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SUSTAINABLE
IRELAND
IRELAND’S ENVIRONMENTAL, WASTE
MANAGEMENT AND ENERGY MAGAZINE
WWW.SUSTAINABLEIRELAND.CO.UK
VOL 9 No.2 2014
£2.40 €3.20
FULL CIRCLE
POWER
ENERGY
PARK
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COMMENT
Vol 9 Issue 2
INVEST NI
If current trends continue, something like 10
million properties in the UK will have their
roofs covered with solar panels by the end
of this decade.
That would see more than a third of
households generating energy from the sun
and would allow Britain to produce about
6% of its annual electricity needs from solar
power. - with as much as 40% coming from
the panels on a typical sunny, summer day.
Globally, solar is the biggest renewable
sector employer, with around 2.27 million
people working in 168 different countries.
These figures are reflected locally, where the number of solar
installations has grown by around 300% over the past two years.
Some of the successful businesses are featured in this edition of
Sustainable Ireland, but they don’t all sing from the same hymn sheet
when it comes to the free/paid for debate.
When a company or householder opts to switch to solar, they have
two options: pay for it up front and ultimately enjoy the benefits or have
the system installed free of charge.
The latter seems too good to be true – and, yes, of course there are
catches. You get to use the power from the PV panels installed, but its the
installers who get the NIROCs (Northern Ireland Renewable Obligation
Certificates) and the income from exporting electricity to the grid.
Conversely, customers who opt to pay up front are not tied into any
contract, the NIROCs are theirs and their systems will ultimately pay
for themselves - but they are, of course, responsible for the ongoing
maintenance costs.
Those customers who are considering shelling out for solar power
should note that the business is getting more and more competitive, and
that there are great deals to be had; ‘free’ customers can join the solar
revolution simply by renting their roofs.
But for Northern Ireland, one of the main drawbacks in the ‘free’
argument is the failure of the Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) to
issue specific guidance about what sort of effect free solar could have on
selling on or remortgaging.
And until that happens, banks could be reluctant to accept the lease
agreements which give the installer a stake in the property.
Across the Irish Sea, the CML released guidance which made lenders
comfortable with free solar agreements; it’s high time the same thing
happened here.
Meanwhile, congratulations to Energia on a successful 2014
conference.
The overall message emanating from the Templepatrick Hilton was
clear; that while a great deal of action with regard to energy efficiency was
already under way, it is not going far enough or fast enough.
Clever businesses, however, will profit from market opportunities.
Just look at the solar market for a good example.
John Laverty
Executive Editor
Follow us on twitter
@SustainableIre
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
Find us on facebook
Sustainable Ireland
Golda Burrows General Manager, John Laverty Editor, Helen Beggs Editor-in-Chief,
Paul Beattie Group Marketing Manager, Brian McCrum Art Director, Nick Stokes
Designer, Eleanor Blane Accounts Manager, Helen Beggs, Garfield Harrison Publishers
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND is Published by:
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND Ltd, The Old Coach House,
12 Main Street, Hillsborough BT26 6AE TEL: 028 9268 8888
FAX: 028 9268 8866 Email: [email protected]
Sustainable Ireland is distributed to Environmental, Waste and energy
managers. The readership covers all aspects of the waste chain and comprises
of major waste producers within industry and commerce, waste carriers, landfill
sites, transfer stations and recycling facilities. Our mailing list also consists of
councils, energy and environmental consultants, hospitals, supermarkets etc.
The aim of the magazine is to provide the reader with articles on the latest
initiatives and legislation affecting the industry and the latest equipment,
technology and services available to and from the industry. The contents of this
publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form, either in part or
in full, including photocopying and recording, without the written consent of the
owner. Nor may any part of this publication be stored in a retrieval system of
any nature without prior written consent of Sustainable Ireland Ltd.
4
Why maximising resource efficiency in
our hotels makes perfect sense
ENERGY NEWS
10
A look back at Energia’s successful 2014
conference... and where their grants are going
14
Renewables fund to pour £27m into
Northern Ireland projects
18
To pay or not to pay for solar
installations... the debate rages
WASTE NEWS
32
VIEW FROM THE CAB: safety must
always be a front seat passenger
34
COVER STORY:
Full Circle Power. Northern Ireland’s private and
public sector collaborate to deliver solution
42
How Banbridge Council successfully
brought its recycling back in-house
3
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND AWARDS
49
Could you be the next big winner? It’s time to
get your entries in for this year’s gala event
ENVIRONMENT NEWS
58
60
Small changes can bring big savings at Green Biz 2014
Rivers Agency releases its sophisticated
new flood maps for Northern Ireland
REGULARS
29
Why it’s never been easier to recycle... or more important
that we do By Keith Patterson, Local Authority
Support Manager, WRAP Northern Ireland
39
Why some employers are finding it difficult
to maintain even basic safety standards
By Jim King, Principal Inspector, HSENI
55
FROM THE DESK OF: Environment
Minister Mark H Durkan: How kids lead the
way in looking after the environment
66
SUSTAINABILITY CORNER: Your passport to global
markets By Liam McEvoy, Sustainos Consultant
67
PAPER PRICE INDEX: by Stephen Duffy, Director
of Highlander International Recycling: Market
stability suits all, while recyclers face bigger issues
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
Contents 1pg.indd 3
04/06/2014 09:42
invest ni neWs
inVest
nortHern irelanD
MaXiMisiNG resourCe effiCieNCy iN your
HoteL MaKes PerfeCt BusiNess seNse
Resource efficiency for the hotel sector in
Northern Ireland can help increase profits, improve
environmental performance and enhance reputation.
Essentially it means getting the most value out of
resources such as energy, water and materials.
While becoming a resource
efficient hotel is an attractive goal,
the reality is many businesses in
Northern Ireland do not know
where to start; or they may have
exhausted all the opportunities
they are aware of.
Invest NI has produced a
guide specifically for the hotel
sector in Northern Ireland,
designed to provide practical
advice for hotels and to
support them in identifying and
implementing good practice
resource efficiency opportunities.
According to the Northern
Ireland Tourist Board (NITB),
one
in
three
visitors
to
Northern Ireland would prefer
to stay in accommodation
that is striving to improve its
environmental
performance.
So by demonstrating that they
care about the environment, by
implementing resource efficiency
opportunities highlighted in this
guide, hotels can strengthen
repeat business and help attract
new custom.
On top of this, 65% of hotels
are already taking steps to reduce
their carbon footprint.
The guide covers the key areas
of resource efficiency in the hotel
sector including energy efficiency,
water
efficiency,
material
efficiency and waste minimisation
and features practical Northern
Ireland based hotel examples.
It also discusses how a hotel’s
resource efficiency efforts can
be recognised formally through
environmental
certification.
The guide can be downloaded
from the publications section on
investni.com
Invest NI is committed to
supporting hotels to implement
resource efficiency. Please do not
hesitate to contact us on 0800 181
4422 and ask for the Sustainable
Development Team or visit www.
investni.com if we can be of
further assistance.
sizing, installation, capital costs,
potential savings and project
payback. Once this study was
completed, the hotel set about
visiting different biomass boiler
suppliers and after a considered
selection process it chose a local
biomass supplier. To improve
water efficiency, Invest NI
recommended the installation of
water saving devices on top of
raising staff awareness of water
efficient practices. As a result,
the hotel undertook a review of
all toilet cistern and water tank
ballcock and float valve condition,
fixing several including the main
water tank which was leaking
water. The hotel also installed
water efficient shower heads in
guest bedrooms, timer controls
for urinals and sensor controls on
sink taps.
investni.com
4
a feW NortHerN ireLaND
HoteLs WHo HaVe
BeNefitteD froM aDViCe
froM tHe sustaiNaBLe
DeVeLoPMeNt teaM
tHe Valley
Hotel
tHe CoMpany
the Valley Hotel located in
fivemiletown is a modern
3-star hotel that is managed
by a family dedicated to
excellent service and superb
food. the hotel has a central
location in northern ireland
close to counties fermanagh,
tyrone and Monaghan. the
current
facilities
include:
• 22 en-suite bedrooms;
• Bordeaux, a 75-seat restaurant;
• A multi-purpose function room
accommodating approximately
250 seated, 500 unseated;
• Two bars, Marbles and Loco,
accommodating 40 and 120
people respectively.
tHe CHallenge
The hotel has made great
progress with environmental
improvements, achieving a Gold
Award under the Green Tourism
Business Scheme and winning
first place Best for Energy Saving
SME in the Action Renewable
Awards. The challenge for the
hotel is to continually seek
efficiencies to combat the
increasing prices of oil for space
heating and hot water. In addition
the hotel wanted to improve its
water efficiency to reduce water
bills as well as the hidden oil costs
of heating the water consumed.
tHe solution
With the help of Invest NI
an
energy
consultant
was
appointed to carry out a detailed
biomass boiler feasibility study
to include advice on system
tHe Benefits
The fully operational biomass
boiler has been a great success.
Heating cost savings have
been identified in the region
of £17,000 per annum with the
system accredited for Renewable
Heat Incentive (RHI) payments.
sustainaBle irelanD VoL 9 issue 2 2014
Invest NI 4pgs.indd 4
02/06/2014 11:21
invest ni neWs
roe park
resort
tHe CoMpany
the roe park resort is situated
on the outskirts of limavady
on the north coast of ireland.
Having been the ancestral
home of the ritter family, then
a care home for the elderly
since the 1950s, the house
was converted and extensively
extended into a hotel in 1995.
the resort has 118 en-suite
bedrooms, two restaurants,
two bars, a spa, 21 holes of golf,
a golf academy and an indoor
and outdoor driving range.
tHe CHallenge
The Roe Park Resort has a
dedicated
pumping
station
within its grounds that is owned
and operated by NI Water. NI
Water identified an ongoing
problem with the accumulation
of fats, oils and greases (FOG)
in the pumping station leading
to the pumps burning out
on a regular basis. This FOG
accumulation is common in
the downstream effluent from
catering establishments, and
often leads to high costs for
clearance and parts replacement.
An increase in cleaning costs
of £7,000 per annum to meet
NI Water requirements was a
concern for the hotel and it
engaged Invest NI to help it
identify a more cost-effective
solution. Space heating, hot
water and cooking requirements
for the hotel are comparatively
expensive compared to others
in the hotel sector, as the hotel
has traditionally used oil and LPG
respectively. The hotel discussed
alternative
energy
supply
approaches with Invest NI that
would reduce these operating
costs.
tHe solution
The hotel has also seen a 25%
reduction in water consumption
since installing water saving
devices, monitoring water use
and promoting staff awareness of
water efficiency.
WHat tHe
Hotel saiD
“The benefits to the hotel are
excellent with a clear increase
in customer satisfaction as the
hotel always has a warm and
comfortable environment. The
savings with wood pellets versus
oil is good, however, adding the
RHI payments and savings make
it a very worthwhile investment.
Overall the project cost was
£46,000 which was supported
through a Carbon Trust interest
free loan. This greatly helped
from a cash flow perspective.
As a result of these heating and
water use cost savings, the hotel
has been able to become more
competitive in the market place
due to this reduced overhead.”
greg Williamson, general
Manager at the Valley Hotel
Invest NI carried out a desk based
study for the hotel to investigate
treatment
technologies
to
minimise the FOG issue and
any potential effluent treatment
charges from NI Water. This
included assessment of financial
benefits, system specification
and identifying suppliers. The
selected solution involved bioaugmentation, a proven method
of reducing Biological Oxygen
Demand
(BOD),
Chemical
Oxygen
Demand
(COD),
Suspended Solids (SS) and FOG
in hotel effluent. A dosing system
was installed upstream of the
FOG wastewater source from the
kitchens.
With the support of Invest
NI, the hotel is in the final stages
of having a natural gas supply
installed by Firmus Gas. The
conversion of the site to natural
gas firing involves the relatively
simple process of converting the
two existing oil-fired boilers to gas
firing, with an estimated payback
within one year. In addition, the
Invest NI report recommended
the conversion of all cooking
and laundry equipment to
natural gas. The introduction of
natural gas also allows the site
to consider alternative methods
of energy generation. Combined
heat and power is a solution
that is particularly suited to the
hotel where it has a high base
load heating demand (with the
use of the swimming pool). The
introduction of combined heat
and power will have significant
paybacks and make significant
savings relating to both thermal
and electrical energy costs on
site.
tHe Benefits
With the avoidance of additional
FOG cleaning costs through
the use of dosing, the project
identified annual savings of over
£3,700. In addition, changing to
trade effluent billing through NI
Water identified potential savings
of over £7,000 per annum. The
identified combined savings of
the oil and LPG conversion to
natural gas is over £100,000 per
annum providing a payback of
just over three years. This will
significantly reduce the hotel’s
carbon footprint and impacts on
the environment.
5
WHat tHe
Hotel saiD
“Invest NI has enabled the resort
to investigate various changes
to its infrastructure in a relatively
short period of time giving the
resort the opportunity to invest in
new technologies that will stand
the resort in good stead over the
next years. Without Invest NI this
process would have been much
longer and the benefits would
have been in the long term rather
than the short term. Invest NI has
really played a major part in the
ongoing success of the resort.”
george graham, general
Manager, roe park resort
sustainaBle irelanD VoL 9 issue 2 2014
Invest NI 4pgs.indd 5
02/06/2014 11:21
invest ni neWs
Manor
House
Country
Hotel
tHe CoMpany
6
the Manor House Country
Hotel is a 4-star luxury country
house hotel situated outside
enniskillen on the shores of
lough erne. the hotel has
81 guestrooms ranging from
family rooms to luxury premier
suites. additional facilities
include two bars, a restaurant, a
bistro, a number of conference
facilities, and a large banquet
room. the hotel also has a spa
and leisure centre which has
a fitness room, gymnasium,
swimming pool, Jacuzzi, hot
tub, sauna and steam room.
tHe CHallenge
The Manor House Country Hotel
was keen to maximise resource
efficiency without compromising
the comfort levels and 4-star
experience provided to guests.
Having previously installed a
biomass heating system to serve
the new extension, and aware
of the significant savings this
investment had made, the hotel
was keen to investigate the
potential to extend the system
to the older part of the building.
The hotel also wanted to consider
options for upgrading inefficient
lighting and some other smaller
resource efficiency measures.
Whilst the hotel management
was eager to implement these
resource efficiency projects they
needed to be confident of the
technical and financial feasibility
of the actions being considered.
tHe solution
To ensure the hotel was confident
in its project choices it approached
Invest NI for support. The hotel
used the Invest NI-funded energy
efficiency loan scheme to finance
the installation of replacement
lighting with lower energy LED
lights. This 0% loan managed by
the Carbon Trust was paid back
using the savings made from the
project. A free resource efficiency
Dates for your Diary
eu sustainaBle energy
Week: 23 - 27 June 2014
23rd-27th June marks eu sustainable energy Week (euseW) –
a european Commission initiative targeted at those interested in
renewable and efficient energy by promoting energy Days. now
in its 8th year, euseW is a platform for showcasing activities
dedicated to energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions.
the event aims to spread best practice, inspire new ideas and
build alliances to help meet the eu’s energy and climate goals.
To help promote EUSEW, Invest
Northern Ireland’s Sustainable
Development team will be
launching the second phase in a
series of Best Practice Guides on
24th June in Riddel Hall, Belfast
audit provided by Invest NI also
identified a number of other
measures to improve the control
of some operating costs. These
included:
• Installation of thermostatic
radiator valves (TRVs) on all
bedroom radiators to ensure
there is a better level of control
available to staff and guests.
Cleaners are now advised to
use these TRVs at settings 2 or
3 depending on the external
temperature,
thereafter
allowing guests to turn the
heating up or down on arrival.
This avoids heating the rooms
excessively when they are
unoccupied.
• Installation of urinal flush
motion sensor controls to
reduce the flushing of urinals
overnight and at other times
they are not being used by
guests. This not only saves the
hotel on water charges but also
on wastewater charges, making
a double saving.
Invest NI provided the Manor
House with specialist consultancy
to investigate the feasibility and
economic case for extending the
biomass heating system to the
older part of the hotel. This has
provided a basis for the hotel to
move forward.
aimed at helping businesses
to become more resource and
energy efficient. These manuals
provide step-by-step guidance
and an outline on the best practice
tools and techniques available to
help companies become more
efficient, save money and also
consider new technologies.
Four Best Practice Guides
have already been launched. The
Practical Water Efficiency Guide
helps businesses become more
water efficient through a simple
ten-step process, while the Waste
Minimisation Guide focuses on
improving business efficiency
and saving money through
minimising and avoiding waste.
The Packaging Efficiency Guide
helps the food and drink sector
understand how to optimise
packaging use, keep packaging
waste to a minimum and reduce
costs. Finally, don’t forget to
check out the new Resource
Efficiency Guide for the Hotel
Sector profiled earlier in the
feature.
The new Guides being
launched during EUSEW will
expand the series and include
topics such as Solar PV, Combined
Heat & Power and Biomass Fired
Heating.
All the Guides will be available
on our website investni.com
For further details on the
launch of the Guides to coincide
with EU Sustainable Energy
Week, visit the events section
of investni.com or alternatively
email [email protected]
com for further information.
tHe Benefits
Lighting replacements in the
hotel have led to as much as 90%
reduction in lighting electrical
costs and have saved the Manor
House over £15,000 per annum,
with a project payback of just
over two years. The hotel has also
reported enhanced lighting levels
with the introduction of the new
LEDs. The installation of TRVs
on guest bedroom radiators has
identified savings of over £400 per
annum in the Old House section
of the hotel and the installation
of urinal flush motion sensor
controls has identified savings of
£250 per annum.
sustainaBle irelanD VoL 9 issue 2 2014
Invest NI 4pgs.indd 6
02/06/2014 11:21
invest ni neWs
inVest
nortHern
irelanD
CoriCk
Country
House
Hotel anD
spa
tHe CoMpany
situated in the heart of Clogher
Valley, the 17th-century Corick
Country House Hotel and spa
offers 4- star, award winning
facilities. the hotel has 43
bedroom suites, the Carleton
restaurant, the Blackwater
grill Bar, seven conference
suites and a new spa facility
providing a hydro pool, sauna,
steam room, outdoor hottub, rasul, Vichy shower,
and eight treatment rooms.
tHe CHallenge
The hotel set out to complete a
24-bedroom and leisure facility
extension
whilst
minimising
the additional operating costs
through the use of ‘passive’
construction
and
design
techniques. In addition to this,
with support from Invest NI, the
hotel is currently investigating
energy efficiency opportunities
within the existing building
including a review of:
• Hotel benchmarking to include
a monitoring and targeting
system;
• Building fabric improvements;
• Heating system efficiencies
including plant insulation and
heating controls;
• The benefits of a building
management system;
• Lighting upgrades.
tHe solution
The hotel enlisted the
support of building contractor
Moffit and Robinson Construction
Ltd to design and build the
24-bedroom extension. As a
result of the work the following
resource efficiency improvements
were implemented.
7
BuilDing faBriC
• Roof insulation thickness was
increased by 40%.
• Triple glazed windows (40%
better than double glazing)
were put in.
• Wall insulation was increased
by 20% and thermal looping
was reduced in the cavities.
• Floor insulation was increased
by approximately 60% with the
insulation fitted between floor
levels to reduce heat transfer.
• Thermal bridging has been
reduced to almost zero in all
sections of the building.
• Thermal
insulation
was
installed between the pool area
and the beauty spa due to the
difference in temperatures and
humidity requirements.
ligHting
• Low energy lighting (PL, CFL
and LED lights) was used.
• Motion sensor lighting controls
were installed in communal
areas.
• High light reflective décor
maximises light from low
energy fittings.
• A card-key system was installed
for each bedroom to reduce
energy wastage by guests
leaving lighting, TV etc.
running.
Heating
• Motion sensors were installed
in the guest bedrooms to
control the heating whereby
they only activate if someone
is in room. The rooms are also
thermostatically controlled to
prevent overheating.
• A heat recovery ventilation
system was installed which
recovers 90% of waste heat
extracted through the guest
bedroom bathroom. This is
then used to heat the fresh air
blown into the bedrooms.
• A wood chip boiler was installed
to reduce the carbon footprint
and cost of heating. The use of
electric water heating has since
been eliminated in the spa and
pool areas by using the wood
chip boiler system.
• A specialised heat recovery
ventilation system in the
pool area was installed which
suited the high humidity
requirements.
Water
• A borehole provides all hotel
water used.
• Bedroom toilets have been
fitted with low-flush cisterns to
save water.
tHe Benefits
The hotel is currently analysing
the cost savings, however, it was
evident to the hotel that the
addition of 24 new bedrooms has
barely been noticeable in respect
of increases in hotel energy
bills. The type of energy saving
measures applied within the
extension bedrooms eliminates
cold surfaces and therefore
increases the comfort levels for
the residents. The air tightness
and triple glazing eliminates
the convection currents within
the rooms leaving a uniform
and
stabilised
temperature
throughout. The heat recovery
unit ensures excellent levels of
indoor air quality as it supplies
fresh, filtered air.
“The hotel is delighted with
these energy saving measures
and more so that all of these
energy saving benefits do not
detract from the comfort of our
guests.”
avril robson, Corick
House Hotel.
sustainaBle irelanD VoL 9 issue 2 2014
Invest NI 4pgs.indd 7
02/06/2014 11:21
ENERGY NEWS
CALOR LPG...
CLEAN, EFFICIENT,
PRACTICAL AND
VALUE FOR MONEY
Choosing the right energy supplier is one of the most important
business decisions a company has to make.
8
And today, more and more
industrial, manufacturing and
production facilities - from
pharmaceutical
manufacturers
to large scale food production
plants - are choosing to switch to
Calor LPG.
The economy and efficiency it
offers can make a positive impact
on a company’s bottom line,
while reduced CO2 emissions will
demonstrate a firm’s commitment
to the environment.
Calor is part of SHV Energy
- the largest global distributor
of LPG, currently serving 30
million customers worldwide, and
choosing LPG from Calor as an
energy source is an investment in
the future of a thriving business.
LPG
–
or
Liquefied
Petroleum Gas – is a naturally
occurring, versatile, portable and
manageable fuel and produces
far less CO2 than conventional
solid or liquid fuels.
It is easily stored and
delivered in cylinder and bulk
tank form, and as it produces far
lower carbon emissions than oil,
coal, peat and even electricity, it is
one of the cleanest conventional
fuels available. “LPG makes perfect business
sense. Switching to Calor LPG
will not only reduce the carbon
footprint of your business but
can have a positive impact on
your bottom line,” said a Calor
spokesperson.
“Benefits
include
lower
running costs due to the increased
efficiency of LPG appliances,
a reduction in equipment
maintenance requirements and a
reduction in carbon tax.”
The spokesperson added
that Calor can offer the reassuring
security of a fuel supply that
doesn’t have to rely on Middle
SIMPLE POwER NI
LAUNCh NEw TURBINES
Local wind energy firm Simple Power have officially launched two new turbines,
heralding the start of rolling out at least 200 across Northern Ireland.
Simple Power Chief
Executive Philip Rainey
(left) with Power NI’s
Philip Carson
The ceremonial ribbon was
cut on the 250kW turbines on
farmland in County Tyrone which
are to be followed by more over
the next four years.
The 250kW single wind
turbines are located in Donemana
and Sixmilecross on land owned
by farmers William McCrea and
Noel McFarland, providing them
a steady income for the next 20
years.
“It’s an important occasion
not only for Simple Power but for
local farmers William McCrea and
Noel McFarland, who have been
able to turn a piece of their land
Eastern or Russian imports; a
large proportion of their LPG
is sourced from their Whitegate
refinery in Co. Cork, with the
remainder sourced within Europe
and the US.
An
increase
in
global
availability makes LPG more
competitive than more pollutant
alternatives, and safeguards LPG
as a secure energy source in
Ireland.
“Calor’s success is based
on an in-depth knowledge of
the specific energy needs of its
business customers,” said the
spokesperson.
“An impressive infrastructure
that includes sea terminals in
Cork, Dublin and Belfast, with
additional strategic storage sites
in Claremorris and Sligo, are all
supported by the largest LPG
tanker fleet in Ireland.”
Calor
has
invested
significantly in digital logistics
technology,
which
ensures
continual
improvement
of
delivery standards.
This enables their schedulers
to optimise delivery routes on a
daily basis, utilising the digital
logistics system and telemetry
units on customer tanks.
Their
remote
telemetry
monitoring system alerts us
when a customer’s tank needs
to be topped up so there is no
interruption in supply.
“Calor are committed to a
policy of supporting best practice
and sustainable development
and have introduced our own
sustainability programme aimed
at reducing the carbon emissions
of the company by 25% by 2020,”
said the spokesperson.
into a reliable and sustainable
source of income from wind
energy for the next 20 years,” said
Chief Executive of Simple Power,
Philip Rainey .
Philip Carson from electricity
supplier Power NI added:
“Our relationships with power
providers like Simple Power help
us build on strong links with
both the farming and agricultural
sector and are pivotal in ensuring
Northern Ireland has a more
secure energy future.”
Founded in Northern Ireland
in 2010, the privately owned
Simple Power launched its first
two wind turbines in October
2012 and its partners include
Power NI, NIE and Vergnet.
Based
in
Belfast
and
employing ten people, Simple
Power
capitalises
on
the
support for renewable energy
by provisioning single wind
turbines that feed directly into the
electricity grid. SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 8
30/05/2014 11:39
Get fre
grantse
NOW!
Energy
Efficiency
at your
finger tips
NEW 2014 Energia
schemes now available
AT LEAST 20% OF THE
CAPITAL COST FREE!
EN Fluorescent/LED Lighting
Hysave Liquid Pump Amplification
Variable Speed Drives
Variable Speed Compressors
Heat Recovery on CAS
Boiler Burner Controller
SME Lighting and Controls
Compressed Air Control System
Aluminium Compressed Air Piping
Call 028 9038 0602 or email
[email protected]
FREE
Grants
Available
Energia fp ad.indd 1
30/05/2014 15:32
energia grants
ENERgIA
REpoRTS
ENERgY
EffICIENCY
SUCCESS
AND
LAUNCHES
NEW DRIVE
Another year, another successful
Energia energy conference at the
Hilton Hotel in Templepatrick.
10
This annual event has become
widely
recognised
as
a
showcase for energy efficiency
excellence, with a programme
that is designed to help those in
attendance learn more about the
latest technologies that will help
them make savings, both in costs
and carbon emissions, along with
the grants that are available to
implement such changes.
Energia,
who
launched
their 2013/14 NISEP energy
efficiency
scheme
at
the
conference, is a company that
prides itself in promoting the
most efficient use of energy.
To this end, Ireland’s leading
independent energy supplier has,
for the past decade, supported
the grant scheme initiative,
which can provide companies
implementing energy saving
projects with up to 20% savings
of the capital costs of schemes for
commercial premises.
First to the rostrum at the
conference was Mark Welsh,
Energy Services Manager at
Energia, who reported on last
year’s scheme results and outlined
the grants that are available for
this year - scheme funding for
2014/15 is £435,798 - and detailed
a number of case studies that
demonstrated where substantial
savings have been made as a
result of installing the grant-aided
efficient equipment. Several case
studies were used to illustrate the
schemes covering a number of
sectors from the foods and drinks
industry to health.
The keynote address, on the
global energy market outlook,
came from Brendan Cronin of
Poyry Energy Consulting, Europe’s
leading
energy
consultancy.
Other speakers on the day
included Ciaran O’Reilly of Invest
NI who discussed the support
available from Northern Ireland’s
regional economic development
agency,
Gary
Ryan,
Retail
Director at Energia who covered
Electricity Markets, Regulatory
and Structural Change and Daniel
Horgan of Energia, who provided
a comprehensive market update.
Energia’s Northern Ireland
Grant
Scheme
is
carried
out in partnership with the
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 10
03/06/2014 11:58
energia grants
Northern Ireland Sustainable
Energy
Programme.
(NISEP)
Funding
for
the
scheme
comes through every customer
contributing £7 per annum
through their electricity bill which
raises in the region of £6million
per annum with 20% of that
funding allocated to non-priority/
non domestic projects. The
remaining 80% aids the domestic
sector and the fuel poor.
Energia’s grant package includes
a free survey by experienced
engineers,
comprehensive
design, a report detailing savings
and costs, a grant covering up to
20% of the costs, commissioning of
the project and a comprehensive
review and audit of installation.
Participating companies may
also benefit from the Enhanced
Capital Allowance Scheme (www.
eca.gov.uk) and there may also
be support from the Carbon Trust
(www.carbontrust.co.uk)
Energia
teamed
up
with a number of different
project
partners
to
help
deliver
the
schemes.
Technologies covered by the
scheme included Fluorescent/
LED lighting, Hysave liquid
pump amplification, variable
speed drives, variable speed
compressors, heat recovery on
Compressed Air Systems, boiler
burner controllers, SME lighting
and controls, compressed air
control systems and aluminium
compressed air piping.
Energia
grant
funding
available for 2014/15 totals
£435,798.
This is a dramatic
increase from the 2011/12 figure
of £274,000 demonstrating how
innovative and committed Energia
is in providing worthwhile schemes
that really make a difference.
Energia reported that last year the
total number of projects were 82
(up from 70); lifetime reductions
were 181GWh (up from 156GWh);
lifetime CO2 savings 129,000
tonnes (up from 112,000 tonnes)
and lifetime cost savings were
£31m (£2.6m annual), which is up
from £27m (2.1m annual).
It’s a trend Energia are keen
to continue.
HEATINg BoILER
BURNER
CoNTRoLLER
BURNER CoNTRoL
CASE STUDY
Our partners: Nitronica,
HeatGem, Romari, Green Energy
Management, March 2014
Client: Manufacturer
1* Boiler Burner Controller
(600 kW Boiler)
Savings in Annual
Consumption: 217,343kWhs
Investment:£3,800
Energia Grant:£760
Payback: 0.1 years
VARIABLE SpEED
CompRESSoRS
SpEED CompRESSoR
CASE STUDY
Our Partner: Team Air
Power, March 2014
Client: Manufacturing Company
Exiting Installation: 2 *
75kVA Fixed Compressors
Existing Consumption:
1,642,579kWhs
Replacement: 2* 75kVA
Variable Compressor.
Annual Consumption:
706,844kWhs
Annual Savings: 935,735kWhs
Investment: £54,000
Energia Grant: £11,000
Payback: 0.4years
REfRIgERATIoN
LpA pUmp
TECHNoLogY
HYSAVE CASE STUDY
Our partner: HYSAVE
Technologies, January 2014
Client: Manufacturing Company
Project Installation of
2* 66kW pumps
Existing Refrigeration Annual
Consumption: 1,287,631kWhs
Consumption with HY-SAVE
Pump: 1,001,665kWhs
Annual Savings: 285,966kWhs
Investment: £34,000
Energia Grant: £6,000
Payback: 0.7 years
VARIABLE SpEED
DRIVES
11
SpEED DRIVE CASE
STUDY
Our Partners: Ashdale,
Mitsubishi Electric, February 2014
Client: Wood Manufacturer
Existing Installation: 3 * 30
kVA Fixed Speed Motors
New Installation: 3 * 30kVA
Variable Speed Drives
Annual Savings: 247,788 kWh
Investment: £6,000
Energia Grant: £2,000
Payback: 0.3 years
HEAT RECoVERY
- CompRESSED
AIR UNITS
HEAT RECoVERY CASE
STUDY
Our partners: Gardner Denver,
Team Air Power, March 2014
Client: Printing and packaging
2* 75kW Heat Recovery Units
Savings in Annual
Consumption: 569,088kWhs
Investment: £13,238
Energia Grant: £6,600
Payback: 0.2 years
LIgHTINg
fLUoRESCENT/LED
LIgHTINg CASE STUDY
Our Partner: Demesne
Electrical, March 2014
Client: Food Manufacturer
Existing Instaillation: 249
fittings, various sizes
Existing Consumption:
699,243kWhs
Replacement: 249
LED various sizes
Annual Consumption:
816,660kWhs
Annual Savings: 617,784kWhs
Investment: £69,784
Energia Grant: £13,756
Payback: 0.5 years
For more information and help on energy efficiency grants contact
janine.o’[email protected] or [email protected]
You can visit our website, www.energia.ie/Business/EnergyEfficiency for lots of information, case studies, brochures and
downloads.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 11
04/06/2014 09:29
ENERGY NEWS
12
ELECTRICAL ENERGY SAVINGS?
ASHDALE HAVE
THE SPARK AND
THE ANSWERS
Major increases in energy
costs make electrical
energy a driving force in
costing for all industries.
Mitsubishi FR-F700
Inverter Drives
Have you ever wondered where
the electrical energy is consumed
in your business? Would you like
to save 30%+ on energy costs?
If the answer to those
questions is yes, then Ashdale, the
specialist engineering company,
are the people to talk to.
The
Belfast-based firm is
introducing an industrial Connect
Monitor Save system that will
help customers control the cost
of their company’s energy.
Ashdale are offering a free
trial of their Pump and Fan
Energy-saving solution on a
process guarantee basis.
They will survey a customer’s
site, install a trial Mitsubishi F
Series inverter (assuming it can
be sized appropriately) and
monitor the energy saving
to
demonstrate
the
viability of the solution.
The
solution
Ashdale may offer
will include some or
all of the following
elements:
Mitsubishi FRF700 Inverter
Drives
for
pump and fan
applications
–
reduce 10% Save
30% Energy.
The
Mitsubishi
FR-F700 range of
VSDs
are a modern
and
intelligent
drive
solution that can be easily
integrated into your automation
systems. The FR-F700 drive
is particularly well suited to
pump and fan applications with
reduced overloads including
Air
Conditioning
Systems,
Ventilation, Air Extraction and
Drain Systems, Ground Water
Pumps and Heat Pumps.
These inverters can achieve
massive savings; for example, at
a frequency of 45Hz, the inverter
achieves a saving of approx
27% and at 40Hz will generate a
saving of almost 50%.
and monitoring. Huge energy
reductions can come about
simply by monitoring and
control.
MAPS is a life-cycle software tool
that addresses the shortcomings
of most PLC/SCADA integration
tools in that it offers value to
the online engineering and
integration phases.
It also extends the integrity of
the “as delivered” solution and
offers customers the ability to
handle the normal extensions
and maintenance of any
automation solution.
Benefits
include
standards
approach to projects; single point
of configuration, deployment
and management; on-going
life-cycle
management;
automatically generated PLC
and SCADA projects which
reduce
engineering
effort;
automatically
generated
reports;
automatically
generated management and
diagnostic screens.
Janitza Power Meters. High
performance power analysers
from the UMG 604 product
family are suitable for use at all
network levels.
All-important power quality
parameters
are
recorded,
e.g. short-term interruptions
with fault recorder function,
transients, harmonics up to a
40th and starting current.
Extensive
communication
options allow affordable and
quick integration in the existing
communication architecture.
Westermo Industrial Networks
(plus the Westermo Connect
Solution which is a M2M Cloud
connection platform).
WestermoConnect is the fully
flexible, M2M cloud connection
service. Companies who invest
in remote access technology
quickly realise the full benefits
and potential; reducing fuel
cost, hours travelling to and from
an installation and overnight
expenses mean there’s a quick
return on the investment.
Remote access eliminates the
need for time-consuming site
visits. The MRD-350 industrial
mobile
broadband
GPRS/
EDGE/3G router uses the
Internet to cost effectively
inter-connect systems, allowing
HMI, PLCs, sensors etc to
communicate with each other.
Westermo Industrial 3g Routers and Janitza UMG96 power meter
Contact Ashdale at
[email protected] or by phone
on +44 28 9078 3000,
www.ashdale.co.uk or tweeters
can follow us at @ashdaleeng
MAPS – Mitsubishi Adroit
Process Suite for reporting
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 12
30/05/2014 14:22
Gaelectric has secured planning approval for two new windfarms in Co Antrim.
A 9.2MW project is earmarked
for Cloonty while a 5.4MW wind
farm will be built at Corby Knowe.
The company is already building
42MW Dunbeg wind farm outside
Limavady, which is expected to be
commissioned by mid-2014.
The Cloonty development,
south of Bushmills, will feature
four turbines with maximum tip
heights of 110 metres.
Gaelectric has reported that
more than 20 full and part-time
construction jobs will be created
by the project, which will cost
£13m.
The Corby Knowe site, which
is 7km north-east of Antrim and
4km south-east of the village of
Kells, will feature three turbines
with maximum tip heights of
101.2 metres.
Total investment in this
project is £7.6m and up to 15 full
and part-time construction are to
be created.
“Both wind farms will add
significantly to our onshore
wind portfolio and assist us
in providing 14.6MW towards
Northern Ireland’s renewable
energy targets,” said Gaelectric
Developments
commercial
manager Patrick McClughan.
“Our total permitted portfolio
now stands at 123MW in Northern
Ireland, which firmly concretes
Gaelectric’s position as Northern
Ireland’s
largest
indigenous
renewable energy company.”
Gaelectric completed its first
local wind farm at Carn Hill in
Newtownabbey, County Antrim in
May of last year.
The company has also
launched
the
‘Dunbeg
Community Benefit Fund’ to
support projects in the Aghanloo
area.
The community benefi t fund
will be administered on behalf
ENERGY NEWS
GAELECTRIC
TO BUILD
TWO NEW
WINDFARMS
IN CO ANTRIM
of Gaelectric by the ‘Community
Foundation for Northern Ireland’
and will provide grants of
between £500 to £5,000 to local
community and voluntary groups
with projects in the Aghanloo
area. Gaeletric say they have set
aside a total of £1 million for the
25-year lifespan of the project.
Discussing the Fund, Mr
McClughan said: “The 42MW
Dunbeg wind farm represents a
total investment of £58million and
will be one of the most significant
wind farm developments on the
island ofIreland. It is due to be
fully operational by mid 2014 and
will generate sufficient renewable
power to meet the electricity
demand of 24,000 homes.
“As part of our ongoing
commitment to delivering local
community benefits it is important
that the local communities close
to the Dunbeg wind farm have the
opportunity to share in the social
and economic benefits of this
renewable energy development,
and we would encourage local
community and voluntary groups
to apply to the Fund.”
He added: “The Dunbeg
Community Fund will provide
grants that support community
cohesion
and
engagement;
energy
efficiency
and
sustainability; are of a social,
cultural or sporting benefit for
the local community; assist in
training and education; or have
an environmental or economic
benefit.”
13
Gaelectric Energy Storage, part of the Gaelectric renewable energy development and energy storage company, celebrated the first year of its three year sponsorship deal
with Larne Swimming Club at the Antrim Swimming Championships this weekend. Pictured with (back row) Andrew Brines, Chairman, Larne Swimming Club and Patrick
McClughan, Gaelectric’s Commercial Manager in Northern Ireland are (Front row l-r) Kendra Kemp, Oliver Clark, Amber Marcus, Jack Adair and Sophie Charlton. Speaking at the
event Gaelectric’s Patrick McClughan said: “We are delighted to be associated with the talented competitors and wider members of Larne Swimming Club. We hope that our
involvement will assist the Club in the valuable work it is doing among the community in Larne and in further enhancing the skills and performance of its swimmers.”
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 13
03/06/2014 15:18
anaerobic digestion
14
Assured Asset Energy Ltd direction Alex Colombini with Environment minister
mark H Durkan and mr Gerry Keogh at the launch
RENEWABLE
ENERGY FUND HAS
£27m TO POUR
INTO NORTHERN
IRELAND PROJECTS
A £27m fund has been launched in Northern Ireland which could result in 30 new
renewable energy projects on local farms, creating a possible 180 construction jobs.
Assured Asset Energy (AAE)
say the plants – with maximum
funding per project of £2.8m –
could
generate
clean
renewable energy for up to 5,000
homes here.
The UK-based company
funds and develops commercialscale anaerobic digestion and
gasification plants for processing
a range of waste including food
waste, harvested crops and farm
waste.
AAE said the projects
could ultimately generate clean
renewable energy for up to 5,000
homes in Northern Ireland.
A spokesman said: “The
Northern
Ireland
farming
community, who have struggled
due to the challenging economic
climate, have the opportunity to
avail of funding under the new
project.
“The plants will process up
to 450,000 tonnes of farm waste
annually to produce biogas and
generate up to 8.5MW of green
electricity for connection and sale
onto the Northern Ireland grid.”
The fund said it would
contribute towards the target
of having 40% of energy from
renewable sources by 2020.
Northern Ireland has just
eight
anaerobic
digestion
plants, compared to nearly 100
in England and Wales. .
Alex Colombini, director at
AAE, said: “We’re very excited
to be launching this fund that
will be of great benefit to local
farmers and will help Northern
Ireland reduce its carbon
footprint.
“We encourage farmers
who have the capacity to take
advantage of the opportunity.”
Environment Minister Mark H
Durkan said: “Renewable energy
really is a win-win – a win for the
environment and the economy.
“This fund will help more
farmers to seize the benefits of
this renewable technology which
can help them make savings
and reduce running costs in the
longer term.
“Anaerobic digesters can
also assist in reducing carbon
emissions and help meet
Executive renewable energy
targets,” he said.
AAE funds and develops
commercial anaerobic plants and
gasification plants for processing
general waste, food waste, farm
waste and harvested crops.
It said its sites would be used
to produce biogas to generate
green electricity to be sold onto
the national grid. The company
also has offices in Dublin, and is
part of Assured Asset Finance.
According to the AgriFood and Biosciences Institute,
anaerobic digestion (AD) has
potential to provide a stable
supply of electricity to the grid.
It estimates that if the slurry
from housed livestock was
used for anaerobic digestion,
around 7% of Northern Ireland’s
electricity needs could be met.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Anaerobic Digestion 3pgs.indd 14
30/05/2014 14:25
FLI Energy, one of the UK & Ireland’s leading AD plant EPC contractors, has
begun construction of the Euston biogas plant, a Biomethane to Grid
Anaerobic Digestion project located on the Euston Estate in Suffolk.
Once operating to full capacity,
the AD plant will generate 10
million cubic meters of biogas,
the electrical equivalent of
powering over 5,000 UK homes.
Under the £9 million contract,
FLI Energy will provide full
EPC wrapped project delivery
including the design, construction
and commissioning of the plant,
as well as a five year maintenance
and process analysis support
contract.
FLI Energy signed the EPC
contract on February 2014, from
project developers Strutt and
Parker Farms Ltd, one of the
largest farming businesses in the
UK, and SS Agripower.
Following on from several
successful UK biogas projects,
FLI Energy will again be
collaborating closely with HoSt
B.V. from Holland, who have been
FLI Energy’s longstanding AD
technology partner, to deliver
the Euston project. HoSt B.V. are
market leaders in the Netherlands
and have extensive experience
in mixed feedstock AD process
design.
FLI Energy’s turnkey contract
scope includes detailed civil and
process design, ground-works,
site
secondary
containment
bunding,
drainage,
silage
clamp, digestate storage, AD
plant technology, CHP, biogas
upgrading, propane addition, and
biomethane network entry. The
biogas upgrading technology will
be supplied to FLI Energy by the
Dutch company Pentair Haffmans.
The main energy export
of the plant is renewable biomethane. When commissioned,
the project will generate 10
million cubic meters of biogas,
which after upgrading on site will
be exported to the gas grid as
renewable bio-methane. As for
the renewable electricity and heat
generated, they will be largely
consumed on site to power the
plant itself.
Charlie Fillingham, Managing
Director of Strutt and Parker
Farms Ltd, said: “It is key to
the success of such complex
renewable energy projects to
have early engagement with a
specialist turnkey Contractor
such as FLI Energy who have
the overall capability to join the
project team early on to ensure
an optimal and de-risked solution
is implemented. We are confident
that FLI will be able to draw
on their significant Anaerobic
anaerobic digestion
FLI ENERGY STARTS
mAJOR AD PROJECT
Digestion project EPC experience
to deliver an outstanding biogas
plant.”
FLI
Energy’s
Managing
Director
Declan
McGrath
commented: “We enjoyed the
collaboration with Strutt and
Parker Farms and their project
team. Being engaged at the
early stages by a prestigious
and progressive client with
a clear vision of renewable
energy provides us with an ideal
opportunity to add value early on
in the project.”
To date, the biogas plants
delivered by FLI have a combined
electrical output of 52,000 MWh
each year – enough to power
more than 6,500 homes, and
potentially
diverting
nearly
100,000 tonnes of biodegradable
waste from landfill. FLI
Energy’s
Managing
Director
Declan
McGrath
concluded:
“Our
focus
has recently been on the
decarbonisation of the gas grid,
and this year, the completion
of the Euston project together
with other projects underway
will contribute more than 15
million cubic meters of gas to the
grid; the electrical equivalent of
powering over 8,000 homes.”
15
Your partner for biogas project delivery
Thanks to our robust biogas plants, onsite energy
generation can look a little different these days.
FLI Energy offers a robust and proven anaerobic digestion technology, as well
as turnkey plant construction. Our biogas plants produce green energy from
waste and industrial effluent streams, which will significantly reduce your need
for imported energy as well as your carbon footprint. So let’s talk about adding
power to your business, we think you will like what you hear.
Contact us now on 0845 6886065 | [email protected] | www.fli-energy.com
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Anaerobic Digestion 3pgs.indd 15
30/05/2014 14:25
anaerobic digestion
16
BANK HOPES TO
TURN FARm WASTE
INTO ENERGY
There aren’t too many small-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) plants
operating in Northern Ireland at the moment – but the government’s
Green Investment Bank wants to change all that.
The bank is planning to help
the agricultural community by
funding projects to turn slurry
and other organic waste into
energy.
GIB estimates that there
are something like 100 AD
plants in the province which
could benefit from investment
in a fast-growing market, and
the bank has plans to develop
a widespread AD programme
where there is considerable
demand and an attractive
government subsidy scheme.
There is a huge amount of
agricultural waste produced
in Northern Ireland, which the
bank regards as a self-evident
incentive for business here.
AD projects in Northern
Ireland are already better
supported
financially
than
in the rest of the UK. Those
projects smaller than 500kW in
capacity receive four Renewable
Obligation Certificates (R)Cs),
while medium projects (up to
5MW) receive three ROCs.
Compare this with small and
mid-sized AD plants in England
and Wales, who suffered from
substantial cuts through he
feed-in tariff regime which could
ultimately kill the market across
the Irish Sea.
The
Green
Investment
Bank say AD should be “at the
heart” of its its waste investment
strategy and last year revealed
plans for a direct investment of
up to £50m in the sector.
Helping farmers will smaller-
scale projects costing £2-3m,
that would produce renewable
energy digestates for the land
and additional revenue streams
for farmers.
GIB say that while they
could in theory fund the entire
investment cost, it would look
for an “affordable” contribution
from farmers, which they could
borrow from a local bank.
The bank recently celebrated
ANAEROBIC DIGESTION
GETS mOmENTUm IN
NORTHERN IRELAND
In the context of the ever-increasing prices of fossil-based electricity, which
constitutes Northern Ireland’s primary energy source, anaerobic digestion
(AD) is emerging as an efficient way to generate sustainable energy.
For farmers as well as industrial
players such as food processors,
dairies renderers, abattoirs or
breweries; anaerobic digestion
systems represent a reliable
and lucrative way to increase
their income by recycling,
managing and utilising organic
waste materials for the onsite
production of heat and power.
Businesses can now benefit
from the opportunity to deal
with their waste responsibly and
improve production efficiencies,
whilst
insulating
themselves
from rising energy prices in the
process.
FLI Energy, one of the UK &
Ireland’s leading AD plant EPC
contractors, has specialised in
anaerobic digestion technology
for biogas plants. Since 2011, FLI
Energy has been constructing
biogas facilities across England
and Wales, and in Northern
Ireland, they are able to deliver
quality installations that offer a
high rate of return to businesses.
Industrial and agricultural
organic products, by-products
and wastes are an excellent
source of feedstock for biogas
production.
FLI Energy operates the
plants at higher organic loading
rates compared with typical
biogas industry values; this is
made possible using superior
mixing technology, achieving
the opening of its first AD plant,
operated by TEG in Dagenham,
which will be able to process five
per cent of London’s food and
organic waste each year. The
Bank is also planning to fund
more large-scale plants of this
kind in London and elsewhere in
the UK.
Planning
permission
is
essential for all anaerobic
digestion installations here
and it falls under Northern
Ireland planning policy, PPS 18:
Renewable Energy.
Details of the policy are
available from the Northern
Ireland Planning Policy website.
Planning applications are
dealt with centrally by the
Renewable Energy Team in
Belfast.
All electricity generators
connecting to the Grid must
meet certain standards and
there are costs associated with
Grid connection.
In Northern Ireland, the
Northern Ireland Electricity
(NIE) Transport and Distribution
Group are responsible for
assessing the feasibility of
connecting an AD plant to the
grid and the associated costs.
An initial feasibility study can be
carried out, and then following a
successful planning application,
a grid study will assess the
appropriate
connection
requirements and the fee
involved.
If upgrades to the local
network are involved, this may
require NIE to obtain planning
permission which may add a
time delay to the process.
rapid and efficient digestion and
conversion of organics to biogas.
An enormous range of
organic materials are generated
as waste or by-products from the
agriculture and food processing
industries, which can be used to
produce biogas and generate
electrical energy. These feedstocks can often return a good
biogas yield and be sourced at a
low cost or even return a gate fee.
The replacement of relatively
high cost energy crops, such
as maize silage, with suitable
alternative low cost organic
feedstocks can make a significant
contribution to the profitability
of a biogas project. For farmers,
the anaerobic digestion process
promotes a better management
of animal slurry and the digested
material is a nutrient-rich biofertiliser and soil improver
which can be used on the farm,
displacing the requirement and
cost of chemical fertiliser.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Anaerobic Digestion 3pgs.indd 16
30/05/2014 14:25
COMING TO A NATIONAL
TRUST PROPERTY NEAR YOU:
ENERGY NEWS
Castle Ward
RENEWABLE
ENERGY
A new era has dawned for the National
Trust, which will soon be able to describe
itself as a major UK energy supplier.
The Trust recently switched on the
first of what will be 44 renewable
power plants that will transform
the charity’s profile over the next
five years... with its Northern
Ireland properties high on the
agenda.
The hydro-turbine plant at
the trust’s Hafod y Llan farm
in Snowdownia will generate
enough electricity for about 445
homes, which will be sold to
customers of Good Energy, the
renewable power supplier.
It paves the way for a £35
million programme that will see
the National Trust build sizeable
solar, wind, biomass and waterpowered generators across its
grounds by 2020.
Biomass is likely to be the
driving force in Northern Ireland,
whose National Trust properties
include Ardress House, The
Argory, The Giants Causeway,
Castle Coole, Castle Ward and
the Crown Bar.
The Trust will use some of the
energy it generates and sell the
remainder to the grid - effectively
reducing its power bill by about
£4 million a year, money which
can be invested in the charity’s
conservation work.
It has set up a separate
trading company to sell the
energy because its charitable
status prevents it from doing so.
“We want our sites to be
both beautiful and useful. We’ve
got beautiful coming out of our
ears but we need to get better
at being useful. This programme
aims to do this,” said Patrick
Begg, the National Trust’s rural
enterprises director.
The planned power plants
are part of a programme to cut
the trust’s energy use by a fifth,
halve its fossil fuel consumption
and generate half of its electricity
from renewable sources by 2020.
Many of the proposed
projects will see National Trust
generating heat in giant biomass
boilers that could burn a wide
range of organic matter, such as
wood, grass and rubbish as well
as methane from waste. Most of
the heat generated will be used
by the National Trust’s estate of
300 historic houses, offices, visitor
centres and 360 holiday cottages.
This will reduce its reliance on old,
oil-fired, polluting burners which
are vulnerable to the volatile oil
price.
By contrast, most of the
electricity generated will be
sold to the grid because many
of power plants are likely to
be based in remote locations
meaning they cannot be hooked
up to National Trust properties.
Mr Begg said the programme
to build 44 renewable power
plants was contingent on five
pilot energy projects hitting their
targets, adding he was confident
they will do so.
Most of the remaining sites
have yet to be finalised because
the trust is still analysing which are
the most suitable.
“We can’t be certain yet
which ones will fly, but it’s fair to
say that Snowdonia and the Lake
District will dominate our hydropower because they are suited to
steep hillsides, fast rivers and rain.
Meanwhile, the biomass plants
are likely to be spread all over
England, Wales and Northern
Ireland,” he said.
The National Trust looks
after about 250,000 hectares of
countryside and 742 miles of
coastline in the United Kingdom.
17
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specialising in flue gas stack economisers, heat recovery
exchange systems and direct contact water heating.
Services provided include:
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Design
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Our friendly and experienced team are more
than happy to discuss your energy saving
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Enquiries - Andrew Baxter
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www.sperrinenvironmental.com
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 17
02/06/2014 10:54
solar ENErGY
TO PAY OR
NOT TO PAY
FOR SOLAR...
THAT’S YOUR
BUSINESS
Northern Ireland’s solar energy market is booming. Last year, for instance,
there was a three-fold rise in the number of installations compared with 2012.
18
That’s no real surprise; with
energy prices constantly on the
rise, driving down the cost of
heat and power is paramount.
And both business and
domestic
customers
are
discovering that it’s becoming
a lot easier to acquire solar
technology these days.
The big question is: do
you take it for free or pay? The
answer is not as obvious as you
might think.
Let’s look at business first.
Here in Northern Ireland, it’s not
difficult to get a free installation
for commercial systems smaller
than 50Kw.
Electricity bills tend to be
higher for commercial properties
such as factories, offices, hotels
and farms; therefore, alongside
a 20-year agreement, a Power
Purchase Agreement (PPA) is
also available.
The PPA, in effect, offers
the power generated by the PV
(photovoltaic cells) system to the
customer at a vastly cheaper rate
than purchasing from the grid;
more than 10p/kWh difference in
some cases.
During the 20-year term,
the commercial system will
be remotely monitored and
regularly maintained, ensuring
any potential disruption to
disruption is unlikely.
After 20 years, ownership
of the system passes onto the
customer and should be viable
for another 10-20 years.
With regard to paid-for solar,
that suits those interested in
using their roof to generate up to
100kWp and thus create a second
income for their business.
Incidentally, the commercial
side of solar in Northern
Ireland is about to become
even
more
competitive,
following the Government’s
recently-announced
review
of solar subsidies, which has
recommended that, from April
2015, large-scale solar farms in
the rest of the United Kingdom
will no longer receive subsidies
through
the
Renewables
Obligation (RO) regime.
The Department for Energy
and Climate Change (DECC)
proposes to halt RO subsidies
for solar farms larger than 5MW
in capacity, in line with ministers’
plans to curb the development
of new ground-mounted solar
farms.
But this does not apply to
Northern Ireland, where the
industry will continue to thrive –
and where the free versus paidfor debate will continue to rage.
With residential customers
opting for free solar, it’s possible
to get, say £15,000-worth of solar
panels installed at your property,
incurring no charge; in return you
will get a significant amount of
free electricity for the next two
decades
So,
no
start-up
costs
and money in your pocket;
commercial or otherwise, this is
clearly an offer than sounds too
good to refuse.
And it’s clear there are a lot
of satisfied customers dotted
throughout Northern Ireland,
and more on the way.
Not all of them, however, ask
the rather obvious questions;
why would a private company
throw money at you? Surely
there’s a catch to all this?
Well, how you look at it will
depend on the circumstances.
It’s fair to say that the solar
industry here is divided on what
is best for consumers, but all
agree it’s important that they
know exactly what they are
getting into.
Covering your roof in PV
cells is an expensive business if
the money is coming out of your
own pocket.
An average domestic solar
installation, for instance, is likely
to cost £4,000 to £9,000 and it
should pay for itself in five to
eight years.
Not everyone can afford
that sort of money – and that
is where the boom in free solar
installations comes in.
Companies offer to provide
the installation and maintenance
of the panels free of charge to
the property owner, who will
then have access to the power
generated.
But it’s the installers, not
the property owners, who get
the Northern Ireland Renewable
Obligation Certificates (NIROCs)
and the income from exporting
power to the grid.
And as the legally-binding
agreement to rent the roof
of a property lasts 20 years,
it’s
certainly
a
long-term
commitment for both parties.
Customers installing solar
systems at their own cost aren’t
tied by a long-term contract and
they will, of course, benefit from
from the NIROCs and reduced
bills. They may also feel that
the self-owned power source
increases the value of their
property.
If you can’t raise the cash to
install solar panels yourself, and
you have a suitable property, it’s
hard to see the free installation
as not being a good thing.
For most customers, all it
will cost them is a few days’
disruption while the installation
work is going ahead.
They will get the energy
generated by the system during
the day – providing they’re
around at the time to use it –
and, as electricity prices rise,
savings will grow. Most solar
customers report something like
30% in savings.
Free solar, however, could
impact on the customer when it
comes to re-selling the property
or re-mortgaging. The panels
are passed on to the new owner,
raising the obvious question:
would they want them? Perhaps
they don’t suit their lifestyles,
future plans – or even their
concept of aesthetics.
For instance, following the
initial solar boom in England,
some customers reported that
potential buyers of their property
were put off by the look of the
panels, nothwithstanding the
benefits they offer.
The Council of Mortgage
Lenders (CML) has yet to issue
specific guidance on this matter
for Northern Ireland customers
and, in the meantime, banks
could be reluctant to accept
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 18
30/05/2014 14:38
lease agreements which give the
solar installer a future stake in the
property.
When the free solar business
took off in England and Wales
four years ago, the CML
looked at the different lease
arrangements available and
released guidance which helped
lenders be comfortable with
those arrangements.
There is also legislation
unique to Northern Ireland - the
Business Tenancies Order, which
suggests that, technically, the
solar installers have the right
to renew the lease at the end
of the 20-year term without the
property owner’s consent.
But companies who offer
the free solar panels are
understood to specify in their
lease agreement that they will
withdraw at the end of the term.
If roof maintenance is
required during the free solar
lease agreement – a possible
scenario when you consider
the timespan involved - the
customer will most likely have
to meet the cost of removing
the panels and having them
replaced.
They could also be penalised
for the loss of earnings while
the panels were off and not
generating power. Remember,
someone else has a claim on
your rooftop once you sign up
for free solar.
Free or paid-for, it’s always
worth having a solicitor check
out the fine print of the contract.
Some customers, for instance,
would be interested in a contract
that gives them the option of
buying it out – and taking all the
benefits – later in the term.
Critics argue that the free
model is akin to watching the
installers “eating your lunch”
but, according to Patrick
Thompson from the Energy
Saving Trust, whether the system
was owned or free there could
still be savings.
“If domestic customers, for
instance, use their equipment
wisely, they could probably save
between £100 and £300 a year
with the ‘rent a roof’ schemes,”
he said.
“If you were to do it yourself
and pay for the panels, you are
looking at a saving of £500 to
£700.”
With regard to domestic
customers, mothers at home with
small children, the retired, and
home-workers -ie, those who are
in their properties throughout
the day - will benefit the most. If
customers are not around during
the daylight hours, the savings
may not be as great as they
hoped.
The lion’s share of the power
produced will be exported to the
grid, and the free solar panels
company will benefit more. If
you own the panels yourself,
you’ll benefit by being paid for
the energy your panels produce,
whether you use the power
during the day or not.
Companies who provide
free PV solar will naturally be
looking for the most productive
properties; up to 30 square
metres of usable space would be
considered ideal, as would a roof
pitch of around 40 degrees.
Having a south-facing –
and unshaded – property is
advantageous.
Free or paid-for, customers
benefit financially. Those who
pay for solar power will get
their investment back within a
decade and can then talk about
really ‘free’ power; those who go
for free installations will enjoy
lower bills, but might feel they’re
missing out on a payment for the
power going to the grid.
solar ENErGY
One
customer
told
me: “anything that opens solar
power up to a wider audience
has to be a good thing. That
said, I recently installed a 2kW
system and worked out that it
would have covered its costs
after nine years; I prefer to keep
control of the payments.”
He added: “with a free
system, you’ll save a few hundred
pounds a year, but you could be
saying goodbye to thousands of
pounds you could make once
you break even on your initial
investment.”
On the other hand, a local
housewife with four children is
delighted she took the free solar
option.
“My bills have fallen by
around £10 a week since the
panels were installed,” she
reports.
“Our neighbour had it
done first and I noticed she was
spending much less than I was
on electricity, so I thought ‘why
not?’ I used to be paying £15-£20
a week, now it’s closer to £5. With
six of us, the washing machine is
always on. There’s no downside
that I’ve come across.”
The Council of Mortgage
Lenders’ most recent advice
on their website provides little
direct guidance for Northern
Ireland customers.
“CML and BSA (the Building
Societies
Association)
have
produced joint guidance for
providers on what lenders will
typically seek comfort on before
consenting to the lease of
roofspace,” they say.
“The guidance includes
a template letter which can be
used by the panel providers
to confirm to lenders that
their lease complies with the
minimum requirements set out in
the guidance.”
The CML adds: “At this
stage, the guidance applies
to England and Wales only,
however guidance for Scotland
and Northern Ireland will be
considered.
“Please note that this is
guidance and as such, it is issued
to inform the market of typical
lender requirements.
“Given the complexity and
variation of solar (PV) schemes
and leases it cannot cover all
issues but sets out areas where
lenders may have minimum
requirements. As with all
guidance, it will be reviewed
regularly.”
In other words, when it
comes to solar power, you pays
your money – or not in some
cases – and takes your choice.
19
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 19
30/05/2014 14:38
solar ENErGY
TRUST ATLAS ENERGY
AFTER ALL, HEALTH TRUSTS DO
The people we trust in the most have put their trust in a local company when it comes to solar power.
Atlas Energy has just completed
an £800,000 contract to install solar
panels on several health trust sites
in Northern Ireland.
Over the last three months,
Atlas has completed work for the
Belfast Trust at Musgrave Park
Hospital’s neurology unit (60kW)
and Withers fractures unit (60kW),
for the South Eastern Trust at
Downe Hospital in Downpatrick
(102kW), Ulster Hospital critical
care unit in Dundonald (128kW)
and
Downshire
Hospital,
Downpatrick (93kW, various units).
Solar installations in hospital
settings require special attention,
as the systems that provide support
to doctors and patients could not
be interrupted. Needless to say,
the tasks were completed to the
satisfaction of all.
But, as Atlas managing
director John Nesbitt explained,
that’s really only the start for his
company when it comes to solar
installations.
“Our upcoming clients include
schools, churches, nursing homes,
sheltered accommodation and
MPH Neurology Solar PV
health centres,” said John, who
is now head of a company he has
worked for since the mid-Eighties.
And these are exciting times
for John and Atlas, who have put
themselves at the forefront of
customers’ minds when it comes
to cutting energy costs while
being environmentally friendly at
the same time.
With regard to the health
trusts – traditionally big consumers
of power - the recent outlay will
pay for itself in around six years’
20
ENERGYÊME TERINGÊTE CHNOLOGY
Our state-of-the-art technology automatically monitors
your energy usage, providing clear and concise data that
provides a wide range of benefits, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
AccurateÊmet erÊr eadingsÊ -Ê noÊ moreÊes timates.
ImprovedÊab ilityÊ toÊ pinpointÊ energyÊ usageÊ wattage
ManageÊan dÊr educeÊ energyÊ costs
SetÊt argetsÊf orÊimp rovements
Bill verification of all utilities
ReductionÊin Êcar bonÊlevels
SOLARÊP VÊS YSTEMS
Our expert team will provide a complete service from
design through to installation as well as being able to
deliver guidance on available grants and how to benefit
from payments for Ôsellin gÕ back unused electricity to utility
providers. Other benefits include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
LowerÊyou rÊen ergyÊcos ts
Clean,Êgr eenÊ electricityÊ andÊ hotÊ water
SimpleÊin stallation
NegligibleÊop eratingÊan dÊmain tenanceÊcos ts
EarnÊmon eyÊ fromÊs upplyingÊu nusedÊen ergyÊb ackÊ toÊ theÊ grid
ReductionÊin Êcar bonÊlevels
ATLASÊ ENERGY
Email:Ê [email protected]
Web: www.atlasenergy.co.uk
PARTÊ OF
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
LORD
KELVIN
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 20
time - and, when it comes to the
free/paid for debate, Atlas is in
favour of the latter.
“Everyone has a choice but,
for us, paying up front is the
more simple and straightforward
option,” said John.
“The system will pay for itself
in a number of years, and after that
a customer can reap the benefits.
In our opinion that makes the most
sense.”
And of course, with Atlas there
are no ifs and buts when it comes
to calibrating the performance
of systems and their subsequent
energy usage and cost.
The company’s renowned
metering systems automatically
monitor a customer’s energy usage
- electricity, gas and/or water and
of course solar - before providing
accurate and reliable data.
Armed with this information,
customers can then pinpoint
where the main costs are and then
make the necessary decisions to
cut these costs.
With energy prices fluctuating,
this is an area of growing
importance for organisations of
varying sizes and Atlas have a
range of solutions that can provide
data, from single buildings or
across a wider group of buildings.
As well as assessment and
installation, Atlas Energy also
provides
complete
training
and continuing support for a
customer’s system.
The recent solar installations
are not the first work they have
carried out in the health sector.
Indeed, using their systems,
the data from some 100 healthcare
buildings at Belfast Health and
Social Care Trust - ranging from
six main hospitals to small health
centres - is being collated jointly.
All the fiscal utility meters
are read every 30 minutes
using automatic meter reading
technology, and sub-meters in
each of the major healthcare
premises are also monitored to
pinpoint wastage.
“Our metering technology
is
state-of-the-art
and
has
already been proven in a wide
range of projects across the UK
including, of course, a number in
Northern Ireland,” said John.
“We have the technology and
also the specialist service on offer
to provide a system that is tailored
to each individual site, providing
the essential data required to
make fully informed choices.”
He added: “No-one can
afford to make costly mistakes
when investing in energy-saving
technology – it defeats the
purpose of trying to cut your
energy bills and cut your carbon
emissions.
“By pinpointing not only
energy usage, but also wastage,
the reports from our energy
metering
technology
will provide
EnergyÊ
MeteringÊ Technology
customers with precise and
accurate information on the areas
PVÊ (Photovoltaic)Ê Systems
they need to focus their energysaving investment on.”
The DATA BIRD automatic
reading system, in conjunction with
DYNAMAT data analysis software
program, physically interfaces
with the on-side utility meters and
feeds consumption data, usually
via wireless communication, into a
central logger.
With a complex infrastructure
to manage, having this information
is vital when making budget
decisions, particularly given the
constraints that the health trusts
are operating under.
The system has already proven
effective, helping to assess burst
pipes during the big freeze of a
couple of years ago.
With
30-minute
meter
readings,
the
information
identified where water supplies
to the healthcare premises were
failing and where burst pipes had
occurred.
Now solar power is the latest
weapon in the armoury. For Atlas
Energy, the sky is no longer the
limit.
Forme No. 12
Flat - 468x403mm
Finished - 226x303mm
30/05/2014 14:38
improve itÐ
Mark Harriott leaves no-one in any doubt about where he stands with
regard to the “free versus paid-for” debate over solar energy.
“For me, paying for your solar makes
so much more sense,” said the man
behind Design Electrical NI.
“There could be an argument
for going for free installation if you’re
always in during the day, but for most
people I recommend the paid-for
model.
“Prices are so keen at the
moment, and the system will have
paid for itself within six years.”
Mark is already well known for
his work as an electrical contractor
but, over the last few years, has built
up a reputation for quality, reliability
and value for money in solar energy
installations.
And there’s no secret to the
success of Design Electrical: they use
the top brands and employ good
people.
This
NICEIC-registered
company, which has achieved MCS
approval, will also do the job they say
they’ll do, at the price agreed.
“Unfortunately, we keep hearing
stories about people who do great
sales pitches but then don’t deliver,”
said Mark.
“We’re not like that; we believe
in straight talking. Like the old ad, we
do exactly what it says on the tin.”
For instance, with Design
Electrical you know your solar
installation will have SMA inverters,
which convert the direct current
generated by the solar module into
grid-acceptable alternating current,
ensuring maximum yields and
highest user convenience.
They also use REC solar panels,
which are optimised for low light
conditions such as sunrise and
sunset; in effect, they wake up early
in the morning and go to sleep late
in the evening. They’re also robust in
construction and more than capable
of withstanding all types of inclement
weather.
Hilti are the rail systems
recommended and used by Design
Electrical; constructed from highgrade components, they offer
long-term reliability and maximum
productivity.
The workmanship warranty is
two years, pv panel warranty is ten
years and the manufacturer’s linear
performance warranty is 25 years.
The whole process usually
begins with a simple call and, as
Mark says, Design Electrical are there
to talk to you about your project. If
you need a free energy audit and
wish to discuss the benefits of solar
power in you business or home, just
pick up the phone.
Apart from installers, Mark
employs roofers, joiners and
builders. They have lots in common;
not least the fact that they’re skilled
tradesmen.
The company covers all types of
installations for homes, commercial
properties, farms and education
facilities in Antrim, Down, Armagh,
Fermanagh, Londonderry/Derry and
Tyrone.
As they point out to customers,
solar power is tax free and could
earn a householder up to £800 per
year (over 20/25 years) on a 4 kilowatt
system or an average saving of £650
on a 3kw system.
All their solar panel installations
come with 25-year manufacturers’
warranty,
10-year
workmanship
warranty and inverters 5-year
warranty.
A typical customer journey starts
with an energy survey carried out on
site. A report is then provided on a
customer’s renewable options, then
a quotation which will also detail any
grant assistance where available.
When the quotation is accepted
, the installation begins, and
Design Electrical will complete
all paperwork, including Building
Control & Grant Assistance. NIE will
install an import/export meter, and
Power NI will then be in contact to
finalise paperwork for the customer’s
Renewables Obligation Certficates
(ROC).
Devices such as Immersun
and I-boost further reduce energy
costs and for monitoring purposes
a customer can use apps on a
computer, tablet or mobile or
wireless device such a Eco-eye.
“We look at your system as a
whole; it’s not just about solar but
using your whole system to its full
capability to save you energy and
money,” said Mark, straight-talking
again.
Mark
recommends
that
customers thinking of renting a roof
for solar read this article from the
Guardian newspaper (http://www.
theguardian.com/money/2012/
mar/23/solar-panels-dim-mortgageprospects) before commiting to
anything.
Design Electrical believe that
the health and safety of their staff
is paramount. They use the latest
climbing equipment... the same
equipment used by local search and
rescue teams.
This allows the company to
achieve very high standards of health
and safety while working on roofs,
giving customers and employers
alike peace of mind and an
assurance that the highest standards
are being adhered to, and that they
meet all current healthy and safety
guidelines.
SOLAR ENERGY
DESIGN ELECTRICAL ARE RISING
STARS IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM
21
FREE energy audit
See how much you could save with a full energy, solar
and led lighting audit for your home or business
SOLAR offer
Exclusive prices on 3kw & 4kw systems
WHAT WE CAN DO
• PV Solar
• General Electrical Services
• LED Lighting
• Inspection & Testing
• Cleaning & Maintenance of Solar Panels
Ashton Centre, 5 Churchill St, Belfast, County Antrim, BT15 2BP
T: 028 9074 6457
Energy Efficiency Enquiries E: [email protected]
www.designelectricalni.co.uk
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 21
02/06/2014 15:04
solar ENErGY
TYRONE FIRM KES SOLAR
ARE A RAY OF SUNSHINE
Free solar installation is a “fantastic opportunity” for both businesses
and homeowners wanting to slash their energy costs.
That’s the view of Tyrone-based KES
Solar, who are now making a big
name for themselves throughout
Northern Ireland.
And that’s no surprise; the
family-owned company has over 20
years’ experience in the commercial
electrical industry, and the reputation
they built up for reliability and value
for money has continued since they
embraced solar power.
With over 50 employees – and
a management team with over 50
years’ experience – KES have, in a
short space of time, become one of
the most trusted, go-to companies
for customers wishing to take the
solar route.
“Solar PV is an option that
is available to every home, farm
and business in Northern Ireland,”
said managing director Conor
McCrossan.
“Electricity costs are rising, and
base rates for all electricity suppliers
have shown a steady increase year
on year. This trend seems likely to
continue.”
Mr McCrossan pointed out
that the entire process is quick
and stress-free, whether customers
purchase their systems or avail of the
free solar option.
But he added: “Free Solar is a
fantastic opportunity for those who
want to save on their electric but
don’t want to pay for the installation
costs.
“We have a wide range of happy
clients who can explain the benefits
that solar has brought to them.”
One of those happy clients is
Harold Richmond of Skea Eggs.
He said: “Running fans, etc, in the
summer was costing a fortune. PV
was the natural choice with peak
output when we need the power
most. We have just upgraded to a
50kWp system, which is doing very
well.”
Moy Park producer Ian Trimble,
added: “We recently had a 6.5kWp
install fitted at our home. The team
at KES completed the work an
exceptionally high standard and
were always polite and friendly. We
now look forward to many years of
savings on our electricity bills.”
KES Solar, who have head
offices in Drumquin, Omagh,
specialize in the installation of state
of the art PV systems for both the
domestic and business sector and
combine them with other ingenious
and
technologically-advanced
components so that all customers
get the very best out of their system.
They employ a team of
professionals to enable them to
deliver a wide range of services, from
the design and planning of complex
systems, to advice on procurement
routes and finance availability; a
one-stop shop for all their clients’
solar needs.
After a customer’s initial enquiry
KES will carry out a digital survey
checking the orientation and then
visit the site to complete a full site
appraisal.
If the appraisal is favourable
for Free Solar NI, the company will
explain in detail how the customer
will benefit from free solar and
provide an approximate savings
breakdown.
They will also explain the
lease and provide a copy for the
installation of the Solar PV array.
A 20-year (plus 6 months) Air
Space Lease Tenancy Agreement
is required over the roof or area
occupied by the panels.
Recent changes to Planning
legislation, mean that most domestic
and commercial properties will not
require a Planning Application for Free
Solar in Northern Ireland if installed on
a roof, except for listed buildings.
Remember, if you have a
mortgage, secured loan or a
business overdraft secured against
the house or business, the lender
must be informed and give their
consent that you are installing free
solar.
KES Solar then apply for the
relevant NIE grid connection, either
G83 or G59 depending on system
size.
When all approvals have been
obtained, KES will proceed to the
installation process. This, depending
on site situation, should take
between one to two days.
The installation will then be
carried out to MCS requirements
and an NIC EIC certificate will also
be issued for all electrical work
carried out.
The installation process will take
place with minimal disruption to the
day-to-day workings of a customer’s
business.
Incidentally, a 4kWp Solar PV
System will weigh approximately 400
kg, distributed over an area of some
27m2.
For
large
roof
mounted
installations, a member of the KES
survey team will carry out a structural
assessment to ensure that all
additional imposed loadings can be
supported.
Once KES have completed the
installation, all the customer has to
do is relax and enjoy the benefits
for the next 20 years! It really is that
simple.
22
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 22
30/05/2014 14:38
You can take reliability as a given; for that reason alone, the Ballynahinch, Co Down firm has
been on the tip of peoples’ tongues for since rising to prominence over the past three years.
4kW of solar on a single-phase
supply, and up to 12kWp on
a three-phase supply without
advance approval. Farms
and
businesses
wishing to install larger systems
up to 20kWp on a single-phase
supply, and over 12kWp on
a three-phase supply require
approval by NIE.
Commercial-scale installations
also require planning permission.
The installer will be able
to confirm compliance with
planning rules, and help you
submit a Building Control
application and complete the
NIROC’s application form after
installation.
Once registered, Power NI
will ask a customer to read their
generation meter at the end of
March each year, and then issue
NIROC’s payments around July/
August.
They will also ask for export
meter readings at the end of
September each year, and make
Export payments in October.
Tommy believes the solar
business is still growing, and
LOCAL COMPANY LEADING THE WAY
T
2013
V
COMMERCIAL
23
T
And so many satisfied customers
can’t be wrong – Premier’s
reputation
for
excellent
workmanship and value for
money has put them in a position
where they are now installing
solar power at up to eight
properties every day.
That reputation has now
crossed the Irish Sea as well;
Premier’s director informs us that
the company is currently getting
as many jobs from England as on
these shores.
That’s a lot of installations
and a lot of experience – and it
comes from Premier Renewables
offering their customers a lot of
choice.
It starts with the free/paid for
option; Premier let the customers
decide what’s best for them.
“We don’t come down on
one side or the other of when it
comes to free or paid for solar,”
said Tommy.
“If customers can pay for
their solar installations up front,
that’s fine, but others can’t afford
to do that so they go for the free
option.
“Either way, there are benefits
to be had. For instance, a paidfor system will eventually pay for
itself, but customers opting for
free installation will never have to
worry about maintenance costs.
“We can see both sides of
the argument, and are happy
to go with what the customer
decides.”
They may be busy all the
time, both here and in England,
but anyone who contacts Premier
will have somebody from the
company doing an assessment
of their property within a couple
of days.
This is an outfit that doesn’t
believe in dragging its feet.
And customers also have a
greater choice when it comes to
the panels, rail systems and other
solar equipment; Premier are
not tied to any particular brand
so customisation is no problem.
They are MCS accredited
and they also work in association
with Free Solar Scheme. A
truly professional installation is
guaranteed.
Incidentally, you can install
solar on most homes without
planning permission and you will
need a certificate from Building
Control NI for the installation.
You are allowed to install up to
solar ENErGY
BALLYNAHINCH FIRM ARE
THE PREMIER INSTALLERS
the latest research backs up that
theory.
Indeed,
the
biggest
renewable
sector
employer
worldwide is now the solar panel
industry, which employs 2.27
million people.
The
price
of
solar
photovoltaic panels has fallen
rapidly in recent years and
increasing installations as the
main driver behind the jobs rise.
Thanks to companies like
Premier, the Northern Ireland
solar energy market has grown
three-fold from what it was in
2012.
Having firmly established
themselves at home – and having
got a firm grip on the mainland
UK market – Premier Renewables
are not resting on their laurels.
“As we’ve proved over the
last few years, we’ll go where are
customers are.”
Premier Renewables, a local company based in Ballynahinch, are the leading installers of photovoltaic
systems (PV Panels) in Northern Ireland. They have installed thousands of panels throughout Northern
Ireland and the UK and specialise in the design and installation of PV Systems.
Premier Renewables are helping more and more people discover the
benefits of generating their own clean energy. As well as installing
for homeowners they are experienced in working with all sectors,
including commercial, agriculture and public sector.
AGRICULTURAL
DOMESTIC
OPTION 2 – Free systems on a
roof lease scheme available
om sti in l h s
ost
stimated nnual Yield
nnual rant id
(4
) ncome
lectrical avings
(50% of V consumed)
xport ncome
(50% of V exported)
ombined ncome
and avings
ayback eriod
ri ultur l omm r i l
h s
ost
stimated nnual Yield
nnual rant id
(4
) ncome
lectrical avings
(50% of V consumed)
xport ncome
(50% of V exported)
ombined ncome
and avings
ayback eriod
kw (
kw n tt) x
w p n ls
£5,670
3325 units/annum
3325 x 0.1696 = £563.86
1662 x 18 = £299.00
1662 x 5 = £83.00
£945.86 per annum
6 years
kw (
kw n tt) x
w
p n ls
£15,840
9974 units/annum
9974 x 0.1696 = £1,691.59
4987 x 18 = £898.00
4987 x 5 = £249.00
£2,839.00 per annum
5 years
Tel: 028 9756 4046
E-mail: [email protected]
Web: www.premierrenewablesni.co.uk
*
– under the
s scheme ( orthern reland enewable bligation
ertificates) you will be paid 4
s for every unit of clean electricity you
produce from the solar panels on your roof worth 16.96p. That’s right, you will be
paid 16.96p for every unit of clean electricity produced, whether you use it in your
home or export it to the grid. This is paid every year. T X
for 20 years.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Solar Energy 6pgs.indd 23
02/06/2014 10:02
power generation
EDINA’S CHP
EXPERTISE
SLASHES HEALTH
SECTOR ENERGY
EXPENSES
There are many reasons why Edina are Europe’s leading and fastestgrowing supplier of power generation equipment for renewable energy.
24
The Edina group of companies
employs over 140 qualified staff
throughout the UK and Ireland
and has a proven track record
of supplying the full spectrum
of services demanded by an
expanding and diverse power
supply industry.
They offer design, supply,
hire and full turnkey solutions and
construct the container and all
related operational products at
their manufacturing premises in
Lisburn.
Edina are becoming the first
name on customers’ lips when
a dependable and interrupted
power supply is paramount,
especially in the critical hospital
and commercial manufacturing
sectors.
They provide “true” national
coverage and the full spectrum
of fuel sources - diesel, natural
gas, biogas and synthetic
gases - are catered for in the
product range. They are also the
official distributor in the UK and
Ireland of the MWM (the oldest
manufacturer of gas-powered
generating equipment) engine
range.
Not
surprisingly,
Edina
were recently awarded The
Queen’s Award for Enterprise
2014, a prestigious accolade
which is regarded as the highest
endorsement of dedication and
professionalism in providing a
sustainable solution to the world’s
increasing climate problems.
The company deals only in
superbly engineered, efficient
and reliable products that provide
customers with both financial and
environmental benefits.
That means the cost savings
through generated energy and
the returns on investment in
installation are better than from
other renewable energy sources,
while offering security of supply
and protection against rising
energy prices.
The
power
generation
efficiency, for instance, is higher
than most UK power stations.
Compared with coal-fired power
stations, they emit significantly
fewer greenhouse gases.
Expansion and diversification
have been the cornerstone of
the Edina success and, to meet
evolving
environmental
and
legislative requirements, the
company is continuing to develop
fresh and innovative technologies.
Combined Heat and Power
(CHP) is an energy efficient
method of generating heat and
electricity in a single process,
saving
fuel
and
reducing
emissions. It can operate on a
very small scale (micro-CHP for
domestic applications) up to
extremely large scale (serving
industrial plants or entire city
communities).
The Edina CHP package
covers a range of systems from
400kWe to 4.3MWe and is utilised
in a wide range of sectors, such
as: Public Sector – Hospitals,
Universities etc; District Heating
Schemes;
Pharmaceutical
&
Biotechnical
Manufacturing;
Chemical
industries;
Food
processing
and
Agriculture/
Horticulture.
The company’s involvement
with the provision of CHP
(Combined Heat and Power) to
the Health Sector began nearly
30 years ago with the project to
install and maintain the energy
centre at St. James’s Hospital
Dublin, the largest in the city.
Successfully
bidding
to
replace this unit recently, Edina
installed and maintains the
MWM TCG2020 V12K engine
which generates 1MWe and is
specially enhanced by MWM for
its steam capacity which is used
by the hospital for heating and
sterilisation.
The ability of these systems to
provide Low Pressure Hot Water
(LPHW) and steam makes them a
particularly attractive proposition
for hospital applications.
Fuelled by natural gas, the
energy and carbon savings are
apparent instantly with typical
pay-back in approximately three
to four years.
At Liverpool and Broadgreen
NHS Trust, two MWM TCG2032
V12 CHP units were ordered
by Dalkia from Edina in 2001
to reduce energy and carbon
emissions whilst maintaining a
high level of availability for this
critical site.
Each unit is rated at 2.65MWe,
one of the largest installations of
its type in the country at the time.
The CHP systems provide
power, LTHW (Low Temperature
Hot
Water),
HTHW
(High
Temperature Hot Water) and
steam to the Hospital. Throughout
its installation, the system has
performed to a consistently high
standard achieving an average
availability of 95% over this
period.
The
installation
recently
received a “highly commended”
award at the 2012 CHPA
Awards ceremony as it was one
of the first of its type at this
size using reciprocating gas
engine technology in lieu of
the conventional gas turbine
approach (the industry standard
at the time of installation).
“This
project
has
not
only significantly reduced the
Trusts’ energy bill across both
Hospital sites, but also enabled
us to substantially improve the
reliability and resilience of our
electrical supplies,” said AJ
Wilkes, Executive Director of
Finance Royal Liverpool and
Broadgreen University Hospitals
NHS Trust.
Uptake of this technology
has increased dramatically with
projects for Altnagelvin Area
Hospital and Craigavon Hospital,
Chorley and South Ribble
NHS Trust and in an exciting
development for NHS Greater
Glasgow and Clyde to name but
a few.
The new South Glasgow
Hospital Campus Energy Centre
will comprise 3 modular CHP
plants from Edina with an
absorption chiller for cooling.
Three MWM TCG2020 V12’s
with a combined output of
3.6MWe and 3.6MWth should
deliver in the region of £1,000,000
savings in annual energy costs
and reduce carbon emissions by
around one fifth.
This forms part of a huge
development
including
the
Regeneration of the Clyde
Waterfront, with strict adherence
to the guidelines from Zero Waste
Scotland and an ESD rating
of BREEAM excellent carbon
footprint of 80kg CO2 per m².
Edina’s scope of amenities
iinclude:
Feasibility
Studies;
Design;
Finance,
Leasing,
Hire and Build Own Operate;
Commissioning and Handover;
Purchasing; Project Management;
Site Health and Safety and
Financial Control.
Post
commissioning
performance tests are carried
out and training of customer
staff is provided. Edina also offer
comprehensive
maintenance
contracts to ensure that every
customer receives the best
possible service. SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Edina 1pg.indd 24
02/06/2014 12:06
Europe’s Leading
Supplier of Efficient Gas EngineTechnology
The Total Energy Solution Provider:
Proven Technical Solutions for:
- Feasibility Consultancy
- Combined Heat and Power
- Customised Container Options
- District Heating
- Manufactured in the UK and Ireland
- Trigeneration
- Design & Construction
- Anaerobic Digestion
- Full Turnkey Contracts
- Bio Gas
- Project Management
- Landfill Gas
- Commissioning
- Sewage Gas
- Operation & Maintenance
- Coal Mine Methane
Highest Efficiency - Proven Reliability - Dependable Service
Operational Availability Contracts with
Sole Distributor in the UK & Ireland for
Guarantees
Edina Group
Edina Ltd, Dublin
+ 353 (0) 1 882 4800
Edina UK Ltd, Stockport
+ 44 (0) 161 432 8833
Edina Manufacturing Ltd, Lisburn + 44 (0) 28 9262 2122
[email protected]
Edina fp ad.indd 1
www.edina.eu.
29/05/2014 11:37
wind EnERGY
WIND ENERGY
RESEARCH
PROJECT
LAUNCHED
An innovative new research project which will examine how wind energy
is stored and managed has been launched at Titanic Belfast.
26
Pictured at the launch (L-R) is Alastair
Ross MLA, Assembly Private Secretary
for the Department of Enterprise, Trade
and Investment, Lorraine McCourt,
Director of the Special EU Programmes
Body (SEUPB) and Professor Richard
Barnett, Vice-Chancellor, University of
Ulster
An innovative new research project which will examine how wind energy is stored
and managed was launched at Titanic Belfast. Through the SPIRE energy project,
researchers from the University of Ulster and Dundalk Institute of Technology (DkIT)
will examine the likely market scales of different capacities of wind energy storage,
on the all-Ireland energy market. The project is being backed with £2.9 million of
financial assistance from the European Union’s INTERREG IVA Programme. Pictured
at the launch (L-R) is Dennis Cummins, Dundalk Institute of Technology, Fergus
O’Dowd T.D., Minister of State for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources
in the Republic of Ireland, Alastair Ross MLA, Assembly Private Secretary for the
Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Professor Richard Barnett, ViceChancellor, University of Ulster Trade and Lorraine McCourt, Director of the Special EU
Programmes Body (SEUPB)
Through the SPIRE energy
project, researchers from the
University of Ulster and Dundalk
Institute of Technology (DkIT) will
examine the likely market scales
of different capacities of wind
energy storage, on the all-Ireland
energy market. The project is
being backed with £2.9million
of financial assistance from the
European Union’s INTERREG IVA
Programme.
Speaking in support of the
launch, Enterprise, Trade and
Investment Minister Arlene Foster
said: “This is a very worthwhile
project that will examine the way
in which we control and store
electricity across Northern Ireland
and Republic of Ireland. This will
help to support the development
of the renewable energy sector
and contribute to our ambitious
targets as outlined in the
Strategic Energy Framework, as
well as reducing reliance on more
expensive and limited natural
resources.”
Speaking at the launch
Alastair Ross MLA, Assembly
Private Secretary said: “The SPIRE
project is a great example of
how we are utilising EU funding
to assist in the development
of pioneering energy research
projects that can have a real and
lasting impact. We see daily the
challenges of ever rising energy
costs and their impact on business
competitiveness and I welcome
this research that may ultimately
assist businesses to ensure their
own security of energy supply and
decrease their overall costs.”
Professor Richard Barnett,
Vice-Chancellor, University of
Ulster said: “The University
is renowned for its research
excellence and has been at
the forefront of sustainable,
renewable
technology
development for many years.
This latest Ulster research
project, which is benefitting from
valuable INTERREG support and
collaboration with DkIT, has the
potential to make major progress
in the evolving all-island energy
market, delivering technological
advances which could have
international impact.”
Also in attendance was the
Republic of Ireland Minister
of State Fergus O’Dowd who
added: “I am delighted to mark
the launch of this interesting
and
innovative
INTERREG
project, and I congratulate the
promoters for putting it together
and obtaining EU funding for it.
My own department, along with
DETI, are also supporting the
project, as we believe it will yield
valuable information which will
allow us to operate our electricity
system in a more efficient way
and incorporate more renewable
energy on the system. I wish the
project every success.”
Welcoming the EU INTERREG
IVA funded project Lorraine
McCourt, Director with the SEUPB,
said: “This is a very exciting and
innovative research project which
has significant implications on
how we store and manage our
electricity on both sides of the
border. The project has great
potential in terms of reducing
our reliance upon imported fuels,
enhancing the security of our
existing energy supply and also
supporting the development of
the renewable energy sector. I
look forward to hearing how it
progresses and what findings are
produced for small, medium and
large-scale energy storage upon
its completion.”
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 26
02/06/2014 12:08
Plans are in place to build a huge battery facility that can
store energy produced by wind farms in Northern Ireland.
AES, who own both the Kilroot and
Ballylumford power stations, are
planning to build the 100 mega
watt (MW) facility at Kilroot, on the
East Antrim coast.
The American company, which
is Northern Ireland’s largest power
generator, claims the facility will
lower the cost to consumers, help
meet renewable energy targets
and improve the flexibility of the
local grid.
It says that depending on “a
suitable commercial agreement” it
could have the facility operational
early in 2015.
It has submitted a connection
application to System Operator
Northern Ireland (SONI), which
operates the electricity grid in
Northern Ireland.
“I’m convinced that the
proposed solution will help
Northern Ireland meet policy goals
while reducing the cost of energy
for electricity customers,” said
Mark Miller, vice president of AES
United Kingdom and Ireland.
AESalready operates battery
storage facilities that work by
‘smoothing’
the
intermittent
output from wind and other
renewable energy sources.
The batteries store power
when it is abundant and then feed
it into the grid at periods of high
demand.
The firm’s projects has a 64
MW battery system connected to a
wind farm in West Virginia.
“Storage arrays have the
unique ability to participate as
active power system support with
no emissions and to provide both
supply and load to help manage
the variability of renewables,”
John Zahurancik, vice president of
AES Energy Storage said.
“Leveraging existing AES
infrastructure will allow us to
rapidly deliver reliable, economical
power resources on behalf of
customers in Northern Ireland.”
AES’s Kilroot power station
is a dual coal and oil fired facility,
the power station which comprises
of two generators, each of which
is capable of producing 260MW
when firing oil.
UK Based Manufacturers
of 225Kw A27/29
Wind Turbines
wind EnERGY
WIND ENERGY
STORAGE PLAN FOR
EAST ANTRIM COAST
Precision Gear Company Ltd
50 Creagh Road, Toomebridge
Co L/Derry, BT41 3SE
Tel: 028796 50471
Mob: +44(0)7803272691
Web: www.pregear.co.uk
27
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 27
02/06/2014 12:08
fRackinG
FRACkING
COMPANY
TAMBORAN
SAY THEY
ExPECT TO
DRILL A WELL
IN IRELAND
THIS SUMMER
The news, delivered by the company’s chief executive
Joel Riddle in an interview with Bloomberg,
sparked a flurry of activity on social media.
28
Anti-fracking activists, especially
those in the Fermanagh area,
increased the pressure on
Stormont MLAs to sign a petition
aimed at referring DETI’s decision
to extend Tamboran’s licence
back to the Northern Ireland
Executive.
Although Mr Riddle, who
was appointed chief executive
of the Australian drilling giant in
November of last year, did not
specify an exact location, the
protesters have no doubt that
Fermanagh is the ‘target.’
In the interview, the Tamboran
chief outlined that the company
is considering making an Initial
Public Offering (going public) in
the USA in the second half of this
year.
He told Bloomberg that
Tamboran expects to drill a well
in Ireland in June or July and
another well in the Northern
Territory of Australia with partner
Santos Ltd. in mid-June.
Tamboran
had
initially
outlined that it was working to
the following timeline in County
Fermanagh: drilling a stratigraphic
borehole (they have been given
an extension until September
2014 for this); selecting a site
for a test well and carrying out a
3D seismic survey in early 2014;
submitting a planning permission
application in late 2014; and test
well drilling in 2015/16.
A company spokesperson
said:
“Tamboran
Resources
requested and received a six
month extension from the
Department of Enterprise, Trade
PUBLIC SUPPORT FRACKING
BAN, CLAIMS GREEN PARTY
A call to ban fracking in Northern Ireland has strong
support from the public, according to the Green Party.
Green Party leader Steven Agnew
says he wants Assembly parties to
sign a petition referring a fracking
decision by Enterprise Minister
Arlene Foster to the Executive.
The minister granted a sixmonth licensing extension to a
company which hopes to carry
out fracking in Co Fermanagh.
Tamboran has said it is likely
to need up to 60 multi wellpads
with up to 24 wells per pad.
Each multi wellpad would be 2.6
hectares, with about 150 hectares
needed.
There would probably be
40,000 acres of underground
development and three layers of
horizontal drilling involved in the
project.
The extension to Tamboran
Resource’s licence will give the
company further time to decide
whether to proceed with its plans
to drill in the area.
Sinn Fein energy spokesman
Phil Flanagan said he was seeking
legal advice as to whether or not
and Investment to the first part of
the licence it was granted on April
1, 2011.
“The first part of the licence
now expires on September
30, 2014 and before then the
company intends to drill a
scientific borehole to collect rock
core.”
Meanwhile, DETI Minister
Arlene Foster has hit out at
“misinformation”
regarding
the prospect of fracking in
Fermanagh.
During a discussion on
extending the gas network to
the west of Northern Ireland,
including to Enniskillen and
Derrylin, Sinn Fein MLA Phil
Flanagan took the opportunity to
ask Minister Foster about fracking
once again.
“I thank the Minister for
her answers. Having engaged
with a number of manufacturing
businesses in our constituency,
I know that this [extension to
the gas network] will be a game
changer for many large energy
users, so we welcome it on that
front.
“However, can the Minister
assure the House that the
rationale for her enthusiasm
for the project is not to sustain
and justify her flawed support
for fracking in Fermanagh?” he
asked.
“I congratulate the Member
for getting fracking in Fermanagh
into a question about gas
infrastructure,”
responded
Minister Foster. “Just to put it
on record, Mr. Deputy Speaker,
there is no fracking licence in
Fermanagh.”
The Fermanagh-south Tyrone
MLA said there had been “a lot of
excitement from some quarters”
and added: “but everybody
should calm down and deal with
the issues as they come up”.
“My support for gas to
the west is because there is
an infrastructure deficit in the
west of the Province. Therefore,
we should address that deficit.
I hope that he will join me in
congratulating the Department
on the work it has done so far
in that regard,” she told the
Assembly.
Referring to Mr. Flanagan’s
question, Deputy Speaker of
the House, John Dallat, said:
“Although we do not discourage
innovation, I encourage Members
to try to ask questions relevant to
what is being discussed.”
Minister Foster was also
questioned - again - this time
by
Fermanagh-south
Tyrone
MLA Bronwyn McGahan - about
why her Department awarded
fracking company Tamboran an
extension to their licence terms in
Fermanagh without first seeking
Executive approval.
In a written answer, the
Minister replied: “The five
year initial term of Tamboran’s
petroleum licence has not been
extended. My Department has
granted an amendment to the
work programme in part one of
the licence to allow Tamboran
to complete necessary technical
work, before they decide whether
or not they wish to drill an
exploration well.
“The
administration
of
petroleum licensing is a matter
for the Department of Enterprise,
Trade and Investment. There is
no requirement to bring to the
Executive an amendment to a
petroleum licence,” she said,
reiterating that “no licence for
fracking has been issued”.
“Any hydraulic fracturing
will require planning permission
and an Environmental Impact
Assessment,” said Minister Foster,
adding: “It is in the best interests
of the Northern Ireland economy
to find out the extent and value of
our natural resources.”
the decision lay outside DETI’s
remit.
“In allowing this extension
to happen, DETI has shown
disregard for the will of the
Assembly, which voted for
a moratorium on fracking in
December 2011,” he said.
Mr Agnew said Tamboran had
failed to meet the commitment in
its exploration licence to drill by
March 31.
“Despite this first failure
by Tamboran to meet its
commitments, which in my
opinion does not bode well for
any agreements made with this
company, DETI Minister Foster
quietly granted them an extension
to their licence,” he said.
“This happened despite
Minister
Foster
previously
assuring the DETI committee
that we would be informed of any
developments in relation to these
fracking licences.
“Instead, she made a ‘below
the radar’ decision to extend
Tamboran’s
licence
without
consulting the Executive.
“The amount of emails
received by MLAs shows the
level of public anger and concern
around this issue and the minister
should not ignore either the will
of the citizens of Northern Ireland
nor the will of the Assembly.
“I have called on all members
of the Assembly to sign a petition
which would bring this issue
before the Executive so the
electorate can finally have some
clarity on where every party
stands in relation to fracking in
Northern Ireland.”
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
NRG Energy News.indd 28
02/06/2014 12:08
BY KEITH PATTERSON, LOCAL AUTHORITY SUPPORT
MANAGER, WRAP NORTHERN IRELAND
Keith Patterson,
WRAP Northern Ireland Local
Authority Support Manager
Recycle Week 2014 this
June brings recycling to
the forefront and WRAP
Northern Ireland’s Local
Authority Support Manager
Keith Patterson reflects
on why good recycling
remains so important.
Now in its 11th year and with
the focus on recycling at
home and away, the annual
Recycle Week (16 to 22 June)
is delivered by an extensive
network of partners throughout
the UK. These partners consist
of local authority-led recycling
campaigns; business and brand
initiatives; and the activities
of
numerous
community
groups and schools. Whatever
their size, these activities
are fundamental in raising
awareness that it’s actually
much easier to recycle than
ever before. Simple things
like checking a label to see if
an item can be recycled and
knowing what colour bin to
put your recycling in can make
recycling a habit that becomes
second nature.
Over the lifetime of
Recycle Week there’s been
a step change in recycling
helped by the hard work of
such groups. Today, 70% of UK
residents describe themselves
as ‘committed recyclers’ and
90% of local authorities use
Recycle Now resources. Back
in 2001 less than 10% of our
household waste was recycled.
Today, it’s a much healthier
picture,
with
household
recycling standing just shy of
40% for 2012/13.
Even though the UK is now
recycling more and sending
less to landfill than ever before,
building on this success and
keeping up the momentum
remains
challenging
and
there’s still much more we
need to do and a growing
urgency to up our game.
This is true of the situation in
Northern Ireland.
Each year businesses and
households produce around
2.3 million tonnes of solid
waste in Northern Ireland. This
has cost implications and does
not reduce our demand on raw
materials. Northern Ireland’s
recycling rate is currently
39.7% which means that
meeting the European Union’s
50% recycling target by 2020
will be something we have to
work harder to achieve. And
a lot of valuable materials are
still heading for landfill in the
meantime.
Take an everyday example
like clothes. Each year the
UK discards an astonishing
£140 million worth of used
clothing to landfill, that’s
350,000 tonnes. Even when
our clothes have reached the
end of their lives as clothes,
they can still be recycled and
used by manufacturers such
as the motor industry. There’s
often a lot of value in things
that people would ordinarily
discard as waste. We need to
refocus on recycling to ensure
we do all we can to capture
this lost material, and Recycle
Week is the perfect time to
take stock.
There are ways WRAP
Northern Ireland can help on
the ground, and not just during
Recycle Week but throughout
the year.
Take the Rethink Waste
Programme. This is helping
to move Northern Ireland
towards becoming a resource
efficient
economy,
and
reduce waste and material
use. As part of the Rethink
Waste
Funds,
managed
by WRAP on behalf of the
DOE, we support Councils
in introducing initiatives to
boost waste recycling and reuse activity. The Rethink Waste
Capital Fund has provided
over £10m to councils since
2010,
accelerating
the
introduction of a range of
local initiatives.
Thinking
about this year’s Recycle
Week theme - Recycling at
Home and Away, the Funds
have provided new collection
services to allow many to
recycle more and for councils
to get the best value from
their services. For example,
Armagh’s
introduction
of
‘Recycle on the Go’ bins in six
towns and villages across the
district and new Household
Waste Recycling Centres at
Ballymena, Ballynahinch, Larne
and Omagh.
WRAP Northern Ireland
has a suite of dedicated
support tailored to help
anyone involved in, or just
interested in recycling. This
can all be found on our
website
www.wrapni.org.uk
or via our WRAP partners’
website http://partners.wrap.
org.uk and is free to use.
There is a range of material
available for various sectors,
including Local Authorities,
small businesses and waste
management contractors.
So Recycle Week is here
again, and not a moment too
soon. Whatever your role in
recycling, WRAP Northern
Ireland and the Rethink Waste
Programme have the expertise
and resources to help Councils
and ratepayers be successful
in meeting the recycling
challenges ahead.
SPONSORED COLUMN
IT’S NEVER BEEN EASIER
TO RECYCLE, OR MORE
IMPORTANT THAT WE DO
29
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST WRAP Column 1pg.indd 29
02/06/2014 12:09
WASTE NEWS
RECYCLING BUG
HITS LOCAL
SCHOOLS
Schools in the Coleraine Borough Council area
have been demonstrating how they are happy to
park their ipods to rummage around in bins and
rise to the challenge with recycling ideas.
They have been coming up with
exciting and original concepts as
part of the RiverRidge Recycling
School Recycling Challenge 2014 in
association with Autoline Insurance
Group.
Pamela Jordan, Business
Development
Manager
for
RiverRidge Recycling said, “It is
fabulous to see all the schools so
keen to engage with the RiverRidge
Recycling
School
Recycling
Challenge in association with
Autoline Insurance Group.They
have really entered into the spirit
of this initiative and it’s wonderful
to see how excited and enthusiastic
the children are about reducing
the waste they produce ensuring
that they make a difference for
themselves and for their school.
“Recent visits have shown
how using their recycling bins in
the classroom is raising awareness
about the importance of recycling
and how it is now becoming part of
everyday school life for the children
involved.” All the schools from the
Coleraine Borough Council area
were invited to take part in this
challenge and apply for the special
sponsorship courtesy of Autoline
Insurance Group.
From litter pickers at Macosquin
Primary School to dedicated
recycling bins in St. Patrick’s School,
Portrush and recycled artwork at
St. Columba’s Primary School in
Garvagh, the sponsorship from
Autoline Insurance Group has been
a welcome boost to all.
Angela Stewart, Commercial
Manager for Autoline Insurance
Group said, “We are delighted to be
involved with the School Recycling
Challenge. It’s fantastic to see the
inventive ideas the children have
come up with in the classroom.The
colourful and imaginative artwork
and their commitment to regular
recycling are all very impressive.”
30
HIGHLANDER
INTERNATIONAL RECYCLING
Your Gateway to World Recycling Markets
Sandleford School-RiverRidge Recycling Challenge 2014; Back row from left,
Alexander Hughes, Jonathan Campbell, Angela Stewart Commercial Manager,
Autoline Insurance Group, Pamela Jordan Business Development Manager, RiverRidge
Recycling, Joe Skelton, Mr. Bonnar Clarke, Principal Sandelford Special School. Front
Row from left, Gillian Henry, Samuel Kirk
Mr Bonnar Clarke, Principal
of Sandelford Special School in
Coleraine, and one of the schools
taking part said, “Recycling is
part of our everyday school life
and it’s great for the whole school
community to get involved in this
recycling challenge. It has helped us
immensely to develop recycling as
an integral part of everyday school
life. “One of the projects we are
running is a school wide recycling
poster competition which all the
children have been able to get
involved with and I have to say
there are some amazing pieces of
artwork.”
Schools’ waste will be assessed
at the end of May and in June gold,
silver and bronze awards will be
presented to the various schools
participating.
Don’t forget the deadline of
31st May 2014 for all schools to
apply for sponsorship money the
RiverRidge
Recycling
School
Recycling Challenge 2014 in
association with Autoline Insurance
Group.
Highlander International
Recycling is your gateway to
world recycling markets.
Providing long term, reliable
end markets for a wide range
of recovered paper.
HIGHLANDER
INTERNATIONAL
RECYCLING
Linwood Avenue, East Kilbride,
Glasgow G74 5NE
Tel: 0044 1355 524 215
Fax: 0044 1355 529 387
E-mail: [email protected]
highlanderinternational.com
www.highlanderinternational.com
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 30
02/06/2014 11:05
One small
step...
all-new design
frOm the lOw
entry specialist
www.dennis-eagle.co.uk
Unit 3
clifton industrial park
161 dargan crescent
Belfast
Bt3 9Jp
S.18914
Dennis
Eagle
Moon
297x210
Manvik
Dennis
Eagle
Moon
fp Ad
ad.indd
1 v2.indd 1
tel: +44(0)2890 776 330
fax: +44(0)2890 776 338
www.manvikplant.com
[email protected]
19/05/2014
26/05/2014 09:35
10:19
VIEW FROM THE CAB
32
SIZE DOESN’T
MATTER WHEN
SAFETY IS A FRONT
SEAT PASSENGER
Anyone who’s watched a lorry backing up knows that driving a large commercial vehicle isn’t easy. The cab-forward
driving position, blind spots and sheer bulk make threading big vehicles down city streets and country lanes a
challenge. Add traffic, pedestrians and cyclists and it becomes downright dangerous, especially on busy streets.
Although there’s no way of
making a large commercial
vehicle any smaller, engineers
can still do their best to make
them safer and easier to drive.
From an operator’s perspective,
the benefits are obvious – fewer
insurance claims, less damage
to their trucks, reduced tyre
wear from curb rubbing, more
relaxed crews and less time
wasted navigating tricky roads.
Reversing cameras help with
backing up, but 360-degree
cameras can generate a bird’seye view of the vehicle for
drivers, allowing them to see
every obstacle from one screen
in the cab. The technology is
still in its infancy but we hope
it will allow crews to carry out
tasks efficiently and safely.
Road safety is a problem that
can never be truly solved; every
journey is a risk. Fortunately
recent advances in technology
are helping to mitigate those
risks by offering drivers and
crew a better look at the world
around them.
So what are engineers
coming up with to solve these
problems? Engineers at Dennis
Eagle considered these in
designing their latest Elite 6
refuse collection vehicle.
The first and most important
issue was the simplest – visibility
from the Elite 6’s redesigned
panoramic cab.
Narrower A-pillars prevent
traffic from disappearing from
sight and longer windows
improve
over-the-shoulder
visibility at junctions. Locating
the cab close to the road gives
drivers a better sense of the
vehicle’s proportions and a
better view of cyclists – some
of the most vulnerable traffic on
the road.
Combined with the large
mirrors and reversing cameras,
the new cab gives drivers and
crew a better chance of seeing
obstacles, hopefully saving
money and lives on the road.
Visibility isn’t the only
consideration in safe cab design;
the Elite 6 was also designed
to improve ergonomics for the
driver and crew. Fewer dashmounted
switches
reduce
clutter and distractions and
many important functions have
been moved to the steering
wheel and column.
Making the vehicle simpler
to operate allows drivers to
focus more of their attention
on the road and obstacles
around them and control their
RCV more intuitively.
Also helping to provide
greater control are Electronic
Braking and Electronic Stability
Control programming, which
further improve handling,
stability
and
braking
performance.
The 7.7-litre Volvo engine
is available in two outputs,
sending either 280 or 320bhp
to the road through a 6-speed
Allison automatic; with smooth,
rapid power delivery, drivers
can join fast-moving traffic
easily and safely.
Comfort was also a
consideration.
It may sound indulgent,
but an uncomfortable crew will
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST View from the Cab Dennis Eagle.indd 32
02/06/2014 12:10
VIEW FROM THE CAB
become fatigued faster, with
a corresponding reduction in
attentiveness. Air suspension
is standard on the Elite 6 at
the front and rear depending
on axle configuration, and all
narrow-bodied trucks receive
air assisted suspension at every
corner. The change from leaf
springs has improved handling
as well as comfort, making
the truck easier to control and
place on the road with greater
feedback through the steering.
Making large vehicles visible
to other road users is another
key safety feature.
Even with a panoramic view
from the cab and 360 degree
cameras, drivers’ attention is
limited and trucks often operate
in low-light conditions at dawn.
Dennis Eagle fitted the Elite
6 with high-performance LED
lighting for improved visibility at
night and low-light conditions.
The
new
corner
cab
beacons, daytime running lights
and safety lights are all brighter
and more reliable than bulblit units, which require more
maintenance and offer
lower output, and new
beacons were added to the
restyled grille.
Naturally, we hope that these
safety and design improvements
make our vehicles popular with
operators. But it would be an
even greater victory if other
manufacturers recognise their
importance
and
introduce
these changes on their own
vehicles to make the roads a
safer, simpler place for RCV
drivers and all road users.
Driving a large vehicle isn’t ever
going to be easy, but it doesn’t
have to be dangerous.
33
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST View from the Cab Dennis Eagle.indd 33
02/06/2014 12:11
COVER STORY - FULL CIRCLE POWER
THE POWER OF
COLLABORATION
NORTHERN IRELAND’S PRIVATE AND
PUBLIC SECTOR COLLABORATE
TO DELIVER SOLUTION
John Laverty, editor of Sustainable Ireland, reports on how the power of
collaboration and co-operation in the private sector has led to an effective solution
to an on-going common problem for both the public and private sectors.
34
Several years ago, Northern
Ireland’s largest manufacturing
employer
and
exporter,
Bombardier Aerospace, began
actively exploring alternative
energy sources to help reduce
operating costs and its reliance
on fossil fuels. It’s an issue that
the majority of major private
sector businesses in Europe have
had to deal with as energy costs
continue to escalate.
In the UK, energy prices have
risen 37% over the last three years
subsequently undermining the
UK’s ability to compete with many
other economies that either have
greater access to lower cost fuels
or have already embarked on
the development of renewable
energy infrastructure.
Decoupling
from
the
unpredictable and often volatile
natural gas market and thus the
energy market is the Holy Grail for
any export-orientated company
and Bombardier is no different.
At the same time a group of
Northern Irish waste companies
identified the lack of local Waste
to Energy (WtE) infrastructure
as a real threat to their overall
business models.
The generally held view
that energy recovery could be
derived through the export of
Refuse Derived Fuels (RDF) to
continental Europe carried a large
degree of unpredictability and
price uncertainty when viewed
over a medium to longer-term
time frame.
With
the
Government
Renewable Obligation Certificate
(ROC)
incentive
programme
coming to an end, the need for
these operators to find a solution
based outside of the then
dominant public procurement
programmes became a necessity.
It was at this point that the
interests of the aerospace and
the waste management sector
converged. Recovering the latent
energy trapped in waste provided
a solution to both sectors’
separate but related issues and
following almost two years of
hard work and dedication to
this principle the two sectors are
now very close to realising the
solution and going a long way to
addressing the business concerns
upon which the journey began.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Full Circle Cover Story.indd 34
30/05/2014 14:43
Location of Full Circle Power Energy Park beside Bombardier’s Wing Facility
Brett Ross explains the
reasoning behind this target,
“Given the rapidly approaching
end to the current ROC program
in 2017, it is imperative that we
target financial close within a
time period that allows for the
export of power within the current
regime.”
Achieving this target will be
no mean task. With the project
essentially being categorised as
a merchant facility by funders,
there will be a heavy emphasis
on the nature of the feedstock
agreement.
Without the benefit of 25year local council contracts for
waste, Full Circle Power will
have to demonstrate an ability
to aggregate 120,000 tonnes
per annum (tpa) of RDF. The
consortium are confident that this
can be achieved and highlight
the fact that the Northern Ireland
waste management sector has
proven its worth over the last
three years despite the negative
impact following the Mills Report
and as such collectively can rise to
this challenge.
“Everyone is aware of the
negative aspects of the sector,
but few are aware of what our
sector has achieved over the last
few years. Our sector employs
over 900 people and generates
close on £150m of revenue each
year,” continued Brett Ross.
“We have exemplar waste
companies that would rival any
other throughout the UK, ReGen Waste is able to secure
contracts across the island and in
Great Britain, and Wastebeater is
regarded as being at the forefront
of cement kiln fuel development.”
It is Full Circle Power’s
ambition to tap into this expertise
in order to secure feedstock for
the project by providing access to
a world-class recovery facility and
therefore price predictability into
the future for Northern Ireland’s
established waste management
companies.
Key to the delivery of a
bankable feedstock agreement
will be the ongoing treatment
of household residual waste on
behalf of Local Councils. The
proposed plant will utilise an
RDF, which can be produced
from Commercial and Industrial
(C&I) waste as well as household
residual waste.
With Northern Ireland still
landfilling over 400,000 tpa of
Local Council waste each year,
there is a tremendous opportunity
for the Full Circle Power Energy
Park to deal with the region’s
NILAS (Northern Ireland Landfill
Allowance Scheme) targets once
and for all.
Once
in
place
and
operational, Full Circle Power
Energy Park, will fit neatly into
already established fuel strategies
currently characterising many of
the sectors existing treatment
methods.
Requiring a front end
tonnage of over 250,000tpa of
residual waste for the first phase
of operation, the multi-fuel
approach will include RDF for the
Full Circle Power project as well
as potentially cement kiln fuels
for the three established cement
kilns that utilise renewable fuels
across the island.
Brett Ross adds, “The
result is a cost effective and
robust
solution
based
on
environmentally
sensitive
technologies, which ultimately
allows Northern Ireland’s Local
Councils to reduce their reliance
on landfill to below 20% of the
2020 NILAS allocation.”
The prospect of realising all
the positive aspects of the project
are rapidly becoming a reality,
with the consortium hoping to
announce a funding consortium
within the next few months, which
will more than likely include the
Green Investment Bank.
The
institution
was
established in 2012 and tasked
with assisting in the funding of
projects that aim to meet the
Governments
sustainability
targets. Full Circle Power’s project
fits comfortably into this remit
and the development team have
been working closely with the
institution to date.
Delivering this ambitious
project through this highly
collaborative approach will be
a success story for Northern
Ireland as whole and certainly
will position the region as one of
the most secure in terms of waste
infrastructure. It could even be a
blue print for how infrastructure
procurement should be tackled in
the future across other sectors of
the economy.
COVER STORY - FULL CIRCLE POWER
In January of this year,
Environment Minister Durkan
granted planning permission
for a large-scale gasification
plant in Belfast’s Harbour Estate,
adjacent to Bombardier’s wing
facility. The speed at which the
planning permission was granted
illustrated how important the
project was to many aspects of
Northern Ireland’s private and
public sector.
Local Authorities throughout
Northern Ireland had begun
outsourcing the treatment of
household waste to the private
sector, however the delivery of a
‘home grown’ recovery solution
had eluded at least two of
Northern Ireland’s three waste
authority groups for some time.
The fact that the UK as whole
was beginning to rethink its
position on public procurement
of waste infrastructure implied
that a solution based to an extent
on merchant capacity and driven
entirely by the private sector was
now a necessity.
Brett Ross, Director of Full
Circle Power, the consortium
tasked with delivering the
solution, explains, “The concept
of ‘closing the loop’ or achieving
the Full Circle through this project
is based on the underlying
rationale of ‘keep it local’ – a
local solution, delivered by local
operators for the benefit of the
local economy alongside local
authorities.”
The name of the consortium,
Full Circle Power, is therefore a
salute to this overriding principle
of collaboration, co-operation
and the environmental sector’s
drive towards a closed loop
economy.
Full Circle Power is a
consortium of waste management
companies and private investors.
Working within a multi-disciplinary
project team comprising marketleading names such as Turner
and Townsend, KPMG and SLR,
those behind Full Circle Power
are confident of meeting the
challenging deadline of financial
close by November 2014.
35
3D Visual of Full Circle Power Energy Park
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Full Circle Cover Story.indd 35
30/05/2014 14:43
WASTE To EnErgy nEWS
36
VEOLIA OPENS 26 MW
WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT
IN STAFFORDSHIRE, UK
Veolia Environmental Services has officially opened a 26 MW waste to energy facility that
will process around 300,000 tonnes of residual waste each year in Staffordshire, UK.
The facility has been developed
as a part of Staffordshire County
Council’s target of sending
zero waste to landfill, while
maximising recycling.
According to the company a part of Veolia Environnement
(Paris Euronext: VIE and NYSE:
VE) – the facility will save
Staffordshire taxpayers £250
million over the next 25 years.
The plant was officially
opened by HRH the Duke of
Gloucester, and represents
the biggest PFI contract in
Staffordshire County Council’s
history.
Veolia explained that the
facility has been built with
the latest technologies and
developed in partnership with
CNIM Clugston, a partnership
between UK construction firm
Clugston and French waste to
energy equipment manufacturer,
CNIM.
“The development of the
new plant is all part of the ‘Zero
Waste to Landfill’ strategy, which
is tackling head on the growing
problem of domestic waste,”
commented Estelle Brachlianoff,
executive vice president for
Veolia in the UK and Ireland.
“We are dedicated to
maximising recycling first, and
then recovering energy from
the leftover residual waste,” she
continued.
Brachlianoff added that new
infrastructure such as the Four
Ashes waste to energy facility is
vital if the UK is to meet landfill
diversion targets and reduce
carbon emissions.
“It
can
also
bring
significant economic benefits
and by working closely with
Staffordshire County Council
we are helping stimulate
economic growth and improve
environmental
performance,”
she concluded.
WASTE TO ENERGY
GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY
FOR GRID INJECTION PLAN
LAUNCHED IN SYDNEY
The City government of Sydney, Australia has published its draft advanced waste
treatment plan, outlining proposals to use waste gasification technology to
process residual waste and inject a natural gas replacement into the gas grid.
According to the city, advanced
waste
treatment
systems
could divert more than 95%t
of Sydney’s household waste
from landfill and convert nonrecyclable waste into renewable
gas to power city buildings and
provide heating and cooling.
The City explained that
rapid population growth means
that by around 2021 its landfill
sites will be full, with the nearest
facility 250 kilometres away.
Along with the US and
Canada, Australia is among the
top three producers of waste
per capita, and around 400,000
truck movements are said to be
required each year to dispose of
Sydney’s waste.
The
advanced
waste
treatment master plan aims
to deliver a waste to energy
solution for Sydney by:
• Recovering material and
energy resources from nonrecyclable waste so almost
no waste goes to landfill
• Converting non-recyclable
waste to renewable and
non-fossil fuel gases
• Converting these gases into
substitute natural gases to
inject into the gas grid to
deliver low-carbon energy.
The City added that any
future plant would be designed
to meet the New South Wales
waste to energy policy emissions
limits.
The system would also
be designed to be able to
fully integrate with future
Staffordshire County Council
leader, Philip Atkins added:
“In addition to the facility
generating energy for the grid,
we are also looking to use heat
created for nearby business
sites.”
Atkins also noted that in
developing the facility 85% of
the construction workforce came
from Staffordshire while 95% of
equipment used was procured
from the county.
“Throughout development
we have worked with the
community
alongside
our
partners Veolia and will continue
to do so,” said Atkins.
“An education centre on
site will be open to schools
from Staffordshire and the
surrounding areas – helping
young people understand why it
is important to recycle and that
energy is a finite resource,” he
continued.
Veolia added that the facility
will generate enough power for
35,000 homes and has created
40 new jobs.
trigeneration plants to produce
local electricity, heating and
cooling.
“It’s estimated this new
technology
could
prevent
around 196,000 tonnes of
greenhouse gas emissions a year
– equivalent to taking 43,556
cars off the road,” commented
Clover Moore, Lord Mayor of
Sydney.
“The technology will also
save ratepayers about $3.9
million a year by avoiding the
waste levy costs of landfill. Every
tonne of waste to landfill incurs
a NSW waste levy of over $100,”
she continued.
Moore went on to praise
Sydney residents for increased
recycling and noted that the
city has already met its target to
divert two thirds of household
waste from landfill.
“An
advanced
waste
treatment plant is a viable
solution already used in other
cities around the world,”
concluded the Lord Mayor.
RiverRidge Recycling is committed to extracting increasing levels of value out of Northern
Ireland’s waste streams prior to landfill. This focus has put the company at the forefront of
finding alternative markets for residual waste streams therefore allowing the company to
play an ever increasing role in helping Northern Ireland achieve its landfill diversion targets.
T: +44 (028) 7086 8844
M: 07764 830 006
E: [email protected]
W: www.riverridgerecycling.com
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST RiverRidge 1pg.indd 36
02/06/2014 12:12
The waste management company behind the plan to build a massive waste incinerator in
Co Antrim has urged people to “look at the facts” before making judgement on the project.
The multi-million pound proposal
for the Mallusk plant put
forward by arc21 - the umbrella
waste management body 11
local council areas - and the
Becon Consortium could see a
Mechanical Biological Treatment
facility, an Energy from Waste
(EfW) plant and a visitor/education
centre built at Hightown Quarry.
Ricky Burnett, arc21’s policy
and operations director, told the
Newtownabbey Times that the
150-acre site at Boghill Road as
“an ideal location” for an Energy
from Waste plant, despite its close
proximity to residential areas.
He
stressed
that
the
£240million
scheme
would
have “major environmental and
economic benefits” for Northern
Ireland,
including
diverting
more residual household waste
(waste that cannot be recycled)
away from landfill and creating
hundreds of jobs.
If the plan gets the go-ahead,
arc21 are hopeful that the new
facility could be operational by
2019.
Opponents
of
the
controversial project, led by
the No-Arc21 anti-incinerator
campaign group, have branded
it “not safe and not sustainable”
and claim that it represents “the
wrong technology in the wrong
location.”
They have vowed to fight the
plan at every stage, including
in the courts if necessary, and
have received widespread public
and political support for their
campaign.
One of their main objections
is the potential health impact a
waste incinerator could have on
people living in the surrounding
area. They point to claims by a
University of Ulster academic
that tiny particles emitted by EfW
plants are detrimental to people’s
health and that there is “no safe
level of exposure.”
However, Mr Burnett says
there have been “endless
comprehensive studies” carried
out into the potential health
effects of EfW plants, with the
“vast majority of medical experts
and
regulatory
authorities”
agreeing that they have “no
measurable detrimental impact
on health.”
Pointing to the use of Energy
from Waste technology across
Europe, he claimed that he would
have “absolutely no concerns”
if such a facility was going to be
built near his home.
Responding to claims that the
granting of planning permission
for a waste gasification plant
at Bombardier in east Belfast
means the Hightown project
isn’t needed, Mr Burnett said:
“We don’t see the Bombardier
proposals as being an alternative
at all. Infrastructure needs to be
built all over Northern Ireland to
move us away from landfill and
that is exactly what Bombardier
are proposing.”
Stressing that the Bombardier
plan is seeking to make use of
industrial and commercial waste,
he added: “We are happy to
see the Bombardier proposals.
It isn’t an alternative. It’s to help
Northern Ireland as a whole to
move away from landfill.”
Full Circle Power, meanwhile,
has confirmed that its Refuse
Derived Fuel could come from
industrial,
commercial
and
household (black bin) waste
streams, offering a ‘greener’
waste disposal solution to local
councils and businesses across
Northern Ireland.
Brett Ross, managing director
of Coleraine-based River Ridge
Recycling - the company leading
the Full Circle Power consortium,
stressed that the Hightown
WASTE To EnErgy nEWS
MALLUSK
INCINERATOR
ROW IS STILL
SMOULDERING
proposal is not the only solution
for dealing with municipal
waste in the arc21 region, which
includes Newtownabbey and 10
other local council areas.
“Suppliers of RDF into the
the Full Circle Power facility
will definitely be accepting
local authority waste into their
respective treatment facilities. We
would welcome the opportunity
to discuss the subject of waste
procurement with arc21 however
they are currently involved in a
long term procurement exercise.”
Around 200 people gathered
at a recent public meeting to
protest against the Hightown
incinerator and air their concerns
about health risks, heavy traffic,
pollution and the potential
impact on local house prices.
People spoke out about their
real concerns over the risk to their
health. They also have concerns
linked to constant heavy traffic
and pollution from the plant and
lorries, and the potential impact
on house prices in the area.
Both the politicians and
members of the public present
also said the project was too big
and cost too much money.
Local resident Marguerite
Gallagher said: “I am against it
because there would be too many
lorries through the development
and it will bring house prices
down.
“We are also concerned
about our children inhaling
fumes. You don’t usually find out
about health problems until years
down the line and then it’s too
late.”
Another opponent, Brigid
37
Artist impression of proposed waste incinerator plant at Mallusk
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 37
03/06/2014 15:11
WASTE NEWS
A Computer Generated Image of the Proposed MBT Plant
(Roof Removed for Illustrative Purposes)
McCann, called for plans for the
incinerator to be nipped in the
bud.
“There will be huge problems
with traffic and pollution in the
area. I am very concerned about
the idea,” she said.
“It’s important this project is
scrapped. I haven’t talked to one
person who is in favour if it.”
University of Ulster Professor
Vyvyan
Howard,
a
toxicopathologist, told the meeting he
had fought at least 12 incinerator
project plans successfully since
1980.
He argued that incinerators
were “completely unnecessary”,
described them as “the easy way
out”, and argued “recycling and
reusing” was the way forward
–as inhaling particles caused
increased strokes and heart
attacks.
UUP
councillor
and
businessman Mark Cosgrove told
the meeting residents were not
‘Nimbys’ – residents who simply
argue ‘not in my back yard’ to
new developments. However, he
questioned why Mallusk “always
has to be the dumping ground for
Northern Ireland”.
He said: “Not only is this
ANGER AS DERRY COUNCIL
STOCKPILES RECYCLING BINS
Thousands of new brown wheelie bins have been held in
storage by Derry City Council for nearly two years.
The council say they are still
waiting on the delivery of
specialist collection vehicles
to handle the organic waste
produced by households.
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Paul Hughes said: “Almost two
years ago we asked Derry City
Council why all these brown
bins were being held in storage
in Campsie and why were they
not issuing them out to people.
“It actually took us to issue
a Freedom of Information
request in order to find out that
the reason all these bins were
gathering dust was because
there was no appropriate facility
to process waste from brown
bins.
“Six months ago they
announced that it was all
systems go and that everything
would be in place so that the
bins could be used in 2014.
“They made the same
announcement in March but
lo and behold here we are in
the middle of May and not
one house in Derry, Eglinton,
Strathfoyle, Maydown or the
Waterside has their brown bin.”
He added: “Derry is a joke
in comparison to other councils’
approach to recycling.”
“I know Limavady Council,
Magherafelt and Co Down have
had brown bins for years, but
despite being the second city
we are like a backwater when it
comes to recycling.”
A
spokeswoman
for
Derry City Council said:
“Unfortunately
there
has
been a delay in rolling out the
food waste scheme due to a
delay with the delivery of the
unwelcome, it is also completely
unnecessary.”
“The
currently
planning
proposals will be decided upon, as
I understand it, before a business
case for the final decision gets
put to the 11 councils. Clearly if it
doesn’t get planning permission
then the rest of the argument is
irrelevant.”
The 300,000 ton capacity
municipal
waste
incinerator
proposed for Mallusk will be
the same size as London’s
redeveloped Wembley Stadium,
with 95-metre high chimney
stacks that will be taller than any
building in Belfast.
If built, it will be one of the
largest incinerator plants in
Ireland, dealing with the waste for
11 councils in the east of Northern
Ireland and helping each of them
reach their landfill targets.
specialist collection vehicles
which will be used to collect the
caddies.”
“These will be arriving
within the next 10 days and
we will begin the process of
delivering caddies to local
homes on their arrival.”
Earlier
this
year
the
North
West
Regional
Waste Management Group
(NWRWMG) announced that
it was recommending that its
plans to construct a £500m
gasification plant are scrapped.
The plant based in Campsie
would have processed waste
from Derry City, Strabane,
Limavady,
Ballymoney,
Magherafelt,
Moyle
and
Coleraine Councils but the issue
of waste remains and failure
to meet European targets on
waste management could see
fines of £500,000 a day being
handed down to the council.
Last November figures
released as part of a report of
all municipal waste collected by
local councils across Northern
Ireland showed that Derry was
at the bottom of the league
for recycling with a level of just
28%.
This is almost half of the
nearby Magherafelt District
Council’s recycling figure which
is 55%, placing it at top of the
league for the second year.
At the time a spokeswoman
for the council admitted that
it was not good but said it
was because it did not have
a kerbside collection service
for compostable materials
including food and/or green
waste, but that there were plans
to roll this service out.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 38
03/06/2014 12:06
NEW TEAM, NEW IDEAS
BY JIM KING, PRINCIPAL INSPECTOR, HSENI
Jim King
HSENI
The Waste Industry
Safety and Health
Forum Northern Ireland
(WISHNI) has been
established to improve
health and safety
standards in the waste
and recycling sector.
To recognise excellence
in the waste industry,
WISHNI operates a
system of Ambassador
Awards and in March
2014 five employers
received these awards.
The search is now on for 2015
Ambassadors. This
year,
CIWM
in
partnership with the Health and
Safety Executive for Northern
Ireland (HSENI) have developed
a ‘Sustainable Ireland’ award for
employers who demonstrate
changes to their operations
which improve the safety of
their employees.
However, some employers
are finding it difficult to maintain
even basic safety standards. Avoidable tragedies
HSENI’s new Waste Team
is a single point of contact for
safety and health issues in the
waste sector. Over the last
couple of months they have
started to engage with the
private sector waste industry.
Regrettably, they haven’t
found much in the way of good
practice in the premises they
have visited.
In recent months, several
people have suffered serious
painful injuries, including two
people who have had limbs
amputated and one person
who was severely burned. In
addition, there is no doubt that
the numbers of incidents are
under-reported.
It would appear that some
employers in the waste industry
simply don’t care about either
their employees or about their
organisation’s reputation.
These injuries, and other
evidence seen by HSENI
inspectors, point to the fact that
it is only a matter of time before
there is yet another fatality on a
waste operator’s site. What are the consequences?
The consequences of such
an accident are many and
serious. As an employer, you
will have to face the family of
the person you have killed and
tell them that a father, a mother,
a son or a daughter won’t be
coming home.
You will have to live with the
knowledge that such a tragedy
could have been easily avoided.
If one of your employees is
killed at work then HSENI will
investigate, as will the PSNI.
The starting point of any
investigation will be around
whether there is a case for
corporate or gross negligence
manslaughter. Your business
will be stopped until the
investigation is sure that the risk
to employees has been dealt
with. In addition, other charges
can also be brought under
health and safety law.
Your time will be taken up in
legal interviews under caution,
providing statements, evidence
and your employees will also be
interviewed. In the meantime,
costs to your business in legal
fees will mount.
If the evidence points to a
criminal case being brought,
you may be arrested, brought
to trial and, if found guilty of
manslaughter, sentenced to a
jail term running into years and/
or be required to pay a fine of
perhaps £100,000 or more.
What can be done?
HSENI has published the
main target areas that are the
causes of serious accidents.
These are:
• workplace transport
• all round visibility from
vehicles
• machinery guarding and
isolation
• falls from heights
• lack of training
Jim King, who heads up
HSENI’s Waste Sector Group
and is an inspector with more
than 27 years experience in
health and safety has been
shocked and indeed angered
by recent findings in the waste
industry.
Commenting on recent
inspections of several waste
facilities Jim said: “So far, visits
by HSENI inspectors to waste
recycling facilities show there is
an abysmally poor compliance
with the law.
“In the premises which we
found to be unsafe, plant and
processes have been closed
down and remedial action has
been required. “The risk of fire is high
in many premises and where
HSENI inspectors are concerned
that there is a danger to life we
have contacted the Northern
Ireland Fire and Rescue Service
(NIFRS) immediately.
“Indeed we are working with
the NIFRS and the Northern
Ireland Environmental Agency
to share a range of information
and to better bring together
the main enforcing authorities
for the waste sector.”
• Take action now
• carry out a workplace
transport risk assessment
and take action on the
findings
• separate vehicle movements
from pedestrians and people
working in the area
• fit reversing cameras or fish
eye mirrors to the rear of
vehicles
• make sure all mirrors and
cameras
are
properly
adjusted and working
• have a daily check sheet
for guards and ensure staff
know not to run the machine
without the guard
If you need help or advice
on preparing risk assessments,
please contact Health and
Safety Works NI on: 0300 020
0030.
If you require some best
practice guides on toolbox
talks for employees then visit
the HSENI website and type
WISHNI into the search box.
If you want to report unsafe
working conditions then phone
HSENI on: 0800 0320 121 and
ask for the Waste Team.
SPONSORED COLUMN
WASTE
39
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST WISH NI 1pg.indd 39
02/06/2014 12:13
HEALTH & SAFETY
WITH OSM,
YOU’RE
SAFE AND
SOUND
It’s a sobering fact that accident rates in the waste and
recycling industry are four times the national average.
Primarily, the incidents involve
refuse/recycing
collection
workers who manually handle
and sort waste, and a significant
proportion of the accidents occur
as a result of poorly guarded work
equipment or improper use.
Needless to say – and
apart from the human suffering
involved - serious accidents cost
businesses inordinate amounts of
money and time.
The business case, therefore,
for reducing both accidents and
injuries in compelling, particularly
in these tough economic times.
For OSM, the renowned
Newry-based
engineering
firm, safety and prevention of
accidents in the waste industry
are mainstays of their business.
And, as their managing
director David Lundy explained,
the company has always taken
a holistic approach to safety
and the smooth, safe running of
waste management machinery
in particular and the business in
general.
“We design, build, maintain
and consult; our business is
predicting
and
preventing
40
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• Design, Build, Installation
and Consultation.
“It's our business to ensure any downtime is kept to an absolute
minimum, and that all work carried out with safetyÊ andÊ valueÊ as the
prime consideration”Ê
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Safety in the waste and recycling industry is paramount
problems rather than attempting
to fix them at a later stage,” said
David.
OSM, whose staff have over
50 years’ combined experience,
have become major players since
entering the waste industry back
in October 2006.
They specialise in PLC
(programmable logic controller)
systems, electrical control systems
and
electrical,
pneumatic,
hydraulic
and
mechanical
maintenance.
Their list of satisfied customers
is dotted all over Ireland and the
UK; OSM stands for One Stop
Maintenance and their success
is based on delivering on their
promises.
Baling machines, conveyors,
shredders, trommels and other
waste management equipment
is running smoothly, all over the
British Isles, because of OSM’s
attention to detail, both at the
start and throughout the lifetime
of the products.
They embrace the most upto-date technology in their work;
for instance, as David pointed
out, if a motor is running too hot
somewhere, the chances are that
OSM will know about it on their
monitors.
“Downtime is our enemy,” he
said.
“Time and money is of course
lost by equipment lying idle, and
also carelessness with regard to
maintenance.
“It’s our business to ensure
any downtime is kept to an
absolute minimum, and that all
work carried out with safety as the
prime consideration.”
The most valuable resources
of the waste management and
recycling sector – the workers
themselves – can go about
their business knowing that the
equipment they use has safety
measures factored in at the design
stage and properly maintained
throughout its lifefime.
OSM ensure equipment is
strong and stable enough for its
particular use, that it is positioned
and installed to minimise any risks
and subject to ongoing thorough
examination and repair – whether
running or not - by competent
people.
David cited an important
example – interlocking guard
systems.
In the waste industry, safety
interlocks for use on breakers,
isolators, disconnectors and earth
mechanisms are typically used
to safeguard the likes of sorters,
shredders,
compactors
and
bailers.
The guard shuts off or
disengages the power whenever
it is opened or pushed out of
position.
“With interlocking systems,
you can isolate part of the
machine or it all; one key will
isolate everything,” said David.
“The more safety you put in,
the more you have to keep things
going.”
David and his colleagues
at OSM use sophisticated
techniques
and
technology,
but simplicity is the key to their
business, starting with that first
contact with the company.
“Our ethos is that one phone
call to us should be enough,” said
David.
“We don’t want people
having to call three or four
different businesses to get three
or four different things done.
“Because we’re involved in
every aspect of the businesses,
from design to maintenance, a
customer shouldn’t have to go
futher after getting in touch with
us.”
Take a note of OSM’s number;
it may well be the only one you
need.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 40
03/06/2014 10:33
Vehicle
Safety
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19 Michelin Road,
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Tel: (028) 9034 2001
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6-10 Killyvalley Road,
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Tel: (028) 2955 8353
Fax: (028) 2955 7957
2 Diviny Drive,
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Portadown BT63 5WE
Tel: (028) 3839 3300
Fax: (028) 3839 1710
www.tbfthompson.com
41
PROTECT YOUR PROFIT
Good health and safety practice in the
waste and recycling industry pays.
For more information contact:
Tel: 0800 0320 121
Email: [email protected]
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 41
03/06/2014 14:12
COUNCIL IN FOCUS - BANBRIDGE D.C.
42
BANBRIDGE
COUNCIL EXCELS
AFTER BRINGING
RECYCLING
BACK IN-HOUSE
It’s now two years and counting since Banbridge District Council
launched their new kerbside recycling scheme – and the results
have been way beyond their hopes and expectations.
Back in April 2012 the Council
integrated the kerbside collection
of dry recyclable materials, which
had previously been outsourced,
into the in-house collection
scheme for organic and residual
waste streams.
As part of the council’s
ongoing drive for continuous
improvement in its services to
the public, a review of the preexisting arrangements saw the
development of a new integrated
model for waste and recycling
collections.
Previously
the
council’s
own crews collected residual
and organic waste streams
on alternate weeks, from all
households across the District.
Additionally, an external
service provider undertook a
weekly kerbside sort modelled
collection of dry recyclable
materials from households.
The planned launch of the
new scheme coincided with the
ending of the ‘task and finish’
model of working for council
waste collection crews and
provided the flexibility to review
working patterns.
The council’s new kerbside
collection scheme, which is
universal across the entire District,
now involves the emptying of a
240 litre black bin (residual waste)
one week and both a 240 litre
green bin (dry recyclables) and
a 240 litre brown bin (organic
garden and food waste) the next.
The green and brown
recycling bins are collected in a
‘one-pass’ system, using splitbodied 32 tonne RCVs that also
have a pod located behind the
cab for the separate collection of
glass.
Separation of glass from other
dry recyclables by householders
is facilitated using a caddy insert
in the green bins. The timing of
the new scheme also tied in with
plans to replace older standard
RCVs and the Council was able to
do so with the new split bodied
models.
Recycling week collections
now involve one rather than two
vehicles servicing each collection
route.
As both the green and brown
bins are emptied together,
the time taken to service each
recycling route is greater than a
standard working day and relief
crews are engaged to finish off
collections in the late afternoon/
early evening.
In terms of cost efficiency, the
new model allowed the council to
shave around £1/3 million from
its waste management budget in
year 1.
“The recycling gain achieved
by implementing the new service
model in Banbridge has been
nothing short of phenomenal,
“ said the council’s director of
Environmental Services, David
Lindsay.
“The level of kerbside dry
recycling had been stagnating for
some years, but in the first year of
the new scheme the amount of
dry recyclables collected at the
kerbside rose by 40% - despite
a fall in overall municipal waste
arisings of over 4% compared to
the previous year.“
The Council’s provisional
figures for the year 2012/13 show
a further significant 13% rise in
the yield of dry recyclables at the
kerbside (again, in the face of a
further drop in overall municipal
waste arisings of over 4%).
This takes the increase in
the amount of dry recyclables
collected at the kerbside over
the first two years of the new
scheme to around 53%, despite a
two year fall of around 9% in the
total amount of municipal waste
generated across the district.
These gains have had a
significant impact on the district’s
overall
municipal
recycling
rate, which provisional Council
estimates place close to if not
above, 60%.
If confirmed by official
statistics, this would make
Banbridge District Council the
first Northern Ireland council to
break the 60% municipal recycling
barrier.
“The Council is grateful to
its suppliers in this new recycling
venture; to Heil Europe (now Heil
Farid) for the split bodied RCVs,
to Schaefer for the new green
wheeled recycling bins and to
Straight for the inner caddies
used for glass separation in the
wheeled bins,” said Mr Lindsay.
“The Council’s partnership
with Re-Gen Waste for the
provision of a high quality service
to sort and process recyclables,
has also been a key feature of the
success of the new scheme.”
Earlier this year, a High Court
judge ruled that the council’s
decision to bring its recycling
service in-house without putting
the service out to tender was
legally compliant.
The ruling marked the end of
a judicial review process brought
by Bryson Recycling.
The case centred onthe
council’s
decision
not
to
retender the area’s recycling
service following the end of
Bryson’s contract on 31 March,
2011.
Bryson introduced a kerbside
box
recycling
service
for
Banbridge in 2004, but in April
2011 councillors decided not
to renew the contract and, with
the exception of glass, collected
materials are now commingled.
Bryson launched a judicial
review against the council in
August 2011, claiming on 11
separate grounds that the
decision to drop its services
was flawed and “not in the best
interest of rate payers”.
This included the claim
that the council had breached
the revised Waste Framework
Directive
and
the
Waste
Regulations (NI) 2011 by “failing
to take into consideration or give
appropriate weight to the impact
of a commingled waste strategy”.
Bryson Recycling claimed
this legislation would prohibit
commingled collections after
2015.
But Mr Justice Treacy, in his
ruling, said that local authorities
were only required to undertake
separate collections if it was
‘technically, environmentally and
economically practicable’.
He accepted the councils’
assertion that there was enough
evidence
that
commingling
increased recycling rates.
A number of local authorities
have been looking for help with
‘technically,
environmentally
and economically practicable’
or ‘TEEP’ after Defra announced
this month it will not be issuing
any guidance. This leaves the
possibility that councils will be
open to legal challenges.
Mr Justice Treacy rejected all
11 grounds put forward by Bryson
Recycling.
Separate glass collections
are in accordance with advice
included in a letter sent to
councils by former resources
minister Lord de Mauley.
An extract from a summary
of Mr Justice Treacy’s ruling
said: “Mr Justice Treacy also
held that the council had not
breached the revised Waste
Framework Directive and the
Waste Regulations (NI) 2011 by
failing to take into consideration
or give appropriate weight to the
impact of a “commingled” waste
strategy.
“He said the legislation
only requires an authority to
facilitate separate collection if it is
“technically, environmentally and
economically practicable”.
Bryson
had
contended
that the legislation prohibited
commingled collections after
2015 but the judge said this was
incorrect.
He accepted the council’s
submission that in this case where
the available evidence clearly
pointed in one direction and
the adoption of a box scheme
as proposed by Bryson would
have given rise to worse results
environmentally (as the number
of households using this method
was lower) at an increased cost, it
was plain that it would be open to
the council, even in 2015, to reach
the same decision.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Banbridge Kerbside 2pg.indd 42
02/06/2014 12:14
TRUSTED IN IRELAND
AND BEYOND
The safe and efficient collection and transportation
of domestic and commercial waste undertaken
in many different and complex geographic
locations is a fundamental requirement of all
private residents and commercial businesses.
Quality products, engineered the Farid European Group, indeed
to meet the varying specific approximately two years ago, it
demands of end users - including sold its very first three 3Cyclers
inclement weather conditions - (TwinTrak RCV’s with UniPod) to
and considerate after sales service Banbridge Council,l allowing them
hold the key to long and lasting to collect three waste streams on
relationships with private refuse one collection round.
These 3Cyclers were not only
collection companies and local
the first to be built by Heil, they
authorities.
It is little wonder therefore were the first to be mounted to
that Heil Farid has an established Mercedes Econic Tridem chassis.
and successful relationship with Heil Farid are pleased that the
many local councils and private vehicles are performing well and
companies, such as Castlereagh Banbridge Council are achieving
Motors in Northern Ireland, and their recycling objectives.
Heil Farid are delighted to
continues to widen its range of
refuse collection vehicles (RCVs) be associated with Castlereagh
Motors Limited who are owned by
offered in Ireland.
Since
partnering
with John Tolerton and Austin Hanna.
Castlereagh Motors, Heil Farid has As Mr Tolerton told Sustainable
increased its product range with Ireland: “we have had a productive
and
profitable
relationship
the acquisition of Heil in Scotland.
An acquisition that is working stretching back over two decades,
very well for both our company and and long may it continue.”
Castlereagh Motors have been
more importantly for customers
in operation since 1981 and with
too.
HF Before
Half P Sust
ad May14_Layout
1 14/05/2014
16:04
Page 1 in
than 30 years
experience
Heil Ire
became
part of more
the municipal industry they have
been the Farid distributors in
Northern Ireland for more than 20
years.
Operating from a large
workshop of more than 1,1000 sq
feet and employing 13 personnel
they have many years experience
in the municipal business in sales,
service and parts (plus all types
of repairs and replacements) and
operate a 24 hr recovery service.
They carry a number of
maintenance contracts both in
local government and the private
industry. With such a wealth of
experience Heil Farid are keen to
continue this valued relationship
for many more years to come.
Indeed, their philosophy is to
provide customers with Quality Reliability - Durability of product
supported by exemplary After
Sales Care… Quality; Refuse and
Recycling Collection Vehicles that
are built to exacting customer
standards. Reliability; Refuse and
Recycling Collection Vehicles that
our customers can depend on.
Durability; Refuse and Recycling
Collection Vehicles that will stand
the test of time. After Sales Care;
Support and care when, or if, it is
needed.
Heil’s goal is to attain and
maintain competitive excellence
and customer satisfaction by
involving people who work for
and with the company (such as
Castlereagh Motors), so enhancing
the collective professional skills.
Their emphasis continues to be
on customer need and satisfaction
with vehicles being built to
exacting customer specification
and exemplary after-sales service.
Heil have perhaps the most
comprehensive range of refuse
and recycling collection vehicles
(RCVs) available in the UK today.
If you are unsure as to what
type of RCV you may require for a
specific purpose they will be happy
to help.
COUNCIL IN FOCUS - BANBRIDGE D.C.
HEIL FARID
43
A Comprehensive Range of Refuse &
Recycling Vehicles to Serve Your Need!
Heil Farid Working in Partnership with Castlereagh Motors Ltd
(Heil Farid Distributor for Northern Ireland)
Vehicles range from the small Micro through to the large 32ton FEL.
MINICOMPACTORS:
FRONT LOADERS:
spanning 4m3 to 15m3 capacity
spanning 29m3 to 37m3 capacity
● Micro
● Micro XHD
● MiniMatic
● MiniPac
● PN Range
● Euro Half Pack Industrial FEL
REAR LOADERS:
spanning 7m3 to 31m3 capacity
● T1 Range
● PowerLink
● TwinTrak (standard width)
● TwinTrak (narrow width)
● BigBite Industrial REL
Tel: +44 (0) 1383 823625
Fax: +44 (0) 1383 824062
[email protected]
www.heilfarideu.com
SIDE LOADERS:
spanning 15m3 to 28m3 capacity
● FMO Side Loader
HEIL FARID European Company Limited
Taxi Way
Hillend Industrial Estate,
Dunfermline, Fife
KY11 9ES
United Kingdom
BUILDING OUR
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Contact us at the above address or visit our website for details
of our comprehensive range of waste collection vehicles
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Banbridge Kerbside 2pg.indd 43
02/06/2014 12:14
council news
COUNCIL
LANDFILL RATES
FALL WHILE
RECYCLING
RATES RISE
Northern Ireland’s council landfill waste rates have dropped to their lowest autumn level yet.
Municipal waste collected by
local authorities and landfilled
fell to 50.4% in October to
December 2013 from 57.6%
for the same period a year
previously.
Recycling rates, meanwhile,
rose by almost 3% to 38.7%
over the same period, according
to the provisional Northern
Ireland local authority collected
municipal waste management
statistics
for
October
to
December 2013.
44
The largest driver of this
increase was from composting,
which showed an increase of
2.3% compared with the previous
autumn period.
The
percentage
of
household
waste
recycled
or composted was 39.2%,
an increase of almost three
percentage points compared
with the same period last year,
when 36.2% was recycled or
composted.
A total of 217,265 tonnes
of local authority municipal
waste was collected in Northern
Ireland, which is broadly similar
to the same quarter last year
when 216,987 tonnes was
collected.
Household kerbside capture
rates for the primary waste
categories ranged from a high
of 55.4% for paper and card to a
low of 1.2% for waste electronic
and electrical equipment.
The capture rates for glass
and organic/compostable waste
BELFAST COUNCIL WINS
UK RECYCLING AWARD
Belfast City Council has scooped a top waste management
award for its kerbside box recycling scheme.
The scheme was named Best
Local
Authority
Recycling
Initiative, at the Awards for
Excellence in Recycling and
Waste Management 2014, in
a year which saw a 44 per cent
increase in entries, demonstrating
the growing importance of the
recycling and waste management
sector.
The awards, which were held
in London last week, attracted
entries from across the UK.
Steve Eminton, editor of
letsrecycle.com,
said:
“The
standard of entries this year –
our 11th Awards for Excellence
celebration – was undoubtedly
the highest we’ve ever seen.
We sincerely congratulate every
organisation
and
individual
who was acknowledged as a
2014 finalists, because this an
incredible achievement in itself.
The judges had a very difficult
task selecting the winners.”
Best Local Authority Recycling Initiative winners, Belfast City Council
The council’s recycling box
initiative is collected by Bryson
Recycling and serves 55,000
households in Belfast. It was
phased into operation between
August and November last year.
Thanks to the scheme,
virtually every household in
Belfast can now recycle food
waste and since the initiative was
introduced last August, we have
collected an extra 1,000 tonnes
of dry recyclables, compared to
the previous year. Almost 1,500
tonnes of food waste was also
collected for composting.
Tim Walker, Head of Waste
Management at Belfast City
increased by 6.5% and 5.5%
respectively.
“The continued decrease in
landfilled waste is important,”
said Environment Minister Mark
H Durkan.
“Together with the continued
increase in the recycling and
composting rate, this shows that
as a society we are making more
use of what must be viewed as
resources and not waste.
“Along with the support of
my department, more councils
are expanding the range of
materials that are collected at
the kerbside for recycling and
as a result a kerbside collection
of food waste for composting is
now available to almost 70% of
households.”
Mr Durkan added: “I
commend the public for the
continuing effort they put into
recycling and encourage people
to check their council’s website
or try http://www.rethinkwasteni.
org for more information on what
they can do to reduce, reuse and
recycle.”
The data in the report is
based on returns made to
WasteDataFlow, a web based
system used by all UK local
authorities to report municipal
waste.
Council, said: “We’re delighted
to have won this award and
to have the council’s recycling
efforts recognised. To date, this
scheme has added 2.5% to our
recycling rate which has now risen
to around 40%. This is a fantastic
achievement and has only been
made possible with the help of
residents.”
“We’d encourage everyone
to continue to recycle as much as
possible at home, and help us to
cut down on the amount of waste
being sent to landfill which in turn
saves money that we can reinvest
in the city.”
Steve
Eminton
from
Environment Media Group said:
“The event proved an exciting
day and gave a chance for all
guests to reflect on the recycling
and waste management progress
that has been achieved over the
past 12 months.
“The standard of entries this
year – our eleventh Awards for
Excellence celebration – was
undoubtedly the highest we’ve
ever seen.
“We sincerely congratulate
every organisation and individual
who was acknowledged as a
2014 finalist, because that is an
incredible achievement in itself.
The judges had a very difficult
task selecting the winners.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 44
02/06/2014 11:01
wAsTe news
DURKAN
PLANNING TO
TOUGHEN UP
WASTE RULES
Mark H. Durkan, Minister of Enviroment
Mark H Durkan has outlined plans to step up the Department of the Environment’s inspections regime in
response to warnings that the Northern Ireland waste industry is vulnerable to organised crime.
The Environment Minister said that
by the middle of this year he will
review the legislative framework for
waste management and establish a
new body, the Resource Efficiency
Directorate, to co-ordinate waste
policies.
“The waste sector in Northern
Ireland is highly vulnerable to
criminal infiltration and some of
this activity is linked to organised
crime,” said Mr Durkan.
“That’s why it’s important
that I reshape the Department of
Environment (DoE) to create a new
directorate that will be joined up.”
An ‘Operational Strategy’ and
an action plan will also be set up
which includes:
* Targeted inspections on waste
operators.
* Partnership
with
local
government so that councils
and the Northern Ireland
Environment Agency (NIEA)
share information, resources
and strategies to manage waste.
Innovation
partnerships
with
Northern Ireland businesses to
help them reduce waste and cut
costs.
The minister added that he
was developing a new bill that will
enable the integration of Northern
Ireland’s policies on environment
and economy.
The ‘Better Regulation Bill’
will allow the DoE to issue a single
integrated environmental permit
to businesses, and will give officers
the power to inspect against all
environmental regulations.
“This will mean the same
number of NIEA officers will be
able to carry out a significantly
increased overall number of
inspections and in a much more
targeted way,” he said.
“We need to use the resources
at our disposal much more
efficiently in tackling waste crime.”
The announcements followed
the recommendations put forward
by the Mills report, which was
published in December 2013.
The study highlighted the need
to reconsider Northern Ireland’s
waste system, to understand how
criminals can exploit it and to
enhance regulatory activity on the
sector.
Mr Durkan insisted that the
new policies will transform waste
management in Northen Ireland.
“We must be vigilant and
fearless in chasing people who
deliberately set out to make money
by damaging our environment, our
communities and our legitimate
businesses through illegal waste
dumping, fuel laundering and
other forms of waste crime,” he
said.
“It is unacceptable and must
be eliminated.”
Tel: 028 9262 1449
45
3 Church Lane, Moira Road, Lisburn BT28 2TT
[email protected]
Food Surplus Management
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Northern Ireland distributors of
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tel: 00353 46 948 3002 fax: 00353 46 948 6750 email: [email protected]
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SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Waste News.indd 45
02/06/2014 11:01
CIWM GOLF DAY
GOLF DAY
This Event took place at the Royal Portrush
Golf Club on Thursday 24th April
The PriceCooper
sWaterhouse tea
Hugh Crossey, Stu
m lead by Alan
art Cairns and Gly
Dickson, with
nn Johnston
The Greenway Polymers team captained by Jon Nicholson, with Andrew
Williamson, Alastair Eagle and Nicky Paul
46
THE CIWM NI team captained by Alan McVicker, with John Rea,
Jack Snodden and Douglas Nisbet
Baskin, with
captained by Andrew
The RPS Group Team tin Patterson
Mar
and
ara
Kevin O’G
Jim McCorry,
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST CIWM Golf.indd 46
03/06/2014 15:35
en Team
CIWM GOLF DAY
White Young Gre
The Regen team who sponsored this year’s event, Darren Fegan,
Brian McDonnell and Raymond Martin CIWM NI
The SLR Consu
lting team from
Walsh, joined by
So
Ian Roberts, Eve uthern Ireland, lead by Cono
r
lyn Smith and Kie
ran Mullins
47
Alan McVicker (Chairman of the CIWM Northern Ireland Centre) (Right)
presenting the overall winner’s trophy to Hugh Crossey (PWC)
for a score of 42 points
The Visitors Tea
Trevor Knipe from with Garfield Harrison from
Paul Topley fromm International Synergies and Sustainable Ireland,
Craigavon BC
TOP
TEAM
Captain, Alan
McVicker with
Michael Boyd
and the winning
team from White
Young Green
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST CIWM Golf.indd 47
03/06/2014 15:35
WASTE NEWS
RWM
AMBASSADOR
PROGRAMME
LAUNCHES TO
SUPPORT THE
FUTURE OF THE
WASTE INDUSTRY
A new Ambassador Programme is announced by RWM
in partnership with CIWM. The initiative has been
launched to help shape the future of the event and to
underline the event organisers’ commitment to supporting
the industry and acting as a positive force for change
The panel of 24 ambassadors
includes thought leaders and
industry leaders from a range of
sectors, including Clyde Loakes
from LGA, Gev Eduljee from
SITA, Lee Marshall from LARAC,
Sophie Thomas from the RSA,
Sarah Wakefield from Co-op
Estates, Chris Dow from Closed
Loop Recycling, Gareth Tancred
from BIFM, Jonathan Davies from
SKM Enviros, Jonathan Straight
from Straight plc, Liz Goodwin
from WRAP, Louis Lindenberg
from Unilever UK Ltd, and Ray
Georgeson from The Resource
Association (see below for a full
list of ambassadors).
Chaired by CIWM Chief
executive Steve Lee, this unique
and high profile group will meet
regularly to discuss key waste
and resource efficiency issues and
provide insight and advice on the
Steve Lee, CIWM Chief Executive
future development of the RWM
event. In addition, RWM is giving
the ambassadors a fund of £15,000
to be used for the good of the
sector.
The first meeting, held this
week opened with an inspirational
keynote speech from leading
environmentalist Sir Jonathon
Porritt, and the group will now
meet every six weeks. The
ambassadors are free to decide
what issues they chose to prioritise
and discuss and how to spend the
funds donated by RWM, other
than that it should be used for
the development of new resource
efficiency initiatives to support the
sector.
Steve Lee said: “Bringing
together some of the sector’s
leading thinkers, the Ambassador
Sir Jonathon Porritt
Programme is a unique group that
will help to shape the direction of
the industry and ensure that RWM
reflects and meets the current and
future needs of our dynamic and
fast-changing sector.”
Sarah
Porter,
divisional
director for the environment
events at i2i, which includes RWM
in partnership with CIWM, added:
“Today’s investment and launch of
the Ambassadors Programme is
our opportunity to give something
back to an industry that is growing
rapidly, generating substantial
environmental impact and which
is vital to the UK’s economy. We’re
proud to be facilitating this group
and excited to see where the
funds will be invested.”
48
Europe’s leading event for resource efficency
and waste management solutions
• 750+ exhibitors
• 250+ speakers
• Network with peers, partners and policy makers
• Free, CPD accredited seminars and discussions
• The entire industry under one roof
NEW HALLS,
NEW EXHIBITORS,
NEW OPPORTUNITIES
TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT RWM VISIT: www.rwmexhibition.com/st
KNOWLEDGE | NETWORKING | PRODUCTS
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
RWM_131x180 Advert_Europes.indd 1
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST RWM 1pg.indd 48
CO-LOCATED EVENTS
SUPPORTED BY
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
03/06/2014 10:38AM
03/06/2014 12:52
Could you be the next
Sustainable Ireland Award Winner?
Send in your Entry or Enter online at www.sustainableireland.co.uk
EXTEND
ED DEAD
L I N E J2u7nteh
BLACK TIE GALA EVENING
WEDNESDAY 3rd SEPT
RAMADA HOTEL, BELFAST
SI Awards 2014 4pgs.indd 47
30/05/2014 15:17
7t e
2
D un
E
D
N E J
E
T
EX ADLIN
DE
h
Start thinking about your
Sustainable Ireland Award Entries
BLACK TIE GALA EVENING
WEDNESDAY 3rd SEPT
RAMADA HOTEL, BELFAST
Energy and
Environment
Innovation Award
Wastes Management
& Environmental
Excellence Award
Ê
Ê
tick
ThisÊ AwardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ
whoÊ hasÊ developedÊ anÊ innovativeÊ productÊ orÊ serviceÊ
whichÊ hasÊ displayedÊ keyÊ elementsÊ inÊ theÊ reductionÊ ofÊ
energy costs and increased environmental efficiency
withinÊ theÊ NorthernÊ IrelandÊ marketplace.Ê
tick
Best Use of
Renewable Energy
Sources Award
Recycling
Industry Award
Ê
tick
Ê
tick
Ê
ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ
whichÊ demonstratesÊ highÊ standardsÊ ofÊ resourceÊ
efficiency in the collection and/or sorting and/or
reprocessingÊ ofÊ materialsÊ asÊ itsÊ coreÊ business.
Council Award for
Excellence in
Waste Management
Ô ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ goÊ toÊ theÊ District,Ê CityÊ orÊ BoroughÊ CouncilÊ orÊ
group of Councils that can show/demonstrate improvement
in Recycling and Landfill Diversion. The winner will have
introducedÊ initiativesÊ thatÊ haveÊ resultedÊ inÊ increasedÊ recyclingÊ
rates, financial savings or both, they will have demonstrated
their commitment to recycling through staff training and/or other
practicalÊ means,Ê andÊ willÊ haveÊ implementedÊ educationalÊ orÊ
awarenessÊ programmesÊ thatÊ encourageÊ youngÊ people,Ê homeÊ
ownersÊ andÊ businessesÊ withinÊ theirÊ areaÊ toÊ recycleÊ andÊ re-use.Õ
SI Awards 2014 4pgs.indd 48
TheÊ AwardÊ willÊ recognizeÊ individualÊ excellenceÊ withinÊ
theÊ resourcesÊ andÊ WastesÊ ManagementÊ industry,Ê
throughÊ bestÊ practiceÊ andÊ innovationÊ acrossÊ aÊ
rangeÊ ofÊ commercialÊ andÊ publicÊ sectors.
tick
ThisÊ AwardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ
whichÊ bestÊ demonstratesÊ itsÊ commitmentÊ toÊ
theÊ useÊ ofÊ renewableÊ energyÊ sources.Ê
Best Energy
Manager Award
Ê
tick
ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ individualÊ whoÊ hasÊ
achievedÊ notableÊ energyÊ savingsÊ withinÊ theirÊ organisation.Ê
JudgingÊ criteriaÊ toÊ include:Ê HowÊ youÊ gotÊ managementÊ buy-inÊ
toÊ secureÊ investmentÊ inÊ timeÊ andÊ moneyÊ forÊ yourÊ projects?Ê
WhatÊ measuresÊ haveÊ youÊ developedÊ andÊ implementedÊ
toÊ improveÊ energyÊ performance?Ê HowÊ haveÊ youÊ informedÊ
and motivated customers, colleagues and/or the supply
chain?Ê InÊ whatÊ waysÊ haveÊ youÊ promotedÊ technologyÊ
innovationÊ inÊ yourÊ companyÊ andÊ toÊ otherÊ stakeholders?Ê
IdentifyÊ theÊ energyÊ savingsÊ achievedÊ andÊ theÊ potentialÊ
energyÊ savingsÊ participatedÊ inÊ theÊ followingÊ years.
30/05/2014 15:17
The Categories are as follows:
Tick the categories you wish to enter
All entries/nominations should be received by 27th June 2014
Best Waste
Carrier Award
Ê
Leadership in Sustainable
Development Award
ThisÊ AwardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ aÊ licensedÊ wasteÊ carrierÊ
who demonstrates high levels of efficiency, extensive
service portfolios, high quality transport fleets and
commitmentÊ toÊ ongoingÊ corporateÊ trainingÊ initiatives.
tick
tick
Most Inspiring
Environmental Project by
a Young Person/Persons
Sustainable Building
Project of the year
This award will be presented to the individual or group which
has demonstrated through a project their understanding of the
local opportunities to sustainable development. The entry must
be able to clearly display the benefit to either their community,
school or workplace. Projects can be drawn from any area of
the environmental education such as waste management and
recycling, water, the natural environment and environmental
protection, or creating and maintaining wildlife habitats.
tick
Ê
tick
tick
ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ orÊ
individual who has shown or demonstrated through a
managed programme or project, how they have striven
to minimise their impact on the natural environment
by carefully managing their waste and environmental
pollution, creating and maintaining wildlife habitats,
building areas which will encourage wildlife and training
staff to take an interest in the natural environment.
tick
tick
Ê
tick
tick
tick
tick
NE
W
ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ thatÊ canÊ
demonstrate safety management systems leading to zero
accidents. Criteria to include: safety policy relative to the
size of the company. Well developed training needs analysis
and training provision. Risk assessment procedures.
Demonstration of capital investment on the ground for safety.
Judging will include a site visit on a predetermined date.
After-show Entertainment
courtesy of
RiverRidge Recycling
This award will be presented to the individual or company
who has implemented or designed a programme or project
dedicated to environmental issues. This project must clearly
demonstrate a high level of environmental responsibility.
Entries can cover all types of environmental concerns.
Energy Efficiency
Award
Ê
Safety in Waste
Award
ThisÊ awardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ whoÊ hasÊ
built, designed or adapted new or existing buildings or
developments which incorporate energy installations and
other techniques which are influential in making a new or
existing building or project over all more sustainable.
Environmental Project
of the year
Biodiversity Project
of the Year
Ê
The Leadership Award will go to an individual and/
or organisational champion of sustainability. The winner
will have made an outstanding contribution to our
understanding of the local opportunities to integrate
social, environmental and economic considerations
in a particular sector or in society as a whole.
ThisÊ AwardÊ willÊ beÊ presentedÊ toÊ theÊ organisationÊ whoÊ hasÊ
achieved high levels of cost reduction within their corporate
energy levels through the implementation of energy saving
policies and programmes. Judging Criteria to include:
What measures you have taken to reduce energy usage in
your company? Which sources have you used to find out
about best practice in energy efficiency? Relative to the
type and size of your organisation, please explain which
significant results you have achieved. Please provide proof
were possible. How you made effective use of limited
resources in your achievements and future plans?
Wine courtesy of
Ulster Shredders
For Sponsorship Opportunities Contact Golda Burrows on 028 9268 8888 or email: [email protected]
ENTRY FORM
HOW TO ENTER:
1 Please tick any award category or categories you wish
to enter on these 2 pages and
2 Post together with your submission to
Sustainable Ireland Awards
Sustainable Ireland Ltd,
12 Main Street, Hillsborough,
Co Down, BT26 6AE
3 Confirm your entry by emailing
[email protected]
HOW TO NOMINATE:
If you wish to nominate an individual or company please tick the
category or categories you feel they deserve to win and fill out
their details on this form and send it to
Sustainable Ireland Awards, Attn: Golda Burrows
12 Main Street, Hillsborough, Co Down BT26 6AE
Submissions should be no more than 2000 words.
Supporting material should be provided together with images of project/
person represented in the entry (ideally as a hard copy).
Separate entries to be supplied for each entered category. The judgesÕ
decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into. All entries are
private & confidential. The winner will remain confidential until the event.
All entries/nominations should be received by 27th June 2014
Post to Sustainable Ireland, Sustainable Ireland Ltd, 12 Main Street, Hillsborough, Co Down, BT26 6AE or via email to [email protected]
SI Awards 2014 4pgs.indd 49
03/06/2014 10:26
Book your table immediately to avoid disappointment
The SUSTAINABLE IRELAND Awards 2014, is set to
be the biggest event in the industry calendar
Held in the plush surroundings of Belfast’s luxury Ramada Hotel
on September 3rd 2014, the awards ceremony includes a superb Gala Dinner
THE AWARDS CEREMONY BEGINS AT 7PM FOR 7:30PM SHARP
Tickets cost just £59.50+vat each – a table of 10 works out at £595+vat.
Anticipated demand is likely to be brisk, so act now to ensure your presence at the event of the year!
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, TELEPHONE
GOLDA BURROWS OR PAUL BEATTIE ON 028 9268 8888
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND
12 Main Street, Hillsborough, Co. Down BT26 6AE. N.Ireland
Tel: 028 9268 8888 Fax: 028 9268 8866
Email: [email protected] www.sustainableireland.co.uk
Please Reserve
seats @£59.50+VAT or
tables(s) of ten places @£595+VAT
at the Sustainable Ireland Awards 2014 in the Ramada Hotel, Belfast on Wednesday 3rd September 2014 at 7pm for 7:30pm sharp.
Name of Company: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invoice Address: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.............................................................................................................................................................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Post
Contact Name:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tel:
Code:
...........................................
.......................................................
Invoices will be raised by Sustainable Ireland in July and will require to be paid in full by Friday 25th July,
to confirm your booking. The above prices are plus VAT and will be shown as such on the official receipt.
This priority booking form to be posted to Sustainable Ireland at the above address, or faxed to 028 9268 8866.
SI Awards 2014 4pgs.indd 50
03/06/2014 10:26
CIWM GOLF DAY
GOLF DAY
Player names
53
Player names
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST CIWM Golf.indd 53
02/06/2014 12:24
SUSTAINEX
in association with
MAXIMISING SAVINGS FOR YOUR BUSINESS
SustainEx 2014 – the comprehensive
exhibition and workshop programme
for Northern Ireland businesses
seeking improved operating costs
and resource efficiency - took place
in the La Mon in April. Sustainable
Ireland magazine worked tirelessly in
association with Invest NI to bring
under one roof key exhibitors from
the energy efficiency management,
waste resources, renewables
and new technology sectors.
During the two-day event, the leading local
industrial players in these rapidly growing
areas exhibited and demonstrated the
latest technologies.
This free event offered unrivalled
opportunities to connect decision-makers,
visitors and exhibitors, courtesy of an
extensive seminar programme with high
profile speakers and panel discussions. It
was an informative, interactive, enjoyable
two days however SustainEx is changing
direction next year so watch this space if
you are interested in making your business
more environmentally friendly, efficient and
profitable.
“It’s vital that the latest technologies
and techniques in resource efficiency
are showcased and demonstrated,” said
Sustainable Ireland General Manager Golda
Burrows, “And the all new SustainEx will do
that and more next year.”
Among the major contributors were Ian
Garner from waste-reduction champions
WRAP, Arup’s Diane Emerson, an expert in
the methods and strategies of sustainable
construction, Richard Robinson (McLaughlin
& Harvey), who has expertise in climate
change and biodiversity, and Invest NI’s
Ciaran O’Reilly, who shared his inimitable
knowledge of RHIs (Renewable Heat
Initiatives) and ROCs (Renewable Obligation
Certificates).
A packed programme, introduced by
well-known entertainer and mentalist David
Meade included workshops on resource
efficiency cost savings, and taking action on
food and packaging waste, within the local
hospitality business, energy efficiency within
the food processing sector, sustainable
construction performance improvement
and delivering change in the retail grocery
supply chain.
FloGas exhib
itors
Element Cons
ultants
53
Olive Hill, Invest NI; David Meade;
Golda Burrows and Fiona Walker, Invest NI
les
Future Renewab
Mabbett
One of the many seminars at SustainEx
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
SustainEx 2pgs.indd 53
03/06/2014 12:54
By Mark H. Durkan, Minister of environMent
from thedesk of:
KIDS LEAD WAY IN
LOOKING AFTER
ENVIRONMENT
For us to sustain
our environment,
we must engage our
young people at a
very early age.
Eco-Schools does that.
Eco-Schools is the world’s
largest environmental education
programme operating in 58
countries and involving over
14,000,000 school pupils, more
than 800,000 teachers and 45,000
schools. In Northern Ireland it
is operated by Keep Northern
Ireland Beautiful and funded by
DOE and Airtricity. There are
currently 1,151 registered EcoSchools (as at 1 May 2014), 96% of
the 1,201 schools.
This
pupil-led
initiative
combines learning and action
to
create
schools
where
environmental awareness and
action is intrinsic to the ethos. It
involves students, teachers, nonteaching staff and parents, as well
as the council, media and local
businesses. Eco-Schools extends
learning beyond the classroom
and develops responsible attitudes
and commitment. Incremental
progress through the Eco-Schools
programme is recognised by
self-assessed bronze and silver
awards prior to the externally
assessed Green Flag Award. The
Green Flag is then reviewed every
two years, based on ISO14001/
EMAS continuous improvement
methodologies.
The Eco-Schools programme
has seven elements, including the
formation of an Eco-Committee to
coordinate all activities. Work starts
with an environmental review,
leads to forming an action plan
and in time to the development
of an Eco-Code for the school.
The
Eco-Committee
involves
pupils, staff and members of the
local community. Schools must
address three of the following
ten environmental topics to gain
Green Flag (usually as one major
and two minor topics):
• Biodiversity
• School Grounds
Mark H. Durkan, Minister of Enviroment with pupils that are part of the Eco-Schools programme
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Healthy Living
Litter
Waste
Water
Energy
Transport
Climate Change and
Global Perspectives.
So how does this play out
at school level? Fairview Primary
School, Ballyclare is just one
example of what children are
achieving across the North. The
school, which was awarded its
second Green Flag last year,
is supported by an innovative
partnership with ISL Waste
Management and Newtownabbey
Borough Council. ISL now takes
all the waste, with the exception of
food waste which the Council has
continued collecting. In December 2012, a school
bin audit showed that only 22% of
waste went into recycling bins. By
March 2013, the work of committed
waste watchers at the school
resulted in the recycling figure
more than trebling to 74% and
by September 2013 NONE of the
school’s rubbish is taken to landfill.
Fairview’s Eco Committee
led school assemblies and visited
classrooms
to
explain
how
everyone could play their part. The
younger classes in the school had
a high percentage of items that
could be recycled in the general
waste bin so the Eco Committee
took special care to stick picture
labels on the recycling bins to help
them know what to put in which
bin.
A record of recycling quantities
was kept and food caddies and
bags for recycling were provided
by the council for each classroom.
General waste bins have been
removed from all classrooms.
Waste paper products were
used to design posters and empty
plastic bottles were used to create
bird feeders for the garden. Pupils
have been constantly stimulated to
think about their waste and how it
could best be reduced, reused or
recycled.
They
have
a
recycled
greenhouse made from plastic
drinks bottles in which they grow
flowers for hanging baskets from
seed to sell to parents. A willow
tunnel leads you to the wildflower
meadow and outdoor classroom.
In one corner the children took
great delight in showing me their
large vegetable garden. What
most impresses is the knowledge
that the young “Eco-Warriors”
demonstrate.
55
The children showed me
the audits they had completed
analysing the methods of transport
the children have to get to school,
all clearly graphed. The school has
taken part in the RSPB’s Big Bird
Watch and the children are able
to recognise different birds. They
had looked at what fruit every child
liked and have planted an orchard
of native fruit trees.
The environment is fully
integrated into their curriculum
and the children are out even in
winter looking after their school,
collecting litter and preparing
the various beds and containers
for growing. The ELF (Energy
Lookout Force) is always alert to
ensure lights, computers and other
electrical items are switched off
when not in use.
It is very inspirational and
also very re-assuring that our
young people take such effective
action to sustain our environment.
I congratulate all schools who
participate in Eco-Schools and
make an impassioned plea for the
small number who don’t, to sign
up.
There is much we can learn
from our young people.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND voL 9 issue 2 2014
ENV Mark Durkan Column 1pg.indd 55
02/06/2014 12:27
in profile: mabbett
LOCAL
KNOWLEDGE AND
GLOBAL EXPERTISE
IS A WINNING
COMBINATION
FOR MABBETT
Mabbett, the renowned environment, health and safety consultants and
engineers, have completed their move to new premises in Belfast.
56
They haven’t however, finished
expanding their business.
Having established a strong
foothold in the United Kingdom
- the workforce is now 32-strong
- Mabbett are looking to new
horizons.
Clients with addresses in
Germany,
France,
Denmark
and
Norway
are
already
benefiting from the company’s
professionalism and technical
expertise, and Dubai could well
be the next port of call.
Managing director Derek
J. McNab says Mabbett is
considering opening an office
in the United Arab Emirates and
tapping into the potential of the
area.
But at the moment, he’s
looking a little closer to home,
with the Republic of Ireland in the
company’s sights for 2015.
It will help that Mabbett’s
Northern Ireland operation is
now based at their new premises
at Adelaide House in Belfast’s
Boucher Road area.
“We actually moved in at the
start of the year but now we’ve got
the place exactly the way we want
it,” said Derek, whose employees
were previously housed at the
Northern Ireland Science Park.
“There are better facilities
and less travel-to-work time; that
has upped the morale and that
could only be a good thing.”
Morale at Mabbett is already
high; why wouldn’t it be, with the
company revealing that, over the
last six years since establishing
permanent residence in Northern
Ireland, they have grown their
client base and turnover by over
300%.
Key clients emanate from
the commercial, manufacturing
and multi-national sectors, which
local authorities and public
sector bodies have also turned
to Mabbett for guidance. Large
or small, there is a chorus of
approval for the results achieved
by the company.
Established in 1996, this
full-service
environmental
consultancy’s modus operandi
is simple and effective: to focus
on enabling their clients to meet
their business objectives by
delivering tangible improvements
to their resource efficiency,
environmental
performance,
legislative compliance status and
profitability.
It’s no surprise that so much
of the firm’s work is from repeat
clients.
“Since the recession hit - and
we’ve all been affected by it companies have had to cut costs
such as energy and water bills,”
said Derek.
(L-R) Growth in numbers and in
opportunity – the NI office opening
on Friday 11 April 2014, Derek J.
McNab, Managing Director, Andrew
Lee, Director of Engineering, Suzanne
Lindsay, Marketing and Business
Development, Geraldine Boylan, Director
of Environment, Health & Safety,
Robert Duncan, Senior Environmental
Consultant, Gareth Williamson, Northern
Ireland Chamber of Commerce
Membership Manager
(non-Mabbett staff member)
“When you bring in a
company like Mabbett there may
be short-term pain - but there’s
long term financial gain and
tangible environmental benefits.”
Mabbett services - you can get
the full list on their comprehensive
website - include building
services engineering consulting
and design, carbon management,
energy auditing and consulting,
contaminated land management,
environmental compliance and
permitting, environmental health
and safety management systems,
environmental
monitoring,
environment pollution control
systems consulting and design,
industrial hygiene and noise
assessments, on-site technical
professional services and resource
efficiency and waste minimisation
audits
and
implementation
support.
“With such a wide range of
services, it’s important to have
the right people on board,” said
Derek, who cited Robert Duncan
from the Belfast operation as a
good example of this.
(L-R) Mabbett’s local Northern Irish core
team in their new office, Philip Harshaw,
Environmental Engineer, Suzanne
Lindsay, Marketing and Business
Development, Robert Duncan, Senior
Environmental Consultant,
Connor McGimpsey, Environmental,
Health & Safety Consultant
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 56
02/06/2014 14:54
“Rob’s a people person,
a strong leader and good
technically as well,” he added.
Technical knowhow, combined
with a local presence, is clearly a
winning formula for Mabbett.
As Derek told guests at
the opening of the Adelaide
House premises: “the new office
is part of our existing growth
strategy, which has the potential
of creating additional high value
and internationally, therefore I’m
delighted to help open Mabbett’s
new offices in Belfast and wish
them every success in their
growth plans.”
If the Mabbett name sounds
familiar, that’s because they’re a
sister company to the US-based
Mabbett and Associates, Inc.
founded by Arthur N. Mabbett
in 1980 and which, over the past
30 years, has become a major,
award-winning force in the fields
of environmental auditing and
permitting,
industrial
waste
management, site assessment and
restoration, pollution prevention,
environmental pollution control,
and occupational safety and
health.
The UK company has access
to this expertise and knowhow;
you’re dealing with a company
that has both local knowledge
and global reach.
We’ll leave the last word
to Derek: “As we continue to
work with clients to provide
independent advice, consulting
and engineering design to enable
reduced energy, water and waste,
we are delighted to be investing
even more into Northern Ireland
- with 100% of cost savings made
from
implemented
projects
staying with our clients.”
in profile: mabbett
career opportunities in Northern
Ireland by the end of 2014 as we
gear up to serve the Republic of
Ireland.”
This wouldn’t be Mabbett’s
first venture across the border;
as Derek pointed out, they have
worked with the Sustainable
Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI)
in the past.
The time, however, is now
right for the company to expand
into the south.
“It’s the obvious next step;
for a start, many of our existing
clients have premises in the
Republic,” said Derek, who
added that Mabbett’s new Belfast
office was part of the company’s
growth strategy.
Gareth
Williamson,
Membership Manager at the
Northern Ireland Chamber of
Commerce,
who
performed
the official opening ceremony
in April, told guests: “Mabbett
are evidence of what can be
achieved even during a recession
by investing locally in Northern
Ireland.
“We are delighted this NI
Chamber member has grown
their business by 300% and look
forward to even brighter times
ahead.
“A key part of NI Chamber’s
role is to enable members to
grow their businesses locally
57
Want to See a Difference?
You will with Mabbett.
Our engineers, scientists and health and safety professionals can
assist you to become compliant with EHS legislation, help you reduce
your energy, water and waste costs, and implement good practice
to become leaders in your sector.
· Energy, Water & Waste
· Engineered Solutions
· Environment
· Health & Safety
· Integrated Management Systems & ISO Standards
· Training
Find out how Mabbett can help you See a Difference
in your business. Call Senior Environmental Consultant
Robert Duncan on +44 (0)28 9038 7047 or email
[email protected]
See Mabbett.
See a Difference.
PERSISTENCE | INTEGRITY | PASSION | SUSTAINABILITY
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 57
02/06/2014 14:54
GREEN BIZ CONFERENCE
SMALL CHANGES CAN
BRING BIG SAVINGS
AT GREEN BIZ 2014
Would you like to save your business money? Boost
profits? Win new customers? AND motivate your
staff to save you money too? What if we said by
doing all this you can also green your business
and enhance the profile of your business?
Almost sounds too good to be true
but that’s exactly what this year’s
Green Biz Conference 2014 will
help you to do!
The one-day Conference and
exhibition will be an excellent
opportunity to hear about and
physically see the sort of solutions
that can help your business make a
real difference to your bottom line
while greening your organisation at
the same time.
The event will also encompass
a Green Award Ceremony in
the afternoon so if you feel your
business deserves recognition for
the work it has been doing put
yourselves forward for a Green Biz
award.
Green Biz has been organised
by the STEM Project (Sustainable
Together through Environment
Management) which is part
financed by the European Union’s
INTERREG IVA Cross Border
Programme managed by the
Special EU Programmes Body.
58
NI Environment Minister Mark
H Durkan has given his support
to the event and will open the
Conference.
Ex-Apprentice and Regional
Director of Groupon Jim Eastwood
will be the host for the day
and deliver a presentation on
motivating your staff to save you
money and UTV’s Jamie Delargy will
do a business brief, others speakers
on the day include leading Solicitor
Firm Cleaver Fulton Rankin and
Dundalk Stadium.
Commenting
on
his
involvement, Jamie stated “As
someone who has always been
convinced that going green is not
just essential for safeguarding
the world, but also provides a
rich source of opportunities for
business, I am very pleased to be
playing my part in the Green Biz
conference.”
The STEM Project, is an EU
funded project offering practical on
site help and support to businesses
Jamie Delargy
to identify savings in their energy,
waste and water bills. Now in its
final year of funding, STEM are
encouraging businesses to seize
the opportunity to avail of the
practical help and support available
including assistance to implement
an Environmental Management
System and up to 50% payment
towards the first year audit costs.
“Not only have we extended
the services of the STEM Project
to make it available to businesses
from other Council areas that were
originally not eligible to apply but
we are also offering assistance
for industry based environmental
standards such as the NVIR-OCERT standard for the construction
industry. However with the Project
due to conclude next year, any
business interested in availing of
the support are urged to sign up
now to start saving and networking
and enjoy the rewards this will
bring sooner rather than later.”
Commented Project Manager Anne
Jim Eastwood
Mason. STEM have organised a
number of high profile best practice
visits including a resource efficiency
visit to the Coca Cola Plant, a zero
waste visit to the Michelin Plant, a
renewable energy visit to Kingspan
and a rain water harvesting visit
to IKEA. Many more events are
scheduled for 2014/5. A limited
number of places are still available
for interested businesses to sign
up to STEM and consideration is
being given to businesses across all
eligible council areas.
Green Biz 2014 will take place
on 2nd October in the Canal Court,
Newry from 9.00am to 4.30 pm.
The one day event will involve
a conference packed with industry
experts, business case studies,
exhibitors and advice clinics.
To sign up to the FREE event
visit www.stemproject.com/
greenbiz or telephone
0044 28 37 515810
Free Conference
Exhibition
Awards
and Networking Opportunity
Canal Court Hotel, Newry, 2nd October, 9am - 4:30pm
HOSTED BY EX-APPRENTICE AND REGIONAL DIRECTOR
OF GROUPON JIM EASTWOOD AND A BUSINESS BRIEF
BY UTV’S BUSINESS CORRESPONDENT JAMIE DELARGY.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Business Case Studies
Industry Experts
Environmental Awards
Exhibition Area
Advice Clinics
Networking
The STEM Project is part financed by the European Union’s INTERREG IVA
Cross Border Programme managed by the Special EU Programmes Body.
2014
Exhibition spaces and sponsorship opportunities available
Book your FREE place at [email protected] or telephone 028 37 515810.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 58
02/06/2014 15:06
The safety and effectiveness of stainless steel hot water cylinders in Northern
Ireland has been challenged after a major research project has linked the
risk of legionella contamination (Legionnaire’s Disease) to their use.
The Centre for Sustainable
Technologies (CST) at the
University of Ulster together
with manufacturing company,
Copper Industries, have analysed
hot water cylinders made from
stainless steel against those made
from copper.
Their research tackles the
‘copper versus stainless steel’
debate which the plumbing
industry has faced since stainless
steel was introduced as a
cheaper alternative to copper in
the mid 90s.
While
copper
cylinder
production is highly regulated,
the report identifies the lack of
such standards and guidelines
for the production of stainless
steel hot water cylinders.
This has led to substandard
production practices and cheap
foreign imports, resulting poor
quality cylinders which are prone
to internal corrosion, being
installed in homes and work
premises.
The report also identifies
how corroded stainless steel
tanks encourage the growth of
legionella bacteria, resulting in
legionnaire’s disease and other
respiratory illnesses which are
potentially lethal to vulnerable
groups.
With an estimated 40%
of properties now relying on
stainless steel tanks, this presents
an obvious risk to householders
and well as hospitals, residential/
nursing
homes
and
the
hospitality sector.
To minimise the risk and
safeguard users, the University
of Ulster and Copper Industries
are calling for the introduction of
British Standard/ EU guidelines
for the manufacture of stainless
steel storage cylinders, bringing
it on equal par with the copper
manufacturing industry.
Mark Anderson from the
University of Ulster said: “The
report has identified the need
for more comprehensive British
Standards,
and
eventually
European Norms, to ensure all
hot water storage cylinders are
manufactured to the highest
possible standard and so that
they can be CE marked in
line with other construction
products.”
INVASIVE WEEDS HAMPER MAJOR
ULSTER ROAD PROJECT
59
Japanese knotweed is now threatening a major road project.
Contractors in Co Antrim have
been hit by an outbreak of
the highly invasive plant while
working on the A8 road dualling
scheme.
They are warning members of
the public not to take any topsoil
away from the site, for fear of
spreading the weed, which can
grow to eight feet or more in a
single season and is capable of
causing serious structural damage
to buildings.
Signs were recently erected
along the route of the A8 between
Ballynure and Larne, warning
people not to trespass on the land
because it is being treated for an
outbreak of Japanese knotweed.
They were also warned not to
take away any material from the
site in case they caused the weed
to spread. It is an offence to plant
or cause Japanese knotweed
to grow in the wild in Northern
Ireland.
It has been estimated that
invasive species are costing
the Northern Ireland economy
£46.5m a year.
A
spokesman
for
the
Department
for
Regional
Development said it was not
an uncommon issue for road
schemes, but there have been
no reported incidents of people
taking topsoil from this site.
“The contractor has taken
steps to ensure that the Japanese
knotweed is contained within the
areas that it currently exists,” he
said.
Meanwhile,
Helicopter
drones are being used to detect
alien invasive plants colonising
local riverbanks.
It’s part of a drive led by
Queen’s University Belfast to
clean up waterways in Ireland
and Scotland threatened by
invasive species, with the hope
of restoring millions of pounds in
lost tourism revenue.
Covering 21 river catchment
areas in Ireland and Scotland,
the initiative, called CIRB, is the
largest of its kind in Europe and
is aimed at clearing aggressive,
non-native weeds such as giant
hogweed from riverbanks.
Using the latest technology
-- including four helicopter
drones
equipped
to
take
aerial photography -- CIRB has
eradicated 70% of Japanese
knotweed,
Himalayan
balsam, giant hogweed and
rhododendron since 2010.
environment neWs
HIDDEN HEALTH RISKS
IN HOT WATER TANKS
This call for action is endorsed
by Charlie Shivers, Managing
Director of Copper Industries:
“Industry standards apply to
all manufacturing processes,
but the lack of appropriate
guidelines for stainless steel
cylinder production is a cause for
genuine concern.
“The risk of legionella
bacteria contamination and its
impact on vulnerable groups
is well known. We would
call for the introduction of
legislation equivalent to British
or EU Standards to enable best
practice, informed decisionmaking, and fairness all-round.”
The report also highlights
the wider environmental benefits
and energy cost efficiencies
associated
with
copper
cylinders. While the findings are
of particular benefit to plumbers,
architects and developers they
are also directly relevant to the
general public who need to be
best informed regarding their
property and their health.
The full report is available on
www.copperindustries.co.uk/rd
Japanese Knotweed, Rahans Lough, Co. Louth, before treatment
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 59
02/06/2014 11:00
flood maps
RIVERS AGENCY
RELEASES
SOPHISTICATED
NEW FLOOD MAPS
Over 23,000 properties in Northern Ireland do not have proper protection from
flooding, according to sophisticated maps just released by the Rivers Agency.
60
The new interactive maps, now
available online, contain the
most detailed information ever
published with regard to flood
risk in the province.
They will enable every
business and homeowner in
Northern Ireland – where cleanup costs from a flooding event
are now averaging £20,000 a time
– to assess the level of risk to their
individual properties.
The interactive maps – a
mandatory requirement under
the EU Floods Directive - are the
product of detailed analysis of 69
areas of Northern Ireland.
Properties in coastal and river
basin areas are, naturally, at most
risk, but many urban areas ramain
vulnerable to flash flooding.
“The events that we’ve had
over the past 10 years show that
it’s predominantly the east of the
province that is most vulnerable,”
said David Porter, Director of
Development for the Rivers
Agency.
“In particular, places like
Antrim, south Belfast and East
Belfast have been subject to
repeated flooding.
“East Belfast flooded about
three times in the last six years,
while August 2008 brought as big
and as widespread an event that
anyone can remember.
He added: “Our biggest
concern would be Belfast purely
because of the density of housing,
the type and nature of economic
activity, the rail and road network
links and the negative impact
that that would have in financial
terms.”
Two years ago a Red Cross
report, which focused on people
living in flooding hotspots across
greater Belfast, concluded that
flooding can have a devastating
impact on people’s lives, with
some taking weeks, months or
even years to recover.
“Research shows that it’s in
and around £20,000 average if
your property floods.” said Mr
Porter.
“That’s taking into account
everything; you have to sleep in
a hotel or B & B for a few nights,
dry your property, rip up floors,
replace things...”
The new flood maps add a
significant level of information to
the Strategic Flood Maps which
were first published in 2008,
which provided an indication of
the general areas throughout
Northern Ireland that may be
prone to flooding from rivers and
the sea.
An update in 2011 included
surface
water
flooding
information, but the new maps
provide considerable more detail
on flood risk areas, including
information on flood depth,
velocity and level.
Mr Porter stressed that,
although the latest maps are
more refined and sophisticated, it
doesn’t mean that more property
owners are at risk or that the risk
of flooding has increased.
But he added: “Now there
is information that people
don’t have to search for and
pay for; a professional will be
able to interpret it for them so
it’ll cut down the cost of flood
risk assessments. That’s the big
advantage.”
The Rivers Agency’s next step
is to encourage communities
to engage with them and other
government organisations and
councils to develop local plans
to deal with the flood risk in
their areas. The protection plan,
however, begins with property
owners themselves.
“You need to maintain your
own property,” said Mr Porter.
“People in an area that’s at
risk must, for instance, keep their
own drains cleared. They need to
understand the risk they face.”
The maps may be useful for
planning new developments, but
were not put together as an aid to
insurance companies.
Northern Ireland has had
several severe flooding incidents
in the last few years, notably the
flash flooding across greater
Belfast (June 2012), widespread
David Porter, Director
of Development for the
Rivers Agency
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 60
03/06/2014 15:04
The UK government is
currently in the throes of
introducing a scheme - called
Flood Re - which will come into
operation next year and will help
reinsure people whose homes are
liable to repeated flooding.
Flood Re will operate as a
not-for-profit reinsurance scheme
managed by the insurance
industry itself. The scheme would
allow insurers to transfer the
INSURANCE pREmIUmS COULd fALL
ShARpLy dUE tO thE REVISEd fLOOd
mApS ANd thE CREAtION Of A
NOt-fOR-pROfIt SChEmE SUppORtEd
by thE bIg COmpANIES
“The levy works out at around
£10.50 per household but this
has already been incorporated
into the cost of insurance policies
so premiums won’t go up
automatically next year. Indeed,
some may actually go down
because the flood risk part of
the household premium will be
capped. “
Two years ago a Red Cross
report, which focused on people
living in flooding hotspots across
greater Belfast, concluded that
flooding can have a devastating
impact on people’s lives, with
some taking years to recover.
“Research shows that it’s in
and around £20,000 average if
your property floods,” said Mr
Porter.
“That’s taking into account
everything; sleeping in a hotel or
B&B for a few nights, ripping up
floors, replacing things...”
Northern Ireland’s updated maps provide a more comprehensive
picture of 69 areas that are likely to flood, allowing business and
householders to see the risks they may face during flood events.
Insurers
could
theoretically
use the information to assess a
property’s likelihood of being
flooded and increase premiums
but,
conversely,
properties
previously considered at risk
could see the cost of their policies
fall significantly.
Premium prices could also
drop due to the new so-called
‘Flood Re’ fund– as agreed by
the Association of British Insurers
(ABI) and the UK Government – to
guarantee that flood insurance
remains affordable and available
to homeowners at high flood risk.
Official figures from the
Rivers Agency show that 46,000
properties here are at risk of
flooding from rivers and the sea,
with some currently benefiting
from flood alleviation measures
such as flood walls, culverts or
coastal sea defences.
However, 23,000 of those have
no protection in place, according
to the Agency’s director of
development David Porter.
“That’s one in 21 properties
here compared to one in six and
England and Wales, so our risk
is significantly lower,” Mr Porter
said.
But the ABI’s Malcolm
Tarling pointed to “several
premium they receive for the
flood risk part of home insurance
policies to Flood Re - and, in
return, Flood Re would reimburse
insurers for flood claims that they
pay to their customers.
The levy would be around
£10.50 for each UK household
with both buildings and contents
insurance in place, and will
be used, alongside Flood
Re’s premium income, to buy
reinsurance, pay claims, and fund
the running of the scheme.
That aside, the Rivers
Agency says that flood risk is
not necessarily something that
should put someone off buying a
property.
“Lots of people, for instance,
live beside the Thames because
it’s a very pleasant place,” said Mr
Porter.
You can view the new maps at
http://www.dardni.gov.uk/rivers
flood maps
flooding across eastern and
western regions (October 2011),
protracted flooding over 40 days
in Co Fermanagh (November
2009), street and out-of-sewer
flooding in Belfast (August 2009)
and of course the epic deluge
of August 2008, when the M2
motorway had to be closed.
Indeed, since 2007 some
4,500 properties have suffered
flood damage in Northern Ireland
– and around 500 of them were
subjected to repeat flooding.
Some £60m of public money
is currently being spent every year
protecting local property against
flooding.
Insurers,
however,
could
theoretically use the information
to reassess a property’s likelihood
of being flooded and increase
premiums. Conversely, properties
previously considered at risk
could see their premiums fall.
61
NORTHERN
IRELAND’S 20
SIGNIFICANT FLOOD
RISK AREAS (SFRAS)
well-publicised flooding events
in Northern Ireland” recently,
warning there was no room for
complacency.
“The one in 21 figure refers
to properties of known flood risk,
but don’t forget flash flooding is
much more prevalent now,” he
said.
“You don’t have to live near
a river or the coast to be at risk
of flooding. Flash floods are a
danger where you get a month’s
or a week’s rain falling in the space
of 24 hours – and that happens.”
“In
Northern
Ireland,
severe flooding is becoming
more commonplace and we’re
concerned that, without some
form of agreement, a sizeable
number of properties could
find themselves uninsurable for
flooding. Obviously that could
have severe implications for their
security because it could put their
mortgage at risk.”
Mr Tarling said this is the
reason why the new Flood Re
scheme, which is due to become
operational next year, has been
established.
“Insurers will be able to
to transfer the premium they
receive for the flood risk part
of home insurance policies to
Flood Re – and, in return, Flood
Re will reimburse insurers for
flood claims that they pay to their
customers,” he said.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Belfast Newtownards Carrickfergus Bangor Newcastle Newtownabbey Downpatrick Dundonald Newry Portadown
Warrenpoint
Banbridge
Lurgan
Glengormley & Mallusk
Antrim
Ballymena
Coleraine
Londonderry
Omagh
Strabane
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 61
03/06/2014 15:04
ENviroNmENt NEWs
QUIET BIRTHDAY
FOR PLASTIC BAG TAX
The plastic bag tax in Northern Ireland is now just over one year old, yet for many of
us it’s already getting hard to remember what things were like when it wasn’t in force.
For instance, on a recent short
trip to Glasgow, a Northern
Ireland man got momentarily
confused when NOT asked by a
shop assistant if he required any
bags... at 5p a time.
Scotland and others are
ultimately likely to follow the
lead of Northern Ireland,
because there’s little doubt that
this legislation, controversial as
it was at the time, has been an
unqualified success.
Indeed, it’s one of those
times when the folk on the hill at
Stormont got collectively behind
an idea that will continue to
improve life in Northern Ireland.
Excess packaging has been a
major problem is this part of the
world for years and will continue
to be so in the future. The plastic
bag levy is a welcome step in
the right direction, but it’s only
a small step so celebrating its
first ‘birthday’ might have been
a little bit over the top.
We live in an age of
rampant consumerism and mass
consumption, in a world where it
still seems easier to throw things
62
SLR is one of Ireland’s leading
environmental consultancies
Offices in Africa, Australasia, Europe and North America.
• access & highways studies
• planning & permitting
• air quality assessments
• quarry planning & design
• archaeology
• resource assessments
• civil & structural engineering
• restoration/afteruse schemes
• ecological surveys
• review of NI mineral permissions (ROMPS)
• environmental impact assessment
• substitute consents required
• extractive waste management plans
by the planning & development
• geology & geotechnical assessment
(amendment) act 2010
• hydrology & hydrogeology
• topographic surveys
• landscape & visual assessments
• valuation & business rates advice
• masterplanning/strategic planning
• waste management strategy
• noise & vibration assessments
• wind energy & hydro power
Belfast Office
T: +44 (0)2892 689 036
Contact Peter O’Connor
[email protected]
Dublin Office
T: +353 (0)1 296 4667
Contact Tim Paul
[email protected]
out than repair or recycle them.
As a consequence, effective
waste management is more
important than ever.
It is encouraging, though,
to see how Northern Ireland has
embraced the bag levy without
too much grumbling.
Remember the days when
shoppers were handed plastic
bags as a matter of course, even
if they were purchasing only the
smallest of items.
And what happens when
you get something for nothing...
well, you treat it like nothing.
It’s expendable, and we throw it
away.
And so many plastic bags
were swiftly discarded, ultimately
ending up in landfill.
It’s too early, of course, to
assess just how effective or
successful the plastic bag levy
has been, but it’s clear that
usage has been dramatically
slashed.
Now,
the
European
Parliament has voted in a draft
law aimed at halving the use of
plastic bags across the continent
by 2017, and further reducing
them by at least 80% by 2019.
This positive move is aimed
at curbing the use of very thin
plastic bags of less than 50
microns (0.05mm), which most
often end up as flyblown litter in
trees.
So, rather than being out a
limb itself, Northern Ireland has
turned out to be a trailblazer.
NET-FINITY
SUPPORTING
SCHOOLS BY
SWAPPING...
Leading Northern Ireland
online company NetFinity has launched a
new digital initiative
which is being adopted by
schools across Northern
Ireland to help reduce
waste and offer parents
the chance to recycle
and swap unused school
uniforms and equipment.
The
School
Swap
Shop
programme which is housed on
jookit.com has been launched
in partnership with Eco Schools
and is being supported by the
Department of Environment.
Pictured
launching
the
initiative
with
Environment
Minister Mark H Durkan are St Ita’s
Primary School children Charlie
Cooley and Rhiana Wojciejzak.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 62
03/06/2014 15:04
A local company is celebrating - presumably with water
- after getting the nod to provide a rainwater harvesting
system for global electronics giant Apple.
Rain Harvesting Ireland (RHI),
who are based in Coleraine will
facilitate the expansion of Apple’s
operation in Cork.
The
company
currently
supplies its systems to private
and public sector clients in
Britain, the Republic and
Northern Ireland, including a
rainwater harvesting system for
the restrooms at Titanic Belfast.
“This is an immensely
significant and encouraging
contract for us because it
represents a terrific endorsement
by one of the world’s biggest
technology
corporations,”
said RHI’s managing director
Jonathan Coyle, who added
that the deal was a “terrific
endorsement” for the company.
“I believe we secured
the business because of our
passion for delivering bespoke
systems to clients based on our
experience and expertise in
developing cost-effective and
cutting-edge solutions.
“The solutions we offer are
backed by our commitment to
providing market-leading service
and after-sales support.
“This contract with Apple will
be extremely important to our
developing export marketing
activities in the Republic and
other parts of the world,” he
added.
Mr Coyle also paid tribute
to the assistance offered by
Invest NI to help secure the deal.
It provided £18,686 towards
research and |development costs
of £26,915.
“Invest NI’s guidance and
practical assistance have been
critically important to the
development of the business
and our recent and successful
move into export markets.”
Des Gartland, Invest NI’s
North West regional office
manager, said: “We have worked
closely with this progressive
NORTHERN IRELAND’S
BEACHES ARE DIRTIEST
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
The latest Marine Conservation Survey (MCS) has revealed
that local beaches are the dirtiest in the United Kingdom.
Northern Ireland’s coastline has
the highest litter density, with
7,028 items per kilometre of
shoreline uncovered in a survey
last September.
This represents a drop,
however of 14% from 2012,
when there were 8,224 items per
kilometre.
Surveys
for
the
new
Beachwatch report were carried
out by volunteers at Brown’s Bay,
the Floodgates at Strangford
Lough, Loughshore Park beach,
Mill Quarter Bay, Millisle Lagoon
Beach,
Murlough
National
Nature Reserve and Newcastle.
The MCS said its volunteers
picked up more litter than ever
across the UK last year, finding
an average of 2,309 items for
every kilometre that was cleaned
and surveyed -- the highest
level in the 20-year history of
Beachwatch.
A total of 223,405 bits of litter
were bagged up and removed
by volunteers as part of the
Beachwatch Big Weekend 2013.
“This is a disgusting tide
of litter which is threatening
the safety of beach visitors,
both human and animal,” MCS
Beachwatch
officer
Lauren
Eyles said.
“It’s coming in from the
sea, being blown from the land
or simply being dumped and
dropped.
“After
20
years
of
campaigning it’s disheartening
that in 2013 we are seeing worse
litter levels than ever.”
The bulk of the litter (39.4%)
was dumped by the public -either dropped at the beach or
carried in by wind or in rivers.
“Fishing debris accounted
for 12.6% of the litter, while 4.5%
came from shipping.
The group said 4.3% was
sewage related debris, including
cotton bud sticks, tampons and
nappies, and 0.9% was fly-tipped
rubbish.
Medical waste such as
inhalers and syringes accounted
environment neWs
LOCAL RAIN
HARVESTING
COMPANY GETS
A BITE OUT OF
APPLE’S BUSINESS
and ambitious company in the
development of its impressive
technology, particularly in the
conservation and recycling of
rain water, a rapidly developing
market opportunity.
“The company is now
marketing its know-how and
technology very professionally
in export markets and is
beginning to see success from
its commitment to sales outside
Northern Ireland,” he added.
RNI’s systems at the Titanic
Belfast building filter rain
collected from its 3000 square
metre rooftop.
The water is then used to
|service the premises’ many
toilets used by thousands
of people daily, resulting in
“significant” savings.
The harvested rainwater is
used to replace mains water for
toilet flushing within the building
but in rare times of low or no
rainfall, the system automatically
changes over to mains water
supply, before reverting back
when rain resumes.
RHI has received a range
of Invest NI assistance in the
development and marketing
of its technology and products
including an innovation voucher,
R&D support, part-funded by the
European Regional Development
Fund, technical and design
support in the development of
the new system, and assistance
for export marketing.
63
to 0.2% of litter and 38.1% of the
litter couldn’t be identified.
“As well as half a TV, a
French bullet-proof vest and a
pack of bacon, there was a brass
candlestick, some plastic bird
feet, a birdcage, a bath plug, half
a canoe and a set of dentures,”
Lauren Eyles said.
Top of the finds was once
again plastic pieces.
These are tiny bits of plastic
that have broken off larger items
or have been in the sea for
possibly decades and become
smaller and smaller.
“Plastic is a real issue for our
oceans and beaches.
“This year we also picked up
lots of lids and caps.
“However, despite it being a
really warm summer, we saw less
crisp, sweets and lolly wrappers,
and fewer plastic bottles.
“There’s continued good
news though for sewage-related
debris (SRD) -- there’s still less of
it about after we asked people,
in 2011, to stop flushing things
down the loo that should go in
the bin,” Lauren said.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
ENV News.indd 63
02/06/2014 11:01
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ENVA NORTHERN IRELAND LTD
www.envani.com
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
www.
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
RECYCLING SYSTEMS
ENVA NORTHERN IRELAND LTD
www.envani.com
TRANSPORTATION OF LEACHATE
ROAD SAFETY CONTRACTS
www.roadsafetycontracts.com
WASTE MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
ENVA NORTHERN IRELAND LTD
www.envani.com
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
SEAFORDE
METALS
EST 1920
HIGHLANDER
INTERNATIONAL RECYCLING
www.highlanderinternational.com
ULSTER SHREDDERS
www.ulstershredders.com
ROAD MARKING
SMILEY MONROE
www.smileymonroe.com
ISL WASTE MANAGEMENT
www.islwastemanagement.co.uk
ROAD SAFETY CONTRACTS
www.roadsafetycontracts.com
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
SEAFORDE METALS
www.seafordemetals.com
ULSTER SHREDDERS
www.ulstershredders.com
OIL SPILL RESPONSE
ENVA NORTHERN IRELAND LTD
www.envani.com
PACKAGING
SEAFORDE
METALS
EST 1920
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
SEPTIC TANKS
REGEN WASTE LTD
www.regenwaste.com
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
REGEN WASTE LTD
www.regenwaste.com
WRIGHT RECYCLING
www.wrightrecycling.com
SHRED-IT NORTHERN IRELAND
www.shredit.co.uk
PAPER RECYCLING
McCLOY CONSULTING LTD
www.mccloyconsulting.com
SKIPS & SKIPLOADERS
Waste Management
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
McKINSTRY SKIP HIRE
www.mckinstryskiphire.co.uk
WEEE RECYCLING
ENVA NORTHERN IRELAND LTD
www.envani.com
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
REGEN WASTE LTD
www.regenwaste.com
www.
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
WRIGHT RECYCLING
www.wrightrecycling.com
SHRED-IT NORTHERN IRELAND
www.shredit.co.uk
SLUDGE TANKERING
SMILEY MONROE
www.smileymonroe.com
ROAD SAFETY CONTRACTS
www.roadsafetycontracts.com
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
SORTING /SEPARATION
R E C Y C L I N G
PLASTERBOARD
McKINSTRY SKIP HIRE
www.mckinstryskiphire.co.uk
PLASTICS RECYCLING
Waste Management
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
Water Engineering Solutions
WEED CONTROL
MT WASTE MANAGEMENT
& MANUFACTURING LTD
www.mt-waste.com
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
McCloy Consulting
ROAD SAFETY CONTRACTS
www.roadsafetycontracts.com
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
R E C Y C L I N G
WATER QUALITY MONITORING
ULSTER SHREDDERS
www.ulstershredders.com
HIGHLANDER
INTERNATIONAL RECYCLING
www.highlanderinternational.com
65
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
SHREDDERS
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
McKINSTRY SKIP HIRE
www.mckinstryskiphire.co.uk
SCREENS
ROAD SAFETY CONTRACTS
www.roadsafetycontracts.com
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
Waste Management
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
SCRAP METAL BUYERS
MOBILE SHREDDERS
Water Engineering Solutions
SWEEPER / GULLY WASTE RECYCLING
TANK CLEANING & DECOMMISSIONING
HEYN WASTE SOLUTIONS
www.heynwaste.co.uk
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
McCloy Consulting
RECON WASTE MANAGEMENT
www.reconwastemanagement.com
RDF / SRF
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
ISL WASTE MANAGEMENT
www.islwastemanagement.co.uk
SUDS
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
WRIGHT RECYCLING
www.wrightrecycling.com
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
HEYN WASTE SOLUTIONS
www.heynwaste.co.uk
ISL WASTE MANAGEMENT
www.islwastemanagement.co.uk
McQUILLAN COMPANIES
www.mcquillancompanies.com
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
MATERIALS HANDLING
SEAFORDE METALS
www.seafordemetals.com
STREET CLEANING
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
DIRECTORY
MAGNETIC SEPARATION
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
SEAFORDE METALS
www.seafordemetals.com
SEAFORDE
METALS
EST 1920
SMILEY MONROE
www.smileymonroe.com
R E C Y C L I N G
WOOD RECYCLING
KMH SYSTEMS LTD
www.kmhsys.com
McATEE RECYCLING LTD
www.mcateerecycling.com
McKINSTRY SKIP HIRE
www.mckinstryskiphire.co.uk
RECON WASTE MANAGEMENT
www.reconwastemanagement.com
NWP RECYCLING
www.nwp-recycle.com
REGEN WASTE LTD
www.regenwaste.com
RIVERRIDGE RECYCLING
www.riverridgerecycling.com
SMILEY MONROE
www.smileymonroe.com
WASTEBEATER RECYCLING
www.wastebeater.com
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
Online Product Directory.indd 65
30/05/2014 16:08
SUSTAINABILITY CORNER
SUSTAINABILITY
CORNERLIAM M EVOY
WITH
C
CONSULTANT
SUSTAINOS
face to face with
SUZANNE
HILL
HANDEL EXPORT
SUSTAINABILITY
YOUR PASSPORT TO
GLOBAL MARKETS
66
Having worked with organisations across a range of industry sectors helping
them increase their quality, environmental and sustainability performance,
I have seen the environmental, economic and commercial benefits for
those companies that embrace a more sustainable approach to business.
Interested to learn more about the
role sustainability is playing in NI and
ROI businesses exporting abroad, I
met with Northern Ireland’s leading
International Business Accelerator,
Suzanne Hill to get her perspective
on the topic. Suzanne owns a
company called Handel Export that
works with businesses throughout
the UK and Ireland helping them
to accelerate their market entry
and sales in new markets across the
globe.
Does sustainability feature high
on your clients’ corporate agendas
when they are targeting new export
markets?
There is a mixed picture
which is often dependent on the
industry sector the company is in,
or who their target customers are.
I also see two different types of
company. Firstly those who view
sustainability as a compliance issue,
where initiatives are implemented
reactively. This leads to an absence
of momentum and a failure to
harness the competitive advantage
this could bring. Secondly there are
those who view sustainability as a
business driver and have put it at
the centre of this business model.
They use sustainability as a point of
differentiation and harness this to
give them a competitive edge.
How can sustainability and
sustainable business models help
NI and ROI businesses compete
abroad?
We often focus on the
environmental
aspects
of
sustainability, with economic and
social elements viewed as more
secondary. However the economic
and social aspects become even
more important in an international
context. Companies who have
sustainability at the core of
their company tend to be more
economically and financially resilient
as they have thought through
risk mitigation and corporate
governance which take on an added
dimension once you start trading
outside your domestic market. In
order to be successful at exporting
you need to be able to resource
the venture financially. Exporting
is not an inexpensive process,
and there can be a long business
development cycle before your
company actually makes any sales.
Economic sustainability therefore
gains even more importance.
Companies who are strong
at community engagement as
part of their sustainability strategy
demonstrate a key skill that is often
overlooked in export ventures – the
ability to really engage with your
customers and understand their
needs and requirements. This is a
vital skill in export markets, not to
treat every market as the same and
to understand the impact of cultural
nuances on your business. This is
critical in the success of an overseas
venture.
Are there any particular export
markets where you have seen a
particular growth with regards
client sustainability requirements
from NI and / or ROI businesses?
Sustainability, smart cities,
intelligent
buildings,
resource
efficiency are all global issues and
so every market offers opportunities
of some description. However,
each market is at a different stage
on the sustainability journey. This
is where thorough market research
is essential to make sure that you
are targeting the optimum market
for your products or services and
matching your level of technology
or expertise to a market where
you can have the fastest return on
investment.
For companies in NI and ROI
looking at exporting for the first
time, GB is the first obvious market.
After this, other European markets
will often be the most logical to
target given that much of the
environmental legislation is EU
driven.
Organizations like The Carbon
Trust have demonstrated the
potential for expert know-how and
the demand in overseas markets.
They have just opened an office
in Mexico to advise the Mexican
Government on energy efficiency,
carbon reduction and finance
programmes for 150,000 SMEs
across the country. The Carbon
Trust also has offices in China, USA
and South Africa. In addition, many
architectural firms from the UK are
winning work in the Middle East and
Brazil off the back of the Olympic
Games in London which were seen
as the most sustainable games to
date. This expertise has become
widely sought after as international
best practice. The BRE has also
made significant progress in getting
their BREEAM standard accepted
by China as their sustainability norm.
This opens up great opportunities
for many UK and Irish construction
firms and their supply chains looking
outwards.
Is there a particular sector you
work with that has embraced
sustainability and see it as a tool to
grow their business?
Sectors that have embraced
sustainability are retail, built
environment and of course clean
tech, as it is integral to their
business.
How important do you think
sustainability is to those NI / ROI
businesses looking to export their
products and services abroad and
what advice can you offer?
Sustainability
is
a
very
important factor in making a
success of an export venture. The
proactive adoption of sustainable
business practices means that
companies display many of the key
skills required to make exporting
really work for them economically.
Developing new markets and
building export business requires
many factors such as good research,
a competitive advantage, adequate
resources and an understanding of
cultural nuances and determination.
There
are
many
local
companies who have innovative
products, services and expertise in
sustainability that would be highly
sought after by overseas customers.
Exporting is therefore an excellent
way for them to expand their
business.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
Sustainability Corner 1pg.indd 66
30/05/2014 16:06
by StEphEn DUffy, ManagIng DIrEctOr Of hIghLanDEr IntErnatIOnaL rEcycLIng
While the paper market has
been on a steady course the last
couple of months, with prices,
supply and demand at good
equilibrium, this has provided
welcome respite to recyclers as
they juggle other problems. It was
announced in April that one of
the largest Insurance underwriters
has decided to withdraw from the
waste sector, with well lamented
factor behind that decision being
the number of fires within the last
two years. To give ideas of the
scale of the problem, according
to the Environment Agency there
were 595 fire related incidents at
private waste companies in the
period from 2012 - 13. This equates
to a, incident at an average of one
in every 18 privately owned waste
companies. The problem is now
so prominent that it prompted
a question in Parliament to the
DEFRA minister and some of the
fires have made national headlines
and cost millions of pounds. Given
the limited number of underwriters
now covering the waste industry
coupled with the obvious increase
in fire risk, insurance premiums for
waste companies have increased
dramatically - so much so that
insurance charges are in some
cases now higher than building
rates and rents / mortgages
combined! Where there is an
anomaly however, is the “clumping
together” of all types of operators
as being in the waste industry.
Without having the exact figures
to hand, anecdotal evidence
would suggest that certain types
MONTH
of waste operators would be
more susceptible to fires than
others - with all operators being
treated the same there seems to
be an imbalance in liability where
relatively low risk companies such
as single material recyclers are
being tarred with the same brush
as multi-material processors / RDF
producers. The challenge for all
waste operators now, is to shift the
paradigm from being an industry
insurers don’t want to touch with
a barge pole to being an industry
that underwriters want to engage
with and ultimately, offer premiums
that allow waste companies
to operate competitively and
profitably.
On a final note, the recovered
paper recycling “bible” EN643
has been reviewed, which now
re-defines the various grades and
standards of recovered paper
(now known as “paper and board
for recycling”) that paper mills and
processors look to buy. This is in
response to the various changes
in the recovered paper market
since the original document was
produced over 10 years ago. The
main items that all suppliers must
be aware of are the definition
of “prohibited materials” being
items that must NOT be placed
in any recovered paper bales and
is stated as “any materials which
represent a hazard for health,
safety and environment, such as
medical waste, contaminated
products of personal hygiene,
hazardous waste, organic waste
including foodstuffs, bitumen,
toxic powders and similar.” Unlike
unwanted materials which now
have a maximum percentage
tolerance level in place, prohibited
materials are not permitted within
any loads and the guidance states
that such offending loads should
be returned to the suppliers
accordingly.
The definition of Unwanted
material now states “material
not suitable for the production
of paper and board” and may
comprise elements such as, nonpaper components, paper and
board not according to grade
definition, paper and board
detrimental to production and
paper not suitable for deinking
(if applicable). In the case of deinking grades such as news and
pams / over issue news / multi –
grade, all paper containing brown,
unbleached fibres are considered
detrimental to production
A major change in the new EN
643 is the introduction of maximum
tolerance levels for non-paper
components and for unwanted
materials (combined maximum of
1.5% for the majority of grades),
with the measurement of these
maximum tolerance levels to be
performed by an agreed method
of sampling and testing. This is
something that directly affects all
recyclers and now gives a defined
target to aim for, which is perfectly
aligned with the Chinese target at
the same level of 1.5%. Where a
discrepancy exists in the tolerance
levels however and which needs to
be addressed urgently is the lack
of alignment with TFS legislation
which allows for 0% contamination
– this anomaly means that
potentially a buyer would be
happy with 1.5% unwanted level,
a seller would be happy with 1.5%
unwanted level, but the deal could
be scuppered (or worse) as the
relevant authorities in between,
enforce legislation at what is
effectively zero margin for error
and from reports on the ground in
Scotland, sometimes they enforce
this rather zealously!
The issue of material shredding
has also been highlighted as an
issue which can be detrimental to
paper quality and with the growth
in security shredding systems,
concern exists more so in the
tissue sector where most office /
confidential type papers are now
destined for final consumption
into products such as toilet paper.
It is now estimated that over 75%
of Sorted office waste received
by tissue mills is now shredded
-EN643 now recommends that
shredding sizes are to be “as large
as possible where practicable”, as
shred sizes that are too small are
very difficult to recycle. Finally and
being not too uncontroversial, EN
643 continues to state that “paper
sorted from refuse collections is
not suitable for use in the paper
industry.”
For the full review document,
you can log into the Highlander
International Recycling website,
market updates section.
SepT ‘13
OcT ‘13
NOv ‘13
Dec ‘13
curreNcy
LOw-HiGH
LOw-HiGH
LOw
LOw
LOw
HiGH
LOw
HiGH
90/10 OCC
STr
£72-£78
£67-£73
£65-£71
£65-£71
£66
£70
£58
£60
Mixed Paper
STr
£15-£20
£15-£20
£15-£20
£15-£20
£15
£20
£15
£18
Sorted Office
Waste
STr
£92-£97
£92-£97
£90-£95
£90-£95
£93
£98
£98
£103
News and Pams
STr
£60-£65
£58-£63
£58-£63
£58-£63
£58
£63
£55
£61
Over issue news
STr
£91-£95
£88-£92
£88-£92
£88-£92
£87
£91
£85
£90
paper GraDe
curreNcy
LOw-HiGH
LOw-HiGH
LOw
LOw
LOw
HiGH
LOw
HiGH
90/10 OCC
eurO
€86-€93
€79-€86
€78-€85
€78-€85
€80
€85
€71
€73
Mixed Paper
eurO
€18 -€24
€18-€23
€18 -€24
€18 -€24
€18
€24
€18
€22
Sorted Office
Waste
eurO
€109 -€115
€108-€114
€107 -€113
€107 -€113
€113
€119
€119
€126
News and Pams
eurO
€71 -€77
€68-€74
€69 -€75
€69 -€75
€70
€76
€67
€74
Over issue news
eurO
€108 -€113
€103-€108
€105 -€110
€105 -€110
€106
€110
€104
€110
paper GraDe
Caveats to price index:
Prices based on full loads of minimum 25 tons average
payload. Prices quoted are all on an ex works basis, from
major cities in Ireland. Prices provided are a guide only
and do not form any offer or contract from the companies
providing the prices.
Prices based on materials meeting Highlander quality
specifications available at www.highlanderinternational.co.uk
Material of a higher / or poorer quality may attract higher
or lower prices respectively. Prices are based on an average
JaN ‘13
paper price index
MARkET STABILITy SUITS ALL, whILE
REcycLERS coNTEND wITh BIggER ISSUES
67
apr ‘14
figure factoring local purchase prices and average mill sales
prices. Prices for material collected in cities further from main
sea ports, will incur higher transport costs ergo lower prices.
SUSTAINABLE IRELAND VOL 9 ISSUE 2 2014
WST Paper Index 1pg.indd 67
30/05/2014 14:08
Shredders
you can trust.
We have over 30 years experience manufacturing
industrial shredders. So, whether it’s for a SME or
a nationwide recycling organisation, we can design
and deliver a shredder that’s perfectly adapted
to your working environment.
Cogry Works, 65 Creagh Rd,
Castledawson, Magherafelt. BT45 8EW
T +44 (0) 28 7965 0050
E [email protected]
ulstershredders.com
Ulster Shredders 'You can trust' fp ad.indd 1
29/05/2014 10:27