
Oct. 2014
TIC
4.
Request for Technical and Financial proposals
from shortlisted consultants
Nov. 2014
Civil Works Team
5.
Evaluate Technical Proposals
Dec. 2014
Evaluation Committee
6.
Approve Technical Proposals evaluation report
Dec. 2014
Technical Implementation
Committee / Project Steering
Committee and Ministerial
Tender Board / Central Tender
Review Board
7.
Open Financial Proposals
Dec. 2014
Evaluation Committee
8.
Prepare combined
proposals report
Dec. 2014
Evaluation Committee
9.
Approve combined report
Jan. 2015
Technical Implementation
Committee / Project Steering
Committee and Ministerial
Tender Board / Central Tender
Review Board
10. Invite recommended consultants for negotiations
Jan. 2015
Evaluation Committee
11. Issue notification of award letters and sign
contracts
Jan. 2015
TIC
12. Supervision of new construction
(Including defects liability works)
Jan. 2015 – Dec.
2016
Civil Works Team
Jan 2015
Supervision Consultants
Technical
and
Financial
contracts
13. Review Facilities Maintenance Plan prepared by
Civil Works Team
Supervision Arrangement
The supervision of the construction of new works will be executed at four (4) levels:
Level 1: The Clerks of Works working on behalf of the Supervision Consultants
Level 2: The Supervision Consultants
Level 3: The Civil Works Team/ District Engineer/District Director of Education
Level 4: Monitoring and Evaluation Team of the SEIP
Level 1: Clerks of Works
 The Clerks of Works engaged by the Supervision Consultants will be responsible for the
day to day supervision of the works in collaboration with the Contractors‘ Site Engineer.
152





They shall ensure that the work is executed to the highest standards possible as provided
in the specifications in the Contract document
They shall ensure that all updated Work Programmes are submitted in a timely manner by
the contractor
They shall keep an accurate daily record of all site activities
They shall facilitate the conduct of site meetings
They shall cross-check all valuations for payment before submitting same to the
Supervision Consultant
Level 2: Supervision Consultants
 Supervision Consultants will be responsible for the review of all architectural, structural,
electrical and mechanical installation drawings prepared based on the site topography and
the need for more detailed information/ drawings
 They will be responsible for preparing geo-technical studies to determine the subsoil
profiles at the various sites
 They will monitor the alignment of activities to environmental and social safeguards for
each site in collaboration with Safeguards Consultants and Environmental and Social
Management Team
 They will be responsible for the overall administration of the contracts
 They will be ultimately responsible for the quality of work executed by the contractor
 They will validate Claims submitted by the contractor and raise Certificates for work
done for submission to the Head of the Civil Works Team
 They will review the Work Programmes submitted by the contractor and make
recommendations for any extension of time to the Head of the Civil Works Team
 They will make arrangements for monthly site meetings together with the District
Engineer and District Director of Education
 They will review all claims submitted by the Contractor and make appropriate
recommendations to the Head of Civil Works Team
 They will make recommendations on requests for extension of time, the application of
Liquidated and Ascertained Damages for non-completion on schedule and contract
termination issues
 They will be responsible for the preparation of monthly project status reports for
submission to the Head of Civil Works Team
Level 3: Civil Works Team (CWT)/District Engineer/District Director of Education
 The CWT shall participate in monthly site meetings organized by the Supervision
Consultants to address problems, challenges and ensure compliance with work plans
submitted by the individual contractors
 Monitoring shall be carried out in delineated zones by sub-teams constituted by the
CWT.Sub-Teams should be rotated among the zones to enable all teams familiarize
themselves with the terrain of all the sites and works
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


The CWT sub-Teams shall take progress photographs at each site and attach them to the
status reports to be submitted to the Head of the CWT
The District Engineer and District Director of Education shall participate in monthly site
meetings organised by the Supervision Consultants to address problems, challenges and
ensure compliance with work plans submitted by the individual contractors
Any observations made by the District Engineer and District Director of Educationabout
the quality or work processes shall be communicated to the Supervision Consultant for
action. They may not issue instructions direct to the contractor‘s site staff
Level 4: Monitoring and Evaluation team
 The monitoring and evaluation team may participate in monthly site meetings organised
by the Supervision Consultants. They may plan their site visits to coincide with these site
meetings and may take photographic records of their monitoring to for e.g. inform the
web based school monitoring.
 Monitoring shall be carried out in delineated zones by sub-teams constituted by MOE and
GES.
 Mobile monitoring options will be explored when available to report on site progress
Role of District Assembly
The District Assembly is the representative of Government on site and must ensure the day to
day monitoring of works to mitigate any risk to the attainment of project objectives. The District
Assemblies
will be responsible for the proper acquisition of the site and prepare all
documentation required for ownership. They must ensure that the siting of schools meets all
environmental and social safeguards requirements. They will, together with the Supervision
Consultants review the design drawings and certification for work done. They will also monitor
construction and safeguards compliance in collaboration with the Safeguards Consultant
Roles of District Director of Education (DDE)
The DDE is the representative of the GES on site and must ensure that all educational
considerations are made in the implementation of new construction. Any red flags must be raised
directly and immediately to the GES who are represented on the PSC.
Payment Arrangement
(i) The contractor prepares valuation of work done and submits to the clerk of works for
corroboration.
(ii) The DDE and District Engineer endorse the valuation for submission to the Supervision
Consultant.
(iii)The Supervision Consultants prepares a payment certificate based on the vetted valuation
prepared by the contractor and submits the certificate to the Head of the Civil Works
Team for onward processing through the Ghana Integrated Financial Management
Information System (GIFMIS).
154
155
ANNEX 8: GUIDELINES FOR FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT
GUIDELINES FOR FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT UNDER THE SEIP
Introduction
The facilities improvement activities under the Secondary Education Improvement Project
(SEIP) will fund the rehabilitation of the physical facilities of 50 selected Senior High Schools
(SHSs) including the provision of furniture and equipment in order to increase enrollment in the
schools. Heads of institutions must request a needs assessment visit from the MOE and GES in
order to kick start the activity. Beneficiary schools were selected from the bottom 100 districts
based on district poverty index, SHS demand and district population (15 to 17 years).
Criteria for Selecting Beneficiary Schools for Facilities Improvement
A combined index of district poverty, demand for SHS (ratio of JHS3 to SHS1 students), and
district population (15 to 17 years) was applied to the 216 districts in order to rank them.
Subsequently the bottom 100 districts were selected and all public SHSs in these 100 districts
were ranked according to their need for major works to their classrooms – see Annex 5. Schools
with enrolment greater than 1,400 were not considered eligible for expanding enrolment. From
this ranking, the bottom 50 schools were selected to benefit from facilities and quality
improvement. .
Process for the Selection of Activities for Facilities Improvement
The following considerations may be made for the selection of various sub-projects for facilities
improvement:
a. Meet with the various stakeholders at the school level i.e. teachers, non-teaching
staff (accounting, procurement, etc.), Board and Students‘ Representative Council
(SRC). The purpose should be to brainstorm and reach agreement on activities
for facilities improvement which will lead to an increase in the enrollment of the
school.
b. Agree on activities (with justification) based on the needs of the school which
will have the most impact on increasing enrollment at the school and which will
be implemented with funding from the project.
156
c. After the stakeholder meetings at the school level to prioritize facilities needs, the
selected activities will be reviewed by the District Assembly and the DEO.
d. Participate in a Needs Assessment intervention led by committee from the MOE
and GES headquarters and finalize major and minor facilities improvement and
the total enrollment increase expected after implementation.
e. Prepare a work plan and budget for the agreed Facilities Improvement activities
for the SHS based on estimates.
f.
Procurement of goods and works under the facilities improvement at the school
level should be based on provisions made in the procurement section.
g. The total cost of Facilities Improvement activities should not exceed the specific
amount46 determined under the SEIP.
Considerations for Major and Minor Facilities Improvement
The following major and minor facilities improvement activities may be considered by heads of
beneficiary SHSs if there is evidence that these will increase enrolment.
Facilities Improvement
1.
A school canteen
2.
Science Laboratory
3.
A school library
iv. Additional classrooms
4.
A teachers/staff flat
5.
Furniture
6. Equipment
7.
Roofing of existing structures
8.
Strengthening of structural frames
9.
Enclosing walls, windows and doors
10. Ceiling wall finishing and floor finishing
11. Decoration of structures
12. Painting of buildings
13. Science and math equipment
46
Estimated amount for each of the 50 beneficiary SHSs for Facilities Improvement will not exceed USD200,000
over the 5 year SEIP implementation period. The amount may be spent on one activity for a determined period or
spread over several activities over a period.
157
It is envisaged that the school facilities improvement under the project will involve the following
activities:

Renovation : to make changes and repair (major or minor)

Refurbishment : to repair and improve existing buildings

Rehabilitation : to restore to formal condition (major or minor)

Conservation : to maintain buildings heritage

New works : make provision for needed facilities
Beneficiary schools may begin activities as soon as they are officially notified of the start of the
project by the MOE. Effectiveness of the project is expected in September 2014 and schools can
begin activities towards implementation of facilities improvement from this point. The school
level stakeholder meetings, orientation workshops, needs assessment visits by the MOE and
GES, preparation and approval of workplans and budgets are all expected to be completed by
February, 2015. The process for selecting facilities improvement contractor for the school will be
completed over the next three months in April 2015. The timing is necessary to ensure that
supervision consultants participate in the process of contractor selection. School Heads must
monitor the sub-project implementation including taking photographs on the phases of facilities
improvement for their websites.
TABLE A8.1: IMPLEMENTATION STEPS FOR FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT
Activity
Time-Frame
Responsible Agency
1.
Notify Beneficiary School Head of SHS
selection
under
SEIP
Facilities
Improvement
Oct. 2014
GES
2.
Organize SHS level stakeholder meeting to
determine possible sub-projects for facilities
improvement (invite DEOs, DAs to
meeting)
Oct. 2014
Head of SHS
3.
Organize orientation workshop to sensitize
beneficiaries about project, roles, timelines,
safeguards considerations, procurement, FM
and DLIs and DLRs
Nov. 2014
Head of Civil Works Team, MOE,
SafeGuards Consultant
4.
Undertake Needs Assessment visits to
Beneficiary Schools (including safeguards
consultant) to determine activities
Nov. 2014 – Jan. 2015
Civil Works Committee, MOE
5.
Prepare SHS Facilities Improvement
Workplan, Budget, Safeguards
considerations (with assistance from
safeguards consultant)
Feb. 2015
Head of SHS
6.
Submit
SHS
Facilities
Workplan, Budget to DEOs
Improvement
Feb. 2015
Head of SHS
7.
Advertise for tenders for facilities
improvement work at district level
Feb. 2015
Head of Civil Works Team, MOE
Procurement Specialist, Das, DEOs
8.
Open tenders received for the work
Mar. 2015
Procurement Specialist, Evaluation
Team, DAs, DEOs
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9.
Evaluate Tenders received
Mar. 2015
Evaluation Team
10. Seek approvals for recommendations for
contract awards
Mar. 2015
Chairman, Technical Implementation
Committee; Project Co-ordinator;
Procurement Specialist
11. Notify Contractors of contract award
Apr. 2015
Technical Implementation
Committee
12. Contractors submit Securities
May. 2015
Civil Works Team / District Team
May. 2015
Supervision Consultants, School
Head, District Engineer and District
Director
14. Monitor/ supervise implementation of the
contract
May. 2015 – April. 2016
Head of SHS, District Engineer,
Supervision Consultant, Civil Works
Monitoring Team-MOE, GES
15. Organise Site meetings and manage contract
Monthly
Supervision Consultants
16. Report on implementation issues at the SHS
level to Civil Works Team
May. 2015 – April. 2016
Head of SHS
17. Hand over completed project to the School
Head
April. 2016
Supervision Consultant; Civil Works
Team, District Chief executive;
District Director of Education,
School Head
18. Submit Project Completion Report
May. 2016
Head of SHS, District Engineer,
Supervising Consultant to Civil
Works Team
13. Hand
over
contractors
sites
to
recommended
Orientation Workshop for Beneficiary Senior High Schools for Facilities Improvement
An orientation for representatives from the 50 Beneficiary SHSs for Facilities Improvement will
be held in October, 2014. Participants from Beneficiary SHSs will include the head of the SHS,
assistant head (academic), assistant head (administration), senior housemaster/mistress, and
accountant. The orientation meeting will introduce the SEIP, explain the role of the school
administration in the selection, implementation, monitoring and reporting on sub-projects and
provide information on contacts for resolving challenges and issues that may arise during
implementation. The orientation will also sensitize participants on what is expected during the
verification of identified needs of beneficiary Senior High Schools by the committee from the
MOE and GES.
Needs Assessment of Beneficiary Senior High School Facilities
A Needs Assessment Committee from the MOE and GES will visit each of the 50 Beneficiary
Schools for Facilities Improvement. The objective is to provide technical assistance which will
confirm the priority facilities for improvement determined during the school‘s stakeholder
meeting. When agreement is reached on which facilities will be funded within the budget, the
Needs Assessment Committee will prepare bills of quantities or estimates for the sub-project.
159
Implementation of School Facility Improvement
With the coordination of the supervision consultant who reports to the Head of the Civil Works
Team at the MOE, the district engineer will prepare handle the site contract administration. The
head of the school will have the role of being the eyes of the technical implementation committee
on the ground and will report any inconsistencies to the Head of the Civil Works Team at the
MOE. Mobile monitoring options will also be used when available to report on progress of work.
Payments will be made on certification of work done which will be signed by the district
engineer, the school head, and the supervision consultant.
Procurement of Works
The District Assemblies shall procure contractors for the works in accordance with the Ghana
Public Procurement Act (Act 663) and as provided in the procurement section of the PIM. The
District Assemblies shall submit the evaluation report to the TIC and thence to the Ministerial
Tender Review Board (MTRB) for review and approval before contracts are awarded. The
MTRB shall review the evaluation reports and communicate its findings to the District
Assemblies within two (2) weeks on receipt of the reports. The District Assemblies on receipt of
the approval from MTRB shall finalize the contracting process and hand over the sites to the
recommended contractors to commence work. A copy of the contract document will be
forwarded to the Ministry of Education.
The Supervision Consultant is expected to be appointed in February, 2015 to oversee the
procurement of contractors for new construction and facilities improvement. The advertisement
for facilities improvement is therefore scheduled to be rolled-out in January, 2015.
TABLE A8.2: RECRUITMENT OF SUPERVISION CONSULTANTS
Activity
Time-Frame
Responsible Agency
1.
Request for Expression of Interest (EOI) from the
supervision consultants
Sept. 2014
Civil Works Team and Procurement
Specialist
2.
Receive and Evaluate Expressions of Interest
Oct. 2014
Civil Works Team and Procurement
Specialist
3.
Approve EOI evaluation report
Oct. 2014
TIC
4.
Request for Technical and Financial proposals
from shortlisted consultants
Nov. 2014
Civil Works Team
5.
Evaluate Technical Proposals
Dec. 2014
Evaluation Committee
6.
Approve Technical Proposals evaluation report
Dec. 2014
Technical Implementation
Committee / Project Steering
Committee and Ministerial Tender
Board / Central Tender Review Board
7.
Open Financial Proposals
Dec. 2014
Evaluation Committee
8.
Prepare combined
proposals report
Jan. 2015
Evaluation Committee
9.
Approve combined report
Jan. 2015
Technical Implementation Committee
/ Project Steering Committee and
Ministerial Tender Board / Central
Tender Review Board
Technical
and
Financial
160
10. Invite recommended consultants for negotiations
Jan. 2015
Evaluation Committee
11. Issue notification of award letters and sign
contracts
Feb. 2015
TIC
12. Supervision of facilities improvement contract
(Including defects liability works)
May, 2015 – May,
2016
Civil Works Team, Supervision
Consultant, District Engineer, District
Director of Education and School
Head
Supervision Arrangement
The supervision of the facilities upgrade will be executed at three levels as follows:
Level 1: School facilities Committee
Level 2: District Engineers / DEO
Level 3: Supervising Consultant / Clerks of Works
Level 1: School Facilities Committee
The schools shall set-up a school‘s facilities committee to undertake the following:
 ensure that all updated Work Programmes to be submitted by the contractor are submitted
in a timely manner
 keep an accurate daily record of all site activities
Level 2: District Supervising Committee (District Engineer, District Education Planning Officer
and DDE)
The District supervising committee shall:
 facilitate the conduct of site meetings
 ensure that the work is executed to the highest standards possible as provided in the
specifications in the Contract document
 review all architectural, structural, electrical and mechanical installation drawings
prepared based on the site topography and the need for more detailed information/
drawings (where applicable)
 prepare environmental and social safeguards for each site
 be responsible for the overall administration of the contracts
 be ultimately responsible for the quality of work executed by the contractor
 validate Claims submitted by the contractor for work done and raise Certificates for work
done for submission to the Head of the Civil Works Team
 review the Work Programmes submitted by the contractor and make recommendations
for any extension of time to the Head of the Civil Heads Team
 make arrangements for monthly site meetings
 review all claims submitted by the Contractor and make appropriate recommendations to
the Head of Civil Works Team
 make recommendations on requests for extension of time and the application of
Liquidated and Ascertained Damages for non-completion on schedule
 be responsible for the preparation of monthly project status reports for submission to the
Head of Civil Works Team
161
Level 3: Supervising Consultant / Clerks of Works
 Back-stops the District supervising team and collates and submits all reports on facilities
upgrade to the Head of CWT.
Payment Arrangement
i. District Supervision Committee will prepare valuations of work done/certificates and
submit to the supervising consultant for verification and approval for payment by the
civil works team (CWT)
ii. Payment will then be effected by the Ministry to the contractor
162
ANNEX 9: STUDENT INFORMATION SHEET ON SCHOLARSHIPS
Objective: The scholarship is to help the beneficiary to gain access to and remain in senior high
education till completion.
Duration of scholarship: The scholarship spans the three years of senior high schooling.
However this is not automatic. To remain on the scheme beneficiaries must:





Attain at least 80% school attendance in each academic term. (If the beneficiary fails to
satisfy this condition s/he must provide tangible reasonsfor the failure).
S/he must show progressive academic work throughout the academic year.
Beneficiaries who do not meet the 80% attendance must seek support from the Guidance
and counseling (G&C) unit for guidance
They may seek support for academic progress from the G&C unit.
Beneficiary will receive a letter warning of possible withdrawal of scholarship if efforts
by the guidance and counseling unit to support her/him increase rate of school attendance
fails.
Scholarship Package
The scholarship will cover all eligible items such as school fees, uniforms, text books, exercise
books, examination fees. The remaining funds will be given to the students to meet their other
needs.
Withdrawing from the scheme
The Scholarship is not transferable
A beneficiary shall who wishes to voluntarily withdraw shall notify the Administrator through
her/his head of school.
A beneficiary will be withdrawn if s/he caught engaging in any criminal act, including stealing,
prostitution, use of illicit drugs.
A female beneficiary will be deemed to have withdrawn from the scholarship when she gets
pregnant in the course of her schooling. She may however re-enroll after delivery and may
reapply.
Guiding Conditions for continuous benefiting
Beneficiaries of the SEIP scholarship will remain on the scheme for the three of the SHS
programme. This however is not automatic. To remain on the programme for the three-year term,
the beneficiary must fulfill the following conditions:
The Scholarship beneficiary must attain 80% school attendance in the academic year. If the
beneficiary unable to satisfy this condition s/he must provide tangible reason for that.
163
S/he must show progressive academic work throughout the academic year. Students who do not
show progressive academic work will be given a warning letter after the second term
examination report. If the third term report shows no progress in academic work, but the said
beneficiary does not provide any reason for the low performance, s/he shall have the scholarship
withdrawn.
Beneficiary shall notify the Administrator through her/his head of school on any intention to
withdraw from the scholarship.
164
ANNEX 10: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SCHOLARSHIP
ADVISOR/ADMINISTRATOR
Draft Terms of Reference
Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP)
Scholarship Administrator
1. BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana has obtained World Bank funding to support the government‘s
strategy to improve secondary education in Ghana. The Secondary Education Improvement
Project (SEIP), approved for an amount of GHC156m (one hundred and fifty six million dollars)
in May 2014 will support the government‘s secondary education program with the objective of
increasing equitable access to and participation in education at all levels; improving the quality
of teaching and learning for students from poor families especially girls. The project has two
components namely: (i) Support to increase access with equity and quality in senior high
schools. This component will employ a results-based financing modality to increase access with
equity in underserved districts and subsidize students, especially girls from low income
households; and (ii) management, research, monitoring and evaluation to strengthen the
implementation capacity of the Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Ghana Education Service
(GES) and its related implementing agencies as well as assist them to achieve the objective of
government‘s senior high school strategy. The SEIP will be implemented over a five year period
from May 2014 to November 2019.
As part of Component 1 of the SEIP, scholarships will be provided for students in 50 existing
senior high schools benefiting from facilities improvement and an additional 23 newly
constructed senior high schools expected to be completed in the third year of project
implementation. The main objectives of the scholarship scheme are to:
(i) address low level of participation of students in secondary education from poor
communities, SEIP will use scholarship as incentive to encourage more students to stay
in school and also as a relief to parents in the low income bracket;
(ii) disburse $23.20m (twenty three million two hundred thousand US dollars) as
scholarships to 10,000 eligible students in selected senior secondary schools.
The agreed outcomes for the SEIP Scholarship Scheme is to (i) support 10,000 need and
qualified youth graduating from JHSs in beneficiary districts to complete SHS; (ii) improve
retention, completion and attainment rates, particularly for girls, and other vulnerable students;
and (iii) ensure stakeholder ownership of the scholarship scheme. Eligible students to benefit
from the SEIP scholarship scheme must come from selected deprived districts, and from the
most disadvantaged households in the relevant communities. The draft guideline for eligibility
and selection of students has been prepared by the Ghana Education Service (GES) and will be
provided as additional information for the administration of the scholarships.
165
2. OBJECTIVES
The objectives of these terms of reference are to employ the services of an individual or firm
who will administer the scholarships under the SEIP, report on the process, assist potential
evaluators and be generally responsible for disbursing the scholarships to beneficiary students
according to agreed guidelines for the scholarship scheme. The Scholarship Administrator will
be responsible for providing leadership for the general and active management of the SEIP
Scholarship Scheme and for meeting Disbursement Linked Indicator (DLI) 4: ―Increased
enrollment in selected SHSs and students from low income families, especially girls‖ and for all
the associated Disbursement Linked Results on the number of students to benefit from SEIP
scholarships annually.
To achieve the objectives, the Scholarship Administrator will be required to address the
following questions:
(i) Does the criteria for selecting beneficiaries focus on the neediest of the needy?
(ii) Is the selection process transparent and fair?
(iii) Is there provision for a conflict resolution mechanism or process?
(iv) How will all stakeholders at the community and school levels be engaged in the
selection of eligible beneficiaries?
(v) How will consultant collaborate with SEIP implementers (MOE, GES, Steering
Committee, interested agencies) to ensure that their interests are constantly factored
into the selection of scholarship beneficiaries as per the Project Implementation Manual
(PIM) and the guidelines for the scholarship scheme?
(vi) What steps will consultant take to ensure that data on individual scholarship
beneficiaries are safeguarded?
(vii) How will other issues of social safeguards, gender, family life issues and adolescent
reproductive health be addressed as part of the intervention?
(viii) What steps will consultant take to ensure that there is no leakage of scholarship funds?
(ix) What measures will consultant take to ensure fiduciary safeguards?
(x) What mechanism is consultant considering to obtain objective information about
potential beneficiaries as a basis for selection?
(xi) What support will consultant provide to enable strong communication and information
dissemination under the program?
(xii) How will consultant monitor the scholarship beneficiaries and outputs?
(xiii) How will consultant ensure collaboration on lessons learned to guarantee that these
benefit the ongoing scholarship scheme implementation as well as future scaling up?
3. SCOPE OF WORK
The Scholarship Administrator will be:
 Responsible for administering and reporting on the SEIP scholarship scheme

Responsible for meeting all the relevant DLIs and DLRs especially, DLI4: ―Increased
enrollment in selected SHSs and for students from low income families, especially
girls‖.
166

Work closely with the Ministry of Education, the Ghana Education Service, Regional
and District Offices of Education, selected schools, relevant communities and
stakeholders in the process of selection of beneficiary students and scholarship
administration.

Responsible for allocated scholarships funds and disbursement to support scholarship
beneficiaries.

Carefully in following the agreed selection criteria as outlined in the PIM in order to
achieve the DLI4.

Task on time to report on funds allocated and used under the scholarship scheme and
collaborate on all financial reporting and audits.

Safeguarding data on scholarship selection process, recipients‘ progress including
their follow up to SHS completion and report regularly on the scholarship program as
required including at the annual review of education performance (NESAR) to the
MOE, GES and other stakeholders.

stay abreast of developments across the programme and facilitate coherence within all
components of SEIP

provide additional technical and specialist support when requested

Design the Plan of Action and manage the disbursement schedule with relevant
Teams and report back as appropriate.

Ensure transparency in the selection procedure and accountability of all relevant
offices.

Design strategies for identifying really needy and qualified students based on agreed
Scholarship Application Form

Develop and collaborate with MOE/GES on communication strategy and carry out
sensitization programme to inform the school and the community as well as the
nation

Develop and implements an agreed approach to the monitoring of outputs of DLI4

Attend all meetings in respect of the scholarship.

lead on knowledge-sharing activities, communication and sensitization on SEIP
objectives in relation to scholarship and disseminate implementation results with the
Government of Ghana, Development Partners and all relevant stakeholders through a
knowledge-management and communications strategy. This will include, but will not
be limited to:
167
Organizing knowledge-sharing events and workshops to strengthen understanding of the
evidence, challenges and opportunities in improving the quality and equity in improving access
for the poor in secondary education.
• Supporting the conduct of research and analysis to inform improvements in
students‘ performance in relation to the results areas and overall objectives and
maintaining a deep understanding of the education sector context.

•
Establishing and maintaining an information data base on the performance of
student beneficiaries.
•
Documenting and reporting results and lesson-learning through a variety of
media, including newspapers and the Internet and acting as a conduit of
information and best practice between partners and key stakeholders.
Assign roles and responsibilities to relevant committees and teams
Working committees and teams
1. Scholarship Implementation Committee
-
Notification of Availability and Distribution of Application Forms
-
School level: preliminary selection of qualified candidates
-
District level: interviews applicants before giving the forms.
2. Scholarship Application Assessors
- Assess Application Forms and select eligible students
-
Score all Application Forms
-
Agree on the cut off point for qualification for the scholarship
-
Make observations which need to be taken into account for improving
the application forms and the overall process.
3. Monitoring and evaluation Teams
- Develop a framework for collecting and analyzing data

-
Undertake regular monitoring and reporting through field visits
-
Establish appropriate quarterly reporting mechanisms
-
Regular sharing of progress on Output and consultation with the
MOE/GES
-
Work closely with MOE/GES on annual reviews, a mid-term review
and a final evaluation.
Develop Annual work plans linked to key performance indicators (KPIs), procurement
plans and budgets, to be approved by the Steering Committee/ Approving Authority.
168



•
These are the key documents against which performance progress will be
monitored and evaluated.
•
They are intended to be working documents and may be updated or revised
subject to approval by the Steering Committee or Approving Authority.
•
They will specify a timetable for the implementation of planned activities and a
detailed programme budget.
•
These will include a brief report on performance to date. It is anticipated that
MOE/GES and the Bank, together with other appropriate persons, will review
work plans and provide comments and recommend changes.
work with a small, responsive and flexible core team, and this may include, but not
limited to, a team leader, education advisors, finance and management specialists.
carry out the requisite due diligence on grant partners and ensure proper fiduciary
oversight through regular monitoring.
assume all the risk for any loss of funds incurred under the contract.
TABLE A10.1: DELIVERABLES
The deliverables outlined are to be provided in both electronic and hard copies. The following
deliverables for the first two years are as follows:
Deliverable
Contract
Year 1
Instrument
Survey
List of School.
Beneficaries
Bank Transfers
Year 2
Monitoring Report
Final Report
Preparatory Stakeholder
Meetings
Follow up Scholarship
Beneficiaries
Subject
Contract Signature
Draft SEIP Scholarship Application
Form
Survey to assess of potential scholarship
beneficiary
Selection of Scholarship Beneficiaries for
Sept. 2014
Transfer of Scholarship Funds to support
Beneficiaries
Follow up on students attendance and
performance
Submission of Final Report and Lessons
Learned
Participatory Learning Appraisal with
stakeholders
Report on students who received
scholarships
169
Timeline
10/2014
% of
Annual
Admini
strative
Fee
10
10/2014
5
11/2014
30
11/2014
25
12/2014
15
Termly
10
12/2014
5
01/2015
10
03/2015
10
Survey
List of School.
Beneficiaries
Bank Transfers
Monitoring Report
Final Report
Survey to assess of potential scholarship
beneficiary
Selection of Scholarship Beneficiaries for
Sept. 2015
Transfer of Scholarship Funds to support
Beneficiaries
Follow up on students attendance and
performance
Submission of Final Report and Lessons
Learned
11/2015
30
11/2015
25
12/2015
15
Termly
10
12/2014
5
5. CONSULTANT QUALIFICATION AND EXPERIENCE
The consultant should have the following qualifications and experience:
Academic Qualifications
Advanced degree in Social Sciences, Project Management and Administration, Financial
Management, Procurement, data management, ?? The consultant must also have experience and
knowledge working with government and the education sector as well as with education
stakeholders including development partners. Knowledge on development and education policy,
access, equity and genders issues are required. Consultant must have advanced ability in the use
of ICT tools and software especially data management.
Good communication, great
interpersonal relations, ability to meet deadlines and deliver under pressure, ability to understand
and resolve complex socio cultural situations, excellent problem solving skills and co-operation,
as well as team building skills will be necessary for a successful implementation of the scheme.
Consultant familiarity with the use of participatory learning approaches and rural appraisal
methods will be an advantage.
Work Experience
Consultant must have held a similar position or have experience on a scholarship scheme in a
developing country, benefiting poor communities. Experience working with multiple
stakeholders and scholarship implementation committees on scholarships related to broad
developmental issues and addressing poverty, deprivation, disability and gender and geographic
disparities will be required. Experience working on large scale projects, in beneficiary data
collection and analysis, monitoring and evaluation, reporting, documentation and in facilitating
dissemination session will be valued.
6. TIMELINE AND REPORTING
The administration of the SEIP scholarship will be for the period of project implementation. The
consultant will be remunerated per percentage of scholarship disbursed as per agreed contract
and World Bank payment guidelines regarding the deliverables outlined. This will be on
condition that the deliverables are of acceptable quality and satisfactory to the Ministry of
Education. With regard to the day to day administration of the scheme, the consultant will report
to the Project Coordinator of the SEIP.
170
ANNEX 11: SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMMEAPPLICATION FORM
1. Name of Pupil........................................................................................................ Affix a duly
attested
2. Nationality.....................................................................3. Age ......................
photograph
here
4 Sex ............................................................................... 5. Class .........................
6
School: ..................................................................................................................
7
Town: .....................................................................................................................
8
District:..................................................................................................................
9
Region: ....................................................................................................................
10 Total number of children under 18 in household (i.e. those taken care of by same
adult(s):......
11 Mother‘s name: ....................................................... Dead/Alive: ........................
12 Mother‘s Age if alive (Tick as applicable) 30-40
40 – 50
50-60
Above 60
13 Father‘s name: ...........................................................Dead/Alive: .......................
14 Father‘s Age if alive (Tick as applicable) 30-40
40 – 50
50-60
Above 60
15 Guardian‘s name if being sponsored by a guardian: .......................................
16 Guardian‘s Age if being sponsored by a guardian (Tick as applicable) 30-40
50-60
; 40 – 50
Above 60
17 Relationship to guardian: aunt, uncle, grandmother, grandfather, family friend, other
(specify)
18 Father‘s Occupation (if alive): ............................................................................
19 Mother‘s Occupation (if alive): ............................................................................
20 Guardian‘s occupation, if being sponsored by any other person than the biological parents
.................................................................................
21 Approximately how much money is spent by parents/guardians each week (include the
value of any payment in goods): ……. GHS
171
22 Who pays your costs of education and levies?: ..............................................................
23 Relationship to the one who pays these costs if not biological parents: ....................
24 Who provides your basic needs (food, clothing & shelter)? ..............................
25 Relationship to the one who provides for your basic needs if not biological parents:
...................................................................................................................................................
26 Are parents married? ...................................................................................................
27 With whom are you staying? ..............................................................................................
28 How many brothers do you live with?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29 How many sisters do you live with? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30 Are there any other relatives living with you?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31 Do you, or anyone who lives with you, have a disability or serious illness? Yes/No
If yes, please give
details:……………………………………………………………………………………
32 Approximate distance travelled to attend school: ............................................................
33 Current mode of transport for journey to school: .............................................................
34 What is the main source of light in your house?
Electricity (mains)
Kerosene
Gas lamps
Candles/ torches/ flashlights
Solar panels/ lamps
Generator
No light
Other
30 Does your household benefit from the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty
(LEAP) Programme? Yes/No
172
A. DECLARATION BY STUDENT
I, ................................................................................................................,
information, I have given about myself is the truth.
certify
that
the
Signature of Pupil: ..................................................................................................
B. DECLARATION BY WITNESS (PARENT/GUARDIAN)
Relationship to student:……………………………………………………………………………..
Signature / Right thumb print………………………………………………………………………
PART FIVE (ENDORSEMENT OF HEADMASTER / HEADMISTRESS)
I………………………………………………………………………Headmaster /Headmistress
of………………………………………………………………………School, having checked on
documents attached declare that, Master/Miss…………………………………………...……....of
……………...……………………………………………………………. (JHS is / was a student
in my School in the…………………………………………....……………………academic year.
I recommend / do not recommend the student (Please Underline appropriately)
PART SIX (DOCUMENT DETAILS)
Please indicate if student has attached the following documents or not.
1. Admission Letter
Yes
No
2. Last School Report
3. Result Slip
4. School Fees/ Bill
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
NB: NO AWARD WILL BE GRANTED IF INFORMATION PROVIDED IS FOUND TO BE
FALSE. AN AWARD IF INADVERTENTLY GIVEN BASED ON FALSE INFORMATION
WILL AUTOMATICALLY BE WITHDRAWN AND THE CULPRIT WOULD BE LIABLE
FOR PROSECUTION.
Please return the completed form to:
SEIP SCHOLARSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box M.45
Accra.
173
OFFICIAL USE ONLY
PART A
(TO BE COMPLETED BY OFFICIALS OF THE SEIP SCHOLARSHIP SECRETARIAT)
Name of Official vetting application:………………………………………………………………
1. Are recommendations made by Institution / School in order? (Please tick)
Yes
No
2. Recommendation of Schedule Officer:
a. Recommended for award of full Scholarship
b. Not Recommended
3. Reason/Justification:
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………….
……………………………………………………………………………………………................
......................................
Signature:…………………………………………………………………..
Date:………………………………………………………………………..
PART B
APPROVAL BY SCHOLARSHIP ADMINISTRATOR
NAME:……………………………………………………………………………………...
SIGNATURE:………………………………………………………………………………
DATE:………………………………………………………………………………………
174
ANNEX 12: GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIPS PLAN
GHANA EDUCATION SERVICE
SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIPS
August 2014
175
Introduction
The School Performance Partnership (SPP) defines the relationship between the school and
District Education Directorate with oversight responsibility by the DEOC as a process of
supporting schools for high achievements. The SPPP is an agreed plan of activities with
expected outputs and outcomes.
Under the Secondary Education Improvement Project, 125
beneficiary SHSs will be required to prepare School Performance Partnership plans.
The main objective of the SPPP is to improve teaching and learning leading to increase in
performance. The SPP therefore provides a platform on which schools are held accountable for
what is taught, how it is taught and how it helps students to learn effectively. Schools thus will
do needs assessment, identify areas of teaching and learning that need support and develop plans
to improve upon these areas. The SPPP must target activities that will improve outcomes in
performance and enrolment. It must include the following
 Improvement in teaching and learning mathematics, science and ICT
 Leadership
 Support for weak students and low learners
 Procuring laboratory materials
 Teaching and learning materials.
These are mandatory and must be catered for in the SPPP. Other activities that may be
considered include student enrolment drive, educational field trips, rehabilitation of minor
facilities among others.
Having received training, heads of schools are expected to provide similar training for all levels
of leadership to help them in identifying areas that need support in their various departments.
With that training it is expected that school would be able to prepare a good SPPP.
Schools then will propose and plan activities for improving quality of teaching and learning
which are approved by the Ghana Education Service to be funded under the SEIP.
The accountability relationship is thus between the head of the SHS and the District Director for
Education who represents the Director-General. The SPPP will therefore be signed by the Head
of the SHS and the District Director for Education and countersigned by the Chairman of the
DEOC. The Regional Director who will sign as a witness has oversight responsibility to
supervise and monitor the implementation of the SPPPs in the
region.
Steps in Preparing the SPPP
1. Meet with your school stakeholders i.e. teachers, non-teaching staff (accounting,
procurement, kitchen etc.), Board47, and Students Representative Council (SRC). The
purpose should be to brainstorm on activities which will improve the quality of teaching
and learning in the school and enhance student performance.
2. Select activities which will have the most impact on improving teaching and learning and
which can be implemented within one year.
47
PTAs are represented on the School Board and are therefore not separately mentioned.
176
3. The total cost for an SPPP in a particular year should not be more than 25 percent of total
SEIP allocation48 for the beneficiary school.
4. List these activities in your SPPP with costs, time-lines, responsibility, and the actual
outcome of quality improvement these activities will lead to. Justify each activity in a
short write-up below the SPPP. A template is provided as an example in Annex 13.
5. Ensure that your outcomes are measurable and there are baselines for all the agreed targets.
Training
The schools will receive training in the following areas among others to enable schools
identify and prioritize their needs
Planning
Leadership
Procurement
Financial Accounting
School inspection
Eligibility for Funding
A school will be eligible for funding if it satisfies the following criteria:
The School has;
i.
An approved School Performance Plan based on priorities identified during school
stakeholder consultations (duly signed by stakeholders).
ii.
Signed a School Performance Partnership Agreement to comply with the requirements of
the SEIP Financing Agreement and to discharge its obligations under the project.
iii.
Opened a School Performance Partnership Account to receive SEIP funds and has
notified the Director-General of the account particulars.
iv.
Submitted School Performance Partnership Plan, Budget, Procurement Plan and Cash
Flow forecast to the Director-General with copy to the District Director of Education
v.
The school shall also ensure that budget figures recorded reflect the period of
implementation indicated in the SPPPs.
vi.
Submitted request for Funds.
48
SEIP allocations for each school is estimated at USD 120,000 (one hundred and twenty thousand US dollars) over
the 5 year SEIP implementation period.
177
Disbursement and Compliance
The school must ensure that it;
i.
Applies Project Funds judiciously and for the intended purposes, and in accordance with
the Financing Agreement and applicable Laws of Ghana.
ii.
Maintains proper books of account and prepares periodic reports.
iii.
Ensures available school level data for necessary in-depth project and financial
management reviews.
The following shall constitute non-compliance:
i.
Delays in responding to queries for more than twenty-one (21) working days.
ii.
Misappropriation of funds
iii.
Under-spending of funds (under-spending represents disbursement below 60% of annual
allocation)
iv.
Over commitment on available funds
Sanctions for Non-Compliance with Disbursement Policies
A School, which fails to meet its obligations under the Project, will face one or more of the
following sanctions depending on the nature and extent of non-compliance:
i.
The name of the defaulting school and a description of the offence will be published in
the public print and electronic media.
ii.
Schools found to have misappropriated funds may be prosecuted in accordance with
Ghana‘s Financial Administration Act.
iii.
Continued under-spending of funds may lead to automatically forfeiting the funds and a
reallocation to other beneficiary SHSs. Funds that remain un-disbursed at the beginning
of the final year of the project will also be forfeited.
iv.
Any other appropriate sanctions as recommended by the Director-General, including
removal of the Head of Institution.
Requesting for Funds
i.
On successful completion of the school sub-project contract, the School Head will
request for payment with support of the necessary documentation and countersignatures.
178
ii.
On approval of the SHS‘s SPPP and procurement plan,SHS heads will receive clearance
from the GES to begin the procurement process for all procurements based activities as
per the procurement plan and proceed with implementation, monitoring and reporting.
iii.
Funds shall be transferred / remitted to Schools on demand and
Estimate of Quarterly Cash Requirements in the form of tranches.
iv.
Transfers of funds to Schools from the Headquarters will not be an automatic occurrence.
Instead, funds shall only be transferred to those Schools that have satisfied the conditions
for the SPPPs.
v.
The Head of School will submit financial statements twice in the year: (i) at the mid-year
review, and (ii) end of year review, to the FC.
on the basis of an
Receiving Funds
The primary responsibility for ensuring the smooth and uninterrupted flow of funds to
Beneficiary SHSs from the project account maintained at the center rests with the Financial
Controller.
Monitoring and Reporting
The School Head has a primary responsibility to monitor the day-to-day work done during the
implementation and to report on all implementation issues, challenges and successes as per
reporting formats from the Ghana Education Service. The School Head will also facilitate all
MOE and GES monitoring visits and ensure that these are smoothly carried out and the
necessary school level data is obtained. Further, the School head will update all relevant SHS
data on the Secondary School Website set up as part of the monitoring of the Secondary
Education Improvement Project. The update will be done two times a year after the mid-year
review and end of year review. There will be independent validation of all SPPP in the
beneficiary schools.
179
ANNEX 13: TEMPLATE FOR SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIPS PLAN 49
ACTIVITY
UNIT
CO ST
Q TY
Train Science, Math, ICT Teachers
Select teachers to be trained
Support T raining process (per diem etc)
Cost of training
ICT Package
Computers
refurbish computer lab
air condition
i-box installation
internet connectivity
cost of internet
3
20
1
1
1
1
1
CO ST
RESPO NSIBILITY
150
0
0
0
450
1200
22000
1300
2000
3500
15000
0
24000
22000
1300
2000
3500
15000
O utreach Programmes Targeting nearby
JHSs
Invite JHS 3 pupils to durbar
0
0
SHS pupils deliver motivation statements
0
Water and light refreshments for pupils
Head's statement about school environment
and scholarships
100
49
various
Aug. 2014
Heads of ICT /Science
JUSTIFICATIO N
O UTPUT
improve teaching and
learning of Science
10% increase in pass in Mock
exams compared last year
Improve teaching and
learning as per SEIP
ref SEIP Pad indicators
Encourage JHS 3 pupils to
select the SHS
SHS 1 enrolment increases by
15%
Improve learning
environment and security
10% increase in pass in Mock
exams compared last year
5% increase in SHS1 enrolment
5% increase in SHS1 enrolment
Dec ,14-Jan., 15
Oct-Nov 2014
Nov, 2014
Jan-15
Mar-15
200
1000
0
School Environment
School fence
Phased greening and tree planting
Minor Repairs and Maintenance
Repair, procurement of school furniture,
equipment
Repair of doors, windows, minor painting
etc.
2
Assist Head
TIME FRAME
School Head
School Head, Students
School Head, Procurement
July-Sept 2014
July-Dec 2014
Improve teaching and
learning environment
10% increase in enrollment
Please note that this is only an example template and each Beneficiary SHS may prioritize their own activities which they will implement to achieve the agreed
outcomes.
180
ANNEX 14: e-TRANSFORM PROJECT AND LIST OF BENEFICIARY
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The IDA funded eTransform project for US$97 million which was approved by the World Bank
Board on July 30, 2014 became effective on September 19, 2014. The project is aligned with the
Government of Ghana’s Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda (GSCDA) which seeks
to contribute to the higher growth and economic opportunities for the poor and create jobs. It
also aligns with the common strategic themes identified in the Ghana Country Partnership
Strategy (CPS) and supports higher growth and economic opportunities for the poor, job
creation, efficiently and effectively managed public sector and resources, improved health
management, service delivery to the poor and the vulnerable, delivery of quality education and
vocational training system, and creation of a large pool of middle-level skilled workers. The
eTransform project seeks to improve the reach and efficiency of public and private sector service
delivery through the smart use of ICT.
PROJECT DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE
The project development objective is to improve the efficiency and coverage of government
services delivery using ICT. The project employs platforms to nurture new businesses, job
opportunities, and ICT-based entrepreneurship.
Under Component 3 of the project activities to Scale up of Applications to improve service
delivery in priority sectors (US$ 41.55 million) include the use of ICT applications and services
to improve education delivery services in Ghana. The subcomponent supports the use of ICT in
education, with a focus on teacher training and local content development.
TEACHERS ’ NETWORK, EDUCATIONAL PORTAL, AND CAPACITY BUILDING (US$ 8.05 MILLION)
The specific subcomponent activities are:
(i)
Teacher and student education portal to improve education quality at secondary level.
Locally produced content and adaptation of online educational content will be utilized.
The portal will be developed to support teachers, students, parents and researchers and
provides access to good practice lesson plans, curricular content such as courses,
exercises and quizzes, teaching and learning aids, on-line advice, and educational
research. The portals provides a platform for knowledge exchange with national and
international networks and for participation in relevant discussion fora.
i) Wireless Networks for Selected Secondary Schools will address the critical need of
connectivity for selected50 senior secondary schools in Ghana. The project will support
NITA to provide connectivity to 200 of the most disadvantaged senior secondary schools
which have the most need to improvement quality of teaching and learning. Beneficiary
50
Selection of SHSs is based on objective criteria to select the neediest senior high schools for quality improvement
181
schools will be provided with high-speed internet (e.g. WiMax/LTE installation),
equipment, devices, and up to 3Mbps of dedicated capacity for the project duration of 5
years. NITA will work with NCA to leverage available spectrum for cost-effective
connectivity to beneficiary senior high schools. The project will provide computing
equipment for computer labs in secondary schools that have a clear plan for use of ICT in
education, with physical facilities to house computing equipment. Where beneficiary
secondary schools already have a functioning computer laboratory, wireless fidelity
(WiFi) will be added.
ii) Capacity building for teachers and educational leaders: The project will support training
to teachers as a part of in-service teacher training for new and practicing teachers in
beneficiary senior high schools. The training will focus on the use of computer- and
internet-aided education (beyond ICT literacy). The project will leverage the facilities of
the Ghana-India Kofi Annan Center and other international training facilities as needed,
for the delivery of ICT training and will determine the minimum ICT competency to be
provided under the project which will support project activities. Teachers to be trained
will cut across the key subject areas including Science, Mathematics, and other technical
subjects. Teachers will be selected from beneficiary senior secondary to receive an initial
5-10 days of face-to-face training during the first year, and another 2-5 days of training
including virtual training every following year during the project life cycle. The actual
time needed for the training will be confirmed during project implementation. The
training will ensure that teachers are refreshed and updated on new educational
technologies including the use of internet and the ability of parents and guardians to
access the educational results of their wards etc.
iii) Developing digital educational content: The project will help develop locally relevant
educational content for schools. The work will be done in collaboration with the subject
associations, such as GAMT, GAST, and with the wider technology developer
community. Using open education resources, the project will support the development of
state-of-the-art and relevant educational content. Emphasis will be given to the subjects
of English, Mathematics, Science and other technical subjects.
SELECTION OF SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS TO BENEFIT UNDER THE PROJECT
a. The project focuses on the senior secondary level of education specifically public senior
high schools. The criterion for selection is schools which have the lowest proportion of
candidates obtaining a credit pass on the West Africa Senior Secondary Certificate
Examination (WASSCE). From the ranking of SHSs using the WASSCE results for
2013, schools which benefit under the project have between zero to 43 percent of their
students scoring a WASSCE credit pass in four subjects in 2013.
b. Public Senior High Schools are ranked according to the proportion of their candidates
who achieved a credit pass (A1 to C6) in all four core subjects of the WASSCE in 2013
(core subjects are English, Mathematics, Integrated Sciences and Social Studies). Any
school benefitting under the Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP) approved
by the IDA Board on May 20, or under the e-Learning project with funding from
182
Belgium, will not be eligible to also benefit from e-Transform project. Given the
considerable overlap of beneficiary SHSs under the three projects, more public senior
secondary schools will benefit from some support for ICT for learning to improve
quality. The list of public SHSs to potentially benefit under the eTransform is attached as
Annex 14 of the SEIP PIM. The SHSs to benefit under the eTransform project will be
confirmed after a school readiness and needs assessment is conducted. Ranked SHSs
may be eliminated if they are found to have comprehensive ICT facilities or if they are
benefiting from other sources of funding not indicated in this PIM. In such cases or in
the case that more funding becomes available, beneficiary SHSs will be added based on
the ranking of schools.
SCHOOL READINESS AND NEEDS ASSESSMENT
As part of the selection procedure, technical teams, comprising NITA and the MOE, GES, and
others will visit each school with a check-list to collect relevant information about the readiness
of the school to benefit from support under the project. The check list will include but will not
be restricted to the existence of a sustainable ICT plan and a budget with potential to maintain
the program, existence of power/alternative power, physical security of equipment, strong school
leadership, a functioning school board, the existence of internet usage on the time-table, and the
appointment of a school coordinating team. The needs assessment would advise on the
functionality of existing computers, anti-virus, and ability to support course programs and
software propose under the project. The assessment will also advise on the need for networking,
the levels of ICT knowledge among teachers and students, the qualification of ICT coordinators
in the schools and their ability to handle minor maintenance issues.
RESULTS
Indicator 4: Number of teachers and/or students who use the education portals. (% of which
female).
Cumulative Target
Number of page views (access) on educational portal, e-parliament, eProcurement, data
protection etc.
Targets are calculated conservatively as (2 teachers per school for 200 Beneficiary Senior
Secondary Schools) + (100 students per SHS for 200 Beneficiary Senior Secondary Schools).
Beneficiaries calculated as: Number of trainees, number of persons in temporary employment in
digitization, Number of students and teachers having access to educational portal, Number of
persons using e-applications, Number of persons with access to ID cards. Results will be
disaggregated by male and female.
Intermediate Indicator: Number of teachers who complete training through computer/internet
aided education
Cumulative Target are defined as number of teachers who have successfully completed computer
and internet aided training
183
ANNEX 15: DATA FLOW MAP FOR MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Data collation and reporting:
M&E Team
Data collation:
Quality and Outcomes Team
Data submitted
to online
platform:
Heads of
Schools
Independent
verification: survey
firm of in-school
activities
Data collation:
Civil Works Team
Monitoring visits: by
TIC and PSC (GES,
MOE, FPMU,
CENDLOS, NTC)
School-level data:
In-school activities
Independent
verification: survey
firm of civil works
School-level data:
Civil works
184
Progress of civil
works: Supervision
consultancies
ANNEX 16: PROJECT DISBURSEMENT LINKED INDICATORS AND RESULTS
DLIs
Actions to be Completed
DLRs
DLI 1:
Targeting of
school
expansion in
underserved
school
districts
Year 0 – FY 2014
DLR 1.1: Agreed targeting criteria applied
to identify list of districts and schools for
expansion and improvement as set forth in
the PIM.
DLI 2:
Increase in
new seats
for SHS
students in
underserved
school
districts
Year 0 – FY 2014
DLR 2.1: Pre-construction requirements
met for new construction in 23 districts
YEAR 1- FY 2015
DLR 2.2: About 30% of all construction
works completed (aggregated)
Amount of the
Financing
Allocated per DLR
(US$)
US$5.54 million
Government
Report
Verification Protocol
Government list of districts and schools with data on
each indicator and indication of SEIP selection based
on agreed selection criteria for:
World Bank
New construction districts: Identification of districts
with no operating SHS; for remaining districts,
selection of school sites for new construction based on
objective targeting criteria: (a) demand for SHS places;
(b) district size; and (c) district poverty index.
Environmental
Screening Report;
Resettlement
Action Plans
US$4.64 m
Review of
Bidding
Documents
US$4.64 m
YEAR 2– FY 2016
DLR 2.3: About 80% of all construction
works completed (aggregated)
World Bank
US$4.64 m
Third party
verification
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 2.4: About 5,000 new seats created
in underserved districts
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 2.5: About 15,000 new seats created
in underserved districts (cumulative)
Verification
Source/entity
Expansion/improvement in low performing schools:
ranked by WASSCE; demand for SHS places (school
size); and infrastructure needs assessment.
Safeguards compliance through ESMF and RPF
verified in all new construction sites (screening and
RAPs completed in 23 districts).
Complete package of final bidding documents for new
construction in 23 districts in line with appraised design
and including facilities maintenance plans.
GoG report which includes schematic and site specific
designs based on agreed criteria and technical analysis.
Construction implementation reports verified by mobile
monitoring and monthly construction supervision
reports.
Seat occupancy verified by school enrolment records,
subsidy collection list and construction certificates.
US$4.64 m
185
US$4.64 m
Total: $23.20 m
DLI 3:
Increase in
number of
seats
utilized in
existing
lowperforming
schools
Year 0 – FY 2014
DLR 3.1: Pre-construction requirements
met for upgrading of selected schools
YEAR 1- FY 2015
DLR 3.2: About 500 seats utilized
(cumulative)
YEAR 2 – FY 2016
DLR 3.3: About 1,000 seats utilized
(cumulative)
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 3.4: About3,000 seats utilized
(cumulative)
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 3.5: About 5,000 seats utilized
(cumulative)
US$4.64 m
Environmental
Screening Report;
US$4.64 m
Review of
Bidding
Documents
District Assembly
certification
Safeguards compliance through ESMF verified in all
expansion/upgrading sites (environmental screening).
Complete package of final bidding documents and
including facilities maintenance plans.
Detailed school specific plans include (i) types of
facilities needed/eligible based on design and technical
standards agreed upon between the GoG and World
Bank
US$4.64 m
World Bank
Construction implementation reports verified by mobile
monitoring and district quarterly reports.
Third party
verification
US$4.64 m
US$4.64 m
Total:$23.20 m
DLI 4:
Increased
enrolment in
SHS in
targeted
districts and
schools for
students
from lowincome
families,
especially
girls
Year 0 – FY 2014
DLR 4.1: Selection and contracting of
implementing partner to administer
scholarships completed and criteria for
selection of beneficiaries of scholarships
developed
YEAR 1- FY 2015
DLR 4.2: At least 2,000 SHS students
receiving scholarship in selected schools
YEAR 2 – FY 2016
DLR 4.3: At least 4,000 SHS students
receiving scholarship in selected schools
(cumulative)
Government
report based on
guidelines from
PIM for selection
of schools and
adoption of
scholarship
criteria for
incentives.
US$4.64 m
US$4.64 m
Scholarship
agency contract
and TOR
US$4.64 m
School
scholarship
186
Contract with scholarship agency signed and inclusive
of methodology and criteria for selection of
beneficiaries (as agreed in PIM).
List of beneficiaries for targeted districts available in
District education offices.
Incentives provided in the form of cash transfers to
schools and students through scholarship agency.
School survey report aggregated by scholarship agency
(yearly)
Mobile monitoring reports verifying receipt of
scholarships at beginning of school year.
DLI 5:
Annual
publication
of School
Performance
Report
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 4.4: At least 6,000 SHS students
receiving scholarship in selected schools
(cumulative)
US$4.64 m
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 4.5: At least 10,000 SHS students
receiving scholarship in selected schools
(cumulative)
YEAR 1- FY2015
DLR 5.1: School Mapping of all SH
schools completed
US$4.64 m
YEAR 2 – FY 2016
DLR 5.2: Publication of updated school
performance data for FY15/16 online and
in brochure
US$4.64 m
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 5.3: Publication of updated school
performance data for FY16/17online and
in brochure
DLI 6:
School
Performance
Partnerships
in 125
Beneficiary
Schools
YEAR 1- FY 2015
DLR 6.2: Training on school improvement
planning and implementation provided for
125 selected schools;
US$4.64 m
Report on school
mapping exercise
and data provided
to Bank
(including code
book)
Online school
performance data
Linked to MOE
website and web
platform for
mobile
monitoring
US$ 4.64 m
US$ 4.64 m
(cumulative) signed
Third Party
Verification and
World Bank
supervision
Total:US$23.20 m
US$4.64 m
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 5.4: Publication of updated school
performance data for FY17/18 online and
in brochure
YEAR 0 – FY 2014
DLR 6.1: Guidelines on preparation of
SPPs developed and distributed to selected
schools
YEAR 2 – FY2016
DLR 6.3: SPPs for80 selected schools
reports aggregated
by scholarship
scheme agency
Spatial and geographic mapping based on verifiable
data and a number of key indicators; published as
report for 2015 NESAR.
Annual Publication includes analysis of school-level
data with particular emphasis on learning outcomes,
equity (including participation of girls), new student
enrollment, as well as infrastructure conditions.
World Bank
Total:$18.56 m
World Bank
US$4.64 m
District/Regional
Education offices
annual reports
Third party
validation- School
audit
School SPP
survey
US$4.64 m
187
Guidelines approved and distributed to targeted
schools.
Detailed report on school level training on school
improvement planning and management.
School plans are developed by schools in collaboration
with local communities, district and regional education
directorates using guidelines in the PIM. GoG reviews
proposals and focuses on providing support to essential
quality improvements, including activities which
strengthen teacher competencies, improve training and
skills of students and teachers in math and science
Signed partnership agreements available for audit in
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 6.4: SPPs for 100 selected schools
(cumulative) signed
DLI 7:
Improved
learning
outcomes in
125 selected
SHS
(quality
package)
District education offices. They include information on:
school location, identified needs and action plan
(including time frame and budget) and linked to
predefined learning objectives.
US$4.64 m
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 6.5: 125 SelectedSchools
US$4.64 m
implementing performance
partnerships based on SPPPs
(cumulative)
Total:$23.20 m
YEAR 0 – FY 2014
DLR 7.1:Report on review of the
US$4.64 m
Financial management quarterly IUFR reports transfers
to x number schools for SPPP partnerships.
NCCA report and
workshop
proceedings
quality of teaching and learning for
mathematics and science in SHS
YEAR 1- FY 2015
DLR 7.2:Training modules rolled out
i-campus content
and modules
finalized, rolled
out and reported
by Center for
Distance Learning
US$4.64 m
for mathematics and science and ICT
based instruction developed for school
use
YEAR 2 – FY 2016
DLR 7.3: ICT based instruction rolled out
in about 50% of targeted schools
(cumulative).
YEAR 3 – FY 2017
DLR 7.4: ICT based instruction rolled out
in all targeted schools (cumulative).
YEAR 4 – FY 2018
DLR 7.5: Increase in number of 6 credits
and above WASSCE scores averaged in
total selected SHS
US$4.64 m
Preliminary curriculum review report on consultations
and workshops held (participants, agendas,
recommendations) Curriculum can be used throughout
country and adheres to best practices in strengthening
skills in mathematics and science
GoG endorsement of curriculum and training plancommunicated to all selected schools.
Training plan includes identification of key
competencies, training timeframe, tracking
participation, certification of completion.
World Bank
Annual school
survey
US$4.64 m
ICT equipment provided to all selected schools,
including i-campus packages (core curriculum modules
and on and off-line capabilities); NITA provided Wi-Fi
connectivity verified by service contracts.
WASSCE report
Third party
validation
US$4.64 m
Total: $ 23.20 m
Annual Report includes information on: roll out
activities, targeting, planned attendance, number of
teachers successfully completing training
anddemonstrating improved content knowledge in
mathematics and science, pedagogical and classroom
management skills
WASSCE in mathematics and science increases
measured as average of all selected schools.
Total:
US$ 140.1 m
188
ANNEX 17: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR INDEPENDENT
VERIFICATION OF CIVIL WORKS ACTIVITIES
Draft Terms of Reference
Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP)
Independent Verification Firm – civil works
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana has obtained World Bank funding to support the government‘s
strategy to improve secondary education in Ghana. The Secondary Education Improvement
Project (SEIP), approved for an amount of USD 156million with a project development
objective to increase access to senior secondary education in underserved districts and
improve quality in low-performing senior high schools in Ghana. The project has two
components:
 Component 1: Support to increase access with equity and quality in senior high
schools (USD 140.1million). This component will employ a results-based financing
modality to increase access with equity and quality in underserved districts and low
performing schools.
 Component 2: Management, research, monitoring and evaluation (USD 15.9million).
This will be a traditional investment lending to support implementation of the project,
monitoring and evaluation activities, verification of results and research activities.
The SEIP was made effective on October 3, 2014 and will be implemented over a five year
period to November 2019. The Ministry of Education (MOE) is the implementing agency,
with implementation at the school-level overseen by the Ghana Education Service.
Component 1 is further broken down into two pillars:
 Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity (Total costs including contingencies: US$125.1
million)
This includes:
o Construction of 24-unit Classroom and ancillary facilities Block (E-Block); 8unit Block of 2-Bedroom Staff Flats; Canteen Block; 3-Bedroom
Headmaster‘s bungalow with 2-Bedroom outhouse; Security/Gate House at
each of 23 sites in 23 districts
o Facilities improvements (construction works) in 50 existing SHS
o Scholarship packages for 10,400 SHS students from low income families,
especially girls.
 Pillar 2: Improve the quality of education in selected low-performing Senior High
Schools (Total costs including contingencies: US$15 million).
This pillar will finance the implementation of School Performance Partnership Plans
in 125 existing SHS. The SPPPs are a mechanism by which schools take
responsibility for decision making and planning to improve their performance, and are
given financial resources to support them. The partnership aspect comes in whereby
the plan is an agreement with the District Education Oversight Committee. Under
SPPPs schools will be able to choose activities from a number of options and will also
be expected to benefit from:
189
o Installation of an ICT package (the iCampus, which contains materials under
the SHS curriculum).
o In-service training for Science and Mathematics teachers.
Also as part of Pillar 2‘s focus on quality an online platform will be established
containing information about Ghana‘s SHS in order to improve transparency and
increase information availability for parents and students.
The results-based financing modality of Component 1 relies on the Government meeting a set
of pre-defined ‗Disbursement Linked Indicators‘ under which there are specific annual
‗Disbursement Linked Results‘ (DLRs). When evidence is shown that a DLR has been met,
the World Bank will release an agreed tranche of the project funds for Component 1. The
DLRs are given in Table 1 below.
190
ANNEX 18: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR INDEPENDENT
VERIFICATION OF IN-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES (QUALITY
AND OUTCOMES)
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana has obtained World Bank funding to support the government‘s strategy to
improve secondary education in Ghana. The Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP),
approved for an amount of USD 156million with a project development objective to increase access to
senior secondary education in underserved districts and improve quality in low-performing senior
high schools in Ghana. The project has two components:


Component 1: Support to increase access with equity and quality in senior high schools (USD
140.1million). This component will employ a results-based financing modality to increase
access with equity and quality in underserved districts and low performing schools.
Component 2: Management, research, monitoring and evaluation (USD 15.9million). This
will be a traditional investment lending to support implementation of the project, monitoring
and evaluation activities, verification of results and research activities.
The SEIP was made effective on October 3, 2014 and will be implemented over a five year period to
November 2019. The Ministry of Education (MOE) is the implementing agency, with implementation
at the school-level overseen by the Ghana Education Service.
Component 1 is further broken down into two pillars:
 Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity (Total costs including contingencies: US$125.1 million)
This includes:
o Construction of 23 new SHS
o Facilities improvements (construction works) in 50 existing SHS
o Scholarship packages for 10,400 SHS students from low income families, especially
girls.
 Pillar 2: Improve the quality of education in selected low-performing Senior High Schools
(Total costs including contingencies: US$15 million).
This pillar will finance the implementation of School Performance Partnership Plans in 125
existing SHS (these include the 50 receiving facilities improvements above, and an additional
75 schools). The SPPPs are a mechanism by which schools take responsibility for decision
making and planning to improve their performance, and are given financial resources to
support them. The partnership aspect comes in whereby the plan is an agreement with the
District Education Oversight Committee. Under SPPPs schools will be able to choose
activities from a number of options and will also be expected to benefit from:
o Installation of an ICT package (the iCampus, which contains materials under the SHS
curriculum).
o In-service training for Science and Mathematics teachers.
Also as part of Pillar 2‘s focus on quality an online platform will be established containing
information about Ghana‘s SHS in order to improve transparency and increase information
availability for parents and students.
The results-based financing modality of Component 1 relies on the Government meeting a set of predefined ‗Disbursement Linked Indicators‘ under which there are specific annual ‗Disbursement
Linked Results‘ (DLRs). When evidence is shown that a DLR has been met, the World Bank will
191
release an agreed tranche of the project funds for Component 1. The DLRs are given in Table 1
below.
192
TABLE A18.1: DISBURSEMENT LINKED INDICATORS AND RESULTS UNDER THE SECONDARY EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
Results
Focus
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
Comments
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
Expansion of
S HS
DLI 1: Targeting of
school expansion and
improvement in
underserved districts
and selected low
performing schools
DLR 1.1: Agreed targeting
criteria applied to identify list
of Districts and schools for
expansion and improvement
under the Project as set forth in
the PIM
DLI 2: Increase in
new seats for SHS
students in
underserved districts
DLR 2.1: Pre-construction
requirements met for new
construction in 23 selected
districts.
Criteria for selection based
on model agreed during the
M arch 2014 appraisal
mission. Selection of
school sites for new
construction in:(i) districts
with no operating SHS;
(ii) district prioritization
based on the following
objective targeting criteria:
(a) demand for SHS places;
(b) district size; and (c)
district poverty index
Selection of
rehabilitation/upgrading of
existing school sites based
on specified criteria and
targeting methods based on
needs assessment.
DLR 2.2: About 30% of
all construction works
completed (aggregated)
193
DLR 2.3: About
80% of all
construction works
completed
(aggregated)
DLR 2.4: About
5,000 new seats
created in
underserved
districts
(cumulative)
DLR 2.5:
About 15,000
new seats
created in
underserved
districts
(cumulative)
Safeguards compliance
through ESM F and RPF
verified in all new
construction sites.
(screening and RAPs
completed).
Validation of site selection
applied in school
construction
implementation plan,
bidding documents and
safeguards reviews.
Package of final bidding
documents completed for
new construction in 23
districts in line with
appraised design.
Results
Focus
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
Comments
Facilities maintenance
plans drafted.
Demand side
interventions
to encourage
enrollment
and
completion of
S HS
DLI 3: Increase in
utilized seats in
existing lowperforming schools
DLR 3.1: Pre-construction
requirements met for
upgrading of selected schools
DLR 3.2:About 500
seats utilized
DLR 3.3: About
1,000 utilized seats
(cumulative)
DLR 3.4: About
3,000 utilized
seats
(cumulative)
DLR 3.5:
About 5,000
utilized seats
(cumulative)
Bidding Documents reflect
identified needs/scope of
expansion/rehabilitation in
selected low performing
schools. District Assembly
report on safeguards
screening, site visits and
civil works tendering.
DLI 4: Increased
enrolment in selected
SHS for students
from low income
families, especially
girls
DLR 4.1:Selection and
contracting of implementing
partner to administer
scholarships completed and
criteria for selection of
beneficiaries of scholarships
developed
DLR 4.2: At least 2,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools.
DLR 4.3: At least
4,000 SHS students
receiving
scholarship in
selected schools.
(cumulative)
DLR 4.4: At least
6,000 SHS
students
receiving
scholarship in
selected schools
(cumulative)
DLR 4.5: At
least 10,000
SHS students
receiving
scholarship in
selected
schools(cumul
ative)
Link to PDO indicator 2
for identification of
beneficiaries for incentives
as defined in the PIM .
Schools report on number
of students receiving
scholarships per year for
their three year SHS
program. Disbursement
scaled according to number
of scholarships awarded
per year.
Pillar 2: Improve quality in low-performing senior high schools
Improve the
quality of
teaching and
learning in
selected lowperforming
secondary
schools
DLI 5: Annual
publication of School
Performance Report
DLR 5.1: School
mapping of all SHS
completed
194
DLR 5.2:
Publication of
school
performance data
for FY 2016 online
and in brochure
DLR 5.3:
Publication of
updated school
performance data
for FY17 online
and in brochure
DLR 5.4:
Publication of
updated
school
performance
data for FY18
online and in
brochure
Greater sensitization and
communication about
SHS- outreach to JHS, up
to date data on school
details.
Results
Focus
Improvemen
ts in teaching
and learning
in targeted
schools
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
Comments
DLI 6: School
Performance
Partnerships in 125
beneficiary schools
DLR 6.1: Guidelines on
preparation of school
performance partnerships
(SPPs) developed and
distributed to selected schools.
DLR 6.2: Training on
school improvement
planning and
implementation
provided for 125
selected schools.
DLR 6.3: 80
selected schools
signing
performance
partnerships
DLR 6.4: 100
selected schools
signing
performance
partnerships
(cumulative)
DLR 6.5: 125
selected
schools
implementing
performance
partnerships
based on
SPPPs
SPPPs would include
details on ICT packages if
needed, leadership and
management training,
competencies, strategy for
improving in-service
teacher training, mentoring
and materials. Survey to be
conducted for beneficiary
schools.
DLI 7: Improved
learning outcomes in
125 selected SHS
(with quality
package)
DLR 7.1: Report on review of
the quality of teaching and
learning for mathematics and
science in SHS
DLR 7.2: Training
modules rolled out for
mathematics and
science teachers and
ICT based instruction
developed for school
use in selected SHSs
DLR 7.3: ICT
based instruction
rolled out in about
50% of selected
SHS.
DLR 7.4: ICT
based instruction
rolled out in all
selected SHS
DLR 7.5:
Increase in
number of 6
credits and
above
WASSCE
scores on
average in
totalselected
SHS.
Year 4 DLR corresponds to
PDO indicator
At least 125 existing
schools expected to receive
quality package- (will roll
out to new schools once
they are functioning)
195
Under Component 2 the MOE and GES will be carrying out their own monitoring and data collection,
particularly at the school level. In addition to traditional monitoring and supervision visits, data will be
collected via an online platform by which schools enter and submit information such as on scholarship
beneficiaries, general enrolment, staffing, execution of funds and activities under SPPPs and others.
OBJECTIVE OF THE ASSIGNMENT
The objectives of these terms of reference are to employ the services of a firm to conduct an annual
survey in the 125 existing schools and the 23 new schools once they have opened over four years. The list
of schools, their districts and regions is given in Annex 1. The firm will provide independent verification
for the meeting of a number of specific DLRs under the project, referred to as the ‗in-school‘ DLRs. (A
separate terms of reference and contract is being procured to verify the construction-related DLRs.) In
addition this consultancy firm will collect further information at the school level to support the
Government‘s own monitoring systems. The data collection will be carried out via an annual survey of
the beneficiary schools.
The DLRs to be verified under this contract are shown in Table 2.
TABLE A18.2: DLR S TO BE VERIFIED BY THIS CONSULTANCY SERVICES
DLR
1. DLR 2.4
2. DLR 2.5
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
DLR 3.2
DLR 3.3
DLR 3.4
DLR 3.5
DLR 4.2
DLR 4.3
DLR 4.4
DLR 4.5
11. DLR6.3
12. DLR 6.4
13. DLR 6.5
14. DLR 7.2
15. DLR 7.3
16. DLR 7.4
Related activities
Enrolment in 23 new SHS. This will require
verification of enrolment records, including
subsidy applications sent to GES HQ.
Additional enrolment in 50 existing SHS. This will
require verification of enrolment records, including
subsidy applications sent to GES HQ.
Years of project
3, 4
1, 2, 3, 4
Scholarship beneficiaries. This data collection will 1, 2, 3, 4
require verifying the numbers of beneficiaries, that
beneficiaries have received their scholarships, the
selection criteria which related to each beneficiary
on application and any update to their personal
circumstances (relating to income).
Schools signing School Performance Partnership 2, 3, 4
Plans. In addition to checking signature, this
requires confirming that SPPPs are being
implemented. This means checking that activities
planned have been implemented (as shown by
expenditures in the cash books, records in stores,
reports of activities including attendance sheets of
trainings [and that they match with intended
trainees] and other evidence available).
ICT package rolled out. This requires verifying
2, 3
that teachers have been trained in use of ICT for
teaching and learning, the iBox has been installed
in the school, the iBox is functioning, internet
connectivity is set-up, and actual use of the iBox
and other ICT resources in student learning and
teacher development.
196
For DLRs 2.4-2.5, 3.2-3.5, and 7.3, it is agreed that some flexibility on the final results would be accepted
(the targets shown in Table 1). The verified results must come within 5% of the target, indicating that the
spirit of the target has been met. In practice this means the following minimum requirements for this
survey firm:
197
TABLE A18.3: FLEXIBILITY IN MEETING DLIS 2, 3 AND 7
DLI
Under
DLI2
Under
DLI3
Under
DLI7
DLR
About 5,000 new seats created in underserved districts (cumulative)
About 15,000 new seats created in underserved districts (cumulative)
About 500 seats utilized
About 1,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
About 3,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
About 5,000 utilized seats (cumulative)
ICT based instruction rolled out in about 50% of selected SHS.
Minimum
requirement
to be met
4,750
14,250
475
950
2,850
4,750
47.5%
In addition to verifying the DLRs, the firm will support the Government‘s monitoring activities by
collecting additional data in order to verify and add to the self-reporting system in place. This will include
more rich information on enrolment, scholarships, activities under SPPPs, use of the iCampus and others.
In addition the firm‘s survey will collect the following data to verify the Results Framework indicators:
 Number of students in the school, by programme
 Number of teachers in the school
 Number of teachers trained - disaggregated for Maths and Science
It is envisaged there will be a number of survey instruments to be conducted within the schools in order to
collect the required data, information and verification evidence. Some of these instruments may be
checklists, numerical data reports or interviews with school management/administration, teachers or
students.
SCOPE OF WORK
The consultant is expected to carry out the following activities:
 Develop survey instruments for data collection in the 23 new SHS and 125 beneficiary existing
SHS.
 Pilot test the survey instruments.
 Train enumerators as necessary to collect the data in 148 schools.
 Carry out data collection in the 148 beneficiary schools (spread across the ten regions of Ghana)
annually in October (year 1 verification = October 2015, year 4 verification = October 2018).
 Conduct data entry, quality checks and cleaning.
 Provide report of findings and all raw data for Government and World Bank use. These reports
should be provided after each annual survey.
198
TIMINGS AND ESSENTIAL OUTPUTS
The following outputs and timings are expected from the consultancy:
TABLE A18.4: DELIVERABLES
Output
Inception report including workplan and detailed methodology
Timing
May 2015
Draft survey for comments
July 2015
Pilot testing survey
September 2015
Train enumerators as necessary
September 2015
Conduct annual survey – Year 1 DLRs
October 2015
Report of Year 1 DLRs and survey raw data
November 2015
Conduct annual survey – Year 2 DLRs
October 2016
Report of Year 2 DLRs and survey raw data
November 2016
Conduct annual survey – Year 3 DLRs
October 2017
Report of Year 3 DLRs and survey raw data
November 2017
Conduct annual survey – Year 4 DLRs
October 2018
Report of Year 4 DLRs and survey raw data
November 2018
QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
The consultancy project team is expected to have the following qualifications and experience amongst its
members:
 A Masters Degree in Social Science, Statistics, Education Management or other related field.
 At least five years‘ experience in survey research, data collection and analysis.
 Experience of relevant projects in Education Management.
 Demonstrated experience developing and testing survey instruments using various
methodologies.
 Demonstrated strong capacity in planning, organizing and conducting survey logistics over a
large geographical scale in Ghana.
 Demonstrated strong capacity in recruiting and training enumerators and managing data
collection (including data entry).
 Experience compiling and managing large volumes of data, analyzing said data and presenting
analysis in reports in a timely fashion.
Enumerators should have a minimum of secondary level education.
199
ANNEX 19: SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ONLINE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL MONITORING
TABLE A19.1: ACCESS M ONITORING – ENROLMENT, CAPACITY AND STAFF ESTABLISHMENT
Enrolment
Term 1
Programme
Male
SHS1
Female
Total
Male
SHS2
Female
Total
Total
of which scholarship beneficiaries
Enrolment capacity
Programme
Enrolment capacity for current year SHS1
Enrolment capacity for next year SHS1
Total
200
Male
SHS3
Female
Total
Staff establishment
Male
School Management
Head
Assistant Head – Academic
Assistant Head
Assistant Head
Teaching staff
English
Maths
Biology
Etc
Total teaching staff
(this may be less than the sum if some teachers cover more than one subject)
Non-teaching staff
Total
201
Female
Total
TABLE A19.2: QUALITY M ONITORING – IN-SERVICE TRAINING, SPPP IMPLEMENTATON AND I-BOX UTILIZATION
In-service Training Activities
Face-to-face training
Male
Female Total
Training via iBox
Male
Female
Total
Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Lab Technicians
Leadership training
Head
Assistant Head
Heads of Departments
SPPP Implementation against plan
Planned
Activity Quantity Unit cost
Actual
Cost
Output
Quantity Unit cost
202
Cost
Output
iBox implementation and utilisation
Has the iBox been installed?
If yes is it functioning?
Has internet been installed?
If yes is it functioning?
How many staff members have attended training on the iCampus?
How many teachers have accessed INSET on the iBox?
How many teachers have used iBox for their lessons?
How many students are in those lessons (total)?
Drop down box - answers
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Enter digit
Enter digit
Enter digit
Enter digit
What challenges are you having with the iBox?
There are not enough computers
for the students to carry out
private learning
What success have you had with iBox?
There are not enough teachers
who can understand how to use it
The classes are too large
Free text - Maximum 50 words
response
203
No
No
No
No
The system does not let us skip
components of a lesson (lesson
presentation, lesson notes,
exercises, practicals, assignment)
The system is slow or not
responding
ANNEX 20: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SUPERVISION OF
NEW CONSTRUCTION
TERMS OF REFERENCE
FOR THE SUPERVISION OF CIVIL WORKS
FOR
THE SECONDARY EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT (SEIP)
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana intends to improve access to quality Senior High School (SHS) education in
the country. It has therefore made budgetary provision and approached other Donors for funds to
construct 200 Community SHS. The International Development Association (The World Bank)
responded by providing a $156 million credit for the Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP).
Part of the credit will fund the construction of 24-unit Classroom (E) Blocks; 8-unit 2-Bedroom block of
Staff Flats; Headmaster‘s Bungalows and Canteen Blocks; Security/Gate Posts, Paving, Drainage and
Ancillary Works in 23 Beneficiary Districts.
The Government of Ghana acting through the Ministry of Education intends to apply part of the funds
allocated for the above Project to cover eligible payments under contracts for consultancy services for
the supervision of civil works contracts for the construction of one each of the above structures at sites
in each of the following twenty-three (23) districts:
TABLE A20.1: DISTRICTS FOR THE SITING OF NEW CONSTRUCTION
S/No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Region
Western
Western
Northern
Northern
Greater Accra
Upper East
Central
Upper East
Greater Accra
Greater Accra
Ashanti
BrongAhafo
Upper West
District
WassaAmenfi Central
Bia East
Mion
North Gonja
KponeKatamanso
Pusiga
Awutu Senya East Municipal
Binduri
Adenta Municipal
Ga East Municipal
Kumasi Metropolis
Sene East
Wa East
204
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Eastern
Ashanti
Volta
Northern
Ashanti
BrongAhafo
BrongAhafo
Eastern
Western
Volta
KwahuAfram Plains South
Offinso North
Adaklu
Gonja Central
AhafoAno South
Kintampo North Municipal
AtebubuAmantin
Ayensuano
SefwiAkontombra
Krachi East
The work is divided into lots based on the number of schools in various Regions summarized as follows:
TABLE A20.2: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF NEW CONSTRUCTION
Lot No.
SC 01
SC 02
SC 03
SC 04
Regions
Western, Eastern & Central
Ashanti & Brong Ahafo
Greater Accra & Volta
Northern, Upper East & Upper West
No. of SHS
Six (6)
Six (6)
Five (5)
Six (6)
OBJECTIVES OF THE CONSULTANCY ASSIGNMENT
The objectives of the Consultancy assignment are the following:
(i) carry out a geotechnical investigation at each site to determine, among others, the soil profile, the
foundation type, depth of foundation, probable settlement etc. to allow for foundation design
review, as appropriate
(ii) verification of setting out for each structure in strict accordance with the detailed designs
(iii) ensure adherence of Contractors to quality assurance requirements for the execution of the works
(iv) achieve sound site supervision and general contract administration in order to secure timely
delivery of the works.
SCOPE OF THE SERVICES
The Consultant will be expected to render the following services:







Review Architectural and Structural/Mechanical/Electrical working drawings to be provided by
the MOE and agree any necessary amendments to be made to them
Carry out Geo-technical study to confirm/modify the Foundation design
Hand over the selected site to the Contractor
Determine the best position and orientation of the structure on the site
Vet the Work Programme submitted by the Contractor
Ensure that good quality materials are brought to the site to execute the work
Organise site meetings as often as necessary and send minutes of the meetings to the Project
Managers
205









Prepare quarterly project status reports for submission to the Project Managers
Supervise the construction of work by physically inspecting and approving the activities
indicated in the Contractor‘s Work Programme
Vet Valuations prepared by Contractors for work done and issue Payment Certificates for
settlement
Take over the completed structure from the Contractor
Hand over the completed structure to the District Director of Education
Issue the practical Completion Certificate to the Contractor
Prepare a Schedule of Defects ( Snag List) after certifying Practical completion
Issue Final Certificate and vet Final Accounts prepared by the Contractor for settlement.
Prepare and submit Final report for each completed structure to the Project Managers
PERSONNEL REQUIRED FOR THE ASSIGNMENT
It is expected that the following Personnel will be required for the assignment as indicated:
TABLE A20.3: REQUIRED PERSONNEL FOR CONSULTANCY
S/No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Personnel
Architect,
Building
Technologist;
Project
Manager (Team Leader)
Architect
Snr. Civil Engineer
Civil Engineer
Snr. Quantity Surveyor
Quantity Surveyor
Electrical Engineer
Geo-Technical Engineer
Geomatic Engineer
Mechanical Engineer
Clerks of Works
Number
required
1 No.
2 No.
1 No.
2 No.
1 No.
2 No.
1 No.
1 No.
1 No.
1 No.
11 No.
Basic Qualification (Years of
Experience)
B. SC. PG Dip Arch (8 )
B. SC. Bldg. Tech. (10)
PMP
B. SC. PG Dip Arch (5 )
B. SC. Civil Engineering (10)
B. SC. Civil Engineering (5)
B. SC. Bldg. Tech. (10)
B. SC. Bldg. Tech. (5)
B. SC. Elect. Eng. (10)
B. Sc. Geo Tech. Eng. (10)
B. Sc. Geo Tech. Eng. (10)
B. Sc. Mech. Eng. (10)
HND Bldg. Tech. (6)
Note: Each Clerk of Works will be required at each site
206
Professional
Qualification
(Years
experience)
AGIA (6)
AGIS (8)
AGIA (5)
MGhIE (8)
MGhIE (5)
AGIS (10)
AGIS (5)
MGhIE(8)
MGhIE (8)
MGhIE (8)
MGhIE (8)
N/A
of
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
Two hard copies and one soft copy of the following reports are to be submitted at the times indicated
below:
TABLE A20.4: DELIVERABLES

Report
Inception Report
Bi-monthly(every other month) Progress
Report
Draft Completion Report

Completion Report

Draft Final report

Final Report


Period due
4 weeks after commencement of assignment
8 weeks after commencement of assignment and
every other month thereafter
4 weeks after Practical Completion of works and
issuance of Practical Completion Certificate
Within 2 weeks after approval of the Draft
Completion Report
Within 4 weeks after expiration of Defects
Liability Period and issuance of Defects Liability
Certificate
Within 2 weeks after approval of the Draft Final
Report
CLIENT’S INPUTS
The Client is expected to provide all the facilities and personnel necessary to accomplish the assignment.
The Consultant shall make his own arrangements and allowances for transport (in-city and up-country)
and submit invoices for re-imbursement. The MOE nominates the Head of the Civil Works Team to work
with the Consultant on matters that will facilitate the smooth implementation of the assigned activities.
207
ANNEX 21: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SUPERVISION
CONSULTANT OF FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana intends to improve access to quality Senior High School
(SHS) education in the country. It has therefore made budgetary provision and
approached other Donors for funds to construct 200 Community SHS. The
International Development Association (The World Bank) responded by providing a
$156 million credit for the Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP).
Part of the credit will fund the upgrading of facilities that will comprise the following
Category 1
- Rehabilitation of existing school buildings
Category 2
- Construction of new school buildings including:

Additional blocks in the existing school premises

Demolition of existing blocks and construction of new blocks
in 50 SHS (List attached in Annex 5: District and Senior High School Selection Data)
The Government of Ghana acting through the Ministry of Education intends to apply
part of the funds allocated for the above Project to cover eligible payments under
contracts for consultancy services for the supervision of the above works that will be
detailed after a needs assessment has been carried out.
The work is divided into two (2) lots based on the number of schools in various
Regions summarized as follows:
TABLE A21.1: REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF LOTS
Lot No. Regions
SFU 01 Greater Accra, Western, Eastern, Volta & Central
SFU 02 Ashanti, Brong Ahafo, Northern, Upper East and
Upper West
No. of SHS
22
28
OBJECTIVES OF THE CONSULTANCY ASSIGNMENT
The objectives of the Consultancy assignment are the following:
(v)
Working in collaboration with the District Engineer, to ensure adherence of Contractors
to quality assurance requirements for the execution of the works
208
(vi)
(vii)
achieve sound site supervision and general contract administration in order to secure
timely delivery of the works.
Enforce the implementation of all safeguards in collaboration with the Environmental
and Social Management Team
SCOPE OF THE SERVICES
CATEGORY 1 – REHABILITATION AND ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS
Development of designs documents for rehabilitation of schools will include the following :
Stage 1:
(i)
survey of the existing object (school) will be carried out to assess the following:
 safety of structural elements: foundation stability, walls, columns, roof etc. ;
 conditions of internal and external finishes of buildings, windows, doors, floors etc.;
 quality of school equipment and furniture;
 conditions of light fittings, ventilation, cooling and air temperature in the building;
 condition of land area around the buildings like paths, play fields, fences, irrigation etc.;
 need for building demolition;
 conditions of lavatories (internal and yard toilets);
 Topographical and geophysical surveys of the sites including collection of details of
existing engineering and communications services around the site.
 condition of internal and external engineering services (water-supply and sewerage,
cooling, electricity etc.) also the possibility of connection to existing engineering
services if the same are not available in the existing school.
The survey should also include (a) obtaining measurements to produce site layout and all
the floor plans, sections and elevations for each building; and (b) pictures of existing
buildings and the site.
In case of any asbestos materials are found at the site, their quantity and location should be
carefully documented. That asbestos materials have been found at the site must be
immediately reported to the МОE in a letter in which details like location, type, quantity of
asbestos, supporting pictures etc. should be given.
(ii)
The findings of the above mentioned survey shall be presented in a Technical Report. The
Technical Report must cover at-least the following aspects about the existing conditions of
the school:
 structural elements: foundation stability, walls, columns, roof etc.;
 internal and external finishes of buildings, windows, doors, floors;
 land area around the buildings improvement ( paths, play fields, fences, irrigation etc
 buildings to be demolished (if necessary);
 lavatory (internal and yard toilets);
209
 internal and external engineering services / nets (water-supply and sewerage, heating,
ventilation, electricity), also the possibility of connection to existing engineering
services / nets;
 school equipment and furniture.
 topographical and geophysical surveys including the ground water levels, soil bearing
capacity and recommendations for soil compaction, suggested sitting of building
blocks, and other technical considerations required for buildings designs. All the
recommendations should have references to the related active construction norms and
standards in Ghana.
 a comparative list of existing and required buildings to justify the need for additional
buildings.
 Prepare preliminary designs of existing buildings after optimizing them and also
designs of additional new buildings at the site. While preparing these designs, it must
be ensured that the existing buildings are adapted and integrated properly with the new
buildings. Attention will be paid to improve the ―child- friendliness ―.
The following also must be included in the Technical report :
 measured drawings, including: site layout, floors plans, longitudinal section and crosssection, façade elevations, scheme of internal and external engineering services;
 a detailed list / statement of defects;
 suggested rehabilitation activities for the buildings including internal and the outdoor
areas (paths, sites, fences, irrigation etc.);
 Designs of new buildings and integrated site plans;
 preliminary estimates for rehabilitation and new buildings;
 topographical surveys and soil investigation reports
(iii)
The Technical report for the above (including options) will be submitted for each of the
sites for the Client consideration
Stage 2:
Upon approval by the Client of the proposals submitted at stage 1, the consultant shall develop
designs, drawings and documents for rehabilitation works and additional buildings if required.
The contents of the design, drawings and documentation for each school will include:

Design brief and compliance with functional program;
 Architectural drawings: these will include at least the following details:
 All floor plans, elevations and sections;
 Toilets, staircases, railings, flooring pattern;
 False-ceiling;
 Integrated service drawing;
 Built- in furniture;
 Any other detail required for proper completion of the works.
 Structural drawing: these will include at least the following:
210




Design basis report;
Detailed design with calculations;
All detailed drawings as required;
A structural safety certificate for all works.
 Water supply, sewerage disposal, sanitary installations and storm water drainage layout:










Design basis report;
Detailed design with calculations;
Bore-well details if required;
Layouts and schematic drawings showing the pipelines as well as detailed drawings
showing internal and external water supply;
Sanitary and water supply installations;
Sewerage disposal including sewage treatment and plant;
Recycling of treated water from the sewage treatment plan;
Overhead tank and underground reservoir;
Storm water drainage including rain water harvesting;
Other elements for re-cycling the resources which are necessary for a ―Green
Building‖, etc.
 Electrical: these will include at least the following details:
 Design basis report;

Detailed design with calculations;

Internal and external electrical layout showing the entire distribution system,
emergency circuit including the electrical back-up;

Design of electric substation;

Electrical back-up and public connection

Schematic drawings/design;

Provision of telephone, broad band conduits, T.V. conduits, and other electronic
equipment;

Any other element that is necessary for energy conservation and are necessary for
―Green Building‖.
 Air conditioning: these will include at least the following details:

Design basis report;

Detailed design with calculations;

Internal and external layouts showing the entire air circulation system;

Building management system to optimally utilize all the installation in the building
and monitor their functioning;

Any other element that is necessary for energy conservation and are necessary for a
211
―Green Building.‖
 Fire safety services:
 Design basis report;
 Provision for the fire safety as per relevant codes.
 Campus development and landscaping:
 All drawings showing areas to be landscaped, detail of horticulture, plantation, water
bodies, roads, parking footpath, boundary wall, signage, street lights and gates etc.
 Note:
In undertaking the assignment activities the Consultant should take into consideration the
following:
 Any other relevant drawing details or designs that might be required for proper and
satisfactory completion of the project;

Requirement that all designs must be prepared as per relevant national and
international building and engineering codes;

Requirement to improve ecological and climatic aspect, the user friendliness, and the
spatial organization of the whole site;

Requirement to indentify and recommend the use of the ecological water treatment
and solar energy systems, where viable;

Requirements for the infection control and the optimal connection and functional
concept for each building within the health facility compound and infrastructure.

approval from local authorities like municipality, fire, water supply and sewage
disposal, electrical departments?

In case asbestos containing building materials are to be removed/replaced, the tender
documents shall specifically include a description of the procedures (including
illustrations) to be followed by the contractor during the process and the monitoring
routine that the Client will apply to ensure adherence to the established procedures.

The technical specifications of materials for all works.

BOQ‘s and detailed estimates based on the local prevailing rates;
The consultant should note that:
-
All the technical decisions incorporated in the designs should meet modern sanitaryhygienic, operational, insulation, fire-prevention and ecological requirements as per the
Environmental and Safeguards Management Framework
-
Each element to be rehabilitated should have the reference to the related active
construction norms and standards in Ghana.
-
The drawings and documents should be so well detailed that absolutely minimum
decisions are to be taken by the engineers at site.
212
Stage 3:
Periodic supervision of the construction. It should be ensured that the designers would
participate in the monthly meetings (the expertise of participants would be decided on the status
of work) and provide input into the monthly reports to be prepared by the Supervision
Consultant.
Field supervision (common for all categories) over Contractor work will include the following:

Periodic (not less, than twice a month) site visits. The details of the visit including the
observations will be recorded in the field supervision log book kept at site.

Observations will include the following:
o If the works are being executed at site as per the drawings;
o Enter the modifications agreed with the client in the log book, if any
o If the materials being used at site are as per the specifications;
o Suggest modifications if any for client‘s considerations;

Inform the Supervision Consultant about the non-conformity if any;

Provide input into the monthly reports on site visits and inspection over construction
works

Participate during the final acceptance of building; and

Supervise removal of defects if any by Contractor during the defects liability period.
School design guidelines
When considering space design, care should be taken that those educational facilities, apart from
being a building constructed and equipped to shelter its users, should also impart an environment
that will promote students‘ learning and growth. Although most of the design recommendations
are given in the normative documents mentioned below, the Client wishes to remind the
Consultant of the importance to consider the main principles related to school designs such as the
following criteria:
The school should be:

a facility providing an atmosphere of inter-action where models of behavior are learned,

a place where students can effectively participate in the process of learning,

developed to facilitate the process of learning from each other,

developed to allow for an efficient use of space, smooth operation by having the qualities
of flexibility and mobility for students and teachers.
213
The school site layout should facilitate:

grouping of spaces related to the same functions such as study areas, administration
offices, sports and recreation areas or communal spaces,

separation of playgrounds (and, if possible, school access) for primary level students
from the two other education levels,

separation of quiet and noisy areas by providing buffer zones,

access by physically disabled to all areas,

possibility of future expansion,

minimum circulation distances to the various functional areas,

segregation of car parks and access roads from pedestrian areas,

preserve and improve existing features of the landscape as a pleasant natural environment
is a stimulating element.
Design principles related to internal space:

grouping of rooms related to the same functions,

access by physically disabled to all areas,

separation of internal recreation areas for primary level students from the two other education
levels,

separation of quiet rooms (i.e. mostly study rooms) from noisy rooms such as sport hall,
technology rooms, music room,

possibility for handicapped persons to access to all rooms on the ground floor level, and, as
much as possible, on the other floors,

design and choice of construction materials should be prepared so that they would minimize
future needs for maintenance works.
PERSONNEL REQUIRED FOR THE ASSIGNMENT
It is expected that the following Personnel will be required for the assignme nt as indicated:
TABLE A21.2: PERSONNEL REQUIRED
S/No. Personnel
1
4
6
7
Architect,
Civil Engineer
Quantity Surveyor
Electrical Engineer
Number
required
Basic Qualification (Years of
Experience)
1 No.
1 No.
1 No.
1 No.
B.
B.
B.
B.
SC. PG Dip Arch (8 )
SC. Civil Engineering (5)
SC. Bldg. Tech. (5)
SC. Elect. Eng. (10)
214
Professional
Qualification
(Years of
experience)
AGIA (6)
MGhIE (5)
AGIS (5)
MGhIE(8)
10
11
Mechanical Engineer
Clerks of Works
1 No.
various
B. Sc. Mech. Eng. (10)
HND Bldg. Tech. (6)
MGhIE (8)
N/A
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
Two hard copies and one soft copy of the following reports are to be submitted at the times
indicated below:
TABLE A21.3: DELIVERABLES


Report
Inception Report
First Progress Report
Period due
2 weeks after commencement of assignment
6 weeks after handing over site to contractors

Second Progress Report
10 weeks after handing over site to contractor

Completion Report

Draft Final report

Final Report
Within 2 weeks after approval of the Draft
Completion Report
Within 4 weeks after expiration of Defects
Liability Period and issuance of Defects
Liability Certificate
Within 2 weeks after approval of the Draft
Final Report
CLIENT’S INPUTS
The Client is expected to provide all the facilities and personnel necessary to accomplish
the assignment. The Consultant shall make his own arrangements and allowances for
transport (in-city and up-country) and submit invoices for re-imbursement.
The MOE nominates the Head of the Civil Works Team to work with the Consultant
on matters that will facilitate the smooth implementation of the assigned activities.
215
ANNEX 22: REPORTING TEMPLATE FOR SUPERVISION CONSULTANTS
REPORTING TEMPLATE FROM SUPERVISION
CONSULTANTS
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
Introduction
1.1
General
1.2
Description of works
1.3
Contract details
Consultant’s resources
2.1
personnel deployed for the project
2.2
Office accommodation
2.3
Vehicles
Contractors’ resources
3.1
Personnel
3.2
Plant and equipment
5.0
Project related issues requiring resolution
5.1
Contractor’s challenges
5.2
Stakeholder’s challenges
6.0
Completed work and progress
6.1
Completed work
6.2
Percentage work in progress
7.0
Financial report
7.1
Details of payment Certificates issued
8.0
Consultant’s general assessment
9.0
Conclusion
Appendices
Consultants activities
4.1
Meetings
4.2
Site Inspections
4.3
Checking of setting out
4.4
Certifying Interim Payment Certificates
216
ANNEX 23: TEMPLATE FOR CONDUCT OF NEEDS ASSESSMENT (FACILITIES UPGRADE)
REGION:______________________ DISTRICT : ___________________________________ SCHOOL :
_______________________________
S/No. NEEDS LIST (IN ORDER OF
DESCRIPTION OF ACTION REQUIRED
ESTIMATED COST
PRIORITY)
(GHS)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
NAME, SIGNATURE & DATE
SCHOOL HEAD:__________________________________________________ PTA CHAIRMAN
:________________________________________________
ASSISTANT SCHOOL HEAD : _______________________________________ DISTRICT
ENGINEER:______________________________________________
217
ANNEX 24: ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING CHECKLIST
Sub-project name:
Subproject Location (include
map/sketch):
Type of activity :
(e.g. district, etc).
(e.g. new construction, rehabilitation, periodic
maintenance)
Estimated Cost:
Proposed Date of Commencement of
Work:
Technical Drawing/Specifications
(circle answer):
Reviewed
This report is to be kept short and concise.
Yes
No
1. Site Selection:
When considering the location of a school project, check if the proposed site has the following
potential impacts. They do indicate a real risk of causing undesirable adverse environmental and
social effects, and that more substantial environmental and/or social assessment may be required
to adequately avoid, mitigate or manage potential effects.
Issues
Impact or Risk
Natural habitats
Water quality and water
resource availability and
use
Natural
hazards
vulnerability, floods, soil
stability/ erosion
Cultural property
Involuntary resettlement
Check if of
Concern
Critical natural habitats present
Intensive water use; multiple water users; potential for
conflicts is high; water quality issues are important
Mountainous terrain; steep slopes; unstable soils; high
erosion potential; volcanic, seismic or flood risks
Known heritage sites in project area
High population density; major towns and villages; lowincome families and/or illegal ownership of land; communal
properties; unclear land ownership rights
2. Checklist questions:
Physical data:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
218
essential.
Site area in acres
Extension of or changes to existing alignment
Any existing property to transfer to sub-project
Any plans for new construction
Refer to project application for this information.
Preliminary Environmental Information:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
State the source of information available at this stage (proponents report,
EIA or other environmental study).
Has there been litigation or complaints of any environmental nature
directed against the proponent or sub-project
Refer to application and/or relevant environmental authority for this information.
Identify type of activities and likely environmental impacts:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
What are the likely environmental impacts, opportunities, risks and
liabilities associated with the sub-project?
Refer to Technical Planning Guidelines – Impact, Mitigation and Monitoring Guide lines
Determine environmental screening category:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
After compiling the above, determine which category the subproject falls
under based on the EPA environmental categories A, B and C.
Refer to Technical Planning Guidelines – Screening and Review Process
Environmental Assessment Report or environmental studies required:
219
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
If Screening identifies environmental issues that require an EIA or a study,
does the proposal include the EIA or study?
Indicate the scope and time frame of any outstanding environmental study.
Required Environmental Monitoring Plan:
If the screening identifies environmental issues that require long term or
intermittent monitoring (effluent, gaseous discharges, water quality, soil
quality, air quality, noise etc), does the proposal detail adequate monitoring
requirements?
Refer to Technical Planning Guidelines – Impact, Mitigation and Monitoring Guid elines
Public participation/information requirements:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
Has consultation been completed?
Indicate the time frame of any outstanding consultation process.
Refer to Chapter 2 – Relevant legislative acts
Land and resettlement:
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
What is the likelihood of land purchase for the project?
How will land be acquired/purchased?
What level or type of compensation is planned?
Who will monitor actual payments?
Refer to the Resettlement Policy Framework.
Actions:
List outstanding actions to be cleared before construction begins.
Approval/re jection
Yes/No answers and bullet
lists preferred except where
descriptive detail is
essential.
220
If proposal is rejected by EPA for environmental reasons, should the site be
reconsidered, and what additional data would be required for approval?
Recommendations:
Requires an EIA and/or RAP, to be submitted on date:
Requires EMP, to be submitted on date:.
Does not require further environmental studies
Reviewer :
Name:
Signature:
Date:
221
ANNEX 25: RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN SCREENING FORM
ITEM
S/No.
1
2
YES NO
Who is the original owner of the land?
3
4
5
Has the
status?
Are the
Is there
Is there
land been fully acquired for the intended purpose? If no, what is the
6
If yes, can we inspect it.
Is there a consensus in the community about the use of the land?
7
8
9
o Chiefs/Opinion Leaders/Politicians
What is the plot size?(lands officer to assist)
Was the site selected by both the MP and the DCE?
Are there any SHS in the district?
10
o Public
o Private
Is an electricity transformer close to the site?
11
Is there a water pipeline close to the site?
12
Is there any VRA pylon on the site?
13
Is the land cleared?
documents available?
any litigation on the land?
another site in contention for the project?
If no, are there any cash crops on the site?
Are there any items/structures to be demolished?
14
Is there any access road to the site?
15.
General remarks/comments
222
ANNEX 26: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR SAFEGUARDS
CONSULTANT
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana intends to improve access to quality Senior High School
(SHS) education in the country. It has therefore made budgetary provision and
approached other Donors for funds to construct 200 Community SHS. The
International Development Association (The World Bank) responded by providing a
$156 million credit for the Secondary Education Improvement Project (SEIP).
Part of the credit will fund the construction of 24-unit Classroom (E) Blocks; 8-unit 2Bedroom block of Staff Flats; Headmaster’s Bungalows and Canteen Blocks;
Security/Gate Posts, Paving, Drainage and Ancillary Works in 23 Beneficiary
Districts.
The Government of Ghana acting through the Ministry of Education intends to apply
part of the funds allocated for the above Project to cover eligible payments under
contracts for consultancy services for the implementation of the already approved
Environmental and Social Management Framework (ESMF) and Resettlement Policy
Framework (RPF) at sites in the following twenty-three districts:
TABLE A26.1: DISTRICTS FOR N EW CONSTRUCTION
S/No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Region
Western
Western
Northern
Northern
Greater Accra
Upper East
Central
Upper East
Greater Accra
Greater Accra
Ashanti
BrongAhafo
Upper West
Eastern
Ashanti
Volta
District
WassaAmenfi Central
Bia East
Mion
North Gonja
KponeKatamanso
Pusiga
Awutu Senya East Municipal
Binduri
Adenta Municipal
Ga East Municipal
Kumasi Metropolis
Sene East
Wa East
KwahuAfram Plains South
Offinso North
Adaklu
223
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
2.0
Northern
Ashanti
BrongAhafo
BrongAhafo
Eastern
Western
Volta
Gonja Central
AhafoAno South
Kintampo North Municipal
AtebubuAmantin
Ayensuano
SefwiAkontombra
Krachi East
OBJECTIVESOF THE CONSULTANCY ASSIGNMENT
The objective of the consultancy assignment is to implement the approved ESMF and
RPF in the execution of the SEIP in the selected twenty-three sites with a view to
identifying the environmental and social impacts associated with the project and
implementing the relevant mitigation and management measures in conformity with
the ESMF and RPF. It will involve the use of the Environmental and Social
Management Framework (ESMF) and a Resettlement Policy Framework which have
already been developed and approved by government of Ghana and the World Bank
under the project to:
 Screen (using project designed and EPA forms) to identify potential
environmental and social impacts arising out of construction and renovation
related activities.

Assess the potential environmental and social impacts, design and implement
appropriate mitigation measures to ensure a safe and sustainable development

Ensure project affected communities and relevant stakeholders are adequately
consulted during the E&S impact assessment process with their concerns noted
and taken into consideration in the final design of the project to avoid, minimise
and/or compensate for potential impacts.


Ensure public disclosure of all relevant E&S documents in country and the Bank
Monitor and report on the implementation of these mitigation measures to assess
performance and compliance with Country and Bank E&S policies and guidance

Assess the institutional capacity at the national, district and school levels for
mitigating as well as implementing these measures


Prepare the budget for the implementation of the environmental mitigation plan
Train Supervision Consultants to implement the relevant environmental and
social safeguards for the project.
3.0
SCOPEOF WORK
The Consultant will be expected to render the following services:
224










4.0
Coordinate the pre-design, planning, and funding stages of the
proposed development with the Technical Planning Guidance (TPG),
Draft Construction phase environmental and social responsibilities of
the ESMF into contractors’ agreement documents.
Coordinate capacity building and training activities for Contractors,
District, Zonal and National Stakeholders
Act as an arbiter for dispute resolution in case of difference on issues
beyond the District level
Ensure that due diligence and compliance reports from districts are
submitted on time, and update the national database.
Facilitate the Implementation of ESMF.
Organize and conduct national and district level trainings
Design manuals and modules for capacity building and
awareness creation.
Facilitate monitoring and auditing process, and
Prepare and submit periodic reports for onward submission to the World
Bank, as may be required.
REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
The report will include the following sections:
1. The Consultant shall prepare the relevant Environmental Assessment Report as
may be required by the EPA, and a A/RAP for each site as may be necessary and
publish the outcome. If required by the EPA, the Consultant will conduct a
public hearing which will serve as ventilation and resolution of conflicting
interests. The Consultant shall furnish the Client with copies of all such reports
as they are submitted to the EPA.
2. Communicate the results of the public hearing to the MOE within fourteen days
of the hearing taking place
3. The consultant shall submit an annual report to the MOE for study
4. The Consultant shall prepare an Environmental and Social Management Plan
after 18 months as required by law
5. The Client will study the report and will determine when the Consultant will
proceed to the next phase.
5.0
SKILLSREQUIREMENTS
The selected consultant should be an Environmental Specialist with at least ten
(10) years’ experience in environmental assessment. Experience in similar
projects, and conversance with the WorldBank’s Environmental and Social
safeguard policies are also required.
225
6.0
DURATION OF THE ASSIGNMENT
The duration of this consultancy assignment is (90) ninety days. The MOE will
determine when each phase of the assignment should be undertaken taking into
consideration the reporting requirements.
7.0
CLIENT’S INPUTS
The Client is expected to provide all the facilities and personnel necessary to accomplish
the assignment. The Consultant shall make his own arrangements and allowances for
transport (in-city and up-country) and submit invoices for re-imbursement.
The MOE will nominate a ‘’Client Coordinator’’ from its staff to work with the
Consultant on matters that will facilitate the smooth implementation of the assigned
activities.
226
ANNEX 27: DRAFT TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR PROJECT
COORDINATOR
BACKGROUND
The Government of Ghana intends to improve access to quality Senior High School (SHS)
Education in the country. It has therefore made budgetary provision and approached the World
Bank for assistance to construct 200 Community SHS in various Districts of Ghana. The
Ministry of Education (MOE) intends to apply part of the above proposed funds earmarked from
the World Bank to cover eligible payments under the contract for individual Consultancy as
Project Co-ordinator.
OBJECTIVES OF THE CONSULTANCY ASSIGNMENT
The objectives of the Consultancy assignment are to ensure that the objectives of the SEIP are
attained in a timely manner.
SCOPE OF THE SERVICES
The Consultant will report to the Project Steering Committee and will be expected to render the
following services:











Ensure that all aspects of the project are implemented according to the Guidelines in the
approved Project Implementation Manual (PIM)
Closely monitor Procurement Plans on a monthly basis and exercise quality control on all
aspects of the procurement process including evaluation, selection and award
Bring up issues requiring policy interpretation, formulation, co-ordination and monitoring
and evaluation to the Project Steering Committee for direction
Liaise with the Project Management Co-ordinator and Results based Team Co-ordinator
to realise the project objectives
Co-ordinate and support all implementing Departments of the SEIP
Report on the progress against the Indicators and Disbursement Linked Indicators
(DLI‘s); Eligible Expenditure Programs (EEP‘s) and Technical Assistance
Ensure timely and comprehensive reporting of results for Disbursements including
Withdrawal Applications
Ensure that Bank Fiduciary (Financial) reporting, Procurement and safeguards
regulations are followed
Ensure timely communication on the SEIP progress to all Stakeholders especially the
Project Steering Committee(PSC)
Manage and co-ordinate the Technical Assistance component with the relevant
Departments
Disseminate all directives from the Project Steering Committee to all implementing
Departments
227
COMPETENCIES REQUIRED







Basic Qualification in a Social Science; Architecture; Building Technology and Civil
Engineering with 12 years post-qualification experience
Professional Qualification in relevant field with 10 years post-registration experience
A Degree in Project Management will be an advantage
Experience in managing at least 2 different Donor-funded projects
Must be conversant with the structure of the Ministry of Education and its policies
Must be a Team Player and matured in handling project conflicts
Must be fluent in oral and written English and able to do presentations on the SEIP at
short notice
DURATION OF THE ASSIGNMENT

The Assignment is expected to last for an initial contract period of 2 years commencing
one month after project effectiveness and renewable for a further period of two years on
satisfactory performance
228
Results
Focus
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
Comments
Pillar 1: Increase Access with Equity in senior secondary education in underserved districts
Expansion of
S HS
DLI 1: Targeting of
school expansion and
improvement in
underserved districts
and selected low
performing schools
DLR 1.1: Agreed targeting
criteria applied to identify list
of Districts and schools for
expansion and improvement
under the Project as set forth in
the PIM
DLI 2: Increase in
new seats for SHS
students in
underserved districts
DLR 2.1: Pre-construction
requirements met for new
construction in 23 selected
districts.
DLR 2.2: About 30% of
all construction works
completed (aggregated)
229
DLR 2.3: About
80% of all
construction works
completed
(aggregated)
DLR 2.4: About
5,000 new seats
created in
underserved
districts
(cumulative)
DLR 2.5:
About 15,000
new seats
created in
underserved
districts
(cumulative)
Criteria for selection based
on model agreed during the
M arch 2014 appraisal
mission. Selection of
school sites for new
construction in:(i) districts
with no operating SHS;
(ii) district prioritization
based on the following
objective targeting criteria:
(a) demand for SHS places;
(b) district size; and (c)
district poverty index
Selection of
rehabilitation/upgrading of
existing school sites based
on specified criteria and
targeting methods based on
needs assessment.
Safeguards compliance
through ESM F and RPF
verified in all new
construction sites.
(screening and RAPs
completed).
Validation of site selection
applied in school
construction
implementation plan,
bidding documents and
safeguards reviews.
Package of final bidding
documents completed for
new construction in 23
districts in line with
appraised design.
Facilities maintenance
plans drafted.
Results
Focus
Demand side
interventions
to encourage
enrollment
and
completion of
S HS
Indicator
YEAR 0
YEAR 1
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
YEAR 4
Comments
Bidding Documents reflect
identified needs/scope of
expansion/rehabilitation in
selected low performing
schools. District Assembly
report on safeguards
screening, site visits and
civil works tendering.
Link to PDO indicator 2
for identification of
beneficiaries for incentives
as defined in the PIM .
Schools report on number
of students receiving
scholarships per year for
their three year SHS
program. Disbursement
scaled according to number
of scholarships awarded
per year.
DLI 3: Increase in
utilized seats in
existing lowperforming schools
DLR 3.1: Pre-construction
requirements met for
upgrading of selected schools
DLR 3.2:About 500
seats utilized
DLR 3.3: About
1,000 utilized seats
(cumulative)
DLR 3.4: About
3,000 utilized
seats
(cumulative)
DLR 3.5:
About 5,000
utilized seats
(cumulative)
DLI 4: Increased
enrolment in selected
SHS for students
from low income
families, especially
girls
DLR 4.1:Selection and
contracting of implementing
partner to administer
scholarships completed and
criteria for selection of
beneficiaries of scholarships
developed
DLR 4.2: At least 2,000
SHS students receiving
scholarship in selected
schools.
DLR 4.3: At least
4,000 SHS students
receiving
scholarship in
selected schools.
(cumulative)
DLR 4.4: At least
6,000 SHS
students
receiving
scholarship in
selected schools
(cumulative)
DLR 4.5: At
least 10,000
SHS students
receiving
scholarship in
selected
schools(cumul
ative)
Pillar 2: Improve quality in low-performing senior high schools
Improve the
quality of
teaching and
learning in
selected lowperforming
secondary
schools
DLI 5: Annual
publication of School
Performance Report
DLI 6: School
Performance
Partnerships in 125
beneficiary schools
DLR 6.1: Guidelines on
preparation of school
performance partnerships
(SPPs) developed and
distributed to selected schools.
DLR 5.1: School
mapping of all SHS
completed
DLR 5.2:
Publication of
school
performance data
for FY 2016 online
and in brochure
DLR 5.3:
Publication of
updated school
performance data
for FY17 online
and in brochure
DLR 6.2: Training on
school improvement
planning and
implementation
provided for 125
selected schools.
DLR 6.3: 80
selected schools
signing
performance
partnerships
DLR 6.4: 100
selected schools
signing
performance
partnerships
(cumulative)
230
DLR 5.4:
Publication of
updated
school
performance
data for FY18
online and in
brochure
DLR 6.5: 125
selected
schools
implementing
performance
partnerships
based on
SPPPs
Greater sensitization and
communication about
SHS- outreach to JHS, up
to date data on school
details.
SPPPs would include
details on ICT packages if
needed, leadership and
management training,
competencies, strategy for
improving in-service
teacher training, mentoring
and materials. Survey to be
conducted for beneficiary
schools.
Results
Focus
Improvemen
ts in teaching
and learning
in targeted
schools
Indicator
DLI 7: Improved
learning outcomes in
125 selected SHS
(with quality
package)
YEAR 0
DLR 7.1: Report on review of
the quality of teaching and
learning for mathematics and
science in SHS
YEAR 1
DLR 7.2: Training
modules rolled out for
mathematics and
science teachers and
ICT based instruction
developed for school
use in selected SHSs
231
YEAR 2
YEAR 3
DLR 7.3: ICT
based instruction
rolled out in about
50% of selected
SHS.
DLR 7.4: ICT
based instruction
rolled out in all
selected SHS
YEAR 4
DLR 7.5:
Increase in
number of 6
credits and
above
WASSCE
scores on
average in
totalselected
SHS.
Comments
Year 4 DLR corresponds to
PDO indicator
At least 125 existing
schools expected to receive
quality package- (will roll
out to new schools once
they are functioning)
Under Component 2 the MOE and GES will be carrying out their own monitoring and data
collection, particularly at the school level. In addition to traditional monitoring and supervision
visits, data will be collected via an online platform by which schools enter and submit
information such as on scholarship beneficiaries, general enrolment, staffing, execution of funds
and activities under SPPPs and others.
1. OBJECTIVE OF THE ASSIGNMENT
The objectives of these terms of reference are to employ the services of an individual or firm
who will provide independent verification for the meeting specific construction- related DLRs
under the project.
The DLRs to be verified under this contract are the following:
TABLE A27.1: DLR S TO BE VERIFIED
DLI
2.
DLR 2.1
DLR 2.2
DLR 2.3
2. DLR 3.1
Activities to be verified
Year of project
Pre-construction requirements met for new
construction in 23 districts
0
About 30% of all construction work
(aggregated) (with 5% flexibility) completed
1
About 80% of all construction work
(aggregated) (with 5%flexibility) completed
2
Pre-construction
requirements
upgrading of selected 50 SHS
met
for
0
3. SCOPE OF WORK
The Consultant is expected to carry out the following activities:
 Study Architectural and Structural/Mechanical/Electrical working drawings for each
structure to be constructed to be provided by the MOE and note any amendments made to
them during construction
 Study documentation and scope of work for each facility to be upgraded to be provided
by the MOE and note any amendments made to them during construction
 Review Supervision Consultants‘ reports at each site
 Check that the structure has been properly positioned and orientated on site
 Ensure that good quality materials are used in the works
 Develop a template stating the various percentages allocated to each component of each
of the new structures being constructed in 23 districts and each facility being upgraded at
the 50 beneficiary existing SHS and agree on same with the MOE
 Submit a report stating whether the agreed result has been achieved to the Chief
Director for the GOG and World Bank use
232
4. TIMING AND ESSENTIAL OUTPUTS
The following outputs and timings are expected from the consultancy:
TABLE A27.2: DELIVERABLES
Output
Inception report including workplan
and detailed methodology;
verification template for new works
for each structure and for facilities
upgrade
Report for year 0 DLR‘s
Report of Year 1 DLRs
Report of Year 2 DLRs
Timing
December 2014
December 2014
November 2015
November 2016
5. QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE
The consultant is expected to have the following qualifications and experience:



Either A Basic Degree (B. Sc. ) and Post-Graduate Diploma in Architecture with 12 years experience and
AGIA with 10 years experience ; B. Sc. Building Technology with 10 years experience and AGIS with 8 years
experience; B. Sc. Civil Engineering with10 years experience and MGhIE with 8 years experience
Experience in developing verification templates
Experience in assessing stages of completion of similar structures
TABLE A27.3: CIVIL WORKS INDEPENDENT VERIFIER STAGES -E-BLOCK
S/No. Stage description
1
2
3
4
5
All excavation work, blockwork; concrete in column bases
and columns; filling under floors up to casting ground floor
slab
Concrete in Ground floor columns; first floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in first floor columns; second floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in second floor columns; third floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in third floor columns; roof beams; roof
233
Percentage
completed
10
11
11
11
9
6
7
8
9
10
construction and covering
Ground , first, second and third floor plasterwork and other
floor; wall and ceiling finishings
Ground , first, second and third floor joinery and metalwork
Ground , first, second and third floor plumbing and electrical
installations
Ground , first, second and third floor painting and glazing
Lightening protection; transformer and external works
TOTAL
16
11
7
4
10
100
TABLE A27.4: CIVIL WORKS INDEPENDENT VERIFIER STAGES -BLOCK OF STAFF FLATS
S/No. Stage description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
All excavation work, blockwork; concrete in column bases
and columns; filling under floors up to casting ground floor
slab
Concrete in Ground floor columns; first floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in first floor columns; second floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in second floor columns; third floor beams and
suspended slab; staircase cast
Concrete in third floor columns; roof beams; roof
construction and covering
Ground , first, second and third floor plasterwork and other
floor; wall and ceiling finishings
Ground , first, second and third floor joinery and metalwork
Ground , first, second and third floor plumbing and electrical
installations
Ground , first, second and third floor painting and glazing
Lightening protection; transformer and external works
TOTAL
Percentage
completed
13
7
7
7
13
11
16
11
7
8
100
TABLE A27.5: CIVIL WORKS INDEPENDENT VERIFIER STAGES -HEADMASTER’S BUNGALOW
WITH OUT-HOUSE
S/No. Stage description
1
2
3
All excavation work, blockwork; concrete in column bases
and columns; filling under floors up to casting ground floor
slab
Concrete in Ground floor columns and roof beams
Blockwork with lintel and window/door openings
234
Percentage
completed
20
11
8
4
5
6
7
9
Roof construction, covering and fascia
Floor, wall and ceiling finishings; painting and decorating
Plumbing and electrical installation
Joinery and metalwork
External works, services and drainage
TOTAL
11
17
17
11
5
100
TABLE A27.6: CIVIL WORKS INDEPENDENT VERIFIER STAGES -CANTEEN
S/No. Stage description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
All excavation work, blockwork; concrete in column bases
and columns; filling under floors up to casting ground floor
slab
Concrete in Ground floor columns and roof beams; blockwork
Roof construction, covering and fascia
Floor, wall and ceiling finishings; painting and decorating
Plumbing and electrical installation
Joinery and metalwork
External works, services and drainage
TOTAL
Percentage
completed
28
10
15
18
11
13
5
100
TABLE A27.7: CIVIL WORKS INDEPENDENT VERIFIER STAGES -BLOCK OF STAFF FLATS
S/No. Stage description
1
2
4
5
6
7
9
All excavation work, blockwork; concrete in column bases
and columns; filling under floors up to casting ground floor
slab
Concrete in Ground floor columns and roof beams; blockwork
Roof construction, covering and fascia
Floor, wall and ceiling finishings; painting and decorating
Plumbing and electrical installation
Joinery and metalwork
External works, services and drainage
TOTAL
235
Percentage
completed
13
58
5
9
8
5
2
100
ANNEX 28: THE E-Education PLATFORM FOR SCHOOL MAPPING
AND MONITORING AND EVALUATION
Introduction
1.
In Ghana, the growing prevalence of Information & Communication Technologies (ICT) such as mobile
phones and internet connectivity can serve as a channel for the public sector to enhance its monitoring
framework, as well as enable citizens to relay their voices in the monitoring and feedback process . The
leveraging of ICT-based platforms can not only help render a geo-spatially based digital baseline of
country-wide SHS in a transparent manner, it can also facilitate large-scale citizen review and feedback on
the quality and effectiveness of these educational institutions, thereby placing pressure points on publicsector agencies for provision of a better and equitable learning experience for students.
2.
To enhance program implementation, SEIP will ada pt an ICT platform, to ensure close monitoring of
works as well as provide school profiles using key performance indicators through a dedicated website
accessible to the general public. The establishment of a user friendly web platform for school reporting
and real time mobile phone-based monitoring of all SHS would enhance and strengthen the EMIS in order
to help government report on achievement of results. Key features of the platform include the capability
to plot reports geo-spatially in real -time, seamless integration with SMS, applicability as a real -time GIS,
and the power to immediately appraise officials responsible for addressing issues through auto matic email notifications and periodic reminders
3.
The platform is a dynamic Smartphone and web-based ICT monitoring and evaluation system that helps
provide real-time information accessible to all stakeholders to closely track progress of key project
activities and to report on Project outputs in a timely manner. The tool also allows monitoring of site visits
by the email identity or phone number allocated. This is particularly useful since the tool allows recording
not only the number of times the school has been visited, but by whom. This allows random verification of
the number of site visits and helps introduce accountability for those tasked with supervision and
monitoring.
4.
The ICT platform will also help Govt. of Ghana conduct a school mapping exercise to locate all schools
with key basic data to help inform decision making about resources, teacher allocations, computerized
selection and rehabilitation/upgrading needs.
5.
Benefits of the platform include supporting the realization of project outcomes, strengthening capacity of
program partners in addressing immediate challenges in program implementation, and promoting
participation of stakeholders in development program management.
6.
The platform has been launched in Ghana for SEIP as ‘The Ghana Seconda ry Schools Monitor’
(www.GhanaSchoolsInfo.org), with the motto “Smarter Monitoring for a Smarter Ghana”. Cost for usage
is zero. As of Sept. 16, 2014, the app for SEIP can be downloaded onto smartphones using the following
link: http://www.thetigerparty.com/downloads/worldbank/Taarifa_GhanaSchool_20140905.apk
7.
Regular updates are made to the app and correspondingl y, links to download the latest versions of the
app are sent to tool users by the World Bank ICT Specialists.
Stages of tool usage in SEIP
236
Application of the platform for achieving project objectives will take place in 3 stages:
Stage 1:
 Stage 1 of the school mapping exercise will involve geo-spatial plotting of all 820+
secondary schools in Ghana on the online portal 'www.GhanaSchoolsInfo.org'.
 Data for each school will be populated from EMIS, along with other parameters
deemed necessary. GES will undertake internal discussions to fully crystallize the
reporting structure.
 It is proposed that Stage 1 will be carried out by a local consultant (hired by the
Bank) in conjunction with a team of 5 IT personnel working in MOE/GES during
October and November, 2014.
Stage 2:
 Stage 2 will involve the headmasters or school ICT teachers of the 125 recipient
schools to self-report on the portal, using a web-survey (see Annex 19: Sample
Questionnaire for online SHS monitoring) for their respective school, the activities
being carried out using funds received.
 Training to the headmasters/school ICT teachers will be provided by the local
consultant in conjunction with GES IT personnel.
Stage 3:
 This will involve, on a randomized sampling basis, periodic monitoring and crossverification of information provided by the headmasters. The platform allows for
automatic replacement of existing online school reports with updated versions.
 Stage 3 will be carried out by the district/regional education directors, who will be
trained by the local consultant and GES IT personnel.
8.
Institutional capacity will be developed within MOE and GES so as to enable them take proactive response in
relation to any SHS-related issues captured by the platform. The emphasis will dwell on establ ishing the
critical ‘monitoring-to-action’ feedback loop.
237
Figure 1: Sample overviewof Smartphone interface for (1)
Recording data, and (2) automatic capturing of GPS
coordinates
238
Figure 2: Screenshot of ‘The Ghana Secondary Schools Monitor’ website
239
ANNEX 29: PROJECT FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)
SEIP Q&A:
1. Why did the World Bank agree to lend money to Ghana for secondary education at this time of tight
budget control? Ghana’s Constitution mandates that all efforts are made to make education gradually
universal and progressively free. With access to primary education becoming near universal in Ghana,
new priorities are emerging at post-basic level where the demand for secondary education is fast
increasing and the supply of SHS has not kept pace. Ghana’s middle income status will also require
more secondary level graduates with the relevant skills to continue their education and/or enter the
labor market, hence investing in secondary education at this time will improve the human capital of the
country, and also improve long-term competitiveness, access jobs and improve people’s lives and
incomes.
2. Why only senior secondary schools and not technical or basic schools? The purpose of the project
does not preclude investing in technically oriented SHS programs and where selected SHSs offer
technical and vocational programs, these will be supported. Most of the external funding for the last 15
years has been going to basic and technical education. The SHS is considered as an underfunded level
and a bottleneck in the education system with significant challenges in terms of equity, access and
quality. The Bank’s support is not mutually exclusive of other subsectors. In fact, the support to
secondary education complements current ongoing support for increasing the quality of basic education
(GPEG-US$75.5 million), improving skills training and science and technology adoption (GSTDP -US$70
million), improving higher education relevance and centers of excellence (Oil and Gas Capacity Building
Project and the African Centers of Excellence Project). The basic education sector is also well supported
by several development partners whose efforts are coordinated by the education sector. These include
DFID supporting girls scholarships at primary and JHS level, USAID supporting reading and learning
assessments at basic level, UNICEF supporting basic education for out of school children, JICA supporting
science and math education and WFP. The African Development Bank, Germany (KfW and GIZ) and
DANIDA also provide significant support for TVET and skills development. The Bank works closely with
all of these partners to ensure collaboration and coordination in its support for education in Ghana.
3. What are the components of the project? The US$156 million project is intended to be implemented
over a five year period, 2014-2019. It will use a results-based financing approach, which means that
funds are only released based on the achievement of specific results expected to help Ghana see
improved educational outcomes in an equitable manner. The results based approach, as a tool, focuses
on results or outcomes rather than inputs.
Component 1 aims to increase access, promote equity and improve quality in the SHS system.
o Subcomponent 1 (a) expanding access through the construction of approximately 23
new SHS in underserved areas, facilities improvement and expansion of existing low
performing schools and through support for SHS access by disadvantaged students
(scholarships to students from low income families, especially girls).
o Subcomponent 1 (b) improving the quality of education in at least 125 selected low performing SHS through: (i) strengthened school management and accountability; (ii)
mathematics and science teaching and learning; (iii) informati on and communication
240
technology expansion and connectivity in schools; and (iv) the introduction of school
performance partnerships for school level improvements.
Component 2 aims to strengthen institutional capacity for delivery of better secondary
education results.
 Subcomponent 2 (a) includes technical assistance to strengthen capacity of MOE, GES
and other implementing agencies to carry out project activities. This includes financial
audits, technical audits, impact evaluations and development of key materials for
leadership training and math and science training.
 Subcomponent 2 (b) supports the improvement of the monitoring and evaluation
system. The project will support baseline data gathering and analysis and endline
survey and analysis. In addition, this subcomponent supports better integration of
school census with GSS data.
 Subcomponent 2 (c) will finance the execution of a school mapping of all secondary
schools using GPS, school data, to help inform decision making about resources, teacher
allocations, computerized selection and rehabilitation/upgrading needs. The school
mapping will be updated annually and reflected in the annual publication of school
performance available to the public on a website and brochure.
 Subcomponent 2 (d) builds on the school mapping to roll out an ICT platform to monitor
all secondary schools using mobile smartphone technology. This dynamic tool aims to
provide real-time information (accessible to all stakeholders on the website) to closely
track progress of key project activities and to allow for social accountability. The tool will
be provided to those tasked with supervision and monitoring, but will also be used by
CSOs and other stakeholders to allow for random verification of on-the ground results.
 Subcomponent 2 (e) will finance the cost of consultants/firm to conduct independent
verification of the achievement of the results. This verification will be required before
funds can be released. This verification is complemented by other tools for sector
monitoring such as school mapping, EMIS data, WAEC analysis, GSS statistics and
expenditure and payroll data.
 Subcomponent 2 (f) will finance research and diagnostic activities to advise the
government on SHS policy and strategy, which would help provide on-demand analyses,
surveys and impact assessments as well as various reviews of education financing,
efficiency surveys, etc. The project will also support improved collaboration between
MOE, WAEC and Ghana Statistical Service so that comprehensive data drives policy
decisions in the sector.
3. What is the SEIP intended to achieve? The Project Development Objective is to increase access to
senior secondary education in underserved districts and improve quality in low -performing senior
high schools (SHS) in Ghana. The project is targeted to ensure resources focus on considerations of
equity. Selection of project sites and beneficiaries involves objective criteria based on data from
Population Census, Ghana Living Standards Survey 6 and annual school census based on the
Education Management Information System (EMIS). The SEIP focuses on improving access in
underserved districts through new school construction (in 23 districts), senior secondary school
facilities and quality improvements of existing SHS (125). The project is expected to benefit
approximately 30,000 new students in secondary education programs, 150,000 students in low
performing schools, 2000 senior high school teachers, head teachers, in addition to education
241
officials. It will provide scholarship to students from low-income families as a way of expanding
access.
4.
What constitutes Quality Improvement under SEIP? Under quality improvements beneficiary
senior high schools will be supported to strengthen various school management processes, financial
management and accountability, efficiency and optimal utilization of school resources to enhance
results. Various training programs will be organised for various levels of leadership in academic and
administrative positions. Additionally, their teachers will be supported to improve their teaching
methods in Science, mathematics and ICT by using lessons learnt from best practices and
intervention programs.
5. Is the SEIP being forced on Ghana? What conditions, if any are attached to this project? Is the
distribution of sanitary pads part of the project?



No, the World Bank does not force projects on its borrower member countries. Projects are
requested by the Government and the Bank team conducts a rigorous appraisal of the proposed
program before submitting the project for Board approval.
There are no conditions attached to this project.
There is no mention of sanitary pads anywhere in the project document. As part of the equitable
access results area, the Government plans to award at least 10,000 eligible students
scholarships. At least 60% of these scholarships are expected to be awarded to females. The
scholarships will be available for day students in existing schools that are targeted under the
SEIP and also in the newly constructed schools when they are completed. The Government of
Ghana, in collaboration of school authorities and other stakeholders will determine how to
disburse the scholarships, whether in cash or in kind.
6. Does this loan provide value for money? What measures are in place to prevent corruption? Yes,
the loan was prepared on value for money principles. In addition the access, quality and equity
considerations provide a balanced approach to improving secondary education in Ghana. Regarding
Component 1, which is results based, the project will follow the Ghana Public Procurement, 2003
(Act 663) procedures and directions. Independent verification will verify, among its many
verification activities, whether the GPP Act 663 has been followed for procurement under this
component. The second component will be subjected to Bank prior and post review s depending on
applicable thresholds, based on World Bank Procurement Guidelines. The SEIP was developed to
reflect the World Bank’s procurement, financial management, auditing, social accountability and
anti-corruption standards. A robust M&E system will be established to ensure performance
monitoring and transparency. The project also includes a web-based monitoring system to be
deployed in a participatory manner and will involve CSOs and other stakeholders including the
general public. In addition, payment schedules for project activities will be determined by the
government’s achievement of agreed outcomes which would be verified through independent
means. There are also annual intermediate targets and end of project targets to be met and
measured. Furthermore, investing US$156 million in SHS education in 5 years is about 10 percent
of the funds budgeted by the Government to run the SHS system. A 10% investment to improve
access, equity and quality at this level is expected to have an impact on the overall quality of
education, social inclusion and labor market outcomes.
242
7.
How were the districts for new construction selected? Districts were selected based on a
transparent process using data on demand for SHS places; SHS-aged population and district poverty
levels. Districts most in need of SHS expansion were selected. Full details of thes are given in Annex
5 of the SEIP PIM.
8.
The new senior secondary schools to be built under the project cost almost three times as much as
the new ones being built under the GoG funded schools, why is that so? The SEIP is supporting the
results from construction of complete SHS schools- these schools include standard 4-storey
classrooms E-block, laboratories, toilets, teacher flats, head teacher bungalow, technical and
vocational blocks where necessary and other core structures and furniture/inputs. Payments will
only be made based on the number of utilized seats, hence the need for “complete” schools. The
contracts for 50 new SHS is being rolled out in phases, and the first phase only includes the standard
4-storey classroom E-block and furnishings/inputs. The understanding from government is that the
additional structures are expected to be rolled out at a later time. This difference in the number of
structures and inputs reflects the difference in estimated costs.
9.
The issue of sustainability has come up in various discussions. What happens when all funds are
disbursed and the project closes after the 5 years of implementation? The government's strategy
to increase equitable access and improve the quality of secondary education has significant fiscal
implications for both investment and recurrent costs. Given the current macroeconomic situation,
the SEIP aims to encourage greater rationalization of expenditures and prioritization of investments.
Key activities under the Ghana Education Development Sector Project (2003-2009) and the EFA-FTI
projects (2008-2011), have been sustained because investments we re focused on targeted
beneficiaries and/or districts to ensure more equitable financing in the sector to those localities and
populations previously underserved. The Government is applying lessons from previous projects in
developing a targeted program based on a long term vision to make secondary education gradually
universal and progressively free, a requirement of Ghana’s Constitution. With facilities and quality
improvement of existing SHSs, the government is introducing efficiencies which will allow m ore
students to access SHS in existing facilities. As part of its program, the Government plans to initiate
an expenditure review which will recommend efficiency measures to improve the sustainability of
the SHS sub-sector. Better schools may attract more students which may improve the utilization rate
in under subscribed SHSs and indirectly lead to the decongestion of over-subscribed SHSs.
9. The SEIP is supporting a number of activities. How are we sure that these are the important
activities to deliver the results of providing quality SHS education and equitable access? As a results
based project, funds will be disbursed only when key results or outcomes are achieved, ensuring that
services are delivered and not just inputs procured. The SEIP activities are also evidence based and the
preparation of the project had a rigorous analytical focus. This ensures that implementation focuses on
activities that have been proven to deliver outcomes e.g. scholarships. The in -built flexibility of a
results-based approach and the allowance to conduct further research under Component 2 also ensures
that as implementation progresses, the Government will have an opportunity to test out different
243
modes of delivery in order to achieve the agreed results. This flexibili ty will help inform policy makers
on how to maximize impact and apply lessons learned.
10. How is disbursement going to be done under SEIP? The project has two components. Each of the
components constitutes a separate disbursement category. The disbursement category for component
1is DLI-based and the disbursement category expense line is for the selected EEP. Component 2 will be a
‘catch-all’ category – “goods, works, consulting services, non-consulting services, training, research, and
operating expenses”. The project follows the report based disbursement, using interim financial reports
generated from the GIFMIS in GES, validated by the Financial Controller and approved by the Chief
Director. The processing of expenditures will be undertaken through the GES Finance Office. The World
Bank procurement guidelines shall govern the procurement activities under the component but the
Government’s financial management systems (budgeting, accounting, and reporting) shall apply.
11. What are the terms of borrowing? Does it make sense to borrow from the World Bank to support
secondary education, given the current level of GoG debt? The terms of borrowing are: 1.25% interest
per annum and a 25 year repayment, including 5 years grace period.
244
ANNEX 30: PROJECT CONTACTS
TABLE A30.1: PROJECT STEERING COMMITTEE
NAME
Prof. Naana Jane Opoku-Agyemang
ORGANISATION
MOE
TELEPHONE NUMBER
208189149
E-MAIL ADDRESS
[email protected]
Hon. Alex Kyeremeh
Enoch H. Cobbinah
Michael Ayesu
Valentine Domapielle
Samuel Ofori-Adjei
Dorothy A. Glover
Cornelius Atsu Dafeamekpor
Stephen Kofi Mensah
Paul Krampah
H. R. Wilson
Ernest Otoo
MOE
MOE
MOF
GES
GES
GES
GETFund
MOE
MOE
MOE
MOE
208150207
202030286; 0244235211
501322681
246987930
244223133
207366900
244474920
244946089
208112338
208111627
0244101822; 0266237400
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.2: TECHNICAL IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE
NAME
ORGANISATION
TELEPHONE NUMBER
E-MAIL ADDRESS
Enoch H. Cobbinah
E. Aaron Adjetey
Lawrence Nyanor
Jacob Adu Larbi
Dr. Felix Amoakoh
Godfred Schandorf
Aruna Nelson
Kwabena Badu- Yeboah
Divine Ayidzoe
Ernest Otoo
Stephen Adu
Joseph Adomako
Andrews K. Quaning
Samuel Ansah
Dr. Augustine Tawiah
Dr. Joshua Mallet
Frank K. Aidoo
Rev. Robert G. Dery
Emmanuel A. Cobbinah
MOE
MOF
MOF
GES
FPMU, MOE
GETFund
MOE
EPA
SRIMPR, MOE
MOE
GES
MOE
SEU, GES
TEU, GES
NTC
CENDLOS
NIB
WAEC
GSS
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
andrewsquaning @ymail.com
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Chris Koramoah
H. R. Wilson
Tony Bediako
Ms. Dorothy Glover
Mawuli Segbefia
Elliot Lamptey
Paul K. Krampa
Rev. Simon Asige
GES
MOE
NITA
GES
MOE
MOE
MOE
GES/SED
202030286; 0244235211
249590077
243438322
277208869
0244092820; 0208178912
0247125542; 0267125542
244068823
0501301399; 0244365613
0244466125; 0505091460
0244101822; 0266237400
0208951622; 0244256976
277400261
244132853
244112802
242501196
0244438643; 0264438643
244663780
243558825; 0202260214
0240284490; 0265661145
0209041494
0204343020; 0264343026
0208111627; 0234238615
202050186
0207366900; 0244812382
264695607
244872352
208112338
244843757
245
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.3: DISTRICT AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL SELECTION CRITERIA
Ernest Otoo
Nicola Ruddle
MOE
MOE/ODI Fellow
0244101822;0266237400
0509041922
[email protected]
[email protected]
0207366900; 0244812382
0244975290
[email protected]
TABLE A30.4: SCHOLARSHIPS
Ms. Dorothy Glover
Kate Mikaldo
GES
GES
TABLE A30.5: SCHOOL PERFORMANCE PARTNERSHIP PLANS
Ms. Dorothy Glover
Augustus Agyemfra
GES
GES
0207366900 0244812382
0264709335
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.6: IMPROVING TEACHING AND LEARNING OF M ATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
Andrews Quaining
Dr. Augustine Tawiah
Rev Joana Koranteng
Peter Atta Gyamfi
GES
NIB
GES
GES
0244132853
0242501196
0244441222
0244732028
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.7: USING ICT TO IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING
Dr. Joshua Mallet
Atta Williams
CENDLOS
GES
0244438643 0264438643
0264530270
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.8: LEADERSHIP AND M ANAGEMENT TRAINING
Stephen Adu
Dr. Augustine Tawiah
GES
NIB
0208951622 0244256976
0242501196
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.9: M ONITORING AND EVALUATION
Joseph Adomako
Divine Ayidzoe
Dr. Felix Amoakoh
Ernest Owusu-Ansah
Benard Ayensu
Bernard Ntim
Natasha Somji
PBME, MOE
SRIMPR, MOE
FPMU, MOE
MOE
MOE
GES
MOE/ODI Fellow
0277400261
0244466125; 0505091460
0244092820; 0208178912
0246617273; 0249986397
0267730142
0202621724
0544361025
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.10: WEB BASED MONITORING AND SCHOOL MAPPING
Ernest Owusu-Ansah
Benard Ayensu
Atta Williams
Natasha Somji
MOE
MOE
GES
MOE/ODI Fellow
0246617273; 0249986397
0267730142
0264530270
0544361025
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
244068823
0208110079; 0249331015
0233772090
0244749497
0248454999
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.11: PROCUREMENT
Aruna Nelson
Mad. Zalia Ali
Kweku Kyei Owusu
Alfred Kavi
Adams Zuwii
MOE
GES
MOE
MOE
GES
246
TABLE A30.12: FINANCIAL M ANAGEMENT AND DISBURSEMENT
Stephen Kofi Mensah
Chris Koramoah
MOE
GES
244946089
0204343020 0264343026
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.13: INFORMATION EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION
Paul K. Krampa
Ms. Maame Efua Cann
Ms. Matilda Tettey
Franklin Bediako
Francis Gbadago
TABLE A30.14:
Mawuli Segbefia
Jacob Adu Larbi
MOE
MOE
MOE
MOE
MOE
208112338
0277785044
0244595298
0277551225
0204481275
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACT ISSUES
MOE
GES
264695607
277208869
[email protected]
[email protected]
TABLE A30.15: CIVIL WORKS
H.R. Wilson
Cornelius Atsu Dafeamekpor
Godfred Schandorf
Mawuli Segbefia
Jacob Adu Larbi
Kingsley A. Nduro
Emmanuel Coleman
Samuel Antwi
MOE
GETFund
GETFund
MOE
GES
FPMU, MOE
FPMU, MOE
FPMU, MOE
208111627
244474920
0247125542; 0267125542
0264695607
0277208869
0208824596
0267041551
0242327957
247
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
`