OFFICIAL STATEMENT

OFFICIAL STATEMENT
NEW ISSUE–Book–Entry–Only
Ratings: Fitch “A”
S&P “A+”
KBRA “AA-”
(See “RATINGS” herein)
The delivery of the Bonds is subject to the opinions of Co–Bond Counsel to the effect that, assuming compliance with
certain covenants and based on certain representations, interest on the Bonds is excludable from gross income for federal
income tax purposes under existing law, except as explained under “TAX MATTERS–Opinions on Bonds.” See “TAX
MATTERS” herein for a discussion of the opinions of Co–Bond Counsel, including a description of alternative minimum tax
consequences for corporations.
Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas
$124,285,000
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds
Series 2014C
(Non-AMT)
Dated Date: June 1, 2014
Due: November 1, as shown on the inside cover
Interest Accrues: Date of Initial Delivery
The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds, Series 2014C (Non-AMT) (the
“Bonds”) are issued jointly by the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas (the “Cities”) for the purpose of (1) financing certain
improvements and additions to the Airport, (2) funding capitalized interest, (3) making a deposit to the Debt Service Reserve
Fund, and (4) paying the costs associated with the issuance of the Bonds. The Bonds constitute “Additional Obligations”
under the Master Bond Ordinance described herein and are limited obligations of the Cities payable solely from and
secured by a pledge of Pledged Revenues and Pledged Funds (as defined in the Master Bond Ordinance) derived from the
ownership and operation of the Airport. For a description of the security for the Bonds, see “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS”
herein. Potential investors should carefully consider the investment considerations described herein. See “CERTAIN
INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS.”
The Bonds are subject to redemption prior to maturity as described herein.
Interest will accrue on the Bonds from their date of initial delivery, and will be payable November 1 and May 1 of each
year commencing November 1, 2014, until maturity or prior redemption. The Bonds are initially issuable only to Cede & Co., the
nominee of The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) pursuant to the Book Entry Only System described herein. Beneficial
ownership may be acquired in denominations of $5,000 or integral multiples thereof within a maturity. No physical delivery of
Bonds will be made to the purchasers. Principal of and interest on the Bonds will be payable by The Bank of New York Mellon
Trust Company, N.A., as Paying Agent/Registrar, to DTC, which will make distribution of the amounts so paid to the beneficial
owners thereof. See “THE BONDS–Book Entry Only System” herein.
_______________
See the inside cover page for maturities, principal amounts, interest rates, and prices or yields.
________________
The Bonds are offered when, as, and if issued by the Cities and accepted by the Underwriters, subject to prior sale,
withdrawal or modification of the offer without notice, the approval of legality by the Attorney General of the State of Texas, and
by Bracewell & Giuliani LLP, Dallas, Texas, McCall, Parkhurst & Horton L.L.P., Dallas, Texas and Newby Davis, PLLC, Fort
Worth, Texas, Co–Bond Counsel, and certain other conditions. Certain legal matters will be passed upon for the Underwriters by
Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP, Fort Worth, Texas and Mahomes Bolden PC, Dallas, Texas. It is expected that delivery of the
Bonds in book–entry form will be made through the facilities of DTC in New York, New York, on or about July 15, 2014.
Morgan Stanley
Siebert Brandford Shank & Co., L.L.C.
Dated: June 25, 2014
J.P. Morgan
MATURITY SCHEDULE
$124,285,000
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds
Series 2014C
(Non-AMT)
Maturity
(November 1)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2030
2031
2032
2033
2034
Amount
$2,220,000
2,340,000
2,445,000
2,570,000
2,700,000
2,815,000
2,970,000
3,115,000
3,280,000
3,435,000
3,605,000
3,790,000
3,985,000
4,180,000
4,385,000
4,585,000
4,835,000
Interest Rate
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
5.000%
Price
115.857
117.136
118.046
118.623
118.783
118.880
117.442(2)
115.586(2)
114.195(2)
113.250(2)
112.654(2)
111.977(2)
111.221(2)
110.637(2)
109.892(2)
109.399(2)
108.990(2)
Initial
Yield
Cusip No.(1)
1.200%
1.610%
1.940%
2.220%
2.480%
2.690%
2.850%
3.060%
3.220%
3.330%
3.400%
3.480%
3.570%
3.640%
3.730%
3.790%
3.840%
235036 Z86
235036 Z94
235036 2A7
235036 2B5
235036 2C3
235036 2D1
235036 2E9
235036 2F6
235036 2G4
235036 2H2
235036 2J8
235036 2K5
235036 2L3
235036 2M1
235036 2N9
235036 2P4
235036 2Q2
$50,510,000 4.125% Term Bond due November 1, 2039, Yield 4.240%, Price 98.220, CUSIP No. 235036 2R0
$16,520,000 5.000% Term Bond due November 1, 2045, Yield 4.060%, Price 107.211, CUSIP No. 235036 2S8
(Interest to accrue from Date of Initial Delivery)
(1)
CUSIP is a registered trademark of the American Bankers Association. CUSIP data herein is provided by CUSIP Global
Services, managed by Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC on behalf of The American Bankers Association. This data
is not intended to create a database and does not serve in any way as a substitute for the CUSIP Services. The Underwriters,
the Cities and the Co-Financial Advisors are not responsible for the selection or correctness of the CUSIP numbers set forth
herein.
(2)
Priced to the first optional redemption date, November 1, 2023.
THE BONDS HAVE NOT BEEN REGISTERED UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, AS AMENDED,
IN RELIANCE UPON EXEMPTIONS CONTAINED IN SUCH ACT. THE REGISTRATION OR QUALIFICATION OF
THE BONDS IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPLICABLE PROVISIONS OF SECURITIES LAW OF THE STATES IN
WHICH THE BONDS HAVE BEEN REGISTERED OR QUALIFIED AND THE EXEMPTION FROM REGISTRATION
OR QUALIFICATION IN OTHER STATES CANNOT BE REGARDED AS A RECOMMENDATION THEREOF. THE
BONDS HAVE NOT BEEN RECOMMENDED BY ANY FEDERAL OR STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION OR
REGULATORY AUTHORITY. FURTHERMORE, THE FOREGOING AUTHORITIES HAVE NOT CONFIRMED THE
ACCURACY OR DETERMINED THE ADEQUACY OF THIS OFFICIAL STATEMENT. ANY REPRESENTATION
TO THE CONTRARY MAY BE A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
The information and expressions of opinion contained herein are subject to change without notice and neither the
delivery of this Official Statement nor any sale made hereunder shall, under any circumstances, create any implication that
there has been no change in the affairs of the Cities or the Board or the other matters described herein since the date hereof.
See “CONTINUING DISCLOSURE” for a description of the Cities’ undertaking to provide certain information on a
continuing basis.
This Official Statement includes descriptions and summaries of certain events, matters and documents. Such
descriptions and summaries do not purport to be complete and all such descriptions, summaries and references thereto are
qualified in their entirety by reference to this Official Statement in its entirety and to each such document, copies of which
may be obtained from the Board. Any statements made in this Official Statement or the appendices hereto involving matters
of opinion or estimates, whether or not so expressly stated, are set forth as such and not as representations of fact, and no
representation is made that any of such opinions or estimates will be realized.
References contained in this Official Statement to the DFW website are for informational purposes, and neither the
website nor the information contained on such website shall be deemed incorporated herein by reference.
The Underwriters have provided the following sentence for inclusion in this Official Statement: The Underwriters
have reviewed the information in this Official Statement in accordance with their respective responsibilities to investors
under the federal securities laws, but the Underwriters do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information.
This Official Statement is delivered in connection with the sale of securities referred to herein and may not be
reproduced or used, in whole or in part, for any other purposes. This Official Statement does not constitute an offer to sell or
the solicitation of an offer to buy nor shall there be any sale of the Bonds in any jurisdiction in which it is unlawful to make
such offer, solicitation, or sale. No dealer, salesperson, or other person has been authorized by the Cities or the Board to give
any information or to make any representation other than those contained herein, and, if given or made, such other
information or representation must not be relied upon as having been authorized by the Cities, the Board, the Underwriters, or
any other person. The information and expressions of opinion herein are subject to change without notice, and neither the
delivery of this Official Statement nor any sale made hereunder shall, under any circumstances, create any implication that
there has been no change in the matters described herein since the date hereof.
The prices and other terms respecting the offering and sale of the Bonds may be changed from time to time by the
Underwriters after such Bonds are released for sale, and the Bonds may be offered and sold at prices other than the initial
offering prices, including to dealers who may sell the Bonds into investment accounts.
None of the Cities, the Board or the Underwriters makes any representation as to the accuracy, completeness, or
adequacy of the information supplied by The Depository Trust Company for use in this Official Statement.
THIS OFFICIAL STATEMENT CONTAINS “FORWARD–LOOKING” STATEMENTS WITHIN THE
MEANING OF SECTION 21E OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, AS AMENDED. SUCH
STATEMENTS MAY INVOLVE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN RISKS, UNCERTAINTIES AND OTHER FACTORS
WHICH MAY CAUSE THE ACTUAL RESULTS, PERFORMANCE AND ACHIEVEMENTS TO BE DIFFERENT
FROM FUTURE RESULTS, PERFORMANCE AND ACHIEVEMENTS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED BY SUCH
FORWARD–LOOKING STATEMENTS. INVESTORS ARE CAUTIONED THAT THE ACTUAL RESULTS COULD
DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE SET FORTH IN THE FORWARD–LOOKING STATEMENTS.
IN CONNECTION WITH THIS OFFERING, THE UNDERWRITERS MAY OVER–ALLOT OR EFFECT
TRANSACTIONS WHICH STABILIZE OR MAINTAIN THE MARKET PRICES OF THE BONDS AT A LEVEL
ABOVE THAT WHICH MIGHT OTHERWISE PREVAIL IN THE OPEN MARKET. SUCH STABILIZING, IF
COMMENCED, MAY BE DISCONTINUED AT ANY TIME.
-i-
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................ 1
PURPOSE AND PLAN OF FINANCING ................................................................................................... 1
SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS ............................................................................................................ 2
THE BONDS ................................................................................................................................................ 2
Interest Payments ............................................................................................................................. 2
Optional Redemption ....................................................................................................................... 2
Mandatory Redemption ................................................................................................................... 2
Notice of Redemption ...................................................................................................................... 3
Book Entry Only System ................................................................................................................. 4
Paying Agent/Registrar .................................................................................................................... 4
Record Date for Interest Payment .................................................................................................... 4
Transfer, Exchange and Registration ............................................................................................... 4
SECURITY FOR THE BONDS ................................................................................................................... 5
Authority .......................................................................................................................................... 5
Pledge............................................................................................................................................... 5
Funds and Flow of Funds................................................................................................................. 6
Reserves Established for Outstanding Obligations ........................................................................ 11
Rate Covenant ................................................................................................................................ 12
Additional Indebtedness................................................................................................................. 12
Investment of Funds....................................................................................................................... 14
Agreements with Airlines .............................................................................................................. 16
Matters Relating to Enforceability ................................................................................................. 16
PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES ....................................................................................................... 17
OUTSTANDING OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER AIRPORT RELATED DEBT.................................... 18
Outstanding Obligations ................................................................................................................ 18
Subordinate Lien Obligations ........................................................................................................ 18
Special Revenue Bonds.................................................................................................................. 19
Special Facilities Bonds ................................................................................................................. 19
Facility Improvement Corporation Indebtedness ........................................................................... 19
Other Indebtedness......................................................................................................................... 19
THE AIRPORT ........................................................................................................................................... 20
General ........................................................................................................................................... 20
The Board ...................................................................................................................................... 22
Airport Management ...................................................................................................................... 22
The Airport’s Leadership System .................................................................................................. 25
The Airport’s Strategic Plan .......................................................................................................... 25
OPERATIONAL INFORMATION ............................................................................................................ 28
Aircraft Operations ........................................................................................................................ 28
Air Service, Destinations and Frequencies .................................................................................... 29
Enplaned Passengers ...................................................................................................................... 30
Landed Weights ............................................................................................................................. 32
RATE SETTING AND FINANCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS........................................ 32
Controlling Documents and Budgetary and Rate Setting Processes .............................................. 32
Airline Use Agreement Rate Model .............................................................................................. 33
Average Landing Fees and Terminal Rental Rates ........................................................................ 37
Airline Cost and Passenger Airline Cost Per Enplanement (CPE) ................................................ 38
-ii-
DFW Cost Center Net Revenues ................................................................................................... 39
NON-AIRLINE BUSINESS UNITS INFORMATION ............................................................................. 40
Parking ........................................................................................................................................... 40
Terminal Concessions .................................................................................................................... 42
Rental Cars ..................................................................................................................................... 43
Commercial Development ............................................................................................................. 44
Natural Gas .................................................................................................................................... 45
Public Facility Improvement Corporation ..................................................................................... 46
CAPITAL PROJECTS................................................................................................................................ 47
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP).................................................................. 47
Airport Improvement Program (Other Projects, Excluding TRIP) ................................................ 50
CASH AND DEBT FINANCING .............................................................................................................. 51
Unrestricted and Restricted Cash and Investment Balances .......................................................... 51
Joint Revenue Bond Debt Service Requirement ............................................................................ 52
Debt Service Coverage .................................................................................................................. 54
RETIREMENT PLANS AND RISK MANAGEMENT ............................................................................ 55
Retirement Plans–Defined Benefit Plan ........................................................................................ 55
Defined Contribution Plan ............................................................................................................. 59
Other Post-Employment Benefits .................................................................................................. 59
Risk Management and Insurance ................................................................................................... 59
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS – FINANCIAL OPERATIONS .......................... 61
Revenues, Expenses, and Change in Net Assets ............................................................................ 61
Operating Revenues ....................................................................................................................... 62
Operating Expenses ....................................................................................................................... 65
Non-Operating Revenues and Expenses ........................................................................................ 66
Capital Contributions ..................................................................................................................... 67
Net Assets ...................................................................................................................................... 68
Liquidity and Financing ................................................................................................................. 68
THE AIRLINES.......................................................................................................................................... 69
AIRLINE AGREEMENTS ......................................................................................................................... 70
FEDERAL REGULATIONS REGARDING RATES AND CHARGES DISPUTES ............................... 72
FEDERAL GRANTS–IN–AID .................................................................................................................. 72
THE CONTRACT AND AGREEMENT ................................................................................................... 73
REPORT OF THE AIRPORT CONSULTANT ......................................................................................... 73
CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS ..................................................................................... 74
General ........................................................................................................................................... 74
American Airlines’ Dominance at Airport (Bankruptcy and Merger) ........................................... 75
Competition ................................................................................................................................... 76
Passenger Facility Charges ............................................................................................................ 78
Airline Industry .............................................................................................................................. 78
Effect of Bankruptcy on Use Agreements ..................................................................................... 80
Regulations and Restrictions Affecting the Airport ....................................................................... 81
Airport Disruption Due to Construction ........................................................................................ 81
Limitations on Remedies ............................................................................................................... 81
LITIGATION .............................................................................................................................................. 82
Litigation and Regulatory Claims .................................................................................................. 82
RATINGS ................................................................................................................................................... 82
TAX MATTERS ......................................................................................................................................... 82
Opinions on Bonds......................................................................................................................... 82
Additional Federal Income Tax Considerations for the Bonds ...................................................... 83
-iii-
AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS ................................................................................................. 85
LEGAL COUNSEL .................................................................................................................................... 85
CO–FINANCIAL ADVISORS .................................................................................................................. 86
UNDERWRITING ..................................................................................................................................... 86
REGISTRATION AND QUALIFICATION OF THE BONDS FOR SALE ............................................. 87
CONTINUING DISCLOSURE .................................................................................................................. 87
Annual Reports .............................................................................................................................. 87
Disclosure Event Notices ............................................................................................................... 88
Availability of Information from the MSRB ................................................................................. 88
Limitations and Amendments ........................................................................................................ 89
Compliance with Prior Undertakings............................................................................................. 89
Miscellaneous ................................................................................................................................ 89
FORWARD–LOOKING STATEMENTS ................................................................................................. 90
GENERAL INFORMATION ..................................................................................................................... 90
MISCELLANEOUS ................................................................................................................................... 91
Form of Opinions of Co–Bond Counsel ......................................................................................Appendix A
Summary of Certain Provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance.................................................. Appendix B
Financial Statements .................................................................................................................... Appendix C
DTC Information .........................................................................................................................Appendix D
Report of Airport Consultant ....................................................................................................... Appendix E
-iv-
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
P.O. Drawer 619428
DFW Airport, Texas 75261-9428
(972) 973-8888
AIRPORT BOARD
APPOINTED BY:
Fort Worth
Dallas
Fort Worth
Dallas
Fort Worth
Dallas
Fort Worth
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Dallas
Irving
Lillie M. Biggins, Chair
Sam Coats, Vice Chair
Francisco Hernandez, Secretary
Mayor Michael S. Rawlings, City of Dallas
Mayor Betsy Price, City of Fort Worth
William Tsao
William Meadows
Curtis Ransom
Regina Montoya
Forrest Smith
Bernice J. Washington
Mayor Beth Van Duyne, City of Irving*
*Non–voting member
AIRPORT STAFF
Sean P. Donohue
Christopher A. Poinsatte
James A. Crites
Linda Valdez Thompson
Kenneth Buchanan
Andy Bell
Jeff Benvegnu
Robert Horton
Alan Black
Zenola Campbell
Armin Cruz
Thomas Dallam
Robert R. Darby
Norma Essary
William L. Flowers, Jr.
Rusty Hodapp
Tamela J. Lee
Paul Martinez
Sharon McCloskey
Luis Perez
Michael Phemister
Mary Jo Polidore
Elaine Flud Rodriguez
Perfecto Solis
Greg Spoon
John Terrell
Byford Treanor
Max Underwood
Chief Executive Officer
Executive Vice President–Chief Financial Officer
Executive Vice President–Operations
Executive Vice President–Administration and Diversity
Executive Vice President–Revenue Management
Vice President–Planning
Vice President–Aviation Real Estate
Vice President–Environmental Affairs
Director–Public Safety
Vice President–Concessions
Vice President–Parking Business Unit
Vice President–Human Resources
Director of Audit Services
Vice President–Risk Management
Vice President–Information Technology Services
Vice President–Energy & Transportation Management
Vice President–Business Diversity and Development
Vice President–Operations
Vice President–Marketing Services
Vice President–Air Service Development
Vice President–Treasury Management
Vice President–Public Affairs
General Counsel
Vice President–Airport Development & Engineering
Vice President–Procurement & Materials Management
Vice President–Commercial Development
Vice President–Customer Service
Vice President–Finance
CO–BOND COUNSEL
CO–FINANCIAL ADVISORS
Bracewell & Giuliani LLP
McCall, Parkhurst & Horton L.L.P.
Newby Davis PLLC
First Southwest Company
Estrada Hinojosa & Company, Inc.
For Information Contact:
Michael Phemister
Vice President–Treasury Management
(972) 973-5447
-v-
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BOARD
relating to
Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas
$124,285,000
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds
Series 2014C
(Non-AMT)
INTRODUCTION
The purpose of this Official Statement, including the cover page and the Appendices hereto, of
the DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BOARD (the “Board”) is to furnish
information with respect to $124,285,000 aggregate principal amount of Dallas/Fort Worth International
Airport Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds, Series 2014C (Non-AMT) (the “Bonds”) being issued jointly
by the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas (the “Cities”). The Bonds are limited obligations of the
Cities and are payable solely from and secured solely by a pledge of Pledged Revenues and Pledged
Funds derived from the ownership and operation of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (“DFW”
or “Airport”). The Bonds are Additional Obligations under the Master Bond Ordinance adopted by the
Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth on September 22, 2010 and September 21, 2010, respectively. Upon the
issuance of the Bonds, $6,322,190,000 in aggregate principal amount of Obligations will be Outstanding
pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance. Capitalized terms used herein not otherwise defined shall have
the meanings assigned to them in the Master Bond Ordinance. See APPENDIX B – “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE” for a summary of certain terms
applicable to the Bonds. For the Report of Airport Consultant related to the Bonds see APPENDIX E –
“REPORT OF AIRPORT CONSULTANT.”
As noted under “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS” herein, the Master Bond Ordinance allows for
the issuance of Additional Obligations on a parity with the Bonds and the other Outstanding Obligations
and any Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and also allows for the issuance of Subordinate Lien
Obligations, Special Revenue Bonds, Net Revenue Obligations and Special Facility Bonds subject to
meeting certain tests, if any, under the Master Bond Ordinance. The Airport Consultant will provide a
letter to the Board stating that the test for issuing Additional Obligations has been met in connection with
the issuance of the Bonds. A Report of Airport Consultant may be required to issue Additional
Obligations in the future, as described in APPENDIX B – “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS
OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness–Additional Obligations.”
Prospective purchasers of the Bonds are urged to carefully review “CERTAIN
INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS.” The Airport’s ability to generate Pledged Revenues in an
amount sufficient to pay debt service on the Bonds depends upon sufficient levels of aviation
activity and passenger traffic at the Airport.
PURPOSE AND PLAN OF FINANCING
The Bonds are being issued under the provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance, as supplemented
and amended by the Fiftieth Supplemental Concurrent Bond Ordinance and the Officer’s Pricing
Certificate authorized therein (together, the “Fiftieth Supplement”) for the purpose of (1) financing certain
improvements and additions to the Airport, (2) funding capitalized interest, (3) making a deposit to the
Debt Service Reserve Fund, and (4) paying the costs associated with the issuance of the Bonds.
-1-
SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS
The following Table sets forth the estimated application of the proceeds of the Bonds:
Source of Funds
Principal Amount of Bonds
Net Original Issue Premium
Total
Amount
$124,285,000.00
8,029,163.90
$132,314,163.90
Use of Funds
Deposit to Construction Fund
Deposit to Reserve Fund
Capitalized Interest
Underwriters’ Discount
Costs of Issuance
Total
Amount
$ 99,342,633.25
5,641,106.01
26,132,466.25
502,654.91
695,303.48
$132,314,163.90
THE BONDS
Interest Payments
The Bonds will accrue interest from their date of initial delivery, which interest shall be payable
on November 1 and May 1 of each year, commencing November 1, 2014, until maturity or prior
redemption.
Optional Redemption
The Cities reserve the right, at their option, to redeem the Bonds on November 1, 2023, and any
date thereafter, at the principal amount thereof, plus accrued interest, if any, to the date fixed for
redemption, without premium.
If less than all of the Bonds are to be redeemed by the Cities, the Cities shall determine the
maturity or maturities and the amounts thereof to be redeemed and shall direct the Paying Agent/Registrar
to call, by lot, the Bonds, or portions thereof, within such maturity or maturities and in such principal
amounts for redemption.
The Cities may condition any election to redeem Bonds upon the receipt of the proceeds of
refunding obligations on or before the redemption date or upon any other condition specified by the Cities
and provided in the notice of redemption required under the Master Bond Ordinance.
Mandatory Redemption
The Bonds maturing November 1, 2039 and 2045 (the “Term Bonds”), are subject to mandatory
redemption prior to their respective maturities at a price of par plus accrued interest to the redemption
date as follows:
-2-
$50,510,000 4.125% Term Bond Due November 1, 2039
Redemption Date
Amount
November 1, 2035
November 1, 2036
November 1, 2037
November 1, 2038
November 1, 2039*
_____________
*Maturity Date
$ 9,305,000
9,680,000
10,095,000
10,500,000
10,930,000
$16,520,000 5.000% Term Bond Due November 1, 2045
Redemption Date
Amount
November 1, 2040
November 1, 2041
November 1, 2042
November 1, 2043
November 1, 2044
November 1, 2045*
_____________
*Maturity Date
$ 3,320,000
3,195,000
3,350,000
2,110,000
2,220,000
2,325,000
The principal amount of the Term Bond required to be redeemed on any redemption date
pursuant to the mandatory sinking fund redemption provisions shall be reduced, at the option of the Board
on behalf of the Cities, by the principal amount of any Term Bond having the same maturity which, at
least 45 days prior to the mandatory sinking fund redemption date (i) shall have been acquired by the
Board on behalf of the Cities at a price not exceeding the principal amount of such Term Bond plus
accrued interest to the date of purchase thereof, and delivered to the Paying Agent/Registrar for
cancellation, or (ii) shall have been redeemed pursuant to the optional redemption provisions hereof and
not previously credited to a mandatory sinking fund redemption.
Notice of Redemption
Not less than 30 days prior to any redemption date for the Bonds, the Cities shall cause a notice of
redemption to be sent by United States mail, first class, postage prepaid, to each Holder of a Bond to be
redeemed, at the address of the registered owner appearing on the registration books of the Paying
Agent/Registrar at the time such notice of redemption is mailed, which will be Cede & Co. as long as the
Book Entry Only System is in effect. Interest on such Bonds will cease to accrue from and after the
redemption date.
With respect to any optional redemption of Bonds, unless the prerequisites to such redemption
required by the Master Bond Ordinance have been met and moneys sufficient to pay the principal of and
premium, if any, and interest on the Bonds to be redeemed shall have been received by the Paying Agent
prior to the giving of such notice of redemption, such notice shall state that said redemption may, at the
option of the Board, be conditional upon the satisfaction of such prerequisites and any other conditions set
forth in such notice and receipt of such moneys by the Paying Agent on or prior to the date fixed for such
redemption. If a conditional notice of redemption is given and such prerequisites to the redemption and
-3-
sufficient moneys are not received, such notice shall be of no force and effect, the Cities shall not redeem
such Bonds and the Paying Agent shall notice, in the manner in which the notice of redemption was
given, to the effect that the Bonds have not been redeemed.
Book Entry Only System
The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), New York, New York, will act as securities depository
for the Bonds. The Bonds will be issued as fully registered securities registered in the name of Cede &
Co. (DTC’s partnership nominee). One fully registered certificate will be issued for each maturity of the
Bonds in the aggregate principal amount of such maturity, and will be deposited with DTC. For
additional information with respect to DTC see APPENDIX D–”DTC INFORMATION.”
In reading this Official Statement it should be understood that while the Bonds are in the Book
Entry Only System, references in other sections of this Official Statement to registered owners should be
read to include the person for whom the Participant acquires an interest in the Bonds, but (i) all rights of
ownership must be exercised through DTC and the Book Entry Only System, and (ii) except as described
above, notices that are to be given to registered owners under the Master Bond Ordinance will be given
only to DTC.
Paying Agent/Registrar
The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., is the initial Paying Agent/Registrar. In
the Master Bond Ordinance the Cities retain the right to replace the Paying Agent/Registrar. The Cities
covenant to maintain and provide a Paying Agent/Registrar at all times while the Bonds are outstanding,
and any successor Paying Agent/Registrar shall be a bank, trust company, financial institution, or other
entity duly qualified and legally authorized to serve as and perform the duties and services of Paying
Agent/Registrar for the Bonds. Upon any change in the Paying Agent/Registrar for the Bonds, the Cities
agree to promptly cause a written notice thereof to be sent to each registered Owner of the Bonds by the
United States mail, first class, postage prepaid, which notice shall also give the address of the new Paying
Agent/Registrar.
Record Date for Interest Payment
The record date (“Record Date”) for the interest payable on any interest payment date shall be the
15th day of the preceding month. In the event of non–payment of interest on the Bonds on a scheduled
payment date, and for 30 days thereafter, a new record date for such interest payment for such maturity or
maturities (a “Special Record Date”) will be established by the Paying Agent/Registrar, if and when funds
for the payment of such interest have been received from the Board. Notice of the Special Record Date
and of the scheduled payment date of the past due interest (the “Special Payment Date” which shall be 15
days after the Special Record Date) shall be sent at least five business days prior to the Special Record
Date by first class United States mail, postage prepaid, to the address of each registered owner of a Bond
appearing on the books of the Paying Agent/Registrar at the close of business on the last business day
next preceding the date of mailing of such notice.
Transfer, Exchange and Registration
The Bonds may be transferred and exchanged on the registration books of the Paying
Agent/Registrar only upon presentation and surrender thereof to the Paying Agent/Registrar, and such
transfer or exchange shall be without expense or service charge to the Holder, except for any tax or other
governmental charges required to be paid with respect to such registration, exchange and transfer. A
Bond may be assigned by the execution of an assignment form on the Bond or by other instrument of
-4-
transfer and assignment acceptable to the Paying Agent/Registrar. A new Bond or Bonds of the same
maturity will be delivered by the Paying Agent/Registrar, in lieu of the Bond being transferred or
exchanged, at the office of the Paying Agent/Registrar, or sent by first class United States mail, postage
prepaid, to the new registered Holder or his designee. To the extent possible, new Bonds issued in an
exchange or transfer of Bonds will be delivered to the registered Holder or assignee of the Holder in not
more than three business days after the receipt of the Bonds to be canceled, and the written instrument of
transfer or request for exchange duly executed by the Holder or his duly authorized agent, in form
satisfactory to the Paying Agent/Registrar. New Bonds registered and delivered in an exchange or
transfer shall be in any integral multiple of $5,000 for any one maturity and for a like aggregate principal
amount of the same series as the Bond or Bonds surrendered for exchange or transfer. Neither the Cities,
the Board, nor the Paying Agent/Registrar is required to issue, transfer, or exchange any Bond called for
redemption, in whole or in part, where such redemption is scheduled to occur within 45 calendar days
after the transfer or exchange date; provided, however, such limitation is not applicable to an exchange by
the Holder of the uncalled principal of a Bond.
SECURITY FOR THE BONDS
Authority
The Cities, pursuant to a certain Contract and Agreement (the “Contract and Agreement”), dated
and effective as of April 15, 1968, between the Cities, authorized and directed the Board, acting on behalf
of the Cities, to proceed with the development of the Airport. Pursuant to the Contract and Agreement,
on November 11 and 12, 1968, the respective Cities adopted the 1968 Ordinance authorizing the issuance
of Joint Revenue Bonds for financing of the Airport. The 1968 Ordinance was amended by the Thirtieth
Supplement which was adopted by the Cities of Fort Worth and Dallas on February 22 and 23, 2000,
respectively. The 1968 Ordinance and the Thirtieth Supplement were amended and restated by the
Master Bond Ordinance which was adopted by the Cities of Fort Worth and Dallas on September 21,
2010 and September 22, 2010, respectively.
The Bonds are being issued pursuant to the Fiftieth Supplement as Additional Obligations under
the Master Bond Ordinance. The Fiftieth Supplement, adopted by the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth on
February 26 and March 4, 2014, respectively, authorizes the issuance, pursuant to certain parameters set
forth therein, of up to $1.7 billion of Additional Obligations to refund certain Outstanding Obligations
and to finance improvements to the Airport. The Bonds are the second installment of the $1.7 billion
authorization. The Fiftieth Supplement provides for the designation of an “Authorized Officer” to approve
the specific terms of such Additional Bonds within the parameters set forth therein and provides that such
Additional Bonds are to be issued in multiple series within 12 months of such authorization.
Additionally, the Bonds will be issued under provisions of Applicable Law, including Chapter 22 of the
Transportation Code, Chapter 1371 of the Texas Government Code, as amended, and the provisions of the
Master Bond Ordinance.
Pledge
The Bonds are payable solely from and secured by an irrevocable first lien on and pledge of
Pledged Revenues and Pledged Funds on parity with all Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and other
Obligations issued or to be issued under the Master Bond Ordinance.
Pledged Revenues include as Gross Revenues the revenues received by the Airport from the
rentals, fees and charges collected from the Signatory Airlines (as defined herein) and other airlines and
from other non-airline sources. See the subcaption “Agreements with Airlines” below and the caption
-5-
“MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS–FINANCIAL OPERATIONS” herein. For the
definitions of Pledged Revenues, Pledged Funds, Gross Revenues and Special Revenues see
APPENDIX B – “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–
Selected Definitions.”
Funds and Flow of Funds
Funds. The Master Bond Ordinance provides for five funds (the “Funds”), each a part of the
Joint Airport Fund originally created pursuant to the 1968 Ordinance. Each of these Funds is governed
by the terms of the Master Bond Ordinance:
(i)
the Debt Service Fund;
(ii)
the Debt Service Reserve Fund;
(iii)
the Capital Improvements Fund;
(iv)
the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund; and
(v)
the Construction Fund.
The Debt Service Fund and the Debt Service Reserve Fund are special trust funds, to be held by
the Board for the benefit of the Holders of Obligations, the Credit Providers holding Parity Credit
Agreement Obligations, and Persons to whom Administrative Expenses are owed, due and payable. All
funds and accounts created or confirmed in the Master Bond Ordinance and in any Additional
Supplemental Ordinance, and the books and records of account with respect thereto, will be kept and
maintained in such manner as will record on a regular basis all deposits therein and the source thereof,
withdrawals therefrom and the purposes therefor, and the earnings realized with respect thereto. All
moneys on deposit in the special funds described under this caption on the date of delivery of any of the
Bonds will be held therein and thereafter will be maintained, supplemented, invested, and applied as
directed in the Master Bond Ordinance and in Additional Supplemental Ordinances, as applicable.
Flow of Funds. All Gross Revenues, when and as received by the Board, will be promptly
deposited to the credit of the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund.
Unless made more frequent by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the Board will transfer,
only to the extent required, all amounts on deposit in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund monthly
on or before the last Business Day of each month to the following Funds and in the following order of
priority:
(i)
First, to the Debt Service Fund, an amount equal to the lesser of (A) all funds
available for transfer, or (B) an amount equal to the Accrued Aggregate Debt Service for such
monthly period, subject to the provisions under the subcaption “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–
Funds and Flow of Funds–Adjustments in Transfer Requirements”;
(ii)
Second, if and to the extent required by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance
pursuant to which Obligations are issued and/or related Parity Credit Agreements are authorized,
to a special account or accounts, such amount as is necessary to pay any Administrative Expenses
that are due and payable during the succeeding month;
(iii)
Third, to the Debt Service Reserve Fund, the lesser of (A) all funds available for
transfer, or (B) subject to the alternative funding methods permitted under the Master Bond
Ordinance and described herein, up to the amount required to cause the amount on deposit therein
-6-
to be equal to the lesser of (y) the Debt Service Reserve Requirement, or (z) the amount then
required to be on deposit therein, plus any amounts required to restore or replenish any
deficiencies in the Debt Service Reserve Fund so that the amounts required by the Master Bond
Ordinance are on deposit therein when, as, and in the amounts therein required;
(iv)
Fourth, to any other fund or account required by any Additional Supplemental
Ordinance authorizing Obligations and/or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, the amounts
required to be deposited therein; and
(v)
Fifth, to a special account or fund, if any, created by the Cities in an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance, for the purpose of paying the principal and redemption price of, the
interest on, and reserves for Subordinate Lien Obligations, and paying Credit Agreement
Obligations that are declared to be on parity therewith.
Unless otherwise directed by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, during each month, subject
to the requirements as described above under this subcaption, the Board is authorized to expend or set
aside any money on deposit in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund for the following purposes, in
the following order of priority:
(i)
First, expending such money for the purpose of paying the Operation and
Maintenance Expenses of the Board in accordance with the current annual budget of the Board;
and
(ii)
Second, setting aside into a separate account an amount sufficient to pay
Operation and Maintenance Expenses for the ensuing period of ninety (90) days, as estimated by
an Authorized Officer.
Gross Revenues remaining unexpended at the close of business on the last day of each Fiscal
Year, after expending or setting aside the money required for the purposes set forth in the above
paragraphs of this subcaption, will be deposited to the credit of the Capital Improvements Fund for use,
deposit and application as described under the subcaption “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and
Flow of Funds–Capital Improvements Fund”; provided, however, an Authorized Officer may, at such
time, elect to keep all or a portion of such unexpended funds in the Operating Revenue and Expense
Fund.
Notwithstanding the deposits to the Capital Improvements Fund described immediately above, an
Authorized Officer may transfer amounts in the Operating Expense and Revenue Fund to the Capital
Improvements Fund at any time and from time to time to the extent it can be certified by an Authorized
Officer that: (A) the rate covenants described in the second and third paragraphs under the caption
“SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Rate Covenant” have been met to date and (B) there is no information
available that the Board will not satisfy such rate covenants for the remainder of the Fiscal Year.
Notwithstanding the other provisions of this subcaption, Gross Revenues received from or
through the United States of America, the State of Texas, or other sources, the use of which is limited,
will be used as Gross Revenues in compliance with any requirements placed on the use of such funds.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-7-
FLOW OF FUNDS1
OPERATING REVENUE AND EXPENSE FUND
DEBT SERVICE FUND
Pay Debt Service on
Obligations and Parity
Credit Agreement
Obligations
DEBT SERVICE
RESERVE FUND
Transfer PFC
Collections, and other
revenues to pay eligible
Debt Service2
Deposit all Gross Revenues of Airport
Monthly Transfer of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service
for Payment of Senior Lien Obligations
and Parity Credit Agreements
Pay any Administrative Expenses with respect to
Parity Credit Agreements
Available to pay principal
and interest
Transfer to Debt Service Reserve Fund
any amounts needed to meet the
Debt Service Reserve Requirement
DEBT SERVICE FUND
Transfer to any funds or accounts the amounts required
pursuant to any Additional Supplemental Ordinance
Pay Debt Service on
Subordinate Lien
Obligations
Monthly Transfer to Pay Principal and Interest with
Respect to any Subordinate Lien Obligation
Pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses
Set Aside Requirement for 90 Days Operating Reserve
Transfer of Remaining Funds
(Subject to Optional Retention)
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS FUND3
Allocated per
Airline Use Agreement
Joint Capital
Account
DFW Capital
Account
Rolling
Coverage Account
1
This diagram is merely a summary of, and is qualified in all respects by reference to, the provisions contained in the
Master Bond Ordinance. See APPENDIX B - “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE CONTROLLING
ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds.”
2
Although not included as part of Gross Revenues, Passenger Facility Charges and certain payments made by the Public
Facility Improvement Corporation pursuant to agreements made with the Airport to pay debt service on certain previously issued
Obligations are currently committed to pay debt service on the Airport’s Obligations. Upon deposit to the Operating Revenue
and Expense Fund such amounts become a part of the Pledged Funds. See “PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES” and “NONAIRLINE BUSINESS UNITS INFORMATION-Rental Cars” and “-Public Facility Improvement Corporation.”
3
See APPENDIX B - “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Particular
Covenants–Sale of Airport or Facilities.” Currently, such revenues are deposited to the Joint Capital Account. See also
“CAPITAL PROJECTS–Airport Improvement Program (Other Projects).”
Adjustments in Transfer Requirements. The Accrued Aggregate Debt Service required to be
transferred to the Debt Service Fund as described in clause (i) of the second paragraph under the
subcaption “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds” for the
respective monthly period will be reduced by an amount equal to the total of any moneys already on
deposit in the Debt Service Fund and in any account created therein, or on deposit in another Pledged
-8-
Fund, if any, that is created in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and after taking into account
investment earnings actually realized and on deposit therein (inclusive of accrued interest and
amortization of original issue discount or premium), excess deposits made on account of Variable Rate
Obligations and the assumed interest rates thereof and money deposited therein from the proceeds of
Obligations as capitalized interest or otherwise. It is provided, however, that the amounts required to be
transferred will never be reduced to an amount below the amount necessary to pay all amounts then due
and owing on the Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations when due and payable.
Other than termination payments, in the event the counterparty to a Swap Agreement becomes
obligated to make payments to the Board, such amounts will be deposited to the Debt Service Fund.
The Board may at any time increase the amounts of any transfers required under the subcaption
“SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds” from funds on deposit in the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund, or from any other lawfully available moneys, so long as such
transfers do not reduce the amounts required to be transferred to any particular fund or account under the
subcaption “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds.”
Debt Service Fund. The Board will pay, out of the Debt Service Fund, to the respective Paying
Agents for any of the Obligations from time to time Outstanding, or directly to a Credit Provider holding
a Parity Credit Agreement Obligation, as applicable (i) on the date specified in the Outstanding
Ordinances and in any Additional Supplemental Ordinances or Credit Agreements pursuant to which
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations are created, but in no event later than each Interest Payment Date,
the amount (as determined by each Paying Agent or other party designated in each applicable Outstanding
Ordinance and Additional Supplemental Ordinance) required for the payment of interest on the
Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations due on such Interest Payment Date, and (ii) on the
date specified in the Outstanding Ordinances and Additional Supplemental Ordinances or Credit
Agreements pursuant to which Parity Credit Agreement Obligations are created, but in no event later than
the redemption date, the amount required for the payment of accrued interest on Obligations or Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations to be redeemed or paid unless the payment of such accrued interest is
otherwise provided for. Such amounts described in clause (ii) above and paid to Paying Agents will be
held and applied by the Paying Agents solely to pay the amounts due and owing on the Obligations with
respect to which such transfers were made and upon demand for such payment by a proper Holder.
The Board will pay, out of the Debt Service Fund, to the respective Paying Agents, on the dates
specified in the Outstanding Ordinances and each Additional Supplemental Ordinance, but in no event
later than each Principal Payment Date for any of the Obligations from time to time Outstanding or Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations coming due, the amount (as determined by each Paying Agent or other
party designated in each applicable Additional Supplemental Ordinance) required for the payment of any
Principal Installments and any Redemption Price that are due on Obligations, and similar amounts that are
due and payable on Parity Credit Agreement Obligations on such Principal Payment Date and such
amounts paid to Paying Agents or Credit Providers shall be held and applied by the Paying Agents or
Credit Providers as directed in each Outstanding Ordinance and in each Additional Supplemental
Ordinance.
The amount accumulated in the Debt Service Fund for each Sinking Fund Installment may, and if
so directed and authorized by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance shall, be applied prior to a day
preceding the due date of such Sinking Fund Installment, as fixed in the Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, to:
(i)
the purchase of Obligations of the series and maturity for which such Sinking
Fund Installment was established, at prices (including any brokerage and other charges) not
-9-
exceeding the Redemption Price payable from Sinking Fund Installments for such Obligations
when such Obligations are redeemable by application of said installments plus unpaid interest
accrued to the date of purchase, such purchases to be made in such manner as is specified in the
Additional Supplemental Ordinance, or
(ii)
the redemption of Obligations pursuant to the provisions of the applicable
Additional Supplemental Ordinance authorizing such Obligations, if then redeemable by their
terms, at a price not exceeding the Redemption Price.
If a stated Interest Payment Date or a Principal Payment Date, or a date fixed for redemption of
Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, is not a Business Day, then the Interest Payment
Date, Principal Payment Date or redemption date will be deemed to be the next succeeding Business Day
and no interest will accrue between the stated day and the applicable succeeding Business Day.
Capital Improvements Fund. Moneys transferred to the Capital Improvements Fund will be:
(i)
used for any purpose permitted by Applicable Law related to the Airport.
(ii)
Notwithstanding the provision described in (i) immediately above, moneys on
deposit in the Capital Improvements Fund shall be used to prevent a default in the payment of any
Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
Current Disposition of Capital Improvements Fund Amounts. The Airport has entered an
agreement with certain airlines called “Signatory Airlines,” regarding use, operation, and charges of the
Airport. These agreements are collectively referred to herein as “Use Agreements.” The Use Agreements
provide for the creation of three accounts within the Capital Improvements Fund: DFW Capital Account,
Joint Capital Account and Rolling Coverage Account. Funds in the DFW Capital Account may be used
for any lawful purpose related to the Airport to fund costs and projects. The DFW Capital Account will
be funded with amounts deposited in the Capital Improvements Fund related to the DFW Cost Center,
which consists of revenues and expenses allocated to activities other than certain terminal and airfield
revenues and expenses. It will also be funded from interest income earned on the DFW Capital Account,
and amounts representing reimbursable PFCs and grants. For Fiscal Year 2014, amounts to be deposited
into the DFW Capital Account have a lower threshold of $42.9 million and an upper threshold of $64.3
million. Any amount in excess of the $64.3 million upper threshold will be deposited such that 75% of
such excess will be used to offset landing fees in either Fiscal Year 2014 or in the next Fiscal Year. The
balance of all amounts in excess of the upper threshold will be deposited into the DFW Capital Account at
the end of Fiscal Year 2014. At the end of the Fiscal Year, if the actual amount deposited into the DFW
Capital Account is less than $42.9 million, then an incremental landing fee charge will be added in the
following Fiscal Year so that the shortfall is recovered. If the amount of cash unassigned to projects in
the DFW Capital Account exceeds $107.2 million, then 50% of such excess will be used to offset landing
fees for the next succeeding fiscal year and 50% will be deposited into the Joint Capital Account. All
such dollar amounts shall be adjusted annually by the consumer price index. The funds in the DFW
Capital Account may be used by the Airport for capital projects and other costs of the Airport without any
majority-in-interest approval by the Signatory Airlines.
The Joint Capital Account is funded primarily with: proceeds from the sale of natural gas and
interest in real property, subject to the limitations set forth in the Master Bond Ordinance (see
APPENDIX B - “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–
Particular Covenants–Sale of Airport or Facilities”); interest income earned from the Joint Capital
Account; amounts representing reimbursable PFCs and grants; and amounts deposited thereto as set forth
in the immediately preceding paragraph. Funds in the Joint Capital Account may be used for any lawful
-10-
purpose that is approved by a majority-in-interest of the Signatory Airlines and the Airport. The
Signatory Airlines have pre-approved spending from this Account as part of the Use Agreements
including the Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program, certain elements of the Airport Improvement
Program, and certain types of projects as defined in the Use Agreements.
The Rolling Coverage Account was initially funded from existing funds. At the beginning of
each Fiscal Year, the Airport is required to transfer the amounts in the Rolling Coverage Account to the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund as Gross Revenues to be included in the calculation of its rate
covenants. Each Fiscal Year, the Airport will determine the amount to be deposited to the Rolling
Coverage Account, plus any incremental coverage collected during the Fiscal Year.
Restoration of Deficiencies. Should the Debt Service Fund or the Debt Service Reserve Fund,
or any other fund or account of any of the types described in the second paragraph under the subcaption
“SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds,” contain less than the
amount required to be on deposit therein, then such deficiency will be restored from Pledged Revenues
over a period not longer than sixty (60) months, and further transfers to the Capital Improvements Fund
as described in the next to last paragraph of the subcaption “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and
Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds” will be suspended until such deficiency has been restored.
Reserves Established for Outstanding Obligations
The Master Bond Ordinance provides for the establishment of a Debt Service Reserve Fund for
Obligations in the amount of the Debt Service Reserve Requirement. The amount of the Debt Service
Reserve Requirement to be deposited and maintained in the Debt Service Reserve Fund on account of the
Outstanding Obligations is an amount equal to the average annual Debt Service on and with respect to the
Outstanding Obligations from time to time. The amount of the Debt Service Reserve Requirement to be
deposited, accumulated, and maintained, or alternatively funded on account of the Bonds and Outstanding
Obligations, including any Additional Obligations, will be established and funded, or funding will be
provided therefor, in accordance with the provisions of Additional Supplemental Ordinances authorizing
their issuance, but will be in an amount that is not less than the average annual Debt Service that will be
required to be paid on or with respect to all Outstanding Obligations from time to time, except that no
increase in the Debt Service Reserve Requirement is required on account of any series of Interim
Obligations that are secured, guaranteed, or insured by a Credit Provider. Under the Master Bond
Ordinance the Debt Service Reserve Requirement may be satisfied in whole or in part by one or more
Credit Agreements, such as surety bonds.
In accordance with the Master Bond Ordinance, the Board has funded the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement for the Outstanding Obligations with a combination of cash and other Investment Securities
and Credit Agreements (Surety Bonds). The Debt Service Reserve Fund is currently funded with
approximately $301,013,765 in cash and Investment Securities and $14,575,951 in Surety Bonds
provided by a third–party insurance provider. Upon the issuance of the Bonds, the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement will be approximately $321,151,580.96.
The Airport currently has one surety policy by Assured Guaranty Municipal Corp. (“Assured
Guaranty”) that is applicable to all Outstanding Obligations in an amount not to exceed $14,575,951.
This policy was issued in conjunction with the issuance of the Series 2004B Bonds. The Policy expires
November 1, 2035, or such earlier date as of which all of the Series 2004B Bonds are no longer
outstanding.
Prospective purchasers are urged to review financial information regarding FSA, Financial
Security Assurance Holdings Ltd. (“Holdings”) and Assured Guaranty Limited (“AGL”). Financial
-11-
information is available over the internet at the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov, at Holdings’
website at http://www.fsa.com, at AGL’s website at http://www.assuredguaranty.com, or will be provided
upon request to Financial Security Assurance Inc.: 31 West 52nd Street, New York, New York 10019,
Attention: Communications Department (telephone (212) 826-0100).
For a complete discussion of the Debt Service Reserve Fund and the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement, see APPENDIX B–”SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Debt Service Reserve Fund.”
Rate Covenant
The Cities have covenanted that the Board will fix and place into effect, directly or through
leases, contracts or agreements with users of the Airport, a schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges for
the use, operation and occupancy of the Airport premises and Facilities and related services (collectively,
the “Airport Rates”) which is reasonably estimated to produce the amounts set forth in the following two
paragraphs (the “Rate Covenant”). From time to time and as often as it appears necessary, the Authorized
Officers (as defined in the Master Bond Ordinance) will make recommendations to the Board as to the
revision of the Airport Rates. Upon receiving such recommendations, the Board will revise, insofar as it
may legally do so, the Airport Rates for the use, operation and occupancy of the Airport, its Facilities, and
related services in order to continually fulfill the requirements set forth in the Master Bond Ordinance.
This Rate Covenant is not to be construed to require adjustment or revision in long–term agreements
which by their terms are not subject to adjustment or revision.
The schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges required above shall be at least sufficient to
produce in each Fiscal Year Gross Revenues sufficient to pay (i) the Operation and Maintenance
Expenses, plus (ii) 1.25 times the amount of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service, as adjusted by taking into
consideration certain investment earnings accruing during each Fiscal Year, respectively, plus (iii) an
amount equal to the amounts required to pay any other obligations payable from Gross Revenues of the
Airport, including Subordinate Lien Obligations, but excluding Special Revenue Bonds and Special
Facility Bonds, and plus (iv) any additional amounts required by the terms of an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance.
Additionally, such schedule shall be at least sufficient to produce in each Fiscal Year Current
Gross Revenues sufficient to pay the amounts provided in clauses (i), (iii) and (iv) of the paragraph
immediately above, plus 1.00 times the amount of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service accruing during each
Fiscal Year, respectively.
The Board will cause all rentals, fees, rates and charges pertaining to the Airport to be collected
when and as due, will prescribe and enforce rules and regulations for the payment thereof and for the
consequences of nonpayment for the rental, use, operation and occupancy of and services by the Airport,
and will provide methods of collection and penalties to the end that the Gross Revenues and the Current
Gross Revenues will be adequate to meet these respective requirements.
A significant portion of Gross Revenues is generated from payments from airlines using the
Airport. For a discussion of the current agreements with the Signatory Airlines, see “AIRLINE
AGREEMENTS.” See also “CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS.”
Additional Indebtedness
The Cities reserve the right to issue additional debt securities for the purpose of improving,
constructing, replacing, or otherwise extending the Airport, or for the purpose of refunding or refinancing
-12-
any debt or obligation of or relating to the Airport permitted by Applicable Law. The Master Bond
Ordinance provides that the Cities may issue five categories of Airport-related debt: Additional
Obligations; Subordinate Lien Obligations; Net Revenue Obligations; Special Revenue Bonds; and
Special Facility Bonds. In addition, the Cities may enter into various Credit Agreements, including Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations, to provide credit support for any series of Obligations, Subordinate Lien
Obligations or Net Revenue Obligations. See “OUTSTANDING OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER
AIRPORT RELATED DEBT” for a discussion of the currently outstanding amounts of Airport–related
debt.
Of these types of debt and debt–related securities, only Additional Obligations and Parity Credit
Agreement Obligations would be on parity with the Bonds with respect to the pledge of Pledged
Revenues and Pledged Funds. The Cities may not issue Additional Obligations unless the Board delivers
the following certifications and orders:
(1)
an Authorized Officer’s certification that all conditions relating to the issuance of the
Additional Obligations contained in the Master Bond Ordinance and any Additional Supplemental
Ordinances have been satisfied;
(2)
an Authorized Officer’s certification that no Event of Default has occurred and is then
continuing under the Master Bond Ordinance or under any Additional Supplemental Ordinances that will
not be cured by the issuance of the Additional Obligations;
(3)
an Authorized Officer’s written order directing that the Additional Obligations be
authenticated, if they are required to be authenticated under the terms of the Additional Supplemental
Ordinance; and
(4)
following:
an Authorized Officer’s certification that the Cities have received at least one of the
(i)
an Airport Consultant’s written report projecting Gross Revenues and Operation
and Maintenance Expenses and indicating that (A) the estimated Net Revenues for each of the
three consecutive Fiscal Years, beginning with the first Fiscal Year in which Debt Service on the
Additional Obligations is due, are equal to at least 125% of the Debt Service that will be due for
each of the three consecutive Fiscal Years and (B) the schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges
then in effect meets the requirements of certain provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance’s Rate
Covenant; or
(ii)
a Certificate of the Board’s Chief Financial Officer showing that (A) for either
the Board’s most recent complete Fiscal Year, or for any twelve consecutive months out of the
most recent eighteen months, the Net Revenues were equal to at least 125% of the maximum
Debt Service scheduled to be paid during the then-current or any future Fiscal Year, taking into
consideration the proposed Additional Obligations and (B) the schedule of rentals, rates, fees and
charges then in effect meets the requirements of certain provisions of the Master Bond
Ordinance’s Rate Covenant.
This list provides a summary description of the certificates and orders the Board must deliver in
order for the Cities to issue Additional Obligations; the complete text from the Master Bond Ordinance is
described in the subcaption “Additional Obligations” in APPENDIX B –”SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness.”
-13-
Under the Master Bond Ordinance, the Cities may not issue any debt, other than Additional
Obligations and Parity Credit Obligations, on parity with the Bonds and the other Outstanding
Obligations. Subordinate Lien Obligations are payable from a pledge of Gross Revenues that is
subordinate to the pledge of Gross Revenues supporting payment of the Outstanding Obligations. Such
debt may also be secured by a pledge of Special Revenues as provided in the documents authorizing their
issuance. Special Revenue Bonds are payable in whole or in part from a pledge of Special Revenue, and
payments made pursuant to Net Rent Leases secure the payment of Special Facility Bonds. For a more
complete description of Subordinate Lien Obligations, Special Revenue Bonds and Special Facility
Bonds, and the security for each of them, see APPENDIX B –”SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness.”
Investment of Funds
Authorized Investments. Available Airport funds are invested as authorized by the Texas
Public Funds Investment Act, as amended, and in accordance with investment policies approved by the
Airport Board. Under Texas law, the Airport is required to invest its funds under written investment
policies that primarily emphasize safety of principal and liquidity; that address investment diversification,
yield, maturity, and the quality and capability of investment management; and that include a list of
authorized investments for Airport funds, the maximum allowable stated maturity of any individual
investment, the maximum average dollar weighted maturity allowed for pooled fund groups, methods to
monitor the market price of investments a requirement for settlement of securities purchased on a delivery
versus payment basis, procedures to monitor securities rating changes, and the liquidation of investments
that fall below the minimum rating required. The Airport’s investment policy may further restrict the
scope of permitted investments from those allowed by current State law. All Airport funds must be
invested consistent with a formally adopted “Investment Strategy Statement” that specifically addresses
each fund’s investment. Each Investment Strategy Statement will describe its objectives concerning: (1)
suitability of investment type, (2) preservation and safety of principal, (3) liquidity, (4) marketability of
each investment, (5) diversification of the portfolio, and (6) yield. The Airport’s investments must be
made “with judgment and care, under prevailing circumstances, that a person of prudence, discretion, and
intelligence would exercise in the management of the person’s own affairs, not for speculation, but for
investment considering the probable safety of capital and probable income to be derived.”
The Airport utilizes a self-directed security investment program and the Board adopted an
investment policy (the “Investment Policy”) which became effective on February 1, 2014. The
Investment Policy emphasizes the “safety of principal” objective and establishes the Board’s Finance and
Audit committee as the oversight committee relating to the investment of the Board’s funds. The
Investment Policy designates the Chief Financial Officer, the Vice President of Treasury Management
and Cash and Investment Manager as the “Investment Officers” and allows investment in securities
consistent with State law, and diversifies investment maturities. The Airport directs investments utilizing
projected cash flow needs as the foundation of its investment strategy. Investment maturities are targeted
to provide available cash for the operating requirements of the Airport and to enhance interest earnings.
The Cash and Investment Manager analyzes specific fund balances and cash flow needs to tailor
individual security purchases and overall portfolio structure to achieve the Airport’s investment objectives
in accordance with the Investment Policy.
The Airport is authorized to invest in (1) obligations of the United States or its agencies and
instrumentalities; (2) direct obligations of the State of Texas or its agencies and instrumentalities,
including obligations that are fully guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or
by the explicit full faith and credit of the United States; (3) other obligations, the principal and interest of
which are unconditionally guaranteed or insured by or backed by the full faith and credit of, the State of
Texas or the United States or their respective agencies and instrumentalities; including obligations that are
-14-
fully guaranteed or insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or by the explicit full faith and
credit of the United States; (4) obligations of states, agencies, counties, cities, and other political
subdivisions of any state rated as to investment quality by a nationally recognized investment rating firm
not less than A or its equivalent; (5) bonds issued, assumed or guaranteed by the State of Israel; (6)
certificates of deposit and share certificates meeting the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act;
(7) fully collateralized repurchase agreements that have a defined termination date and otherwise meet the
requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act; (8) securities lending programs if the loan under the
program meets the requirements of the Public Funds Investment Act; (9) certain bankers’ acceptances
with the remaining term of 270 days or less, if the short-term obligations of the accepting bank or its
parent are rated at least A1 or P1 or the equivalent by at least one nationally recognized credit rating
agency; (10) commercial paper with a stated maturity of 270 days or less that is rated at least A1 or P1 or
the equivalent by two nationally recognized ratings agencies; (11) no-load money market mutual funds
registered with and regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) that have a dollar
weighted average stated maturity of 90 days or less; and (12) no-load mutual funds registered with the
SEC that have an average weighted maturity of less than two years, invest exclusively in obligations
described in this paragraph, and are continuously rated as to investment quality by at least one nationally
recognized investment rating firm of not less than “AAA” or its equivalent.
Investments may be made in such obligations directly or through a particular government
investment pool pre-approved by the Board that invests solely in such obligations provided that the pool
is rated no lower than AAA or AAAm or an equivalent by at least one nationally recognized rating
service.
The Airport Board may also contract with an investment management firm registered under the
Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. Section 80b-1 et seq.) or with the State Securities Board to
provide for the investment and management of its public funds or other funds under its control for a term
up to two years.
Current Investments. As of March 31, 2014, the Airport’s funds were invested in the following
categories of investments:
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
as of March 31, 2014
Type of Investment
U.S. Treasuries
Money Market Funds
Commercial Paper
Agencies
Municipals
Guaranteed Investment Contracts
Certificates of Deposit
Total
Percentage of
Portfolio
0%
29%
9%
55%
7%
0%
0%
100%
Book Value
($ in millions)
$
0
760
246
1,424
172
0
0
$2,602
Market Value
($ in millions)
$
0
760
246
1,423
172
0
0
$2,601
Source: Dallas Fort Worth International Airport treasury records.
As of such date, approximately 69% of the Airport’s investment portfolio will mature within
twelve months and the market value of the investment portfolio was approximately 100% of its book
value. The Master Bond Ordinance does not require market valuations for required fund investments,
-15-
except for those held in the Debt Service Reserve Fund. No funds of the Airport are invested in (i)
derivative securities, i.e., securities whose rate of return is determined by reference to some other
instrument, index of commodity or (ii) leveraged investments.
Agreements with Airlines
The Use Agreements provide that each Signatory Airline will pay rentals, rates, fees and charges
for its use, operation (or right to operate) and occupancy of the Airport premises and facilities, and
services appertaining thereto. The Use Agreements also provide for the setting of landing fees sufficient,
after taking into consideration other revenues, to satisfy the Rate Covenant each Fiscal Year. The Use
Agreements establish cost centers and contain formulas and methodologies to develop rates and charges
for various services.
Under the Use Agreements, at the end of each Fiscal Year, the Board will cause an audit to be
accomplished by an independent certified public accountant to determine actual cost for certain cost
centers versus budgeted cost. Any deficiency or excess related to such cost center will result in a
corresponding adjustment in rates and fees during the following Fiscal Year. For a further discussion of
the Use Agreements, see “AIRLINE AGREEMENTS.” See also “CERTAIN INVESTMENT
CONSIDERATIONS.”
Matters Relating to Enforceability
The practical realization of any rights upon any default will depend upon the exercise of various
remedies specified in the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth Supplement. These remedies, in certain
respects, may require judicial action, which is often subject to discretion and delay. Under existing law,
certain of the remedies specified in the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth Supplement may be
limited. A court may decide not to order the specific performance of the covenants contained in these
documents. The security interest in the Pledged Revenues granted pursuant to the Master Bond
Ordinance and the Fiftieth Supplement may be subordinated to the interest and claims of others in certain
circumstances. The application of federal bankruptcy laws may have an adverse effect on the ability of
the Holders to enforce their claim to the Pledged Revenues. Federal bankruptcy law permits adoption of a
reorganization plan, even if such plan has not been accepted by the Holders of a majority in aggregate
principal amount of the Bonds, if, inter alia, the Holders (i) retain their original lien and receive, on
account of their claims, deferred cash payments totaling at least the amount of such claim determined by
the value of the collateral securing such claim or (ii) are provided with the “indubitable equivalent.” In
addition, if a bankruptcy court concludes that the Holders have “adequate protection,” it may under
certain circumstances substitute other security for that provided by the Master Bond Ordinance and the
Fiftieth Supplement and may subordinate the security interest of the Holders to claims by persons
supplying goods and services after the bankruptcy and the administrative expenses of the bankruptcy
proceeding. In the event of the bankruptcy of the Airport or any of its Signatory Airlines, the amount
realized by the Holders might depend, among other factors, on the bankruptcy court’s interpretation of
various legal doctrines under the then-existing circumstances. See “MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION
AND ANALYSIS–FINANCIAL OPERATIONS–AMR Bankruptcy.”
Legal opinions with respect to the enforceability of the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth
Supplement will be expressly subject to a qualification that enforceability thereof may be limited by
bankruptcy, reorganization, insolvency, moratorium or other similar laws affecting creditors’ rights
generally and by applicable principles of equity if such remedies are sought.
Under the Fiftieth Supplement, the Bonds are not subject to acceleration under any circumstances
or for any reason, including without limitation on the occurrence or continuance of an Event of Default.
-16-
See APPENDIX B – “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE – Events of Default–Remedies for Defaults.” Upon the occurrence or continuation of an
Event of Default, a Bondholder would only be entitled to principal and interest payments on the Bonds as
they come due.
PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES
Under the Aviation Safety and Capacity Act of 1990 (the “PFC Act”), as modified by the
Wendell H. Ford Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (“AIR 21”) as amended, the
FAA may authorize a public agency to impose a Passenger Facility Charge (“PFC”) of $1.00, $2.00,
$3.00, $4.00 or $4.50 on each passenger enplaned at any commercial service airport controlled by the
public agency, subject to certain limitations. PFCs are available to airports to finance certain projects that
(i) preserve or enhance capacity, safety or security of the national air transportation system, (ii) reduce
noise resulting from an airport or (iii) furnish opportunities for enhanced competition among air carriers.
PFC applications are approved by the FAA for specific projects. An airport may only impose the
designated PFC until it collects the authorized total amount of that application. Interest earnings on
collections are included in the application total. Under certain circumstances, the FAA grants approval to
commence collection of PFCs (“impose only” approval) before approval to spend PFCs on approved
projects (“use” approval) is granted. Approval to both collect and spend PFCs is referred to as an “impose
and use” approval. PFCs may be spent to pay eligible debt service only on approved PFC projects and the
terms of the PFC approval do not permit the use of PFC revenue to pay debt service on any new or
outstanding bonds issued to finance other than approved PFC projects.
The Airport began collecting PFC revenues in June 1994. PFC collections, at the approved $4.50
level, and interest for the past five Fiscal Years on a cash basis are shown below. These collection
amounts differ from the PFC amounts included as non-operating revenues on Table 16 which reflect the
amount of PFCs used to pay eligible debt service each year.
PFC Collections and Interest on Cash Basis
Fiscal Year
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014*
_____________
PFC Revenues (Millions)
$107.1
106.5
105.1
109.3
109.3
115.7
58.5
*Through 2nd fiscal quarter ended 3/31/2014.
Effective July 1, 2011, PFC Application 11-10-C-00-DFW authorized the Impose and Use of
$4,165,097,984 of which $382,902,403 has been collected as of March 31, 2014, for the purpose of
paying debt service on 14 approved PFC projects. The Airport expects such collections to occur until
approximately 2037. PFC collections are approved at the $4.50 level. PFCs remitted to the Airport by
the airlines are deposited into a separate fund and, to the extent funds are available, are transferred
monthly to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund in an amount sufficient to pay eligible debt service
on the 14 approved projects. Although not specifically included as a part of Gross Revenues, pursuant to
the PFC Application and the Use Agreements with the Signatory Airlines, PFC revenues may be used
only for the purpose of paying eligible debt service on approved PFC projects, and upon deposit to the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund, such amounts become a part of the Pledged Funds. Failure to
-17-
collect PFC revenues in an amount sufficient to pay eligible debt service on the PFC approved projects
may lead to increases in other costs at the Airport, such as landing fees and terminal rents.
Although levied by the Airport, PFCs are actually collected from airline passengers by the
airlines on behalf of the Airport. In the process of collecting PFCs, each airline is entitled to and does
commingle the collected PFCs with other airline funds, with the exception of airlines in bankruptcy.
Airlines in bankruptcy must segregate PFC revenue in a designated separate account. See “CERTAIN
INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS–Passenger Facility Charges.” Airlines remit collected PFCs, less
any applicable collection fee, to the Airport on a monthly basis. Each airline retains the investment
income earned on PFC monies while held by the airline.
No assurance can be given that PFCs will actually be received in the amount or at the time
contemplated by the Airport. The amount of actual PFC revenues collected, and the rate of collection, will
vary depending on the actual numbers of qualified passenger enplanements at the Airport. In addition, the
FAA may terminate the Airport’s ability to impose PFCs, subject to informal and formal procedural
safeguards, if (1) the Airport fails to use its PFC revenues for approved projects in accordance with the
FAA’s approval, the PFC Act or the regulations promulgated thereunder, or (2) the Airport otherwise
violates the PFC Act or regulations. The Airport’s ability to impose a PFC may also be terminated if the
Airport violates certain provisions of the Airport Noise and Capacity Act of 1990 and its implementing
regulations. Furthermore, no assurance can be given that the Airport’s authority to impose a PFC will not
be terminated by Congress or the FAA, or that the PFC program may not be modified or restricted by
Congress or the FAA so as to reduce PFC revenues available to the Airport. See “CERTAIN
INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS–Passenger Facility Charges.”
Regardless of the amount of PFC revenues collected, the Board will apply such revenues, as
available to pay debt service on Outstanding Obligations only to the extent the Board applied such
Obligation proceeds to pay the eligible costs of PFC-approved projects described in PFC applications that
were authorized by the FAA to pay Debt Service on such Obligations.
OUTSTANDING OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER AIRPORT RELATED DEBT
Outstanding Obligations
Upon the issuance of the Bonds, $6,322,190,000 in aggregate principal amount of Obligations
will be Outstanding. See “Table 15–Joint Revenue Bonds Debt Service Requirements” for the debt
service requirements of all Outstanding Obligations. The Airport does not currently have outstanding any
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
Any Parity Credit Agreement Obligations issued in the future would be on parity with the
Outstanding Obligations.
Subordinate Lien Obligations
No Subordinate Lien Obligations are currently outstanding. In the event that the Cities issue
Subordinate Lien Obligations in the future, such Subordinate Lien Obligations will be payable from and
secured by a pledge of Gross Revenues that is subordinate to the pledge securing the Bonds and the other
Outstanding Obligations. For a description of Subordinate Lien Obligations, see APPENDIX B “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional
Indebtedness–Subordinate Lien Obligations.”
-18-
Special Revenue Bonds
No Special Revenue Bonds are currently outstanding. In the event that the Cities issue Special
Revenue Bonds in the future, such Special Revenue Bonds will be payable from and secured by a pledge
of Special Revenues to support payment of such Special Revenue Bonds. Unless any portion of such
Special Revenues are included as part of Gross Revenues under the provisions of an Additional
Supplemental Indenture, none of such Special Revenues would be Gross Revenues and would not secure
the Bonds. For a description of Special Revenue Bonds, see APPENDIX B - “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness–Special
Revenue Bonds.”
Special Facilities Bonds
No Special Facilities Bonds are currently outstanding. In the event the Cities issue Special
Facilities Bonds in the future, each series of Special Facility Bonds will be payable solely from the rentals
received in respect of each Special Facility pursuant to a Net Rent Lease. Any such Special Facility
rentals would not be Gross Revenues and would not secure the Bonds. For a description of Special
Facility Bonds, see APPENDIX B – “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER
BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness–Special Facility Bonds.”
Facility Improvement Corporation Indebtedness
In 1990, the Cities created the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Facility Improvement
Corporation (the “FIC”) for the purpose of providing conduit financing for the airlines and other users of
the Airport. Senior executive staff of the Airport serves as the FIC’s Directors. As of the date hereof,
bonds issued by the FIC are outstanding in the aggregate principal amount of $144,210,000. Each series
of the FIC’s bonds is payable solely from payments made pursuant to an agreement between the FIC and
the borrower. The payments that are pledged to the FIC’s bonds are not part of the Gross Revenues of the
Airport and do not secure the Bonds.
Other Indebtedness
In addition to the FIC, the Cities have the power to create additional Airport facility improvement
corporations. Any such additional corporations, if created, may be empowered to issue debt to provide
financing for Airport facilities and will have such other powers as may be granted by the Cities. See
“NON-AIRLINE BUSINESS UNITS INFORMATION–Public Facility Improvement Corporation.”
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-19-
THE AIRPORT
General
The Airport is the principal air carrier facility serving the North Central region of the State of
Texas (the “State”) and the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area, also referred to as the Metroplex. The
Airport is located within a four–hour flight time of 95% of the U.S. population. The primary Airport
service region (the “Airport Service Region”) includes the 9,500-square mile, 12-county Dallas/Fort
Worth Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (“CMSA”). Although owned by the Cities of Dallas
and Fort Worth, the Airport sits within the city limits of Coppell, Fort Worth, Grapevine, Euless and
Irving, and within Dallas and Tarrant Counties.
-20-
Airfield. The Airport has more operational capacity than any airport in the world with seven
runways: two diagonals and five north/south parallels. Four of the Airport’s runways are 13,400 feet in
length. The Airport has the capacity to land, park and gate the A380, currently the largest passenger
airliner in the world. The Airport completed construction of the Southeast Quadrant End–Around
(perimeter) Taxiway in December 2008 to enhance aircraft operational efficiency, safety and prevent
runway incursions. The Airport’s designated hourly capacity arrival/departure flow is approximately 186
to 193 aircraft operations per hour under reduced instrument flight conditions and approximately 270 to
279 aircraft operations per hour under optimum visual flight conditions, a condition that prevails
approximately 94% of the time. The Airport estimates that it is using approximately 50%–60% of its
maximum landing capacity at this time.
Terminals. The Airport has five terminals (A, B, C, D, and E) totaling 6.3 million square feet of
building space, including 155 aircraft boarding gates, approximately 358 ticketing positions, including
supporting self-service kiosks and 15 security checkpoints, with pre-authorized check-in for domestic
passengers at 4 of them. The Airport has sufficient gate capacity to allow for the closure of approximately
19 gates as the Terminal Renewal and Improvement and Improvement Program (“TRIP”) construction
continues in all four terminals (A, B, C, and E) in 2014 and 2015. Collectively, the airlines averaged
seven turns per active gate in Fiscal Year 2013.
American Airlines operates domestic service in Terminals A and C and both domestic and
international service in Terminal D. American Eagle operates domestic service in Terminal B and
international service in Terminal D. All other airline domestic flights operate from Terminal E. All
international flights and charters operate from the Airport’s International Terminal D. Terminal D has 2.2
million square feet and 27 gates. All terminal gate leases are preferential and expire September 30, 2020,
concurrent with the Use Agreements. (See “AIRLINE AGREEMENTS” for further discussion.) The
Airport’s Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) facilities are located in Terminal D. The Airport’s
CBP facility is approximately 406,000 square feet with 60 inspection booths and 8 bag carousels. The
CBP has the capacity to handle approximately 2,800 international customers per hour. Pre-authorized
check-in for international passengers (Global Entry) has now grown to approximately 60,000 participants
in the DFW area, and there are 16 processing kiosks in passport control.
The Airport is responsible for all of the janitorial and facility maintenance services in Terminals
B, D and E, and baggage maintenance in Terminals B and E. The Airport outsources most of the
maintenance and janitorial functions to third parties. The costs associated with the maintenance of these
facilities are included in the Airport’s operating budget. American Airlines is responsible for the majority
of the facilities maintenance and custodial services in Terminals A and C and all of the baggage
maintenance in Terminals A, C and D. The cost of these maintenance activities are paid directly by
American Airlines and are not included in the Airport’s operating budget or financial statements.
Transit System. The Airport has operated its elevated transit system (“Skylink”) since 2005.
Skylink is operated and controlled solely by the Airport. Skylink is used to transport members of the
general public on the secure side of the terminal. The Airport operates 16 of its 24 fully automated cars
on Skylink during normal operations. Skylink cars circle the five terminals in two directions with an
average time between terminals of 2 minutes. There are two Skylink stations in each terminal. The
average customer ride is estimated to be about 5 minutes.
The Airport also uses buses to transport passengers and employees between terminals, the Grand
Hyatt Hotel, parking lots and the consolidated rental car facility. The Airport uses 29 buses to shuttle
passengers between the terminals and Grand Hyatt; 59 buses between remote and express parking lots and
the terminals; 32 buses between employee parking lots and the terminals, and 54 buses between the
terminals and the consolidated rental car facility.
-21-
The Airport is currently constructing a light rail station for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit
(“DART”), which operates a light rail system through significant portions of the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
The light rail station will connect downtown Dallas with Terminal A. The new station is expected to open
in late summer 2014. The light rail system currently extends to the southeast corner of the Airport, which,
in turn, requires passengers to take a shuttle to Terminal A.
Airport Operations Center/Emergency Operations Center (AOC/EOC). The Airport
completed its AOC/EOC in April 2006. The AOC/EOC serves as a single point of contact to centralize
communications for the Airport’s passengers, guests, tenants, employees, and contractors. This includes
the 9-1-1 call management of police, fire and emergency medical response teams and 3-1-1 nonemergency services. The AOC and EOC handle an average of 26,400 and 1,950 calls, respectively, each
month.
Aircraft Fueling System/Fuel Farm Consortium. A number of the Signatory Airlines have
entered into a consortium agreement to provide aircraft fuel on the Airport. The fuel farm sits on 35 acres
of land, has a holding capacity of approximately 28.4 million U.S. gallons, and provides single point
refueling at all terminal apron gate areas. Actual fuel flowage is approximately 800 million gallons per
year. The fuel farm is managed and operated by a third party for the consortium. The Airport does not
receive a fueling fee from consortium members, but does receive payments for the ground rent and the
fuel farm’s share of debt service. The fuel farm agreement with the airlines had an original expiration
date of December 31, 2009, but was extended through September 30, 2010 and continues in effect on a
month-to-month basis.
The Board
Under the terms of the Contract and Agreement, the Airport is operated by a Board on behalf of
the Cities. The Board is authorized to plan, acquire, establish, develop, construct, maintain, equip,
operate, lease, regulate and police the Airport and is charged with the responsibility of exercising on
behalf of the Cities, the powers of each with respect thereto.
The Board consists of 11 members, 7 from the City of Dallas and 4 from the City of Fort Worth.
Both the Mayor of Dallas and the Mayor of Fort Worth sit on the Board. The remaining Board members
are appointed by the respective City Councils of the Cities. In addition, the Board has one non–voting
member who is selected by the Cities of Coppell, Euless, Grapevine and Irving, Texas, respectively, on a
rotating basis. Members of the Board serve without compensation.
Airport Management
The operations of the Airport are administered by a Chief Executive Officer. There are currently
four Executive Vice Presidents, 20 Vice President positions, one General Counsel, and a Director of
Audit Services. The Airport currently has approximately 1,850 full time employees.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-22-
Sean P. Donohue (Chief Executive Officer). In his role as Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Donohue
is responsible for the management, operation and future development of the Airport. As the chief
executive of the Airport, Mr. Donohue manages an organization comprised of more than 1,700
employees, as well as an annual operating budget of over $650 million and a $3 billion capital
improvement program. Under Mr. Donohue’s direction, the Airport produces more than $31 billion in
annual economic impact for the Dallas/Fort Worth region, and hosts more than 60 million passengers
each year. Mr. Donohue joined the Airport in October of 2013, following a distinguished 28-year career
in the airline industry. Prior to his arrival at the Airport, Mr. Donohue served for three years as the Chief
Operating Officer for Virgin Australia Airlines, where he led day-to-day operations for Australia’s second
largest air carrier. Prior to that, Mr. Donohue served for 25 years with United Airlines in a variety of
executive roles that included operations, sales and commercial startups. Mr. Donohue graduated from
Boston College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing and Economics, and is a native of
Massachusetts.
Christopher A. Poinsatte (Executive Vice President–Chief Financial Officer). Mr. Poinsatte was
appointed Executive Vice President–Chief Financial Officer for the Airport in September 2003. In this
position, Mr. Poinsatte is responsible for the business and financial planning, budgeting, accounting,
information technology systems, treasury functions and aviation real estate. Mr. Poinsatte has over 30
years of financial experience in the private and public sectors. Before coming to the Airport, Mr.
Poinsatte was the Chief Financial Officer of NextJet Technologies, Inc., a start–up transportation
management and logistics software company. Prior to that, Mr. Poinsatte served as the Chief Financial
Officer for the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (“DART”) where he developed DART’s $2.9 billion financing
plan for expansion of the transit system. Mr. Poinsatte is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and
has been a Certified Public Accountant in Texas since 1981.
Kenneth Buchanan (Executive Vice President–Revenue Management). Mr. Buchanan was
appointed Executive Vice President-Revenue Management in August 2005, and is responsible for the
Airport’s strategic direction to maximize non-aviation revenues and increase customer satisfaction. He
oversees and directs the Airport’s concession, commercial development, customer service, marketing, and
parking business units; also included are two (2) Hyatt Hotels and two (2) 18-hole golf courses on the
property. Commercial development handles negotiations of real estate-ground leases and natural gas
exploration; and acquisition and property management of the Airport’s industrial, office, and air cargo
facilities. His responsibility is to continue to grow and enhance non-airline revenue in all aspects of his
business units. He is also responsible for implementation of the Corporate Strategic Plan through all
business units. During his career Mr. Buchanan has acquired more than 20 years of industry experience in
revenue management, sales, merchandising technology, sales planning and marketing. Prior to joining the
Airport, he served as the Director of Strategic Initiatives and Sales Planning for Coors, Inc. He has also
held executive level positions at Kmart Corp., Pepsi, Information Resources, Inc., and Kroger Corp. Mr.
Buchanan attended Memphis State University, earning a B.A. in Business, and earned an MBA from
Jackson State University. He has also completed the Airport Management Professional Accreditation
Programmer (AMPAP) and received the AIP designation through Joint ACI-ICAO.
James M. Crites (Executive Vice President–Operations). Mr. Crites serves as Executive Vice
President for the Operations Division of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. He oversees the
activities of Operations, Energy and Transportation Management, Asset Management, Airport
Development and Engineering, Department of Public Safety, Planning and Environmental Affairs. Mr.
Crites joined the staff at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport on October 30, 1995 to serve as the
Director of Planning and Marketing Research. He has provided key leadership in planning for
development of facilities, and new business opportunities throughout all aspects of the Airport. Prior to
this, Mr. Crites worked in several key management positions at American Airlines, Inc. including
Managing Director, Airport Services and Managing Director, Financial Planning. Mr. Crites graduated
-23-
from the University of Illinois after earning a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and
subsequently earned a Master’s Degree in Operations Research while attending the Naval Postgraduate
School, Monterey, California. He is currently serving as a member of: the Transportation Research Board
Executive Committee; the University of Texas at Arlington College of Engineering Advisory Board; the
U.S. Travel Association Board of Directors; the ACI-NA Technical and Operations Committee; and the
Subcommittee of the RTCA NextGen Advisory Committee.
Linda Valdez Thompson (Executive Vice President–Administration and Diversity). Ms.
Thompson was appointed to this position when she joined the Airport in February, 2001. Prior to joining
the Airport, Ms. Thompson was employed by Fruit of the Loom, Inc. as the Vice President of Human
Resources and previously held management positions with companies such as Hasbro, Inc., Levi
Strauss & Co. and Baxter Healthcare, Inc. Ms. Thompson has been in the Human Resources field for
over 18 years and is a certified Senior Human Resources Professional (SHRP), Certified Benefits
Professional (CBP), Certified Compensation Professional (CCP), and Global Remuneration Professional
(GRP). Ms. Thompson received her B.B.A. in Business Administration with honors from Midwestern
State University in 1982 and her Masters in Organizational Management from the University of Phoenix
in 1998.
Elaine Flud Rodriguez (General Counsel). Ms. Rodriguez was appointed as an Executive
Assistant City Attorney for the City of Dallas and General Counsel for the Airport in August 2011. In
this position, Ms. Rodriguez directs and manages all legal functions for the Airport, including
management of outside legal counsel. Prior to joining the Airport, Ms. Rodriguez served as Senior Vice
President, General Counsel and Secretary of two NASDAQ-listed companies, EF Johnson Technologies,
Inc. (from March 2008 to February 2011) and CellStar Corporation (from September 1993 to
August 2007). Prior to joining CellStar, she was General Counsel and Secretary of Zoecon Corporation, a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Sandoz Ltd. Earlier in her career, she was engaged in the private practice of
law with Atlas & Hall and Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld. Ms. Rodriguez earned her bachelor’s
degree at Loyola University New Orleans and her Juris Doctor from Tulane University School of Law.
She is licensed to practice law in the states of Texas and Louisiana.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-24-
The Airport’s Leadership System
The Airport management team has developed and installed a standard methodology for planning
and executing its mission (the “Leadership System”). The Leadership System ensures a methodical
process for executing and achieving the Airport’s goals, objectives and strategies. This methodology is
depicted in the following two flow charts. The first highlights the phases and interactive nature of the
Airport’s Leadership System. The second highlights the key elements within each phase.
Phases of DFW's Leadership System
Policy and Controlling Documents
Strategic
Planning and
Management
Measurement
Employee
Alignment and
Compensation
Annual
Workplan and
Budget
Employee Goal
Setting and
Engagement
Phases and Key Elements of DFW’s Leadership System
Policy and
Controlling
Documents
Contract and
Agreement
Airline Use
Agreements
Bond
Ordinances
Strategic Planning and
Management System
Strategic
Plan
Financial
Plan
Airport
Master Plan
Enterprise
Risk
Management
3-5 Yr
Business Unit
Plans
Capital Plan
Annual
Workplan and
Annual Budget
Employee Goal
Setting &
Engagement
Measurement
Annual
Operating and
Capital
Budget
Level 1 Goals
and Initiatives
for Senior
Management
Level 1
Scorecards
and
Reporting
Annual
Workplan of
Goals and
Initiatives
Level 2 & 3
Goals/Initiatives
Cascaded to
Managers and
Employees
Level 2 & 3
Scorecards
and
Reporting
Employee
Alignment and
Compensation
Pay for
Performance
Incentive
Compensation
Leadership
Competencies
Beliefs
The Airport’s Strategic Plan
DFW’s Strategic Plan contains the Airport’s vision and mission statements and identifies the key
strategies and results required to achieve the Primary Business Goal to grow the core business of domestic
and international passenger and cargo airline service. The Airport has taken a balanced approach to its
strategic plan. Management is focused on being cost competitive, satisfying the customer, and achieving
operational excellence through engaged employees. A schematic of the Strategic Plan follows:
-25-
Management updated the DFW Strategic Plan in 2012. The more significant changes in the
revised plan include an increased emphasis on the growth of international passenger service, the
expansion of DFW brand awareness throughout the world, and an expansion of the customer to include
the airlines and tenants as well as the passengers. A copy of DFW’s Strategic Plan may be found on the
DFW website at www.dfwairport.com/investors.
Although much of this Official Statement is focused on the financial or cost competitive elements
of DFW’s Strategic Plan, management has been very focused over the past years on a balanced approach
that improves passenger satisfaction, operational excellence, and employee engagement. DFW
management believes these elements all work together to drive superior performance. The following two
charts highlight DFW’s performance in these areas.
-26-
Passenger Satisfaction. The following chart highlights DFW’s Airport Council International
passenger satisfaction survey results since 2009. The survey scale has a maximum satisfaction rating of
five. Management is very pleased with the Airport’s continued progress in this critical area, especially
over the past 25 months during the construction of the Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program
(“TRIP”). (See “CAPITAL PROJECTS-Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program” herein for a
discussion of the TRIP.
Passenger Satisfaction
4.25
4.20
4.18
4.19
4.19
4.18
4.18
FY 09
FY 10
FY 11
FY 12
FY 13
4.15
4.10
4.05
4.00
Operational Excellence. In addition to safety and security, one of DFW’s key operating
excellence goals relates to sustainability and reducing the organization’s energy footprint. The following
chart highlights DFW’s 47% reduction in energy costs for electricity and natural gas over the past seven
Fiscal Years. Twenty-five percent of this reduction is related to usage and fifteen percent to lower prices.
-27-
OPERATIONAL INFORMATION
The following sections provide comparative operational information for the Airport’s core
business, including passengers, operations, destinations and landed weights. The information in the
following tables is unaudited. Some schedules may not correspond or tie due to rounding of numbers and
some amounts may vary from prior official statements due to reclassifications. All amounts are in whole
numbers unless stated in the title of the table or on a particular row. Data in the following tables, the
“MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS – FINANCIAL OPERATIONS” and Report of
the Airport Consultant may differ due to source of information and basis of accounting. Airport staff
provides monthly updates to the information in many of the below tables. Readers are directed to
http://dfwairport.com/investors for such updates, including the financial results for the six-month period
ending March 31, 2014.
Aircraft Operations
According to the Airports Council International (“ACI”) World Traffic Report, as of the 12
months ended December 2013, the Airport was third in operations behind Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson and
Chicago O’Hare. Table 1 highlights total annual aircraft operations at the Airport for each of the past five
Fiscal Years ended September 30, 2013, and the six months ended March 31, 2014, and 2013.
Table 1
Aircraft Operations (Unaudited, in thousands)
Domestic Passenger
International Passenger
Total Passenger
Cargo Aircraft
General Aviation Aircraft
Total Annual Operations
For Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Ops
%
Ops
%
282
87%
287 87%
30
9%
27
8%
312
96%
314 96%
10
3%
10
3%
4
1%
4
1%
326
328
2013
Ops
%
589 87%
59
9%
648 96%
19
3%
8
1%
675
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
Ops
% Ops
%
Ops
%
565 88% 568 88% 571 88%
51
8% 50
8%
48
7%
616 96% 618 96% 619 95%
21
3% 23
3%
22
4%
7
1%
7
1%
6
1%
644
648
647
Source: DFW Airport Finance Department, based on flight activity reports provided by airlines.
*Numbers may not add due to rounding
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-28-
2009
Ops
%
557 88%
49
8%
606 96%
22
3%
5
1%
633
Air Service, Destinations and Frequencies
The Airport currently has approximately 900 daily non-stop departures for passenger service to
147 domestic destinations in the United States and 56 international destinations in Europe, Asia, Canada,
Mexico, Central America, South America, Australia, the Middle East and the Caribbean. Since 2009 this
represents growth in international and domestic destinations of 11%.
AirTran discontinued service at DFW in November 2011 because it was acquired by Southwest
Airlines which does not operate from DFW. Cities previously served by AirTran include Atlanta, GA,
Orlando, FL and Baltimore, MD. Those cities are currently being served by other carriers at DFW.
DFW’s largest international passenger markets by region are Mexico, Europe, Asia, Canada,
Caribbean, Central America, South America, Middle East, Africa and Oceania. The Airport offers an air
service incentive plan for carriers who provide service to a new international destination or certain new
domestic destinations. The incentive plan currently pays for landing fees and some marketing costs for
up to two years depending on the destination being served.
The Airport provides service to many cities throughout the United States. Table 2 summarizes
the major domestic markets served from the Airport by departing flights and departing seats as of
March 31, 2014. (Note: “AA” is American Airlines and American Eagle, “DL” is Delta Airlines, “US”
is US Airways and “UA” is United Airlines.)
Table 2
Domestic Markets
(Unaudited)
Rank Market
ORD
1
LAX
2
ATL
3
LGA
4
DEN
5
SFO
6
IAH
7
SAT
8
PHX
9
MSP
10
LAS
11
AUS
12
CLT
13
PHL
14
MCO
15
DTW
16
BOS
17
MIA
18
SEA
19
DCA
20
Monthly Frequencies
Total Market Largest Market Carrier
745
AA
728
AA
670
DL
616
AA
580
AA
513
AA
503
UA
437
AA
433
AA
420
DL
416
AA
410
AA
406
US
375
AA
345
AA
341
DL
338
AA
319
AA
304
AA
303
AA
Rank Market
LAX
1
ATL
2
ORD
3
DEN
4
LGA
5
SFO
6
CLT
7
PHX
8
LAS
9
SAT
10
AUS
11
MIA
12
MCO
13
BOS
14
IAH
15
PHL
16
MSP
17
SEA
18
DCA
19
SAN
20
-29-
Monthly Seats
Total Market Largest Market Carrier
112,257
AA
96,403
DL
92,300
AA
78,244
AA
77,759
AA
71,371
AA
64,771
US
63,982
AA
61,924
AA
59,850
AA
56,725
AA
54,605
AA
52,081
AA
51,699
AA
51,038
AA
50,006
AA
47,596
AA
47,305
AA
44,107
AA
AA
42,359
Enplaned Passengers
According to ACI, as of the 12 months ended December 31, 2013, the Airport ranks eighth in
total passengers, behind Atlanta-Hartsfield, Beijing Capital, London Heathrow, Tokyo Haneda, Chicago
O’Hare, Los Angeles LAX, and Paris Charles de’ Gaulle. American Airlines (including American Eagle)
is the Airport’s largest carrier with 82.5% of total passengers for Fiscal Year ended September 30, 2013.
The average load factor for all flights departing and arriving at the Airport for the same Fiscal Year was
approximately 82%.
Table 3 highlights enplanements categorized by domestic and international service; originating,
destination and connecting; and by carrier for each of the past five Fiscal Years ended September 30 and
the six months ended March 31, 2014, and 2013.
Table 3
Total Domestic and International Enplanements Statistics
(Unaudited, in millions)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Pass
%
Pass
%
2013
Pass
%
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
Pass
%
Pass
%
Pass
%
2009
Pass
%
Domestic/International
Domestic
International
Total Enplanements
13.1
1.6
14.7
89
11
100
12.8
1.6
14.4
89
11
100
26.8
3.3
30.1
89
11
100
26.1
3.0
29.1
90
10
100
26.1
2.8
28.9
90
10
100
25.5
2.7
28.2
90
10
100
25.4
2.5
27.9
91
9
100
O&D/Connecting
Origination (O)
Destination (D)
Connecting
Total Enplanements
3.2
3.1
8.4
14.7
22
21
57
100
3.1
3.1
8.2
14.4
22
21
57
100
6.7
6.1
17.3
30.1
22
20
58
100
6.5
6.0
16.6
29.1
22
21
57
100
6.3
5.8
16.8
28.9
22
20
58
100
5.9
5.6
16.7
28.2
21
20
59
100
6.0
5.5
16.4
27.9
22
20
58
100
By Airline
American
American Eagle
US Airways
10.6
1.5
0.5
72
11
3
10.2
1.7
0.4
71
11
3
21.4
3.4
0.9
71
11
3
21.2
3.3
0.8
73
11
3
21.5
3.0
0.9
75
10
3
21.2
3.1
0.8
75
11
3
20.7
3.4
0.7
74
12
2
0.6
4
0.5
4
1.4
5
0.9
3
0.8
3
0.8
3
0.8
3
0.4
1.1
14.7
3
7
100
0.4
1.2
14.4
3
8
100
1.0
2.0
30.1
3
7
100
0.5
2.4
29.1
2
8
100
0.5
0.3
1.9
28.9
2
1
7
100
0.5
0.3
1.6
28.2
2
1
6
100
0.6
0.3
1.5
27.9
2
1
5
100
Delta (includes Northwest)
(1)
United (includes Continental)
AirTran
Other less than 1%
Total Enplanements
(2)
Source: DFW Airport Finance Department, based on flight activity reports provided by airlines.
(1)
(2)
As of December 2009, Delta and Northwest Airlines begun operating under a single certificate.
As of November 2011, United and Continental Airlines begun operating under a single certificate.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-30-
Table 4 shows monthly enplanements (departures) for each of the past five Fiscal Years
and the six months of Fiscal Year 2014.
Table 4
Total Domestic and International Enplanements
(Unaudited, in thousands)
October
November
December
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
Total
2014
2,593
2,353
2,417
2,445
2,214
2,643
14,665
2013
2,485
2,385
2,435
2,314
2,187
2,555
2,457
2,636
2,766
2,838
2,695
2,375
30,128
2012
2,497
2,326
2,332
2,173
2,126
2,498
2,321
2,597
2,675
2,711
2,583
2,288
29,127
2011
2,469
2,312
2,387
2,160
1,939
2,436
2,316
2,438
2,698
2,775
2,551
2,384
28,867
2010
2,374
2,229
2,313
2,131
1,922
2,401
2,344
2,428
2,605
2,677
2,484
2,280
28,188
2009
2,389
2,139
2,330
2,078
1,979
2,368
2,305
2,370
2,578
2,729
2,488
2,194
27,947
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-31-
Landed Weights
Table 5 highlights total landed weights by carrier type and airline and cargo tonnage for each of
the past five Fiscal Years ended September 30 and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
American Airlines (including American Eagle and Executive Airlines) was the Airport’s largest carrier
representing approximately 74% of total landed weights at the Airport for the Fiscal Year ended
September 30, 2013, and the six months ended March 31, 2014, and 2013.
Table 5
Landed Weights and Cargo Tonnage
(Unaudited, in billions of pounds)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Wgt.
% Wgt. %
2013
Wgt. %
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
Wgt. % Wgt. % Wgt. %
2009
Wgt. %
By Carrier Type
Domestic Passenger Airlines
International Pass. Airlines
Cargo/Integrator Airlines
Total Landed Weights
17.0 90 16.9 91
0.3
2 0.3
1
1.5
8 1.3
7
18.8 100 18.5 100
35.0 92
0.6
2
2.7
6
38.3 100
32.8 90
0.6
2
3.1
8
36.5 100
32.7 90
0.6
2
3.0
8
36.3 100
32.7 90 32.4 90
0.7
2 0.7
2
2.9
8 3.1
8
36.3 100 36.2 100
By Major Airline
American
American Eagle
US Airways
UPS
12.3
1.8
0.5
0.5
63
11
3
2
24.5
4.0
1.0
0.9
64
10
3
2
23.6
3.8
0.9
0.8
65
11
3
2
24.4
3.5
0.9
0.8
67
10
3
2
24.5
3.8
0.9
0.9
Delta (includes Northwest)
(1)
Federal Express
United (includes Continental)
AirTran
Other
Total Landed Weights
Cargo Tonnage
(2)
65 11.7
10 2.0
3 0.5
2 0.4
68 24.0
11 4.1
2 0.8
2 1.0
66
11
2
3
0.6
3
0.7
4
1.4
4
0.8
2
0.8
2
0.7
2
0.8
3
0.3
2
0.2
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
0.5
1
0.5
2 0.5
3
0.0
0 0.0
0
2.3 11 2.5 13
18.8 100 18.5 100
1.1
3
0.0
0
4.9 13
38.3 100
0.6
2
0.0
0
5.5 15
36.5 100
0.7
2
0.3
1
4.4 12
36.3 100
0.7
2 0.8
1
0.4
1 0.3
1
3.9 11 3.9 12
36.3 100 36.2 100
336
647
660
670
628
325
626
Source: DFW Finance Department, based on flight activity reports provided by airlines.
(1)
As of December 2009, Delta and Northwest Airlines begun operating under a single certificate.
(2)
As of November 2011, United and Continental Airlines begun operating under a single certificate.
RATE SETTING AND FINANCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
Controlling Documents and Budgetary and Rate Setting Processes
The Cities entered into the Contract and Agreement in 1968 for the purpose of developing and
operating the Airport as a joint venture. In addition to the Contract and Agreement, the Airport is
governed by several other key documents, including the Master Bond Ordinance and the Use Agreements.
Collectively, these documents are called the “Controlling Documents.” The Controlling Documents
establish the framework for much of DFW’s budgeting, rate setting and financial reporting process. See
“AIRLINE AGREEMENTS.”
Each year, management prepares an annual budget of projected expenditures for the Operating
Revenue and Expense Fund (commonly called the “Operating Revenue and Expense”). This budget
includes the Airport’s projected operating expenses, plus an amount equal to at least 1.25 times the
-32-
amount of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service accruing during such Fiscal Year, plus any incremental
amount sufficient to maintain a 90-day operating reserve.
The budget also includes airline and tenant revenues (primarily landing fees and terminal rents),
non-airline revenues (e.g., parking and concessions) and non-operating revenues (e.g., interest income and
PFCs). The revenues and expenses are allocated among three cost centers: Airfield Cost Center, Terminal
Cost Center and DFW Cost Center (see “Airline Use Agreement Rate Model” below). Management then
uses this information to prepare an annual Schedule of Rates, Fees, and Charges (approved by the Board
in September) which is the basis for charging the airlines, tenants, and other airport users for Airport
services during the year. For a discussion of the obligations of the Signatory Airlines under the Use
Agreements and end of year reconciliations related to overpayments and underpayments by Signatory
Airlines see “AIRLINE AGREEMENTS.”
Pursuant to the Use Agreements, the Signatory Airlines agree to pay terminal rents and landing
fees established pursuant to an allocation formula intended to comply with the Rate Covenant. See
“Airline Use Agreement Rate Model” below; “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Rate Covenant” and
“AIRLINE AGREEMENTS.”
The Annual Budget is prepared by management, reviewed with the Signatory Airlines, approved
by the Board in August, submitted to the Cities by August 15, and approved by the Cities by
September 30 each year. After approval of the Budget, individual budgetary items may be adjusted by
Airport management provided the total budget is not exceeded. For additional financial information
regarding the Airport please refer to www.dfwairport.com/investors. Information provided by the Airport
on its website is not a part of the Cities’ continuing disclosure obligations under its Continuing Disclosure
Agreement relating to the Bonds. Neither the Airport nor the Cities are obligated to continue to provide
information on the Airport’s website.
Airline Use Agreement Rate Model
The Use Agreement is a hybrid model whereby the Signatory Airlines pay landing fees and
terminal rentals based on the net cost to provide those services, and DFW retains a portion of the net
revenues from non-airline business units (e.g., parking) in the DFW Cost Center.
Airline Cost Centers (Airfield and Terminal Cost Centers) – The Airline Cost Centers are “cost
recovery” in nature, such that the amount charged to the airlines equals the cost to provide services, after
certain adjustments. Landing fees and terminal rental rates are based on the net cost to operate and
maintain the airfield and terminals, respectively. DFW charges the direct operating and maintenance
costs for the airfield and terminals, plus allocated Department of Public Safety (DPS) and overhead costs,
plus debt service, net of Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs), to each cost center; then, subtracts ancillary
revenues generated in these cost centers; and credits or charges certain transfers and/or adjustments (see
“Reconciliation Adjustments” below). The budgeted landing fee rate is determined by dividing the net
cost of the airfield by estimated landed weights. The budgeted average terminal rental rate is determined
by dividing the net cost of the Terminal Cost Center by leasable square footage. The Use Agreement
requires the Airport to charge an “equalized” terminal rental rate for all five terminals. The amount paid
by the airlines for landing fees and terminal rents equals “airline cost,” which is a Key Performance
Indicator (“KPI”) used by DFW Management. Another common industry KPI is “passenger airline cost
per enplaned passenger” or CPE. This KPI for passenger airlines is calculated by dividing the amount
paid by passenger airlines for landing fees and terminal rents (i.e., airline cost) by the number of
enplanements.
-33-
DFW Cost Center – All non-airline business units, plus interest income, are included in the DFW
Cost Center. The DFW Cost Center is also responsible for all costs associated with the Skylink people
mover system per the terms of the Use Agreement. The net revenues from this cost center are transferred
to the DFW Capital Account provided the net revenues are not lower than the Lower Threshold or not
higher than the Upper Threshold. If either of these occur, then a Threshold or “Reconciliation
Adjustment” is required (described below). One of DFW’s most important KPIs is Net Revenues from
the DFW Cost Center. This measures the profitability of DFW’s business units, after adjusting for the
cost of Skylink, and drives the amount of cash flow that can be transferred to the DFW Capital Account.
Joint Capital Account - Projects funded from the Joint Capital Account require majority-ininterest (MII) approval by the Signatory Airlines, subject to certain limitations included in the Use
Agreement. As part of the Use Agreement, the Signatory Airlines approved $310 million of additional
capital projects including $90 million for Terminal D extensions on the north and south end of the
terminal and $220 million (net of $52 million of assumed discretionary Airport Improvement Program
Grants) of additional projects broken into five categories: airfield; rail, roads and bridges; utilities;
parking; and other. Since the Use Agreement was signed, the Signatory Airlines have approved an
additional $331 million of capital projects with the most significant being the Terminal A Parking garage.
Of the $641 million of non-TRIP projects approved to date, DFW has spent $302.5million (47.1%) and
committed an additional $105 million (16.4%) as of December 31, 2013.
The Financial Plan also includes $371 million of projects not yet approved by the Signatory
Airlines, the largest of which is two new employee parking garages. Airport management includes these
in the Financial Plan because, in their opinion, the Signatory Airlines will ultimately approve them.
Additional projects or increases in project scopes may be added to the Financial Plan in the
future. These projects, if approved by the Signatory Airlines, would most likely be funded through the
issuance of Additional Obligations.
Coverage Account – The Airport established the Coverage Account as part of the new Use
Agreements in order to implement “rolling coverage.” It was initially funded from coverage collected in
Fiscal Year 2010 (the last year of the old Use Agreement). Each year, the Coverage Account is “rolled”
into the Operating Revenue and Expense as a source of revenue, then is transferred back into the
Coverage Account as excess revenue at the end of the year. The Coverage Account must equal 25% of
aggregate debt service each year. If new debt is issued, each cost center must generate the incremental
coverage required to fund 25% of the new debt service. These incremental coverage amounts are
collected in the Operating Revenue and Expense through rates and charges during the fiscal year. See
“SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Rate Covenant.”
DFW Capital Account – This is DFW’s discretionary account and is funded primarily from the
Net Revenues of the DFW Cost Center, plus interest income. Supplemental funding for projects paid
from the DFW Capital Account comes from grants and the issuance of debt. Funds in this account may
be used for any legal purpose without prior airline approval.
Threshold Adjustments – The Use Agreement establishes a Lower Threshold and an Upper
Threshold for Net Revenues from the DFW Cost Center. The Upper Threshold limits the amount
transferred annually to the DFW Capital Account. The Lower Threshold insures a minimum amount will
be transferred to the DFW Capital Account. If DFW Cost Center Net Revenues are budgeted to be less
than the Lower Threshold ($42.9 million in Fiscal Year 2014), then an incremental charge (i.e., a Lower
Threshold Adjustment) is collected through landing fees in an amount sufficient to achieve the Lower
Threshold amount. Conversely, if DFW Cost Center Net Revenues are budgeted to be greater than the
Upper Threshold ($64.3 million in Fiscal Year 2014), then 75% of the excess is credited to the Airfield
-34-
Cost Center as an Upper Threshold Adjustment. This reduces budgeted landing fees. The remaining 25%
may be retained in the DFW Cost Center and transferred to the DFW Capital Account at the end of the
Fiscal Year. The benefit of the Lower Threshold Adjustment is that it guarantees that DFW will have a
minimum level of cash to transfer to the DFW Capital Account so that DFW can replace assets on a
timely basis. Conversely, the Upper Threshold limits the Airport’s ability to generate significantly more
net revenues and serves to reduce Signatory Airlines’ costs as non-airline revenues increase. It also places
a limit on DFW’s ability to significantly increase its coverage ratios. If the amount of cash unassigned to
projects in the DFW Capital Account exceeds the Maximum Threshold ($107.2 million in Fiscal Year
2014) then 50% of such excess will be used to offset landing fees for the next succeeding fiscal year and
50% will be deposited into the Joint Capital Account. The Threshold Amounts are adjusted annually for
inflation.
Reconciliation Adjustments – At the end of each Fiscal Year, DFW performs a reconciliation
such that the revenues collected equal the actual net cost to operate and maintain the airfield and the
terminal. Any difference is either charged or credited to that cost center in the next fiscal year, beginning
in January.
Annual Capital Transfer – Per the terms of the Use Agreement, an annual transfer is made from
the Joint Capital Account to the Terminal Cost Center to reduce the cost of the terminal to the airlines for
a period of years. This transfer was $28 million in Fiscal Year 2011 (first year of new Use Agreement)
and $24 million in Fiscal Year 2012. The transfer will be reduced by $4 million each year through Fiscal
Year 2017 when it will be eliminated.
DFW Terminal Contribution – Per the terms of the Use Agreement, an annual transfer is made
from the DFW Cost Center to the Terminal Cost Center to pay for DFW’s share of common use and
leasable, but unleased space, in Terminals D and E. This amount was $5.85 million in Fiscal Year 2013.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-35-
The following chart is a summary of the current Airline Use Agreement rate model.
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund
Airline Cost Centers
DFW Cost Centers
Airfield
Expenses
Direct Costs
DPS and Overhead Allocations
Debt Service (net of PFCs)
Terminal
Expenses
Direct Costs
DPS and Overhead Allocations
Debt Service (net of PFCs)
Less: Misc Airfield Revenues
General Aviation
Fueling Facility Lease
Less: Misc. Terminal Rentals
Federal Inspection Fees
Turn Fees; TSA rentals
Concessions Reimbursements
+/- Transfers/Adjustments
+ DFW Terminal Contribution
+ Annual Capital Transfer
+/- True-Up Adjustment
Net Cost = Terminal Rentals (KPI)
+/- Transfers/Adjustments
- Lower Threshold Adjustment
+ Upper Threshold Adjustment
+/- True-Up Adjustment
Net Cost = Landing Fees (KPI)
Airline Cost & Airline Cost per Enplanement (KPI)
DFW
DFW Revenues (Business Units)
Parking, Concessions, RAC,
Commercial Development,
Employee Transp., Taxis
Utilities, and Interest Income
Less: Expenses
Direct Costs
DPS and Overhead Allocations
Debt Service (net of PFCs)
- Transfers/Other
- Skylink Costs
- DFW Terminal Contribution
DFW Cost Center
Net Revenues (KPI)
+/- Threshold Adjustments
+/- True-Up Adjustment
Net Revenues to the
DFW Capital Account (KPI)
Capital Accounts (Capital Improvement Fund)
Joint Capital Account
+ Natural Gas Royalties
+ Sale of Land Proceeds
- Annual Capital Transfer to the
Terminal Cost Center
Coverage Account
Funded from existing coverage,
plus coverage from New Debt
Service from all three cost centers
as debt service increases
DFW Capital Account
Funded annually from DFW CC.
Contributions must be higher than
“Lower Threshold” and cannot
exceed the “Upper Threshold.”
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-36-
Average Landing Fees and Terminal Rental Rates
Table 6 shows average landing fee rates and average terminal rental rates for the past five fiscal
years. An average landing fee rate is used because the Airport makes rate adjustments during the year.
Prior to Fiscal Year 2011, the Airport settled annually with the Signatory Airlines as opposed to making
interim adjustments.
Terminal rental rates equate to the average cost to operate and maintain the terminals per square
foot of leasable space. Under the new Use Agreement, Signatory Airlines that lease space pay a
consolidated and equalized terminal rental rate regardless of which terminal they occupy. In the prior Use
Agreement, Signatory Airlines paid a myriad of fees and rentals to occupy terminals. Accordingly, there
is no comparable cost per square foot for the period Fiscal Year 2010 and prior. However, the new Use
Agreement shifted costs from the airfield to the terminals to more closely reflect the cost to maintain and
operate these facilities.
Table 6
Average Signatory Landing Fee and Terminal Rentals Rates (Unaudited)
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
2013
Average Landing Fee Rates*
Final Rates at the True-up
Budgeted
(1)
Average Terminal Rental Rates**
Final Rates at the True-up
Budgeted
(1)
2009
$
2.72
$
2.98
$
2.90
$
4.49
$
4.54
$
3.21
$
3.33
$
3.11
$
4.70
$
4.60
$ 115.73
$ 103.30
$
94.09
n/a
n/a
$ 128.13
$ 106.80
$
94.95
n/a
n/a
* Per 1,000 pounds
** Per square foot, not available prior to Fiscal Year 2011 as terminal costs were calculated differently under old Use
Agreement before credits.
Source - DFW Finance Department.
(1)
For the purposes of Continuing Disclosure, the Budgeted rate is what was formerly called the Interim Rate.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-37-
Airline Cost and Passenger Airline Cost Per Enplanement (CPE)
Two of DFW’s KPIs are airline cost and passenger airline cost per CPE. Airline cost measures
the total payments by the passenger and air cargo carriers primarily for landing fees and terminal rentals.
CPE measures the passenger airline (only) payments divided by the number of enplanements. The
Airport’s goal is to maintain an airline cost and CPE structure competitive with other large major hub
airports. The Airport staff provides monthly financial information on its website at
www.dfwairport.com/investors. On a quarterly basis, it provides cost per enplanement data. Readers are
encouraged to review such information.
Table 7 shows airline cost and CPE on a Final Rate at the True-Up and Interim Rate basis for the
last five fiscal years. Airline cost and CPE have been adjusted to reflect rebates paid under the Airport’s
Air Service Incentive Program (“ASIP”) from the DFW Capital Account beginning in Fiscal Year 2011
when DFW began showing these rebates as a reduction in airline cost in the audited financial statements.
ASIP payments do not flow through the Operating Revenue and Expense or airline rate base as described
above because FAA regulations do not allow ASIP rebates to be included in rate base calculations. ASIP
payments prior to Fiscal Year 2011 were not material.
Table 7
Airline Cost and Passenger Airline Cost Per Enplanement (CPE)
(Unaudited)
2013
Airline Cost (millions)*
Final Rates at the True-up
Budgeted
(1)
Cost per Enplanement*
Final Rates at the True-up
Budgeted
(1)
Fiscal Year Ended, September 30
2012
2011
2010
2009
$
225.3
$
200.1
$
190.5
$
203.3
$
213.9
$
243.8
$
203.4
$
202.4
$
216.4
$
227.6
$
7.20
$
6.54
$
6.30
$
6.74
$
7.17
$
7.91
$
6.72
$
6.73
$
7.29
$
7.78
* Includes Air Service Incentive rebates from DFW Capital Account beginning in Fiscal Year 2011.
Source - DFW Finance Department.
(1)
For the purposes of Continuing Disclosure, the Budgeted Rate is what was formerly called the Interim Rate.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-38-
DFW Cost Center Net Revenues
The DFW Cost Center was created as part of the new Use Agreement. One of the Airport’s most
important objectives is to grow DFW Cost Center Net Revenues which includes all of the Airport’s nonairline business units. The following table provides a summary of the DFW Cost Center for the Fiscal
Years ended September 30, 2013, 2012 and 2011 and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
The parking, concessions, rental car and commercial development business units are priced to generate
net revenues. The remaining business units (grouped as other revenues) include employee transportation,
ground transportation, and non-terminal utilities and are priced to break even.
Under the Use Agreement, the DFW Cost Center is also responsible for paying all of the costs
associated with the Skylink people mover system and making a contribution to the Terminal Cost Center
based on unused leaseable and common use space. The following table highlights the gross margin from
the DFW Cost Center before Skylink costs and the Terminal Contribution (see “RATE SETTING AND
FINANCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS–Airline Use Agreement Rate Model”).
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
DFW Cost Center Net Revenues
(Unaudited)
Revenues*
Parking
Concessions
Rental Car
Commercial Development
Other Revenues
Total Revenues
6 Months Ended 03/31
2014
2013
Fiscal Year Ended
30-Sep-13 30-Sep-12 30-Sep-11
$
$
DFW CC Expenditures
Operating Expenses
Debt Service, net of PFCs
Total Expenditures
Gross Margin - DFW Cost Center
Less Transfers and Skylink
DFW Terminal Contribution
Skylink Costs
Net Revenues from DFW Cost Center
$
57.1
34.2
15.7
19.7
16.2
142.9
$
55.6
30.1
14.5
17.7
15.6
133.5
116.1
63.8
31.4
36.6
30.0
277.8
$
110.8
56.0
27.8
34.5
28.7
257.8
$
107.5
53.1
27.7
36.5
25.3
250.1
(53.4)
(17.3)
(70.7)
(49.9)
(14.5)
(64.4)
(116.6)
(36.2)
(152.8)
(114.8)
(30.7)
(145.5)
(112.5)
(28.7)
(141.2)
72.2
69.1
125.0
112.3
108.9
(3.8)
(18.8)
(4.1)
(17.0)
(5.9)
(22.4)
(14.2)
(21.4)
(14.1)
(23.0)
49.60
* Revenue classifications based on Use Agreement
-39-
$
48.09
$
96.70
$
76.70
$
71.80
NON-AIRLINE BUSINESS UNITS INFORMATION
This Section of the Official Statement provides a summary of DFW’s most significant revenue
producing non-airline business units (i.e., parking, concessions, rental car, commercial development,
natural gas, and the Public Facility Improvement Corporation) and their key operating and financial
performance metrics. Parking, concessions, rental car, and commercial development are part of the DFW
Cost Center and are priced to generate net revenues. The amounts provided in this Section of the Official
Statement are unaudited. Airport staff provides monthly updates to the information in many of the below
tables. Readers are directed to http://dfwairport.com/investors for such updates.
Parking
The Airport manages its own parking operations. Parking is the largest source of non-airline
operating revenue at the Airport totaling $116.1 million or 19.9% of total Gross Revenues in Fiscal Year
2013.
The Airport, as of September 30, 2013, had a total of 38,784 public parking spaces available. See
“CAPITAL PROJECTS–Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program.” The Table below highlights
DFW’s parking products, spaces and parking rates.
DFW Parking Space and Rate Summary
Parking Products
Terminal lots
A (3 structures)
B (3 structures)
C (4 structures)
D (1 structure)
E (3 structures)
Infield (uncovered)
Total Terminals
Express lots
Remote lots
Intra-day
Valet
Drop-off
Pass-throughs
Total Public Spaces
Employee Parking
No. of
Parking
Spaces
Spaces
Closed for
Renovation
Spaces
Available
5,567
3,524
5,781
7,821
4,050
1,842
28,585
8,642
4,864
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
42,091
(1,829)
(860)
(618)
(3,307)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
(3,307)
3,738
2,664
5,781
7,821
4,050
1,224
25,278
8,642
4,864
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
38,784
8,648
-
8,648
Post TRIP
Renovation
Spaces* Daily Parking Rate (includes sales tax)
$18 toll tag; $20 cash or credit card
7,700
3,524
5,781
7,821
4,050
1,605
30,481
8,642
$11 uncovered; $13 covered
4,864
$9 uncovered
n/a
$2 to $7 (up to 6 hours)
n/a
$25 (uses existing parking facilities)
n/a
$1 (8-30 minutes)
n/a
$1 toll tag; $2 cash
43,987
8,648
* Included in Fiscal Year 2012 Financial Plan
The Airport is closing and renovating sections of the parking garages as it implements TRIP.
One section of the parking garages in Terminal A, B and E will be closed at one time through Fiscal Year
2015. Airport management believes that there is sufficient remaining terminal, express, and valet
capacity to maintain parking revenues despite these closures.
The Airport’s Financial Plan includes two major parking garage reconstruction projects to meet
projected future parking demand. The first is the Terminal A parking garage which has three
-40-
structures. Each structure will be demolished and rebuilt into one new structure concurrent with the
terminal Section renovations in TRIP. The estimated cost of this new parking garage is approximately
$199 million. It will have a capacity of approximately 7,700 spaces and includes various customer
service enhancements such as elevators and a parking guidance system. The second parking project is the
Terminal E parking garage at an estimated cost of $160 million for two sections sequenced with the
Terminal E TRIP construction. The Terminal E parking garage will have a capacity of approximately
5,700 spaces and will include various customer service enhancements including elevators and a parking
guidance system. Other minor parking expansion projects include the expansion of more than 3,000
covered revenue parking spaces at the North Express Parking lot. This North Express covered parking
expansion is currently in process and will be completed in two additional phases as demand warrants. All
three phases are estimated to cost approximately $37.6 million. Additionally, there are plans to expand
employee surface parking for approximately $37.6 million. The Terminal E parking garage
reconstruction, the two outer year phases of the North Express Parking expansion, and the employee
surface parking structure projects would require approval by the Signatory Airlines.
Table 8 highlights key parking financial and operational information for the past five fiscal years
and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
Table 8
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Summary of Key Parking Financial and Operational Information (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Parking Revenues (Ms)
Terminal/Infield
Express/Remote
Drop Off/Meeter-Greeter
Pass-Through
Other
Total Revenues
Parking Transactions (Ms)
Terminal/Infield
Express/Remote
Drop Off/Meeter-Greeter
Pass-Through
Total Transactions
Average Length of Stay (Days)
Terminal
Infield
Express
Remote
Weighted Average
Parking Rev/Originating Pax*
$
$
$
34.5
13.1
4.9
1.4
3.2
57.1
$
$
34.3
11.9
4.1
1.1
4.2
55.6
2013
$
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
71.7
26.0
8.6
2.3
7.5
$ 116.1
$
69.6
22.9
8.6
4.0
5.7
$ 110.8
$
71.2
21.8
8.6
3.4
2.2
$ 107.2
$
$
64.8
20.7
8.3
2.6
1.1
97.3
2009
$
$
63.1
18.1
8.4
2.3
0.8
92.7
0.88
0.31
4.01
0.90
6.10
1.05
0.28
3.45
0.95
5.73
2.04
0.64
6.69
1.68
11.06
1.80
0.65
7.58
3.23
13.26
1.97
0.63
7.57
3.08
13.25
1.88
0.61
6.94
2.41
11.84
1.92
0.56
6.97
2.19
11.64
2.10
3.93
4.26
2.62
1.71
4.09
4.43
2.25
1.83
4.19
4.07
2.38
2.09
3.60
4.00
2.50
1.93
3.64
3.81
2.37
2.03
3.69
3.70
2.44
1.95
1.98
4.28
3.76
2.40
8.71
$
8.75
$
7.98
$
7.75
$
8.02
$
7.91
$
7.46
* Does not include Pass-throughs
Source: DFW Finance and Parking Departments
The increase in parking revenues for Fiscal Year 2013 compared to the same period in Fiscal
Year 2012 was primarily due to higher transaction volumes in the Valet, Terminal and Express products.
-41-
In addition to revenues from on-airport parking, there are nine off-airport parking providers (six
self-park and three dedicated valets) which pay a 10% fee to the Airport for access to the Airport. The offairport operators report their gross revenues to the Airport on a monthly basis. Total off-airport sales
volume, including off-airport valet providers, was approximately $29.6 million in Fiscal Year 2013.
Terminal Concessions
Terminal concessions primarily consist of food and beverage, retail and duty free, advertising,
and customer service/amenities. Concessions agreements generally are for a term of 5 to 10 years and
include a minimum annual guarantee (“MAG”) and percentage rent. The Airport occasionally combines
several concessions locations into one concessions package. As of December 31, 2013, the Airport had
223 total locations. The number of concession locations will vary over the next few years as concessions
are closed and opened in conjunction with TRIP construction.
Table 9 highlights key terminal concessions financial and operational data for the past five fiscal
years and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
Table 9
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Summary of Key Terminal and Non-Terminal Concessions
Financial and Operational Information
(Unaudited)
Number of concessions locations
Leased sq. ft. EOY (000s)
Concessions Sales-Terminal (Ms):
Food and beverage
Retail and duty free
Other In Terminal
Total concessions sales
Concessions sales/enplanement
Concession sales/sq. ft.
Concessions Income to DFW-Terminal (Ms):
Food and beverage
Retail and duty free
Other In Terminal
Income-Terminal Subtotal
Concessions income/enplanement
Concessions income/sq. ft.
Concessions - Not In Terminal*
Total Concessions income to DFW
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
205
222
222
251
$
2013
226
254
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
207
243
214
223
241
231
2009
214
229
95.7
52.8
11.7
160.2
10.93
1,441
$
87.9
52.8
10.8
$ 151.5
$ 10.55
$ 1,207
$ 184.6
111.0
23.3
$ 318.9
$ 10.59
$ 1,254
$ 171.4
103.8
19.7
$ 294.9
$ 10.12
$ 1,320
$ 165.9
101.1
28.3
$ 295.3
$ 10.23
$ 1,224
$ 150.2
92.1
25.3
$ 267.6
$ 9.49
$ 1,159
$ 141.5
88.8
22.8
$ 253.1
$ 9.06
$ 1,105
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
12.4
9.0
12.0
33.4
2.27
300
$
3.0
36.4
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
11.2
8.6
9.6
29.4
2.21
253
$
2.8
32.2
$
$
$
24.0
17.8
20.4
62.2
2.07
245
$
6.0
68.2
$
$
$
21.5
17.2
20.7
59.4
2.04
266
$
6.3
65.7
$
$
$
20.6
17.2
13.8
51.6
1.79
214
$
5.9
57.5
$
$
$
19.6
15.1
13.9
48.6
1.73
211
$
$
$
17.8
15.0
13.4
46.2
1.65
202
$
2.6
51.2
$
2.6
48.8
Source: DFW Finance and Concessions Departments, from concessionaire on-line reporting.
* Non-passenger/non-terminal income. Includes reimbursable services. Not included in ratios.
The overall trend of increasing concessions sales per enplanement is primarily due to the
Airport’s use of market and industry research to identify customer preferences and patterns, thereby
improving the mix of food and beverage, retail, and service options for passengers. The Airport has also
been successful in increasing advertising revenue by introducing additional advertising opportunities,
such as large format and attended advertising displays.
-42-
Additionally, as part of the TRIP construction phasing, the Airport is redesigning concessions
spaces and locating them into strategic zones, such as near gate lounges and security checkpoints. To
date, the Airport has selected new concessions packages for all of Terminal A and approximately 67% of
Terminals B and E. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2011 and extending through Fiscal Year 2012, DFW closed
approximately one-third of Terminal A for TRIP construction. The net impact on concession sales and
income was positive due to the ability of existing operators to absorb the increased demand. Management
does not expect there to be a negative impact on concessions revenues as a result of upcoming TRIP
construction phasing based on the Terminal A model and because new concessions will open with
concepts that better match customer profiles and preferences.
Rental Cars
The consolidated rental car facility located at the airport (“RAC”) covers 145 acres and includes a
common rental building with individual counters and back office space for each rental car company, a
parking garage for ready and return car spaces, a bus maintenance facility, maintenance bays and fueling
systems. The Airport collects ground lease, percentage rent, and O&M expenses from the rental car
companies, all of which have historically exceeded the operating costs of the RAC.
There are six (6) rental car companies with eleven (11) brands operating from the RAC, with a
total available inventory of approximately 25,000 cars. The largest three rental car companies and their
market share are Hertz (37%), Avis (30%), and Vanguard (30%) as of September 30, 2013. There are no
major off-airport rental car companies competing with the Airport.
Table 10 highlights key terminal rental car financial and operational data for the past five fiscal
years and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. The shifts in rental car sales are the result of
changes in the overall United States economy and destination passengers.
Table 10
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Summary of Key Rental Car Financial and Operational Information (Unaudited)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Transaction days (millions)
2.5
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
2013
2.4
5.0
4.9
4.9
2009
4.2
4.1
Rental car sales (millions)
$ 129.1
$
124.1
$
256.9
$
240.5
$
236.9
$
217.1
$
217.5
Income to DFW (millions)
$ 15.7
$
14.5
$
31.4
$
27.7
$
27.7
$
25.7
$
25.7
Income/destination passenger
$ 2.51
$
2.36
$
2.56
$
2.32
$
2.37
$
2.31
$
2.31
Source: DFW Finance and Concessions Departments, from rental car companies self reporting.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-43-
Commercial Development
The Airport has a total landmass of 17,207 acres. As of September 30, 2013, 8,179 acres have
been developed and are being used for runways, taxiways, terminals, roads, and commercially developed
property. Management estimates that approximately 4,839 acres of additional land is available for future
development. A commercial development land use plan has been completed and approved by the Board.
The Airport focuses primarily on developing land that has airport synergy such as logistics and
warehousing.
Commercial Development revenues include ground leases, foreign trade zone tariff, facility rents
generated from non-terminal Airport facilities, as well as property and surface use fees resulting from
natural gas drilling and compensation related to appraised damages to remaining property and
improvements when conveying land interests. Multi-year lease agreements are negotiated with tenants on
a square foot or acre basis. Some leases such as the Hyatt Regency Hotel and Bear Creek Golf Course
also have percentage rent components based on revenues.
The Airport has a 2,500-acre Foreign Trade Zone (“FTZ”) permitting companies with facilities
thereon to avoid or defer payment of custom duties.
Table 11 highlights key commercial development financial and operational information for the
past five fiscal years and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. The Airport currently has
revenue-producing ground leases with 69 tenants for 1,247 acres of land. Approximately 40% of this land
is leased under negotiated terms with the remainder being (primarily those with airfield access) leased at
the Airport Services Rate (“ASR”). The calculation of the ASR is defined in the Use Agreements. The
calculation in the Use Agreements prior to October 1, 2010, was total airport service costs (e.g.,
administrative costs, police, and fire) divided by developed acres. Thus, when the Airport reduced its
airport service cost budget or the number of developed acres increased (e.g., for the Southeast perimeter
taxiway), the ASR decreased. The ASR was changed in the new Use Agreements to be $25,000 per acre
in Fiscal Year 2011 with annual inflation adjustments thereafter. The largest three Airport tenants from a
revenue perspective are: American Airlines (32%), GTE Realty Corporation (8%), and UPS (7%).
Table 11
Summary of Key Commercial Development Financial and Operational Information
(Unaudited)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Ground Lease Revs. (millions)
$ 17.9
$
17.3
Acres Leased (end of period)
1,247
1,229
Average Lease Rate per Acre
-
-
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
2013
$
34.3
$
33.5
$
33.2
$
28.0
2009
$
26.1
1,247
1,166
1,166
1,165
1,152
$ 27,502
$ 28,737
$ 28,494
$ 24,032
$ 22,672
Source: DFW Finance and Commercial Development Departments.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-44-
Natural Gas
On October 6, 2006, the Board signed an agreement (the “Lease”) with Chesapeake Energy
Company (“Chesapeake”) to begin natural gas exploration and extraction at the Airport. The Lease
required payment of an upfront fee (“bonus”) and a percentage of revenue (“royalty”) for the right to
explore and extract natural gas at the Airport. Chesapeake paid a bonus of $185.6 million to the Airport
which was recognized for accounting purposes in Fiscal Year 2007 and Fiscal Year 2008. The Lease
requires Chesapeake to pay an ongoing royalty fee of 25% of gross natural gas revenues.
Bonuses and royalty payments are not Gross Revenues of the Airport. They are treated as
proceeds from the sale of Airport property and are deposited into the Capital Improvements Fund.
Chesapeake also pays surface use and other fees to the Airport on an ongoing basis to manage the
extraction and transportation of natural gas on and through the Airport. Such surface use and other fees
are classified as Gross Revenues of the Airport.
Table 12 highlights key natural gas financial and operational information for the past five fiscal
years and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. Natural gas revenues have declined over the
last four years primarily due to lower market prices for natural gas and declining production at existing
wells (which is normal without refracking). The lower prices have caused Chesapeake to stop drilling
new wells at this time. It is uncertain when or if new wells will be drilled in the future.
Table 12
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Summary of Key Natural Gas Financial and Operational Information
(Unaudited)
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Revenues (millions)
Royalties
Surface use and other revenues
Bonus
Total Natural Gas Revenues
Operational Information
Wells in production
Production (MMcf)
Average price paid to DFW
$
$
3.1
1.8
n/a
4.9
98
3.3
$ 3.85
$
$
3.2
0.4
n/a
3.6
$
98
4.0
3.16
2013
$
$
6.2
2.3
n/a
8.5
$
98
7.8
3.19
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
$
$
7.7
1.0
n/a
8.7
$
98
9.8
2.10
$
$
16.2
3.9
n/a
20.1
$
102
12.5
3.82
$
$
23.8
1.7
n/a
25.5
$
102
23.2
4.01
2009
$
$
23.4
2.8
n/a
26.2
$
101
24.7
3.57
Source: DFW Finance and Commercial Development Departments, production data from
Chesapeake Energy.
The Airport obtained an appraisal from DeGolyer and MacNaughton as of July 31, 2010, of the
extent and value of the proved and probable natural gas reserves of royalty interests in the Airport
property. Estimates of the possible gas reserves were also included. The proved, probable, and possible
reserves presented by DeGolyer and MacNaughton were prepared in accordance with the Petroleum
Resources Management System (“PRMS”) as approved March 2007 by the Society of Petroleum
Engineers, the World Petroleum Council, the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, and the
Society of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers. The appraisal identified 61,533 MMcf of proved reserves,
13,935 MMcf of probable reserves, and 51,526 MMcf of possible reserves. The valuation of these
reserves is dependent on the market price at the time the gas is produced.
-45-
Public Facility Improvement Corporation
The Public Facility Improvement Corporation (“PFIC”) was created in 2001 for the purpose of
financing, planning, constructing, equipping, owning, renovating, repairing, improving, maintaining
and/or operating one or more facilities within the boundaries of the Airport. The revenues and costs of
PFIC projects are separate from the DFW Cost Center and the Airport’s Operating Revenue and Expense,
and therefore, not shared with the Airlines. Except as described below, the revenues of the PFIC are not
Gross Revenues of the Airport. There are currently three approved PFIC projects: the Grand Hyatt Hotel,
the Rental Car Facility and a proposed Hyatt Place Hotel. Management expects that the Airport will
request the Cities to approve additional projects for the PFIC in the future.
Grand Hyatt Hotel. The Grand Hyatt Hotel is a 298-room hotel located in Terminal D that
opened in Fiscal Year 2005. The hotel is owned by the Airport and leased to the PFIC which is
responsible for hotel management. The PFIC has signed an agreement with the Hyatt International
Corporation to provide the day-to-day management of hotel operations.
The PFIC issued approximately $70 million Public Facility Improvement Corporation Airport
Hotel Revenue Bonds, Series 2001 to construct the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Since the opening of the hotel,
Grand Hyatt net revenues have been used to pay debt service on these bonds and for capital
improvements to the Hotel. In 2012, the Series 2001 Bonds were refunded by the Dallas/Fort Worth
International Airport Joint Revenue Improvement and Refunding Bonds, Series 2012C. In consideration
for the Board issuing the Series 2012C Bonds, the PFIC entered into a Financing Agreement whereby the
PFIC will deposit, to the extent available, an amount sufficient to pay that portion of the debt service and
coverage requirement attributable to the refunding of the Series 2001 Bonds. Although the net revenues
of the Grand Hyatt are not Gross Revenues of the Airport and are not pledged to the payment of debt
service on the Bonds, amounts transferred to the Board to pay for debt service and coverage, once
received by the Board and deposited to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund become part of the
Pledged Funds of the Airport.
Rental Car Facility (“RAC”): In 1998 and 1999, DFW’s Facility Improvement Corporation
(“FIC”) issued approximately $160 million of taxable bonds (the “FIC Bonds”) to construct a
consolidated rental car facility, referred to as the “RAC.” The FIC Bonds were secured by the collection
of a Customer Facility Charge (the “CFC”) by the rental car companies. The FIC Bonds were defeased
with the proceeds of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds,
Series 2011A. In consideration for the Board issuing the Series 2011A Bonds, the FIC entered into a
Financing Agreement whereby the FIC will deposit, to the extent available, an amount sufficient to pay
that portion of the debt service and Coverage attributable to the 2011A Bonds. The CFC is currently
$4.00 per transaction day and may be changed at any time as necessary to ensure the payment of debt
service. The CFC is also used to make capital facility improvements to the RAC and to purchase buses.
During Fiscal Year 2012 the Cities authorized the assignment of the FIC’s assets, obligations and
responsibilities, with respect to the RAC to the PFIC. Although the revenues from the CFC are not Gross
Revenues of the Airport and are not pledged to the payment of debt service on the Bonds, amounts
transferred to the Board to pay for debt service and coverage on the 2011A Bonds, once received by the
Board and deposited to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund, become part of the Pledged Funds of
the Airport.
Hyatt Place Hotel. During 2012 the Cities authorized the Hyatt Place Hotel as an approved PFIC
project. A feasibility study has been completed on the Hyatt Place Hotel and the Board has approved a
development agreement to begin the hotel’s construction. The current estimated cost for construction of
the Hyatt Place Hotel is approximately $23 million, which management anticipates funding from
-46-
available and unrestricted cash in the PFIC. The Hyatt Place Hotel is expected to be completed in mid to
late 2015. The net revenues of the Hyatt Place Hotel are not Gross Revenues of the Airport and are not
pledged to the payment of debt service on the Bonds.
As of March 31, 2014, the PFIC had unrestricted available cash and investments of approximately
$68 million.
Table 13 highlights the combined cash flows from operations and debt service coverage for the
Grand Hyatt and RAC business assuming both entities were part of the PFIC in Fiscal Year 2013.
Table 13
Actual/Proforma PFIC Cash Flows and Coverage
Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013
(Unaudited)
Revenues
Less:
Expenses
Net Available for Debt Service
Debt Service
Grand
Hyatt
RAC - CFC
Total
$
31.0 $
20.2 $
51.2
$
Coverage Ratio
21.9
9.1
4.0
$
2.27
20.2
15.6
1.29
$
21.9
29.3
19.6
1.48
CAPITAL PROJECTS
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP)
DFW’s most significant current capital project is the TRIP which renovates and updates DFW’s
four older terminals (A, B, C and E) between 2011 and 2019. The planning, programming, and schematic
design of the TRIP was developed jointly by the Airport and the Signatory Airlines. The Signatory
Airlines preapproved the $1.92 billion TRIP budget and the bond financing of the project as part of the
Use Agreement that became effective October 1, 2010. Approximately two-thirds of the TRIP budget
replaces aging terminal building systems such as electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling, security, fire
safety, conveyances, telecommunications, lighting, and information technology systems. The majority of
the remaining budget upgrades ticket halls, reconfigures TSA security checkpoints, replaces certain
baggage systems, and develops concessions villages. The TRIP also includes modest improvements to the
terminal exteriors, entrances and parking structures.
Renovation of each terminal will be completed in phases (i.e., each terminal has three or four
major phases with sub-phases to ensure on-going flight activity) with renovation of each phase lasting
approximately 12-18 months (see construction schedule below). The Airport currently has sufficient
terminal capacity to renovate up to one section of three different terminals at one time without adversely
impacting flight operations activity. However, only one section of Terminals A and C may be closed at
one time to accommodate American Airlines projected flight activity.
Any portion of the TRIP described below may be expanded, modified, reduced or eliminated, at
the discretion of the Airport or the Signatory Airlines, with approvals from the other party as provided in
-47-
the Use Agreements. Subsequent to signing the Use Agreement, the Signatory Airlines have approved
approximately $119 million of scope additions for projects such as Terminal B baggage handling system,
terminal window replacement, terminal vault replacement, and changes to ticketing areas. As a result, the
current TRIP budget is now $2.045 billion.
Airport management and the Board receive regular reports regarding the present status of the
TRIP budget and schedule from the Airport’s Vice President-Airport Development, who oversees and
receives regular reports from each of the managers for the various TRIP components. These reports detail
the current status of each component of the TRIP and include such information as cost to date and
percentage to completion, and estimate to complete. Summary status reports will be available periodically
on the Airport’s web site: http://www.dfwairport.com.
Airport management has entered into discussions with the Signatory Airlines to rebaseline the
TRIP budget and schedule for all four terminals. In addition, American Airlines has requested as part of
this process that the Airport estimate the incremental schedule and cost impact of two potential scope
additions: (1) building back the “high Terminal C gates” (gates C35-C39) currently planned to be
demolished as part of TRIP; and (2) the construction of a new Terminal C parking garage to replace the
existing garage.
The current status of the rebaselining exercise shows that Terminals A, B and E are currently
anticipated to have budget increases of approximately $328 million and Terminal C is currently
anticipated to have budget increases totaling $157 million, not including the “high C gates” or the
Terminal C Parking Garage. The estimated incremental cost of the potential scope additions are
approximately $100 million for rebuilding the “high Terminal C gates” and $200 million for a new
Terminal C parking garage.
It is assumed that any increase in TRIP budget will be financed with the issuance of Additional
Obligations. Financing for $269 million of potential cost increases for Terminals A, B and E was included
in the accompanying Report of Airport Consultant; but the additional $59 from the rebaselining of
Terminals A, B and E, the $157 million of potential incremental cost of Terminal C and the incremental
costs of the “high-Terminal C gates” and parking garage have not been considered in the Report of
Airport Consultant.
The rebaseline process is currently expected to be complete in mid-summer 2014. Then the
Signatory Airlines will evaluate the total cost and decide if the potential additions should be included in
the program, and/or if other scope can be reduced. At the conclusion of this process, the Airport will
request Signatory Airline approval of a new baseline TRIP budget and schedule for the four terminals.
The current target date for completion of this process is July 31, 2014. There is no certainty that
incremental scope or cost increases will not occur in the future after the rebaseline is established.
-48-
The following table sets out the current TRIP Budget, including the anticipated increases
described above, but does not include the estimated incremental cost of the potential scope additions of
$100 million for the rebuilding of the “high Terminal C gates” and the $200 million for a new Terminal C
parking garage:
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP)
In Millions
Current
Budget
Terminal A
$
519.0
Incurred
$
363.7
Estimate at
Future Spend Completion
$
283.3
$
647.0
Variance
$
(128.0)
Terminal B
451.0
214.2
317.8
532.0
(81.0)
Terminal C
519.0
55.9
620.1
676.0
(157.0)
Terminal E
556.4
212.9
462.1
675.0
(118.6)
Totals
$
2,045.4
$
846.6
$
1,683.4
$
2,530.0
$
(484.6)
Due to the complexity of the renovation work, unforeseen site conditions, and the need to keep
airline gates operational due to the growth of air service, the TRIP schedule is subject to change and
updated on a regular basis. Following is the current TRIP schedule.
Projecting the cost of a long-term capital improvement program such as the TRIP is subject to
many variables, and inevitably, any budget for such a program must be updated periodically to reflect
current economic conditions. As described above, the budget for the TRIP has been updated to reflect
projected increases in cost, which information is posted periodically to the Airport’s web site. In view of
the foregoing, unless the TRIP budget experiences an increase or decrease that, in the opinion of Airport
-49-
management will materially affect the Airport’s operations or financial condition, budget updates will be
reported only on a periodic basis on the Airport’s web site.
Airport Improvement Program (Other Projects, Excluding TRIP)
Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Plan. DFW publishes a long-term Financial Plan on an annual basis,
usually in January. The Financial Plan includes a detailed list of capital projects that were planned at that
time to be funded from either the Joint Capital Account or the DFW Capital Account through Fiscal Year
2020.
A copy of DFW’s Financial Plan can be found on the website at
http://www.dfwairport.com/investors/.
Joint Capital Account - Projects funded from the Joint Capital Account require majority-ininterest (“MII”) approval by the Signatory Airlines, subject to certain limitations included in the Use
Agreement. As part of the Use Agreement, the Signatory Airlines approved $310 million of additional
capital projects including $90 million for Terminal D extensions on the north and south end of the
terminal and $220 million (net of $52 million of assumed discretionary Airport Improvement Program
Grants) of additional projects broken into five categories: airfield; rail, roads and bridges; utilities;
parking; and other. Since the Use Agreement was signed, the Signatory Airlines have approved an
additional $331 million of capital projects with the most significant being the Terminal A Parking garage.
Of the $641 million of non-TRIP projects approved to date, DFW has spent $302.5 million (47.1%) and
committed an additional $105 million (16.4%) as of December 31, 2013.
The Financial Plan also includes $371 million of projects not yet approved by the Signatory
Airlines, the largest of which is two new employee parking garages. Airport management includes these
in the Financial Plan because, in their opinion, the Signatory Airlines will ultimately approve them.
Additional projects or increases in project scopes may be added to the Financial Plan in the
future. These projects, if approved by the Signatory Airlines, would most likely be funded through the
issuance of Additional Obligations.
DFW Capital Account - The Use Agreement provides that net revenues from the DFW Cost
Center be deposited into the DFW Capital Account. (See “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and
Flow of Funds–Current Disposition of Capital Improvements Fund Amounts” for a discussion on the
limitations of the amount of net revenues that may flow into the DFW Capital Account). Per the Fiscal
Year 2014 Financial Plan, the DFW Cost Center will generate net revenues sufficient to transfer between
$70 and $100 million of net revenues annually to the DFW Capital Account through Fiscal Year 2020.
These proceeds are expected to be used to fund non-TRIP renewal and replacement projects on the
Airport; however, the proceeds of the DFW Capital Account may be used for any lawful purpose, subject
to limitations defined in the Use Agreement. The Airport plans to use the funds for program renewals and
replacements annually as part of its budget process. These projects will be funded primarily from existing
cash balances and incremental proceeds from the DFW Cost Center.
The Use Agreement provides the Airport the right to issue bonds to finance certain DFW Cost
Center projects, provided the cost of the debt service is repaid by the DFW Cost Center. The Financial
Plan includes the assumption that DFW will issue up to approximately $179 million of Additional
Obligations to finance projects that will allow further commercial development and a new twoSection parking garage in Terminal E.
DFW has entered into an agreement with American Airlines as part of its assumption of its leases
of nonresidential real estate, including the Use Agreement in its Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding in
2012, to make up to approximately $63 million in improvements to facilities and hangers leased by
-50-
American Airlines. These projects will be funded with Additional Obligations which will be primarily
repaid through incremental lease rates over time.
CASH AND DEBT FINANCING
Unrestricted and Restricted Cash and Investment Balances
The Airport’s Master Bond Ordinance requires the Airport to reserve certain funds for designated
purposes. These funds are classified as restricted. The remaining cash and investments are available for
any legal purpose (including repayment of debt) and are classified as unrestricted. Table 14 reflects
restricted and unrestricted cash balances by primary source and the number of days of unrestricted cash
available to pay operating expenses as of the end of each of the last five fiscal years and the six months
ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
Table 14
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Cash and Investment Balances (Unaudited, in millions)
As of March 31
2014
2013
Unrestricted Cash and Investments
Operating revenue and expense fund
Capital improvement fund
PFIC
Total unrestricted cash/investments
Restricted Cash and Investments
Passenger facility charges
Bond/construction funds
Debt Service Fund
Debt Service Reserve Fund
PFIC
Other
Total restricted cash/investments
Total DFW cash/investments
Operating Expenses
Unrestricted Cash/Ops Exps - Days
$
2013
As of September 30 (fiscal year end)
2012
2011
2010
2009
$243
382
69
694
$227
376
60
663
$214
407
66
686
$202
400
59
661
$191
353
29
573
$164
400
564
$188
432
620
14
1,435
153
292
11
5
1,910
2,604
19
836
139
226
12
4
1,236
1,899
11
1,631
186
287
9
5
2,128
2,815
32
593
145
170
12
10
962
1,623
61
199
122
167
37
3
588
1,161
84
6
113
167
80
5
455
1,019
95
18
103
168
87
7
478
1,098
184
689
$173
701
$
410
611
$
363
663
$
352
594
$
333
619
$
342
662
Source: DFW Airport Finance Department records.
Unrestricted Cash. The cash and investments (collectively called “cash” in this subsection) in
the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund includes a 90-day operating reserve, the rolling coverage
amount (equal to 25% of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service), plus any positive cash flow from operations
and balance sheet management. The Capital Improvements Fund (“CIF”) consists of the Joint Capital
Account, Rolling Coverage Account and the DFW Capital Account. The cash in these funds is classified
as unrestricted because it can be used for any lawful purpose. PFIC cash relates to unrestricted cash and
investments included in the PFIC from the Grand Hyatt Hotel and Customer Facility Charge (“CFC”)
collections for the Rental Car Facility. Prior to Fiscal Year 2012, PFIC cash was classified as restricted
due to trust indentures relating to outstanding debt. Since the PFIC and FIC debt has been refunded,
unreserved PFIC cash is classified as unrestricted. (See “NON-AIRLINE BUSINESS UNITS–Public
Facility Improvement Corporation” and “–Restricted Cash” discussion below).
Restricted Cash. Restricted cash includes the Passenger Facility Charge (“PFC”) Fund,
Bond/Construction Fund, Debt Service and Debt Service Reserve Funds, and certain PFIC/FIC cash
-51-
accounts. PFCs are restricted to the stated use per the terms of the respective PFC application (see
“PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES”). Bond/Construction Funds are reserved for projects listed in
the bond documents. Debt Service and Debt Service Reserve Funds are restricted to the repayment and/or
security of outstanding debt (see “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS-Funds and Flow of Funds”).
PFIC/FIC cash was restricted prior to Fiscal Year 2012 due to the trust indentures related to outstanding
debt. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2012, restricted PFIC cash relates to required reserves for the Grand Hyatt
Hotel and RAC Customer Transportation Charges collected but unspent. The FIC no longer has cash
because the cash was transferred to the PFIC during Fiscal Year 2012 (see “NON-AIRLINE BUSINESS
UNITS–Public Facility Improvement Corporation”).
Joint Revenue Bond Debt Service Requirement
Table 15 is a summary of debt service requirements for all Outstanding Obligations including the
Bonds.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-52-
Table 15
Joint Revenue Debt Service Requirements(1)
12
Months
Ending
(1)
Series 2014C Bonds
Principal
Interest
11/1/2014 $
11/1/2015
11/1/2016
11/1/2017
11/1/2018
2,220,000
11/1/2019
2,340,000
11/1/2020
2,445,000
11/1/2021
2,570,000
11/1/2022
2,700,000
11/1/2023
2,815,000
11/1/2024
2,970,000
11/1/2025
3,115,000
11/1/2026
3,280,000
11/1/2027
3,435,000
11/1/2028
3,605,000
11/1/2029
3,790,000
11/1/2030
3,985,000
11/1/2031
4,180,000
11/1/2032
4,385,000
11/1/2033
4,585,000
11/1/2034
4,835,000
11/1/2035
9,305,000
11/1/2036
9,680,000
11/1/2037
10,095,000
11/1/2038
10,500,000
11/1/2039
10,930,000
11/1/2040
3,320,000
11/1/2041
3,195,000
11/1/2042
3,350,000
11/1/2043
2,110,000
11/1/2044
2,220,000
11/1/2045
2,325,000
11/1/2046
11/1/2047
11/1/2048
11/1/2049
11/1/2050
-
$
Totals
$110,753,372
$124,285,000
1,699,618
5,772,288
5,772,288
5,772,288
5,772,288
5,661,288
5,544,288
5,422,038
5,293,538
5,158,538
5,017,788
4,869,288
4,713,538
4,549,538
4,377,788
4,197,538
4,008,038
3,808,788
3,599,788
3,380,538
3,151,288
2,909,538
2,525,706
2,126,406
1,709,988
1,276,863
826,000
660,000
500,250
332,750
227,250
116,250
-
Total
$
1,699,618
5,772,288
5,772,288
5,772,288
7,992,288
8,001,288
7,989,288
7,992,038
7,993,538
7,973,538
7,987,788
7,984,288
7,993,538
7,984,538
7,982,788
7,987,538
7,993,038
7,988,788
7,984,788
7,965,538
7,986,288
12,214,538
12,205,706
12,221,406
12,209,988
12,206,863
4,146,000
3,855,000
3,850,250
2,442,750
2,447,250
2,441,250
-
$ 235,038,372
May not add due to rounding.
-53-
$
Outstanding
Capitalized
Total
Debt Service
Obligations
Interest
Outstanding
233,164,607
392,523,831
400,293,142
408,074,172
416,467,547
419,168,151
421,936,291
426,631,568
418,521,644
421,369,556
424,047,506
409,869,200
404,426,500
402,630,350
406,930,294
409,935,556
414,445,969
419,886,281
418,565,456
423,550,950
430,411,863
433,718,050
269,394,538
269,405,475
274,396,925
283,217,175
292,132,344
292,142,344
292,133,544
284,444,306
271,661,438
271,653,725
6,031,250
5,825,000
5,618,750
5,412,500
5,206,250
$11,785,244,050
$ (46,549,968) $
(66,834,285)
(23,749,840)
(539,833)
-
188,314,257
331,461,833
382,315,590
413,306,627
424,459,834
427,169,439
429,925,579
434,623,606
426,515,182
429,343,094
432,035,294
417,853,488
412,420,038
410,614,888
414,913,082
417,923,094
422,439,007
427,875,069
426,550,244
431,516,488
438,398,150
445,932,588
281,600,244
281,626,882
286,606,913
295,424,038
296,278,344
295,997,344
295,983,794
286,887,056
274,108,688
274,094,975
6,031,250
5,825,000
5,618,750
5,412,500
5,206,250
$ (137,673,927) $11,882,608,495
Debt Service Coverage
The Airport’s Master Bond Ordinance (see “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Rate Covenant”)
requires that the Airport establish rates and charges which are reasonably estimated to achieve the two
debt service coverage ratio s defined below. The Airport has added an additional coverage calculation for
information purposes that includes net cash flows from sources that are not Gross Revenues. The
computation of these ratios is summarized in Table 16.
Gross Revenues – The Master Bond Ordinance requires that the Airport set rates at levels to
produce Gross Revenues sufficient to pay the operating expenses plus 1.25 times Accrued Aggregate
Debt Service. This calculation includes the Rolling Coverage amount which is a Gross Revenue of the
Airport. Per Table 16, the Gross Revenue ratio was always 1.25 under the “Original” Use Agreement
(prior to Fiscal Year 2011) because the Airport was fully residual and settled with the Signatory Airlines
each year, such that Gross Revenues always equaled operating expense plus 1.25 times Accrued
Aggregate Debt Service. The increase in Fiscal Year 2011 was due to the transfer of net revenues to the
DFW Capital Account under the new Use Agreement.
Current Gross Revenues - The Master Bond Ordinance obligates the Airport to set rates at levels
sufficient to produce Current Gross Revenues sufficient to pay operating expenses plus 1.0 times Accrued
Aggregate Debt Service. Current Gross Revenues differ from Gross Revenues in that they exclude
transfers from the Capital Improvements Fund such as Rolling Coverage and the Annual Capital Transfer
(see “RATE SETTING AND FINANCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS–Airline Use
Agreement Rate Model”). In other words, Current Gross Revenues only include operating revenues from
rates and charges, Special Revenues, plus interest income. The new Use Agreement limits the Airport’s
ability to significantly improve the Current Gross Revenue coverage ratio because it must use 75% of
DFW Cost Center Net Revenues in excess of the Upper Threshold to reduce landing fees. (See “RATE
SETTING AND FINANCIAL KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS–Airline Use Agreement Rate
Model”).
All Sources – This coverage ratio adds other available net revenues not classified as Gross
Revenues (e.g., PFIC/FIC net revenues and proceeds from natural gas royalties and the sale of land) to the
Gross Revenue calculations. The ratio computation is presented both with and without Capital
Improvements Fund transfers.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-54-
Table 16
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Debt Service Coverage
(Unaudited, in millions)
2013
Coverage Calculation - Gross Revenues
Operating Revenues
Airfield cost center
Terminal cost center
DFW cost center (non-airline revenues)
Total Operating Revenues
Non-operating Revenues*
Rolling coverage
Total Gross Revenues
Less Operating Expenses
Gross Revenues available for debt service
Debt Service
Coverage ratio - Gross Revenues
Coverage Calculation - Current Gross Revenues
Gross Revenues available for debt service
Less: Transfers and Rolling Coverage
Current Gross Revenues available for debt service
Debt Service
Coverage ratio - Current Gross Revenues
Coverage Calculation - All Revenues Sources
Current Gross Revenues available for debt service
Natural Gas Royalties, Land Sales, Interest Income
PFIC
All Current Revenues available for debt service
Debt Service
Coverage ratio - All Current Revenues
Coverage ratio - All Current Revenues plus Capital
Transfers and Rolling Coverage
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
140.1
164.3
252.7
557.1
156.7
70.2
784.0
(352.9)
431.1
280.9
1.53
431.1
(90.2)
340.9
280.9
1.21
340.9
13.7
20.8
375.4
280.9
1.34
1.66
Fiscal Year Ended September 30
2012
2011
2010
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
131.0
138.2
246.5
515.7
144.4
61.8
721.9
(344.0)
377.9
247.2
1.52
377.9
(85.8)
292.1
247.2
1.18
292.1
9.9
21.2
323.2
247.2
1.31
1.65
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
124.4
128.4
241.2
494.0
135.0
57.0
686.0
(332.5)
353.5
233.4
1.51
353.5
(85.0)
268.5
233.4
1.15
268.5
59.3
22.0
349.8
233.4
1.50
1.86
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
203.3
242.4
445.7
143.5
589.3
(328.2)
261.0
208.8
1.25
261.0
(29.6)
231.4
208.8
1.11
231.4
24.0
n/a
255.4
208.8
1.22
1.36
2009
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
213.4
233.7
447.1
171.9
619.0
(323.4)
295.6
236.5
1.25
295.6
(39.6)
256.0
236.5
1.08
256.0
37.3
n/a
293.3
236.5
1.24
1.41
* Non-operating revenues include Passenger Facilities Charges and certain amounts from Public Facility Improvement Corporation transferred to the Operating
Revenue and Expense Fund.
RETIREMENT PLANS AND RISK MANAGEMENT
Retirement Plans–Defined Benefit Plan
The Airport has two fiduciary defined-benefit pension plans covering substantially all Airport
employees: the employees of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Retirement Plans and the
Department of Public Safety (DPS) Retirement Plans (“Retirement Plans,” collectively). Both plans are
single-employer public employee retirement system plans in which the assets are held in an investment
trust. Employees vest after five years of service and are eligible for early retirement at ages 55-61 and full
retirement benefits at age 62 and after. Pension benefits increase by a cost of living adjustment each
January 1. The fiscal year-end for the Retirement Plans is December 31. The Airport has actuarial
reviews performed annually effective January 1 of each year.
-55-
Employee Plan - All regular employees hired prior to January 1, 2010, other than DPS officers,
are covered by the Employee Plan. Benefits vest after five years of service. Airport employees who retire
are entitled to an annual retirement benefit, payable monthly for life in an amount equal to a percentage of
final average monthly compensation times credited service plus an annual cost of living adjustment (as
defined by the Employee Plan). Employees can also elect a limited lump-sum distribution. The Employee
Plan also provides early retirement, death, and disability benefits. As of January 1, 2010, the Employee
Plan was closed to new employees. New employees are hired under a 401A plan.
DPS Plan - The DPS Plan was established effective October 1, 1999, when the assets and
liabilities accrued by public safety officers eligible for the DPS Plan prior to October 1, 1999, were
transferred from the Employee Plan to the DPS Plan in compliance with the requirements of IRS Code
Section 414(1). DPS officers contribute 7% of their salary to the Plan. The public safety officers who
retired or terminated employment prior to October 1, 1999, were not eligible for the DPS Plan and will
continue to receive their benefits, if any, from the Employee Plan.
The DPS Plan permits early retirement at ages 55 to 61, or upon satisfaction of the “Rule of 80.”
The “Rule of 80” is the attainment of age 50 and the completion of the number of years of benefit service
that when added to the participant’s age equals the sum of 80. All Public Safety Officers employed by the
Airport are permitted early retirement upon the satisfaction of the “25 Year Rule.” The “25 Year Rule” is
the attainment of 25 years of service within the Public Safety department.
DPS officers receive pension benefits in the form of a qualified joint and survivor annuity;
however, an employee may request optional forms of pension benefit payments upon written request to
the Plan Administrator. Other forms of payment of accumulated plan benefits include lump-sum
distribution upon retirement or termination or equal monthly payments for life.
The Airport determines each Retirement Plans’ funding policy. Historically, the Airport has
contributed an amount equal to the actuarially determined pension cost for the year. In some years,
however, the Airport funds additional contributions to help retire the unfunded liability sooner. The
significant actuarial assumptions used to compute the actuarially determined contribution requirement are
the same as those used to compute the actuarial accrued liability.
Both pension plans provide that employees with five or more years of service are entitled to
annual pension benefits, beginning at normal retirement age of 62, equal to a certain percentage of their
final average monthly compensation for each year of credited service, less a certain percentage of
anticipated primary insurance benefits. The final average monthly compensation is determined by
utilizing the highest 60 consecutive months of earnings out of the 120 months immediately preceding the
date of service termination.
Employer contributions are generally made annually and recognized as additions in the period in
which employee services are performed. Employee contributions are required for the DPS Plan, but not
permitted for the Employee Plan.
-56-
Significant Actuarial
Assumptions
Employee Plan
DPS Plan
Valuation date
January 1, 2013
January 1, 2013
Actuarial cost method
Entry Age Normal
Entry Age Normal
Amortization method
Level dollar, closed
Level percent, closed
Remaining Amortization period
22 years
22 years
Actuarially assumed investment rate 7.25% per annum compounded
of return
annually
7.25% per annum compounded
annually
Mortality rates for males and females
Retirement Plans 2000 Healthy
Mortality Table
Retirement Plans 2000 Healthy
Mortality Table
Retirement Plans 2000 Disability
Mortality Table
Graduated rates based on age
(detailed in actuary's report)
3.0% per annum
Variable Rate (3.75% to 6.25%) of
increase based on years of
services which includes inflation
rate (3%)
Retirement Plans 2000 Disability
Mortality Table
Graduated rates based on age
(detailed in actuary's report)
3.0% per annum
Variable Rate (3.75% to 11.50%)
of increase based on years of
services which includes inflation
rate (3%)
Method used for determining
actuarial value of assets
5-year Moving Average
5-year Moving Average
Payroll growth rate
Employee Contribution Rate
not applicable
not applicable
3.75% per annum
7% of compensation
a. Non-Disabled
b. Disabled
Retirement, disablement and
separation rate
Cost of living adjustment
Projected salary increase
The actuarially determined contribution requirements for the Plans are computed through an
actuarial valuation performed as of January 1 each year. The annual actuarial valuation is performed to
determine the adequacy of current contribution rates, to describe the current financial condition of the
Plans and to analyze changes in the Plans’ condition. Significant actuarial assumptions are as follows:
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-57-
The Airport’s annual required contributions, employer contributions, percent contributed, and net
pension asset is as follows:
Employee Plan (millions)
Annual
Pension
Cost
$ 22.1
21.2
19.7
DFW Year ended
September 30, 2013
September 30, 2012
September 30, 2011
Airport
Contribution
$21.4
20.8
19.2
Percentage
Contributed
97%
98%
97%
Net
Pension
Asset
$38.4
39.1
39.5
DPS Plan (millions)
Annual
Pension
Cost
$ 6.1
5.7
4.6
DFW Year ended
September 30, 2013
September 30, 2012
September 30, 2011
Airport
Contribution
$6.2
5.9
4.8
Percentage
Contributed
102%
104%
105%
Net
Pension
Asset
$15.0
14.8
14.6
As of January 1, 2012, the most recent actuarial valuation date, the funding status of the Plans is
as follows:
*May not add due to rounding.
Defined Benefit Plans - Funding Ratios (millions)
2013
Employee
Actuarial accrued liabilities
Actuarial value of assets
(Unfunded) actuarial accrued
liability
Funded ratio
$ 450.9
323.8
$ (127.1)
71.8%
DPS
$ 165.8
111.4
$
(54.4)
67.2%
The schedule of funding progress, presented as Required Supplemental Information (“RSI”)
following the notes to the Comprehensive Annual Financial Statements in Appendix C, presents multiyear trend information about whether the actuarial value of plan assets are increasing or decreasing over
time relative to the actuarial accrued liability for benefits.
-58-
Net pension assets for the Employee and DPS Plans for the Airport’s fiscal year ending
September 30, 2013, are as follows:
September 30, 2013
Annual required contribution
Interest on net pension asset
Adjustment to annual required contribution
Annual pension cost
Employer contributions
Increase in net pension (asset)
Net pension (asset), beginning of year
Net pension (asset), end of year
Employees
plan
DPS plan
$ 21.4
(2.8)
3.5
22.1
21.4
0.7
(39.1)
$ (38.4)
$ 6.2
(1.1)
1.0
6.1
6.2
(0.1)
(14.8)
$ (14.9)
(in millions)
Total
$ 27.6
(3.9)
4.5
28.2
27.6
0.6
(53.9)
$ (53.3)
Defined Contribution Plan
All regular employees hired after January 1, 2010, are enrolled in a defined contribution plan.
DFW has agreed to match employee contributions up to 7%. Employees are required to contribute 1%3% of their pay based on years of employment. Employees are eligible to contribute more, up to IRS
limits.
Other Post-Employment Benefits
In addition to pension benefits, the Airport provides certain other post-employment benefits for
retired employees (“OPEB”). Specifically, the Airport allows qualified retired employees to participate in
the Airport’s health insurance plans and provides a premium subsidy for those employees. These benefits
apply only to retired employees ages 65 or younger who meet certain eligibility criteria, and provide a
maximum premium benefit per employee of $400 per month. The OPEB plan is administered by the
Airport’s Executive Vice President of Administration and Diversity and the Vice President of Human
Resources. The assets are managed by the Board’s Retirement Committee. All assets are held in a
Section 115 Trust.
As of January 1, 2013 and 2012, the OPEB plans had total assets of $16.1 million and $13.1
million, respectively. The OPEB plan’s unfunded actuarial accrued liability as of January 1, 2012 and
2011 were $9.0 million and $24.3 million, respectively. The annual required contribution for Fiscal Year
2013 is $1.6 million, a decrease of $1.2 million from the prior year. The decrease is mainly due to the
adoption of new assumptions. As of September 30, 2013, the OPEB plans’ total assets included $2.6
million of prepaid assets due to additional contributions in excess of the annual required contribution.
Risk Management and Insurance
Effective April 9, 2003, the Cities amended Section 9.13 of the 1968 Ordinance relating to
casualty insurance. As amended, and as more particularly provided in APPENDIX B - “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Particular Covenants–Casualty
Insurance,” the covenant requires the Airport to maintain insurance in amounts and against such losses or
-59-
damages as are customarily insured by the owners of similar properties. The Airport will annually
determine the type, amount and extent of coverage following consultation with an Independent Insurance
Consultant or the Risk Manager.
In accordance with this covenant and as of March 1, 2011, the Airport, with the assistance of an
insurance brokerage firm, conducted a review of the Airport’s Property Insurance Program. The review
concluded that the Airport’s total property assets are valued at approximately $5.3 billion. The Airport
has procured an “all risks” property policy with FM Global, an A.M. Best A+ rated carrier. The policy
protects the Airport from any fortuitous loss with a coverage limit of liability and time element losses of
$2 billion per occurrence with a deductible of $250,000. Terrorism is subject to a limit of $2 billion with
an average policy deductible of $250,000. The total annual premium for this policy is approximately $2.6
million. The Board conducted a survey and has determined that the amount and scope of the Airport’s
insurance is comparable to that acquired by similar sized public entities and/or airports.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-60-
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS – FINANCIAL OPERATIONS
This section of the Official Statement is Management’s Discussion and Analysis of DFW’s
Revenues, Expenses and Change in Net Assets. The amounts shown in the following section for the
Fiscal Years ended September 30, 2013 and 2012 are audited numbers and are presented on a basis that is
consistent with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The discussions of the changes between Fiscal
Years 2013 and 2012 are taken directly from DFW’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report that is
included in APPENDIX C. The amounts shown for the six month period ended March 31, 2014 and 2013
are from the Airport’s internal accounting records and are unaudited.
Revenues, Expenses, and Change in Net Assets
The following table is a summary of Revenues, Expenses, Net non-operating expenses, and
Increase (Decrease) in Net Position for the years ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, and for the first six
months of Fiscal Year 2014 and Fiscal Year 2013. The decreases in net position for the six-month period
ended March 31, 2014 and 2013 are due in large part to higher depreciation charges related to TRIP. The
changes in net position in Fiscal Year 2013 and Fiscal Year 2012 are primarily due to additional
depreciation related to the change in the accounting estimate of useful life of parking garages, the
construction of the Terminal A garage and the change in scope of the Terminal B and E baggage handling
systems. Detailed descriptions and variances of the components of revenues, expenses and non-operating
revenues are described in the sections below.
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Net Position (millions)
Operating revenues
Operating expenses
Non-operating expenses, net
Capital contributions
Special item
(Decrease) in Net Position
$
$
313.0
(309.4)
(94.5)
3.6
(87.3)
$
$
298.5
(296.1)
(43.6)
8.4
(32.8)
For the Year Ended
2013
2012*
$
$
577.5
(637.5)
(79.6)
21.0
(32.3)
(150.9)
$
533.6
(643.1)
(61.9)
24.9
$ (146.5)
*The cost of the Air Service Incentive Program (ASIP) has been reclassified from an Operating Expense to
a reduction in Operating Revenue for Fiscal Year 2012 for comparison purposes.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK]
-61-
Operating Revenues
The following table highlights the major components of operating revenues for the fiscal years
ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. Significant
variances are explained below.
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Operating Revenues (millions)
Landing fees
Terminal rent and use fees
Federal Inspection Services (FIS)
Other airline
Total Airline Revenue
$
Parking
Concessions
Ground and facility leases
Rent-A-Car rental
Grand Hyatt Hotel
Employee transportation
Rent-A-Car customer transportation charge
Natural gas
Taxi and limo fees
Other non-airline
Total Non-Airline Revenue
Total Operating Revenues
$
53.3
71.6
9.5
0.0
134.4
$
For the Year Ended
2013
2012*
59.3
60.9
10.8
(0.2)
130.8
$ 100.6
109.7
21.8
0.3
232.4
$ 105.9
81.2
17.7
(0.2)
204.6
57.1
36.4
17.9
15.7
17.7
7.1
5.5
4.9
4.4
11.9
178.6
55.6
32.2
17.3
14.5
16.2
6.3
5.3
3.6
4.1
12.6
167.7
116.1
68.2
34.3
31.4
31.0
12.3
11.1
8.5
8.1
23.9
344.9
110.8
65.7
33.5
27.7
28.8
10.2
11.7
8.7
8.2
23.7
329.0
313.0
$ 298.5
$ 577.3
$ 533.6
*The cost of the Air Service Incentive Program (ASIP) has been reclassified from an Operating Expense to
a reduction in Operating Revenue for Fiscal Year 2012 for comparison purposes.
First six months, Fiscal Year 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year 2013. Landing fees decreased
$6.0 million (-10.1%) from $59.3 million to $53.3 million, primarily due to a decrease in landing rates.
Terminal rent and use fees increased $10.7 million (17.6%) from $60.9 million to $71.6 million due to
higher per square foot rates necessary to offset increased terminal operating costs. FIS decreased $1.3
million (-12.0%) from $10.8 million to $9.5 million, primarily due to lower per passenger inspection
rates. Parking increased $1.5 million (2.7%) from $55.6 million to $57.1 million primarily due to higher
activity in the Express and Remote products. Concessions increased $4.2 million (13.0%) from $32.2
million to $36.4 million primarily due to higher food and beverage sales, passenger services, and
advertising activity. Ground and facility leases increased $0.6 million (3.5%), primarily due to higher
lease activity in the International Commerce Park development area.
-62-
Fiscal Year 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year 2012. Total Airline Revenue consists of fees paid
by signatory and non-signatory airlines for the use of the airfield and terminals at DFW based on DFW’s
cost to provide related facilities. Landing fees for passenger and cargo carriers are assessed per 1,000
pounds of maximum approved landed weight for each specific aircraft as certified by the FAA. Signatory
airlines are the airlines that sign a Use Agreement with DFW. Landing fees, including passenger and
cargo fees, decreased $5.3 million (5.0%) from $105.9 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $100.6 million in
Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to a larger transfer from the DFW cost center to the Airfield cost center.
This transfer, as defined in the Use Agreement, is based on net non-airline revenue which also increased
from Fiscal Year 2012 to Fiscal Year 2013.
Terminal rents and use fees (“Terminal Revenues”) include terminal rent from gates leased
primarily by signatory airlines and gate use fees from DFW-owned gates. The Controlling Documents
require the signatory airlines to pay terminal rent equal to the cost of terminal operations, plus allocated
debt service and overhead, minus concessions revenue. Terminal revenues increased $28.5 million
(35.1%) from $81.2 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $109.7 million in Fiscal Year 2013 due to an increase
in rates necessary to cover the increased debt service incurred from TRIP.
Federal Inspection Service (FIS) fees per departing international passenger in Terminal D
increased $4.1 million (23.2%), from $17.7 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $21.8 million in Fiscal Year
2013 due to an increase in international passengers combined with a per passenger fee increase from
$7.76 to $8.63 related to higher allocated costs to DFW’s inspection facilities.
Other airline revenue consists of bad debt and aircraft parking charges. Other airline revenue
increased $0.5M due to the recovery of previously recognized bad debt.
Parking fees are charged based on the length of time and parking product. DFW’s primary
parking products include terminal ($18-20 per day), express ($10-13 per day) and remote ($8 per day).
Parking revenues increased $5.3 million (4.8%) from $110.8 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $116.1
million in Fiscal Year 2013 due to an increase in originating passengers, select rates, and an increase in
DFW Valet parkers. Terminal parking revenues accounted for 61.8% and 66.4% of total parking
revenues in Fiscal Year 2013 and Fiscal Year 2012, respectively.
Concession revenues increased $2.5 million (3.8%), from $65.7 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to
$68.2 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to an increase in enplaned passengers, and increased
food and beverage and advertising sales.
Ground and facility lease revenues consist primarily of ground leases of Airport property, various
facility leases, Hyatt Regency Hotel, and other. Ground and facility lease revenue increased $0.8 million
(2.4%) from $33.5 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $34.3 million in Fiscal Year 2013 primarily due to an
increase in the average lease rate per acre and additional leased properties.
Rent-A-Car (RAC) lease and rentals revenue consists of ground leases plus a percentage rent
based on gross revenues. RAC revenues increased $3.7 million (13.4%), from $27.7 million in Fiscal
Year 2012 to $31.4 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to increased average daily rental rates and
an increase in destination passengers. Percentage rent accounted for 85.2% of the total RAC rental
revenues in Fiscal Year 2013 and 84.6% in Fiscal Year 2012.
The Grand Hyatt Hotel operations include room rental, food and beverage and other revenues.
Revenues increased $2.2 million (7.6%), from $28.8 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $31.0 million in
Fiscal Year 2013 primarily due to higher food and beverage sales and higher average room rates.
-63-
Employee transportation revenues are derived primarily from a monthly fee paid by airlines and
other tenants to pay for the cost of employee transportation services between remote parking lots and the
terminals. Employee transportation revenues increased $2.1 million (20.6%) from $10.2 million in Fiscal
Year 2012 to $12.3 million in Fiscal Year 2013 primarily due to an increase in fees required to cover the
costs to provide the transportation services.
RAC customer transportation revenue is derived from a $2.20 per rental day transaction fee that is
used to fund operation and maintenance of the bus fleet to transport passengers between the airport
terminals and the RAC. RAC customer transportation revenue decreased $0.6 million (5.1%), from $11.7
million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $11.1 million in Fiscal Year 2013 due to timing differences in collections
offsetting slightly higher transaction days.
Taxi and limo fees (Ground Transportation) revenues represent the access, decal, and application
fees charged to taxicab, limousine, shared ride, and courtesy van companies and providers. These
revenues remained relatively flat at $8.1 million in Fiscal Year 2013.
Natural gas revenues include royalties and property and surface use fees resulting from natural
gas drilling. Natural gas revenues remained relatively flat at $8.5 million in Fiscal Year 2013.
Other non-airline revenue is comprised of General Aviation fees related to fueling and aircraft
service fees; the fuel farm fees paid by the airlines to retire the debt incurred to construct the fueling
system and overhead of the fuel farm; non-airline utilities; pass-through and reimbursable revenues from
airline and tenants; building code/standard fees; and other miscellaneous revenues offset by non-airline
bad debt. Other revenue remained flat at $23.9 million in Fiscal Year 2013 compared to $23.7 million in
Fiscal Year 2012.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK]
-64-
Operating Expenses
The following table highlights the major components of operating expenses for the fiscal years
ended September 30, 2013 and 2012, and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013. Significant
variance explanations follow.
Operating Expenses (millions)
Salaries, wages and benefits
Contract services
Equipment and supplies
Utilities
Grand Hyatt Hotel
Insurance
General, administrative and other
Depreciation and amortization
Total Operating Expenses
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
For the Year Ended
2013
2012*
$
$ 169.6
147.9
21.9
26.1
21.9
5.2
7.2
237.8
$ 637.6
$
90.8
64.1
13.0
12.8
11.4
2.6
5.7
109.0
309.4
$
85.8
61.1
9.4
13.2
11.1
2.3
5.3
107.9
$ 296.1
$
$
177.4
130.2
21.8
27.5
20.1
4.3
6.5
255.3
643.1
*The cost of the Air Service Incentive Program (ASIP) has been reclassified from an Operating Expense to
a reduction in Operating Revenue for Fiscal Year 2012 for comparison purposes.
First six months, Fiscal Year 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year 2013. Salaries, wages, and
benefits increased $5.0 million (5.8%) from $85.8 million to $90.8 million primarily due to higher wage
rates, health care costs and retirement contributions. Contract services increased $3.0 million (4.9%) from
$61.1 million to $64.1 million, primarily due to increased de-icing and Customs and Border Patrol
operations. Equipment and supplies increased $3.6 million (38.3%) primarily due to baggage system
maintenance and de-icing operations.
Fiscal Year 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year 2012. Salaries, wages and benefits decreased $7.8
million (4.4%) from $177.4 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $169.6 million in Fiscal Year 2013 primarily
due to lower pension contributions and less employees resulting from the outsourcing of bussing and the
early retirement program that was completed in Fiscal Year 2012, an increase in the amount of payroll
capitalized for construction activity, and lower health insurance costs. DFW employed 1,755 and 1,856
full time employees as of September 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
Contract services include grounds and facility maintenance, busing services, financial and legal
services, software and hardware maintenance, advertising, planning, and other professional services.
Contract services increased $17.7 million (13.6%), from $130.2 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $147.9
million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to increased contract busing and marketing costs.
Equipment and supplies primarily consists of non-capitalized equipment, materials, fuel for
vehicles, and supplies used to maintain and operate the Airport. Equipment and supplies increased $0.1
million (0.5%), from $21.8 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $21.9 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily
due to an increase in operating supplies offset partially by lower fuel costs.
-65-
Utilities represent the cost of electricity, natural gas, potable water, trash removal, and
telecommunications services. Utilities decreased $1.4 million (5.1%), from $27.5 million in Fiscal Year
2012 to $26.1 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to lower electrical costs.
Grand Hyatt Hotel operations include room, food and beverage and other expenses. Operating
costs increased $1.8 million (9.0%) from $20.1 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $21.9 million in Fiscal
Year 2013. These costs increased to match the increased demand for rooms, food and beverages, and
other hotel services.
General, administrative and other charges increased $0.7 million (10.8%), from $6.5 million in
Fiscal Year 2012 to $7.2 million in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily due to higher business development and
training activities.
Depreciation and amortization decreased $17.5 million (6.9%), from $255.3 million in Fiscal
Year 2012 to $237.8 million in Fiscal Year 2013. The decrease is primarily due a reduction in the
accelerated depreciation on assets being replaced by TRIP.
Non-Operating Revenues and Expenses
The following table highlights non-operating revenues and expenses for the fiscal years ended
September 30, 2013 and 2012, and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Non-Operating Revs (Exps) (millions)
Passenger facility charges
Rent-A-Car customer facility charge
Interest income
Interest expense on revenue bonds
Other, net
Total Non-Operating Expenses, net
$
40.8
10.0
3.5
(156.0)
7.2
$ (94.5)
$
$
37.8
9.6
2.5
(93.9)
0.4
(43.6)
For the Year Ended
2013
2012
$
115.6
20.2
4.8
(225.4)
5.2
$ (79.6)
$
109.1
19.7
6.0
(200.6)
3.8
$ (62.0)
First six months, Fiscal Year 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year 2013. Passenger facility charges
increased $3.0 million (7.9%) due to additional passenger collections. Interest expense on revenue bonds
increased $62.1 million (66.1%) due to additional debt.
Fiscal Year 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year 2012. Congress established Passenger Facility
Charges (PFCs) in 1990 as part of the Aviation Safety and Capacity Expansion Act of 1990. DFW
currently collects a $4.50 Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) from enplaned passengers to pay for the cost
to design and construct eligible airport capital projects or to repay debt service issued to build such
projects. DFW estimates that 87.4% of all enplaned passengers were required to pay PFCs in Fiscal Year
2013. PFC collections are recorded as revenue when earned and deposited in the 252 PFC Fund, then
used to pay eligible debt service costs or eligible pay-as-you-go capital projects. PFC revenues increased
$6.5 million (6.0%), from $109.1 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $115.6 million in Fiscal Year 2013 as a
result of more passengers.
-66-
RAC customers pay a $4.00 facility charge for each transaction day to pay for the debt service
and capital improvements to the RAC facility. RAC customer facility charges (CFCs) increased $0.5
million (2.5%), from $19.7 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $20.2 million in Fiscal Year 2013 as a result of
additional transaction days.
Interest expense on revenue bonds increased $24.8 (12.4%) million from $200.6 million in Fiscal
Year 2012 to $225.4 million in Fiscal Year 2013 due to an increase in borrowing associated with TRIP.
Other net non-operating revenues/expenses are comprised primarily of write-offs of capital and
other assets, insurance proceeds, and other miscellaneous receipts and payments. This category increased
$1.4 million (36.8%) from $3.8 million in Fiscal Year 2012 to $5.2 million in Fiscal Year 2013 primarily
due to additional insurance payments for hail damage.
Capital Contributions
The following table highlights capital contributions for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2013
and 2012, and the six months ended March 31, 2014 and 2013.
Six Months Ended
Mar-14
Mar-13
Capital Contributions (millions)
Federal and state grant reimbursements
Total Capital Contributions
$
3.6
3.6
$
8.4
8.4
For the Year Ended
2013
2012
$
21.0
21.0
$
24.9
24.9
First six months, Fiscal Year 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year 2013. Capital Contributions
decreased $4.8 million from $8.4 million to $3.6 million due to the timing of receipts and smaller
program drawdowns.
Fiscal Year 2013 Compared to Fiscal Year 2012. DFW receives Airport Improvement Program
(AIP) and other grants through the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and other Federal and State
agencies. Airport grant reimbursements decreased $3.9 million (15.7%) from $24.9 million in Fiscal Year
2012 to $21.0 million in Fiscal Year 2013 due to smaller program drawdowns resulting from lower
available government discretionary funding.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE LEFT INTENTIONALLY BLANK]
-67-
Net Assets
The following table summarizes net assets as of September 30, 2013 and 2012, and as of
March 31, 2014.
As of
3/31/2014
Net Position (millions)
Net investment in capital assets
$
Restricted net position:
PFIC
Passenger facility charges (PFC)
Public safety and other
Total restricted
Unrestricted net position
Total Net Position
$
For the Year Ended
2013
2012
121.5
$ 229.8
$
371.2
14.3
13.5
3.0
30.8
11.4
28.6
2.9
42.9
12.9
50.0
2.8
65.7
710.1
862.4
677.0
$949.7
663.9
$1,100.8
Net investment in capital assets decreased $108.3 million for the first six months ended
March 31, 2013, and $141.4 million from Fiscal Year 2012 to Fiscal Year 2013 primarily due to
depreciation outpacing bond principal payments and the difference in rate and GAAP treatment for TRIP
related asbestos removal.
Restricted net position, PFIC increased $2.9 million in for the six months ended March 31, 2014
from Fiscal Year 2013 primarily due to an increase in cash reserved for furnitures, fixtures and
equipment. Restricted net position, PFIC decreased $1.5 million in Fiscal Year 2013 from Fiscal Year
2012 primarily due to a slightly higher usage of cash.
Restricted net position, PFC represents the cash and investments held from the collection of PFCs
that will be used in the future to pay eligible debt service. The PFC balance decreased $15.1 million for
the six months ended March 31, 2014, and $21.4 million from Fiscal Year 2012 to Fiscal Year 2013 due
to the use of PFC’s outpacing collections.
Restricted net position, public safety and other represents cash obtained during seizures and
arrests. These funds may only be used for public safety and security purposes as defined by Federal law.
Also represented are funds collected from concessionaires to operate joint marketing programs.
Unrestricted net position at December 31, 2013 was $710.1 million, an increase of $33.1 million
in the first six months ended of Fiscal Year 2014.
Liquidity and Financing
As of March 31, 2014, DFW had total cash and investments of $2.6 billion of which $694 million
was unrestricted. Unrestricted cash and investments may be used for any lawful airport purpose; including
capital expenditures, the payment of Operation and Maintenance expenses, and the payment of debt
service, should the reserves restricted for debt service prove inadequate.
-68-
As of March 31, 2014, DFW had $6.2 billion of fixed rate bonds outstanding. Currently, DFW
has no SWAPs or variable rate debt. Under the current Use Agreement DFW and the airlines agreed to
the amount of debt service to be paid annually by rates, fees and charges through 2020. DFW issued four
refunding series bonds during Fiscal Year 2013 and achieved $105.7 million in net present value savings
and $137.0 million in actual savings on future debt service. In Fiscal Year 2014, DFW issued refunding
bonds series 2014A resulting in net present value savings of $6.8 million and $13.8 million in actual
savings on future debt service.
DFW issued the series 2012H, 2013A, 2013B and 2013C bonds totaling $955.8 million for the
TRIP and $534.0 million for non-TRIP projects during Fiscal Year 2013. Depending upon contract
terms, DFW may be required to identify and have available funds (joint/DFW capital, grants, debt, and
PFCs) before it can enter into a contract for capital programs. DFW is currently monitoring the cash flow
and contracting requirements for the TRIP and other approved projects, and expects to issue additional
bonds in the future to meet capital funding needs.
The Controlling Documents require DFW to annually adopt a Schedule of Charges that is: (1)
reasonably estimated to produce Gross Revenues in an amount sufficient to at least pay Operation and
Maintenance Expenses plus 1.25 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service and (2) reasonably estimated to
at least produce Current Gross Revenues in an amount sufficient to pay Operation and Maintenance
Expenses plus 1.00 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service. DFW’s Gross Revenues Coverage ratio was
1.53 and 1.52 for the fiscal years September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012, respectively; while
Current Gross Revenues covered debt service improved to 1.21 from 1.18 for the same periods,
respectively.
THE AIRLINES
Certain of the airlines (or their respective parent corporations) are subject to the information
reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and in accordance therewith file reports
and other information (collectively, the “SEC Reports”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission
(the “SEC”). Only companies with securities listed on a national securities exchange or registered under
§ 12(g) of the Exchange Act, or companies which are required to file with the SEC under § 15(d) of the
Exchange Act, are required to file with the SEC pursuant to the information reporting requirements will
have information on file. Certain information, including financial information, as of particular dates,
concerning each such Airline (or their respective parent corporations) is included in the SEC Reports.
The SEC Reports can be inspected in the Public Reference Room of the SEC at Room 1580, 100 F Street,
N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549, and at the SEC’s regional office at 500 West Madison Street, Suite 1400,
Chicago, IL 60661 and copies of such SEC Reports can be obtained from the Public Reference Section of
the SEC at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549 at prescribed rates. The SEC maintains a web site
at www.sec.gov. In addition, each domestic airline is required to file periodic reports of financial and
operating statistics with the United States Department of Transportation (“DOT”). Such reports can be
inspected at the following location: DOT Dockets Office, Research and Innovative Technology
Administration, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., Room W12-140,
Washington, DC 20590, and copies of such reports can be obtained from DOT at prescribed rates. In
addition, further information regarding American Airlines, the predominant carrier servicing the Airport,
may be found at its web site: www.aa.com. Foreign flag airlines also provide certain information
concerning their operations and financial affairs, which may be obtained from the respective airline.
Any significant financial or operational difficulties incurred by American Airlines, or the
elimination or reduction of the Airport’s status as a connecting hub for American Airlines, could have a
material adverse effect on the Airport. Financial or operational difficulties by any of the other airlines
may also, whether directly or indirectly, have an adverse impact on Gross Revenues or Airport operations,
-69-
the effect of which may be material. For an examination of the airlines’ present situation and the relative
presence of each airline at the Airport, see the sources outlined in “THE AIRLINES” above. See also
“CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS.”
AIRLINE AGREEMENTS
The Board entered into new agreements with various air carriers utilizing the Airport. Such
agreements are hereinafter collectively referred to as the “Use Agreements.” The Use Agreements signed
by each Signatory Airline are substantially similar. The following is a summary of certain provisions of
the Use Agreements. The summary does not purport to be complete or to follow the exact language of the
Use Agreements and is subject in all respects to the detailed provisions of the Use Agreements, copies of
which are available for inspection at the office of the Board. The capitalization of any word or phrase
which is not defined herein, or not conventionally capitalized, indicates such word or phrase is defined in
the Use Agreements.
New Airline Agreements. For over 35 years, the Airport operated under the “original” Use
Agreements. The “original” Use Agreements expired on September 30, 2010. The Airport has entered
into new Use Agreements with certain airlines. To become a Signatory Airline, an airline must execute
the Use Agreement.
Term. The Use Agreement expires September 30, 2020.
Use of Airport. Each Signatory Airline has the right to use the Airport for any lawful,
reasonable and appropriate activity in connection with such Airline’s business of transportation by
aircraft. Such use includes, among other things, terminal structures, aircraft parking ramps, runways and
taxiways.
General Commitment. In consideration of its use, occupancy and operation of the Airport, each
Signatory Airline agrees to pay rentals, fees and charges based on a methodology in which cost will be
allocated to three cost centers: the Airfield Cost Center, the Terminal Cost Center and the DFW Cost
Center.
The Airfield Cost Center aggregates costs associated with the airfield. These costs include, but
are not limited to, operation and maintenance expenses, allocable overhead, public safety expenses and
allocable debt service. Such costs will first be offset by all revenues, other than landing fees, associated
with the airfield and any maximum capital threshold adjustments and/or prior period rate adjustment
credits. Costs remaining after allocating such costs and revenues will be paid from the setting of landing
fees in an amount that will generate revenues equal to cost. Under the Use Agreements, the Signatory
Airlines agree that the Airport will adjust landing fees to meet certain minimum capital threshold amounts
as described under “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds and Flow of Funds–Current Disposition of
Capital Improvements Funds Amounts.”
The Terminal Cost Center aggregates costs associated with the terminals. These costs include,
but are not limited to, terminal operation and maintenance expenses, allocable overhead, public safety
expenses and allocated debt service. Such costs will be offset by miscellaneous terminal revenues, other
than airlines terminal rents, including capital transfers from the Joint Capital Account which total $112
million over the next six (6) years through Fiscal Year 2018 and an annual contribution from the DFW
Cost Center of the Airport’s share of terminal costs. In addition certain airlines will be credited with
certain maintenance costs pursuant to the terms of its Use Agreement. Not all Signatory Airlines enter
leases or are subject to the Terminal Cost Center methodology.
-70-
The Use Agreements also provide for the DFW Cost Center. The DFW Cost Center includes the
direct costs associated with airport parking, concessions, rental car, commercial development (including
hotels), employee transportation, ground transportation, miscellaneous revenues, and interest income on
certain cash accounts. The Airport also pays for the direct costs of Skylink as this is managed and
operated by the Airport. The DFW Cost Center also receives cost allocations for overhead, public safety,
debt service and incremental debt service coverage adjustments. Such costs are offset by revenues
generated by these business units.
Adjustments to Rates and Charges. If during any Fiscal Year, the Airport anticipates that
collected revenues from the Airfield Cost Center and certain sub-cost centers will be insufficient by an
amount at least equal to 3% of that projected for the associated cost center or sub-cost center, then the
Airport may, without Signatory Airlines approval, increase rates or fees during such Fiscal Year in an
amount sufficient to recover the shortfall by the end of such Fiscal Year. Nothing in the Use Agreements
is intended to limit the ability of the Airport to adjust rates, fees and charges, including without limitation
landing fees, from time to time, in order to meet the requirements of the Master Bond Ordinance,
including, without limitation, debt service reserve fund adjustments, the Rate Covenant, and the flow of
funds requirements under the Master Bond Ordinance.
Final Audit. At the end of each Fiscal Year, the Board will cause an audit to be accomplished by
an independent certified public accountant to reconcile the budgeted and actual revenues and expenses
associated with the Airfield Cost Center and the Terminal Cost Center according to the methodologies set
forth in the Use Agreements. If the actual cost for the Airfield Cost Center and Terminal Cost Center,
respectively, is less than the budgeted cost, the overage will be applied during mid-year of the following
fiscal year at as a credit to the respective cost center. If the actual cost for the Airfield Cost Center and
Terminal Cost Center, respectively, is greater than the budgeted cost, the underage will be applied during
mid-year of the following fiscal year as an incremental charge to the respective cost center.
New Projects. The Use Agreements establish procedures regarding new projects, other than the
pre-approved TRIP and non-TRIP projects, at the Airport initiated by the Board and Signatory Airlines,
and place restrictions and conditions in respect of such new projects. Before commencing certain projects
that are to be funded from the Joint Capital Account or from the proceeds of Obligations, except for the
pre-approved projects set forth below, the Board must, subject to certain exceptions, obtain the approval
of a majority–in–interest of the Signatory Airlines. Projects funded solely from the DFW Capital Account
do not require approval of a majority-in-interest of the Signatory Airlines. The TRIP, certain additional
capital projects, and the issuance of Obligations to fund these projects were approved upon execution of
the Use Agreement by the Airport and certain airlines (See “CAPITAL PROJECTS–Terminal Renewal
And Improvement Program and Airport Improvement Program” for further discussion).
Assignment by Airline. A Signatory Airline may not make an assignment of or sublease under
its Use Agreement without the written consent of the Board, which consent will not be unreasonably
withheld; provided, however, that so long as the Signatory Airline’s obligations under its Use Agreement
are assumed by the assignee, such agreement may be assigned without such consent to any successor in
interest of the Signatory Airline with or into which the Signatory Airline may merge or consolidate, or
which may succeed to the assets of the Signatory Airline or a major portion of its assets related to its air
transport system.
Termination by Airline. A Signatory Airline may not terminate its Use Agreement as long as
any Joint Revenue Bonds are outstanding. Thereafter, a Signatory Airline may terminate its Use
Agreement if the Airline’s Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity is suspended, cancelled or
terminated, or if it is prevented from using all or a substantial part of the airfield under various
circumstances and for various minimum periods of time ranging from 30 to 90 days, or in the event of an
-71-
uncured default by the Board.
Bankruptcy on Use Agreement.”
See “CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS–Effect of
Events of Default and Remedies. The Use Agreements set forth certain occurrences or events
which constitute events of default thereunder and remedies on default.
FEDERAL REGULATIONS REGARDING RATES AND CHARGES DISPUTES
In August 1994, the President of the United States signed into law the FAA Authorization Act of
1994 (the “1994 Act”) which continues the pre–existing federal requirement that airline rates and charges
set by airports be “reasonable” and mandates an expedited administrative process by which the Secretary
of Transportation (the “Secretary”) shall review rates and charges complaints, 49 U.S.C. § 47129. Under
49 U.S.C. § 47129, an affected air carrier may file a written complaint requesting a determination of the
Secretary as to reasonableness within 60 days after such carrier receives written notice of the
establishment or increase of such fee. During the pendency of the review, the airlines must pay the
disputed portion of the fee to the airport under protest, subject to refund to the extent such fees are found
to be unreasonable by the Secretary. The airport must obtain a letter of credit, surety bond or other
suitable credit facility equal to the amount in dispute unless the airport and the complaining carriers agree
otherwise. In January 1995, pursuant to the 1994 Act, the DOT issued a rule which was amended
effective December 16, 1996 (the “Final Rule”), outlining the rules of practice for filing complaints and
adjudicating complaint matters involving federally assisted airports. This Final Rule is broader in
application and covers matters other than just rates and charges complaints. The initial rule was
accompanied by a policy statement setting forth the standards DOT would apply to resolving airport fee
disputes under 49 U.S.C. § 47129. The initial policy statement was supplemented in September of 1995
and replaced on June 14, 1996, by the “Policy Regarding Airport Rates and Charges.” In an August 1,
1997, decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit invalidated that part of the
policy that required airports to value their airfield assets at historical costs in calculating airfield use fees.
Until DOT promulgates a new policy regarding airfield rates and charges, the guiding principle for
determining the validity of rates and charges for use of airfield assets is the requirement of federal law
that such charges be “reasonable.”
FEDERAL GRANTS–IN–AID
The Airport and Airway Improvement Act of 1982 created the Airport Improvement Grant
Program (“AIGP”), which is administered by the FAA and funded by the Airport and Airway Trust Fund.
This fund is financed by federal aviation user taxes. Grants are available to airport operators in the form
of “entitlement” funds and “discretionary” funds. Entitlement funds are apportioned annually based upon
enplaned passengers and cargo landing weights and discretionary funds are available at the discretion of
the FAA based upon a national priority system. Actual entitlement funds will vary with the actual number
of passenger enplanements, with total appropriations for the AIP and with any revision of the existing
statutory formula for calculating such funds. In addition, pursuant to the PFC Act and AIR 21, an
airport’s annual federal entitlement grants are reduced by 50% when a $3.00 PFC is imposed, and reduced
by 75% when a $4.50 PFC is imposed. For Fiscal Year 2013, the total amount of federal grant funds
appropriated for all airports was $3.2 billion. The FAA awarded a total of $3.0 billion. Of this amount, the
Airport was awarded 16.6 million in entitlement and discretionary funds. The authorization has been
extended to September 30, 2015. No assurances can be given that federal grants in aid will actually be
received in the amount or at the time contemplated by the Airport.
-72-
THE CONTRACT AND AGREEMENT
The following is a summary of certain provisions of the Contract and Agreement, to which
reference is hereby made. Copies of the Contract and Agreement are available upon request from the Co–
Financial Advisors or the Office of the Chief Executive Officer.
Powers of the Board. The Board is authorized to plan, acquire, establish, develop, construct,
enlarge, improve, maintain, equip, operate, regulate, protect and police the Airport, together with the air
navigation facilities, airport hazards and land, and exercises on behalf of the Cities all of the powers of
each with respect thereto.
The Board, in operating the Airport, may enter into contracts, leases and other arrangements with
any person, association of persons, firms, or public or private entities or corporations for terms not
exceeding forty years, granting the privilege of using or improving the Airport, or any portion thereof or
space therein for commercial purposes; and may confer the privilege of supplying goods, commodities,
things, services or facilities at the Airport or of making available services to be furnished to or by the
Board or its agents. The Board also establishes the terms and conditions and fixes the charges, rentals or
fees for such privileges or services.
The Board may contract with any person, firm or private or public entity or corporation for the
planning, supervision, financing and construction of, or may itself construct or otherwise acquire, all
structures or improvements which in its judgment are useful, necessary, desirable or convenient in
efficiently operating and maintaining the Airport and its facilities. The Board has full discretion as to the
methods employed in construction or acquisition of the Airport and its facilities. It may provide for and
enter into any operating agreements or agreements of lease with any person, firm or private or public
entity or corporation for the operation or lease of such facilities, or any part thereof. The terms and
conditions of such agreements are determined by the Board.
Joint Airport Fund. The Cities created a “Joint Airport Fund” pursuant to the Contract and
Agreement and directed that it be held, supervised and maintained by the Board. Within the Joint Airport
Fund, the Board is authorized to create, designate and maintain such separate and special accounts and
trust funds considered by it proper in the sound business management of its business and affairs. The
Joint Airport Fund is treated by the Board and the Cities as the master fund for accounting purposes in
which is recorded and listed all properties of any nature initially and at any time thereafter contributed or
committed by the Cities to the Airport and at any time thereafter received by the Board from any source.
For a description of the funds within the Joint Airport Fund, see “SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Funds
and Flow of Funds.”
Distribution of Net Profits. No distribution of net profits of the Airport will ever be made if
such action would violate the terms, covenants and provisions of any lawful agreement of the Board or of
any ordinance authorizing Obligations or any other airport revenue bonds of either of the Cities. At any
other times and to the extent not in violation of any such covenants, the Cities acting jointly may require
the distribution of net profits to the Cities, but neither of the Cities acting independently are authorized to
require any such distributions.
REPORT OF THE AIRPORT CONSULTANT
As set forth in the report of the Airport Consultant prepared by LeighFisher (the “Airport
Consultant”) dated May 1, 2014, included herein as APPENDIX E (the “Report of the Airport
Consultant”), Gross Revenues for the forecast period (Fiscal Year 2014 through Fiscal Year 2020) are
forecast to be sufficient to meet the funding requirements established by the Master Bond Ordinance
-73-
pursuant to the terms of the Use Agreements effective October 1, 2010, both under base passenger
forecast assumptions and for a stress test with reduced passenger numbers. The following tables, which
show forecast Net Revenues, Accrued Aggregate Debt Service requirements, Debt Service coverage, and
airline payments per enplaned passenger during the forecast period under the base passenger forecast
assumptions, have been extracted from the Report of the Airport Consultant. For data under the abovestated stress test purchasers are directed to APPENDIX E. The Report of the Airport Consultant has not
been updated from its dated date to reflect events occurring thereafter, including the effect of rebaselining
the costs of the TRIP budget and the estimated incremental cost of additions to the scope of the program.
See “CAPITAL PROJECTS-Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP).”
Forecast of Debt Service Coverage
Fiscal Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Forecast Net Revenues*
(In Thousands) (A)
$423,898
524,228
588,751
628,958
675,972
692,089
699,783
Accrued Aggregate
Debt Service
Requirements
(In Thousands) (B)
$282,130
364,212
415,533
442,709
479,224
487,644
491,437
Debt Service Coverage
Ratio ([A] ÷ [B])
150%
144%
142%
142%
141%
142%
142%
*Net Revenues are Gross Revenues, PFC revenues and other revenues expected to be used to pay less
Operation and Maintenance Expenses.
Forecast of Airline Payments Per Enplaned Passenger
Fiscal Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Passenger Airline
Payments
(In Thousands) (C)
$246,133
323,326
378,444
402,272
440,886
442,141
449,352
Enplaned Passengers
(In Thousands) (D)
30,600
30,000
30,000
30,500
31,000
31,500
32,000
Payments Per Enplaned
Passenger ([C] ÷ [D])
$ 8.04
10.78
12.61
13.19
14.22
14.04
14.04
CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS
General
The principal of and interest on the Bonds is payable pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance
solely from the Pledged Revenues and Pledged Funds. The ability to pay debt service on the Bonds will
depend on the receipt of sufficient Gross Revenues.
The Airport’s ability to generate Gross Revenues depends primarily upon sufficient levels of
aviation activity and passenger traffic at the Airport. The achievement of passenger traffic will depend
partly on the profitability of the airline industry, including their ability to access capital and the ability of
-74-
individual airlines to provide sufficient capacity to meet demand. A weak economy, war, pandemic
illness, geophysical event, and the threat of terrorist activity reduce demand. A reduction in passenger
traffic would result in a reduction in PFC revenues. Additionally, reductions in connecting passenger
traffic would result in lower concessions revenues, and reductions in originating and destination
passengers would result in lower concessions, parking and rental car revenues. A decrease in aviation
activity at the Airport would likely result in an increase in landing fees and terminal rentals to offset the
Airport’s cost of providing these services as required by the Use Agreements. As landing fees and
terminal rentals rise, airlines could elect to discontinue service at the Airport. A continued reduction in the
number of airlines operating at the Airport could have an adverse impact on the Airport’s
competitiveness.
In considering the matters set forth in this Official Statement, prospective purchasers should
carefully review all investment considerations set forth throughout this Official Statement, and should
specifically consider certain risks associated with the Bonds. There follows a discussion of some, but not
necessarily all, of the possible considerations and risks which should be carefully evaluated by
prospective purchasers of the Bonds prior to purchasing any Bonds. The Bonds may not be
suitable investments for all persons. Prospective purchasers should evaluate the risks and merits of an
investment in the Bonds and should confer with their own legal, tax and financial advisors before
considering a purchase of the Bonds.
American Airlines’ Dominance at Airport (Bankruptcy and Merger)
American Airlines is the dominant carrier operating at the Airport, which serves as a primary hub
in American Airlines’ route system. For the Fiscal Year 2013, American Airlines, together with its
affiliate, American Eagle, accounted for approximately 83% of passenger enplanements at the Airport,
and approximately 74% of total landed weights at the Airport. No other airline accounted for more than
3% of passenger enplanements or total landed weights at the Airport for Fiscal Year 2013. See Table 3 –
Total Domestic and International Enplanements.
Any significant financial or operational difficulties incurred by American Airlines, or the
elimination or reduction in the Airport’s status as a connecting hub for American Airlines, could have a
material adverse effect on the Gross Revenues of the Airport. See “CERTAIN INVESTMENT
CONSIDERATIONS-General.” In the event American Airlines discontinues or reduces its operations at
the Airport, American Airlines’ current level of activity may not be replaced by other carriers resulting in
higher airline fees to use the Airport’s facilities and lower Gross Revenues primarily from lower PFCs
and lower concessions revenue.
On November 29, 2011, American Airlines, together with its parent, AMR Corporation and
American Eagle and other subsidiaries (including Executive Airlines) (collectively, “AMR”) filed for
bankruptcy protection under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code in the United States Bankruptcy
Court for the Southern District of New York. AMR assumed all unexpired leases for nonresidential real
property at the Airport, including the Use Agreement, and paid approximately $11 million to the Airport,
curing defaults under such leases relating to pre-petition amounts due and owing under such leases.
On February 14, 2013, AMR announced it had entered an Agreement and Plan of Merger with
US Airways Group, Inc., which was subject to approval by the Bankruptcy Court as part of a confirmed
plan of reorganization. On September 12, 2013, the Bankruptcy Court confirmed AMR’s plan of
reorganization, subject to the consummation of the merger in accordance with the terms of the Merger
Agreement. On December 9, 2013, AMR’s Plan of Reorganization became effective and the merger was
consummated.
-75-
American Airlines Group Inc. was formed on December 9, 2013, with the closing of the merger
between American Airlines and US Airways Group. The company now lists on NASDAQ Global Select
Market under the ticker symbol AAL.
Prospective purchasers are warned that the assumptions, explicitly and otherwise, used to make
forward-looking statements and assessments could prove to be inaccurate and, as a result, the forwardlooking statements based on those assumptions could also be incorrect. The Airport expresses no opinion
as to the correctness of the assessments stated in the reports. If the assessments regarding the Airport’s
continued role as a primary hub are incorrect, the Airport’s operations and finances will be materially and
adversely impacted.
Competition
General
The Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth each own and operate other airports (the “Other Airports”)
that provide various aviation and air carrier services in the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan area. Such
Other Airports consist of Dallas Love Field Airport (“Love Field”), Fort Worth Alliance Airport
(“Alliance”), Meacham International Airport (“Meacham”), Fort Worth Spinks Airport and Dallas
Executive Airport (formerly known as Redbird Airport). The revenues of the Other Airports are not
pledged to the payment of or as security for any bonds of any type that are issued in relation to the
Airport. In addition, general aviation, business and charter operations are conducted at Addison Airport,
owned by the Town of Addison. No commercial passenger air service is currently provided at Fort Worth
Alliance Airport, Meacham International Airport, Fort Worth Spinks Airport, Dallas Executive Airport or
the Addison Airport.
The Airport also competes with other large airports across the United States to serve as a hub in
the routing system for major airlines and as an international gateway for international travel. Some of the
factors that impact the Airport’s ability to compete with regional, national and international airports are
geographic location, airport infrastructure, metropolitan population and costs–per–enplaned–passenger.
There can be no assurance that the Airport will continue to successfully compete with other
airports for air passenger service and passenger market share. A significant loss of passengers and/or
flights at the Airport could have a material adverse effect on Airport operations. See “CERTAIN
INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS–General.”
Love Field Airport
Scheduled non–stop passenger service is currently provided at Dallas Love Field Airport (“Love
Field”), located approximately five miles from downtown Dallas, by Southwest Airlines, Delta Airlines
and United Airlines. Love Field is also the base for extensive private, general and corporate aviation
activities and aircraft repair and finish-out facilities.
Love Field Airport has one terminal building, and is in the process of a modernization program to
upgrade terminal facilities for increased operating efficiencies and customer services. Upon completion
Love Field will have a maximum of 20 gates. Currently, 16 gates are leased by Southwest Airlines, two
gates are leased by Continental Express Airlines (now operating as United Express), and two gates are
leased though not used by American Airlines. As part of American Airlines bankruptcy proceedings it
was required to surrender its rights to gates at Love Field. On May 12, 2014, the City of Dallas approved
an agreement whereby Virgin American will sublease the two gates from American.
-76-
Five-Party Agreement and Wright Amendment Reform Act
Pursuant to the terms of the Five-Party Agreement among Dallas, Fort Worth, Southwest
Airlines, American Airlines, and DFW Airport (the “Agreement”) the parties sought the repeal of the
Wright Amendment, formally known as the International Air Transportation Competition Act of 1979, by
2014, and to cap Love Field Airport at 20 gates. On September 29, 2006, Congress responded by passing
the Wright Amendment Reform Act of 2006 (the “Reform Act”), Pub. L. No. 109-352, 120 Stat. 2011
(2006). Under the Agreement and the Reform Act, air carriers could immediately provide through service
and ticketing to or from Love Field and any United States or foreign destination through any point in
Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri or Alabama. Eight
years after enactment of the Reform Act (October 2014), all restrictions with respect to domestic air
carrier service to or from Love Field will be removed. The Agreement and the Reform Act required the
City of Dallas to reduce as soon as practicable the number of gates available for passenger air service at
Love Field to no more than 20 gates. Under the Agreement, following a four–year transition period and
subject to certain exceptions, Southwest Airlines is entitled to the preferential use of 16 gates; American
Airlines the preferential use of 2 gates and Express Jet Airlines (United) the preferential use of 2 gates.
As a result of the settlement with the United States Department of Justice regarding the merger of
American Airlines and US Airways, American Airlines relinquished its preferential use of the two gates
under the Agreement. Under the Agreement the City of Dallas agreed that it would significantly remodel
portions of Love Field, including the modernization of the Main Terminal, which is near completion. In
addition, pursuant to the Agreement, the City of Dallas has acquired and demolished the gates at the
Lemmon Avenue Terminal. The Agreement provides that if Southwest Airlines operates passenger
service from another airport within an 80–mile radius of Love Field, then for every gate which Southwest
Airlines operates or uses at another airport within such area, Southwest will relinquish control of an
equivalent number of gates at Love Field, up to 8 gates, and such gates will be made available to other
carriers. No such relinquishment trigger has occurred. A similar penalty applies to operations by
American Airlines with respect to operations other than at the Airport or Love Field. The requirements to
relinquish gates at Love Field expire in 2025. Both airlines are also required to relinquish gates at Love
Field if Congress enacts subsequent legislation to repeal the restriction of the Wright Amendment earlier
than the eight years provided in the Reform Act and such airline elects to commence service to or from
Love Field to a destination not currently allowed under the Wright Amendment.
As a result of the Reform Act, Southwest has commenced through ticketing to and from Love
Field and the nine states permitted by the Reform Act. Southwest Airlines announced it will offer nonstop
flights from Love Field to 15 major cities including Chicago, New York and Los Angeles later this year.
Southwest Airlines plans to fly nonstop to Baltimore, Denver, Las Vegas, Orlando, Florida; and Chicago
Midway from October 13. Service to Atlanta, Washington D.C., Los Angeles, New York LaGuardia,
Phoenix and other U.S. cities will begin on November 2. Virgin American has announced that it will
serve Chicago O’Hare, Los Angeles, New York LaGuardia, San Francisco and Washington Reagan from
Love Field and will discontinue service to Los Angeles and San Francisco from DFW. Since the repeal
of all the restrictions of the Wright Amendment, the Shelby Amendment and the 2005 Amendments will
not occur until 2014, it is not possible to predict with any accuracy the effect of such repeal and the
effects, if any, on air traffic at the Airport.
Alliance Airport and Meacham International Airport
Fort Worth’s Alliance Airport (“Alliance”) currently serves as an industrial airport located in the
City of Fort Worth. Alliance has one 9,600–foot runway and an 8,200–foot parallel runway. Alliance has
extended the main runway by 3,400 feet to accommodate certain additional aircraft operations. An
aircraft maintenance and engineering center adjacent to Alliance has been completed. The center, which
is owned by the City of Fort Worth, was leased to American Airlines for use as a major American
-77-
maintenance base, however that maintenance base was closed in conjunction with American’s bankruptcy
proceeding. Federal Express Corporation has constructed a regional express mail sorting hub at Alliance.
Santa Fe Railway operates an intermodal cargo facility located adjacent to Alliance. Currently, Alliance
is not certified to provide air carrier passenger service.
Meacham International Airport (“Meacham”), a Fort Worth owned and operated general aviation
airport, is certified for passenger service and available for charters. Meacham has one 7,500–foot
runway, one 4,000–foot runway and one 3,700–foot runway. No commercial air carriers operate out of
Meacham at this time.
Passenger Facility Charges
Application. No PFCs are pledged to the Bonds. See “PASSENGER FACILITIES CHARGES.”
While the Outstanding Obligations, including the Bonds, are not secured by or payable from PFC
Revenues, PFC Revenues are required pursuant to PFC Application 10 and the Use Agreements to be
used to pay debt service on the Outstanding Obligations. A decrease in the collection of PFC revenues
would result in a significant increase in airline cost.
See “CERTAIN INVESTMENT
CONSIDERATIONS–General” and “PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES.”
Sufficiency. The amount of PFC revenues collected in any given year will vary depending on the
actual number of passengers enplaned at the Airport. If the number of enplaned passengers at the Airport
falls below certain estimates, the actual PFC revenues will fall short of certain projections (unless the
dollar amount of PFCs increases). For a discussion of the possible impact of a decrease in enplaned
passengers see “CERTAIN INVESTMENT CONSIDERATIONS–General.” There can be no assurance
as to what passenger traffic and revenues of the Airport will be in the future.
Availability. The authority to impose and use PFCs is subject to the terms and conditions of the
PFC Act, AIR–21 and the related regulations and statutes. Failure to comply with the requirements of
applicable law, such as the failure to use PFCs strictly for the approved PFC Eligible Projects, may cause
the FAA to terminate or reduce the Board’s authority to impose and collect PFCs. In addition,
notwithstanding FAA regulations requiring airlines that collect PFCs to account for PFC collections
separately and indicating that those PFC collections are to be regarded as funds held in trust by the
collecting airline for the beneficial interest of the public agency imposing the PFC, in the event of a
bankruptcy proceeding involving a collecting airline, there is the possibility that a bankruptcy court could
hold that the PFCs in the airline’s custody are not to be treated as trust funds and that the Airport is not
entitled to any priority over other creditors of the collecting airline as to such funds. Airport management
believes that any uncollected PFCs held by current bankrupt airlines operating at the Airport are not
material to the continued operation of the Airport. Also, there is no assurance that the PFC Act or any
other relevant legislation or regulation will not be repealed or amended as to adversely affect the Board’s
ability to collect PFCs or to apply them to pay for the prior capital development program and other
projects. The occurrence of any of these events could have an adverse impact on the timely payment of
principal of or interest on the Bonds, as noted above.
See “CERTAIN INVESTMENT
CONSIDERATIONS–General.”
Airline Industry
General. Key factors that affect airline traffic at the Airport and the financial condition of the
airlines, and, therefore, the amount of Gross Revenues available for payment of the Bonds, include: local,
regional, national and international economic and political conditions; international hostilities; world
health concerns; aviation security concerns; airline service and routes; airline airfares and competition;
airline industry economics, including labor relations and costs; availability and price of aviation fuel
-78-
(including the ability of airlines to hedge fuel costs); regional, national and international environmental
regulations; airline consolidation and mergers; capacity of the national air traffic control and airport
systems; capacity of the Airport and competition from other airports for connecting traffic; and business
travel substitutes, including teleconferencing, videoconferencing and web-casting.
The airline industry is highly cyclical and is characterized by intense competition, high operating
and capital costs and varying demand. Passenger and cargo volumes are highly sensitive to general and
localized economic trends, and passenger traffic varies substantially with seasonal travel patterns. The
profitability of the airline industry can fluctuate dramatically from quarter to quarter and from year to
year, even in the absence of catastrophic events such as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and
the economic recession of 2008 and 2009. Other business decisions by airlines, such as the reduction, or
elimination, of service to unprofitable markets, increasing the use of smaller, regional jets and changing
hubbing strategies have also affected air traffic at the Airport and could have a more pronounced effect in
the future.
Following are just a few of the factors affecting the airline industry including, regional and
national economic conditions, costs of aviation fuel, international conflicts and threats of terrorism and
structural changes in the travel market.
Economic Conditions. Historically, the financial performance of the air transportation industry
has correlated with the state of the national and global economies. During September 2008, significant
and dramatic changes occurred in the U.S. and global financial markets. Several U.S. commercial and
investment banks declared bankruptcy, were acquired by other financial institutions, combined with other
financial institutions or sought huge infusions of capital. The volatility in the capital markets led the U.S.
government to intervene by making funds available to certain institutions, taking over the ownership of
others and assuming large amounts of troubled financial instruments in exchange for imposing greater
regulation over certain institutions in order to restore consumer confidence in, and stabilize, the nation’s
financial markets. Since 2008, the U.S. economy has experienced a recession followed by weak growth.
As a result of concerns about the U.S. government’s ability to resolve long-term deficits, in August 2011
Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, a Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC business, downgraded
the credit rating of the U.S. sovereign debt from “AAA” to “AA+.” It is not known at this time whether
the high national unemployment rate, or the slow rate of national and global economic growth will persist
beyond 2014. There can be no assurances that the prolonged weak economic conditions, the downgrade
of the credit rating of the U.S. sovereign debt or other national and global fiscal concerns will not have an
adverse effect on the air transportation industry.
Cost of Aviation Fuel. Airline earnings are significantly affected by changes in the price of
aviation fuel. According to the Air Transport Association, fuel, along with labor costs, is one of the
largest cost components of airline operations, and continues to be an important and uncertain determinate
of an air carrier’s operating economics. There has been no shortage of aviation fuel since the “fuel crisis”
of 1974, but any increase in fuel prices causes an increase in airline operating costs. Fuel prices continue
to be susceptible to, among other factors, political unrest in various parts of the world (particularly in the
oil-producing nations in the Middle East and North Africa), Organization of Petroleum Exporting
Countries policy, the rapid growth of economies such as China and India, the levels of inventory carried
by industries, the amounts of reserves maintained by governments, disruptions to production and refining
facilities and weather.
International Conflict and the Threat of Terrorism. The increased threat of terrorism has had,
and may continue to have, a negative impact on air travel. The Airport cannot predict the likelihood of
future incidents similar to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the likelihood of future air
-79-
transportation disruptions or the impact on the Airport or the airlines operating at the Airport from such
incidents or disruptions.
Structural Changes in the Travel Market. Many factors have combined to alter consumer
travel patterns. The threat of terrorism against the United States remains high. As a result, the federal
government has mandated various security measures that have resulted in new security taxes and fees and
longer passenger processing and wait times at airports. Both add to the costs of air travel and make air
travel less attractive to consumers relative to ground transportation, especially to short-haul destinations.
Additionally, consumers have become more price-sensitive. Efforts of airlines to stimulate traffic by
heavily discounting fares have changed consumer expectations regarding airfares. In addition, the
availability of fully transparent price information on the Internet now allows quick and easy comparison
shopping, which has changed consumer purchasing habits. Consumers have shifted from purchasing
paper tickets from travel agencies or airline ticketing offices to purchasing electronic tickets over the
Internet. This has made pricing and marketing even more competitive in the U.S. airline industry.
Finally, smaller corporate travel budgets, combined with the higher time costs of travel, have made
business customers more amenable to communications substitutes such as tele- and video-conferencing.
Uncertainties of the Airline Industry. The Board’s ability to derive Gross Revenues from its
operation of the Airport depends on many factors, many of which are not subject to the Board’s control.
Revenues may be affected by the ability of the Signatory Airlines, individually and collectively, to meet
their respective obligations under the Use Agreements.
The financial strength and stability of airlines serving the Airport are key determinants of future
airline traffic. In addition, individual airline decisions regarding level of service, particularly hubbing
activity, at the Airport will affect total enplanements. No assurance can be given as to the levels of
aviation activity that will be achieved by the Airport. There is no assurance that the Airport, despite a
demonstrated level of airline service and operations, will continue to maintain such levels in the future.
The continued presence of the airlines serving the Airport, and the levels at which that service
will be provided, are a function of a variety of factors. Future airline traffic of the Airport will be affected
by, among other things, the growth or decline in the population and the economy of the Airport Service
Region and by national and international economic conditions, acts of war and terrorism, federal
regulatory actions, airline service, air fare levels and the operation of the air traffic control system. See
“THE AIRLINES.”
Effect of Bankruptcy on Use Agreements
When a Signatory Airline seeks protection under the bankruptcy laws, such airline or its
bankruptcy trustee must determine whether to assume or reject its agreements with the Board (1) with
regard to non–residential real property leases (including the Use Agreements) by the earlier of (i) 120
days after the date of the order for relief (unless extended by the court for an additional 90 days for
cause), or (ii) entry of the order confirming a plan, or (2) prior to the confirmation of a plan of
reorganization with respect to any other agreement. In the event of assumption, the airline would be
required to cure any defaults and to provide adequate assurance of future performance under the
applicable Use Agreement or other agreements. Rejection of a Use Agreement or other agreement or
executory contract would give rise to an unsecured claim of the Board for damages, the amount of which
in the case of a Use Agreement or other real property lease agreement is limited by the Bankruptcy Code
generally to the amounts unpaid prior to bankruptcy plus the greater of (a) one year of rent or (b) 15% of
the total remaining lease payments, not to exceed three years. However, the amount ultimately received
in the event of a rejection of a Use Agreement or other agreement could be considerably less than the
maximum amounts allowed under the Bankruptcy Code. Except for costs allocated to such airline for
-80-
usage and rental of the terminal, concourse and ramps, amounts unpaid as a result of a rejection of a Use
Agreement or other agreement in connection with an airline in bankruptcy, such as airfield costs and costs
associated with the baggage claim area, would be passed on to the remaining Signatory Airlines under
their respective Use Agreements, although there can be no assurance that such remaining airlines would
be financially able to absorb the additional cost. Additionally, during the pendency of a bankruptcy
proceeding, a debtor airline may not, absent a court order, make any payments to the Board on account of
goods and services provided prior to the bankruptcy. Thus, the Board’s stream of payments from a debtor
airline would be interrupted to the extent of pre–petition goods and services, including accrued rent and
landing fees.
Regulations and Restrictions Affecting the Airport
The operations of the Airport are affected by a variety of contractual, statutory and regulatory
restrictions and limitations including, without limitation, the provisions of the Use Agreements, the
federal acts authorizing the imposition, collection and use of PFCs and extensive federal legislation and
regulations applicable to all airports in the United States. The Airport also has been required to
implement enhanced security measures mandated by the FAA, DHS and Airport management.
It is not possible to predict whether future restrictions or limitations on Airport operations will be
imposed, whether future legislation or regulations will affect anticipated federal funding or PFC
collections for capital projects for the Airport, whether additional requirements will be funded by the
federal government or require funding by the Cities or the Board, or whether such restrictions or
legislation or regulations would adversely affect Gross Revenues.
Airport Disruption Due to Construction
As noted under “CAPITAL PROJECTS–Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program
(“TRIP”),” the Airport will be undergoing significant construction over the next seven years. The $2
billion TRIP will require scheduling and planning that will manage the disruption to operations at the
Airport. The Airport believes that it has sufficient terminal capacity to renovate up to one Section of the
three terminals scheduled to be renovated at one time without adversely impacting flight operations
activity at the Airport. However only one Section of Terminals A and C may be closed at one time to
accommodate American Airlines’ projected flight activity. While the Airport does not anticipate a change
in flight activity, there can be no assurance that the TRIP will not adversely impact flight activity at the
Airport which could lead to a decrease in Gross Revenues, which is the primary source for the payment of
debt service on the Bonds.
The Airport cannot predict how the TRIP will impact other activities such as concessions and
parking. It is possible that the Airport may see decreases in revenues in parking, concessions and other
activities as the construction may alter airport customers’ consumption of the goods and services provided
at the Airport. Decreases in such business activities would decrease the amount of Gross Revenues
available to pay debt service and may increase the cost of airlines to operate at the airport
Limitations on Remedies
The Bonds are not subject to acceleration under any circumstances or for any reason, including
without limitation on the occurrence or continuance of an Event of Default. Upon the occurrence or
continuation of an Event of Default, a Bondholder would only be entitled to principal and interest
payments on the Bonds as they come due. Under certain circumstances, Holders of the Bonds may not be
able to pursue certain remedies or enforce covenants contained in the Master Bond Ordinance. See
“SECURITY FOR THE BONDS–Matters Relating to Enforceability.”
-81-
LITIGATION
Litigation and Regulatory Claims
There is no litigation, regulatory action or other claim or proceeding pending or, to the knowledge
of the Board or the Cities, threatened, which would have a material, adverse impact on the Airport, the
Board, or the Bonds.
RATINGS
Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”), Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services, a Standard & Poor’s Financial Services
LLC business (“S&P”), and Kroll Bond Rating Agency, Inc. (“KBRA”) have assigned their municipal
bond ratings of “A,” “A+,” and “AA-,” respectively, on the Bonds.
None of the Cities, the Board or the Underwriters makes any representation as to the meanings of
such ratings. An explanation of the S&P rating may be obtained from S&P by writing to Standard &
Poor’s Ratings Services, 55 Water St., New York, New York 10041; an explanation of the Fitch rating
may be obtained from Fitch by writing to Fitch, Inc., One State Street Plaza, New York, New York
10004; an explanation of the KBRA rating may be obtained from KBRA by writing to Kroll Bond Rating
Agency, Inc., 845 Third Avenue, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10022. The ratings are not
recommendations to buy, sell or hold the Bonds. There is no assurance that such ratings will be
maintained for any period of time or that such ratings will not be withdrawn or revised downward by one
or more of such rating agencies if, in their judgment, circumstances so warrant. Such actions, if taken,
could have an adverse effect on the market price of the Bonds. The Cities and the Board have undertaken
no responsibility to ensure the maintenance of the ratings or to oppose any revisions or withdrawals.
A securities rating is not a recommendation to buy, sell or hold securities and may be subject to
revision or withdrawal at any time.
TAX MATTERS
Opinions on Bonds
In the opinion of Bracewell & Giuliani LLP, McCall, Parkhurst & Horton L.L.P. and Newby
Davis, PLLC, Co-Bond Counsel, assuming compliance with certain covenants and based on certain
representations, interest on the Bonds is excludable from the gross income for federal income tax
purposes, under existing statutes, regulations, published rulings and court decisions (“Existing Law”).
The interest paid on the Bonds is not treated as a “preference item” in calculating the alternative tax
imposed on individuals and corporations under Section 57(a)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986
(the “Code”).
The Code imposes a number of requirements that must be satisfied in order for interest on state or
local obligations, such as the Bonds, to be excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes.
These requirements include, among other things, limitations on the use of the bond–financed project,
limitations on the use of bond proceeds, limitations on the investment of bond proceeds prior to
expenditure, a requirement that excess arbitrage earned on the investment of bond proceeds be paid
periodically to the United States, and a requirement that the issuer file an information report with the
Internal Revenue Service (the “Service”). The Board and the Cities have covenanted in the Fiftieth
Supplement that they will comply with these requirements.
-82-
Co–Bond Counsel’s opinion will assume continuing compliance with the covenants of the Fiftieth
Supplement pertaining to those sections of the Code that affect the exclusion from gross income of the
interest on the Bonds for federal income tax purposes and, in addition, will rely on representations by the
Board, the Cities, the Co–Financial Advisors and the Underwriters with respect to matters solely within
the knowledge of the Board, the Cities, the Co–Financial Advisors and the Underwriters, respectively,
which Co–Bond Counsel have not independently verified. If the Board or the Cities fail to comply with
the covenants in the Fiftieth Supplement or if the foregoing representations should be determined to be
inaccurate or incomplete, interest on the Bonds could become includable in gross income from the date of
original delivery of the Bonds, regardless of the date on which the event causing such inclusion occurs.
Except as stated above, Co-Bond Counsel will express no opinion as to any federal, state or local
tax consequences resulting from the receipt or accrual of interest on, acquisition, ownership or disposition
of, the Bonds.
Co–Bond Counsel’s opinions are based on Existing Law, which is subject to change. Such
opinions are further based on Co–Bond Counsel’s knowledge of facts as of the date thereof. Co–Bond
Counsel assumes no duty to update or supplement its opinion to reflect any facts or circumstances that
may thereafter come to its attention or to reflect any changes in any law that may thereafter occur or
become effective. Moreover, Co–Bond Counsel’s opinions are not a guarantee of result and are not
binding on the Service; rather, such opinions represent Co–Bond Counsel’s legal judgment based upon
their review of Existing Law and in reliance upon the representations and covenants referenced above that
they deem relevant to such opinions. The Service has an ongoing audit program to determine compliance
with rules that relate to whether interest on state or local obligations is includable in gross income for
federal income tax purposes. No assurance can be given regarding whether or not the Service will
commence an audit of the Bonds. If an audit is commenced, in accordance with its current published
procedures, the Service is likely to treat the Cities as the taxpayers and the Owners may not have a right
to participate in such audit. Public awareness of any future audit of the Bonds could adversely.
Additional Federal Income Tax Considerations for the Bonds
Collateral Tax Consequences. Prospective purchasers of the Bonds should be aware that the
ownership of tax–exempt obligations may result in collateral federal income tax consequences to financial
institutions, life insurance and property and casualty insurance companies, certain S corporations with
Subchapter C earnings and profits, individual recipients of Social Security or Railroad Retirement
benefits, taxpayers who may be deemed to have incurred or continued indebtedness to purchase or carry
tax–exempt obligations, low-and moderate-income taxpayers qualifying for the health insurance premium
credit, and individuals otherwise qualifying for the earned income credit. In addition, certain foreign
corporations doing business in the United States may be subject to the “branch profits tax” on their
effectively connected earnings and profits, including tax–exempt interest such as interest on the Bonds.
These categories of prospective purchasers should consult their own tax advisors as to the applicability of
these consequences. Prospective purchasers of the Bonds should also be aware that, under the Code,
taxpayers are required to report on their returns on their federal income tax returns the amount of tax–
exempt interest, such as interest on the Bonds, received or accrued during the year.
The Code also imposes a 20% alternative minimum tax on the “alternative minimum taxable
income” of a corporation if the amount of such alternative minimum tax is greater than the amount of the
corporation’s regular income tax. Generally, the alternative minimum taxable income of a corporation
(other than any S corporation, regulated investment company, REIT, or REMIC), includes 75% of the
amount by which its “adjusted current earnings” exceeds its other “alternative minimum taxable income.”
Because interest on tax-exempt obligations, such as the Tax-Exempt Bonds, is included in a corporation’s
-83-
“adjusted current earnings,” ownership of the Tax-Exempt Bonds could subject a corporation to
alternative minimum tax consequences.
Tax Accounting Treatment of Original Issue Premium. The issue price of all or a portion of
the Bonds may exceed the stated redemption price payable at maturity of such Bonds. Such Bonds (the
“Premium Bonds”) are considered for federal income tax purposes to have “bond premium” equal to the
amount of such excess. The basis of a Premium Bond in the hands of an initial owner is reduced by the
amount of such excess that is amortized during the period such initial owner holds such Premium Bond in
determining gain or loss for federal income tax purposes. This reduction in basis will increase the amount
of any gain or decrease the amount of any loss recognized for federal income tax purposes on the sale or
other taxable disposition of a Premium Bond by the initial owner. No corresponding deduction is allowed
for federal income tax purposes for the reduction in basis resulting from amortizable bond premium. The
amount of bond premium on a Premium Bond that is amortizable each year (or shorter period in the event
of a sale or disposition of a Premium Bond) is determined using the yield to maturity on the Premium
Bond based on the initial offering price of such Bond.
The federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and redemption, sale or other
disposition of Premium Bonds that are not purchased in the initial offering at the initial offering price may
be determined according to rules that differ from those described above. All owners of Premium Bonds
should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the determination for federal, state and local income
tax purposes of amortized bond premium upon the redemption, sale or other disposition of a Premium
Bond and with respect to the federal, state, local and foreign tax consequences of the purchase, ownership
and sale, redemption or other disposition of such Premium Bonds.
Tax Accounting Treatment of Original Issue Discount Bonds. The issue price of all or a
portion of the Bonds may be less than the stated redemption price payable at maturity of such Bonds (the
“Original Issue Discount Bonds”). In such case, the difference between (i) the amount payable at the
maturity of each Original Issue Discount Bond, and (ii) the initial offering price to the public of such
Original Issue Discount Bond constitutes original issue discount with respect to such Original Issue
Discount Bond in the hands of any owner who has purchased such Original Issue Discount Bond in the
initial public offering of the Bonds. Generally, such initial owner is entitled to exclude from gross
income (as defined in Section 61 of the Code) an amount of income with respect to such Original Issue
Discount Bond equal to that portion of the amount of such original issue discount allocable to the period
that such Original Issue Discount Bond continues to be owned by such owner. Because original issue
discount is treated as interest for federal income tax purposes, the discussions regarding interest on the
Bonds under the captions “Opinions on Bonds” and “Additional Federal Income Tax Considerations for
the Bonds–Collateral Tax Consequences” generally apply, and should be considered in connection with
the discussion in this portion of the Official Statement.
In the event of the redemption, sale or other taxable disposition of such Original Issue Discount
Bond prior to stated maturity, however, the amount realized by such owner in excess of the basis of such
Original Issue Discount Bond in the hands of such owner (adjusted upward by the portion of the original
issue discount allocable to the period for which such Original Issue Discount Bond was held by such
initial owner) is includable in gross income.
The foregoing discussion assumes that (i) the Underwriters have purchased the Bonds for
contemporaneous sale to the public and (ii) all of the Original Issue Discount Bonds have been initially
offered, and a substantial amount of each maturity thereof has been sold, to the general public in arm’s–
length transactions for a price (and with no other consideration being included) not more than the initial
offering prices thereof stated on the cover page of this Official Statement. None of the Board, the Cities
-84-
or Co–Bond Counsel has made any investigation or offers any assurance that the Original Issue Discount
Bonds will be offered and sold in accordance with such assumptions.
Under Existing Law, the original issue discount on each Original Issue Discount Bond accrues
daily to the stated maturity thereof (in amounts calculated as described below for each six–month period
ending on the date before the semiannual anniversary dates of the date of the Bonds and ratably within
each such six–month period) and the accrued amount is added to an initial owner’s basis for such Original
Issue Discount Bond for purposes of determining the amount of gain or loss recognized by such owner
upon the redemption, sale or other disposition thereof. The amount to be added to basis for each accrual
period is equal to (i) the sum of the issue price and the amount of original issue discount accrued in prior
periods multiplied by the yield to stated maturity (determined on the basis of compounding at the close of
each accrual period and properly adjusted for the length of the accrual period) less (ii) the amounts
payable as current interest during such accrual period on such Bond.
The federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership, and redemption, sale or other
disposition of Original Issue Discount Bonds that are not purchased in the initial offering at the initial
offering price may be determined according to rules that differ from those described above. All owners of
Original Issue Discount Bonds should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the determination for
federal, state, and local income tax purposes of interest accrued upon redemption, sale or other disposition
of such Original Issue Discount Bonds and with respect to the federal, state, local and foreign tax
consequences of the purchase, ownership, redemption, sale or other disposition of such Original Issue
Discount Bonds.
State, Local and Foreign Taxes. Investors should consult their own tax advisors concerning the
tax implications of the purchase, ownership or disposition of the Bonds under applicable state or local
laws. Foreign investors should also consult their own tax advisors regarding the tax consequences unique
to investors who are not United States persons.
Tax Legislative Changes. Current law may change so as directly or indirectly reduce or
eliminate the benefit of the exclusion of interest on the Bonds from the gross income for federal income
tax purposes. Any proposed legislation, whether or not enacted, could also affect the value and liquidity
of the Bonds. Prospective purchasers of the Bonds should consult with their own tax advisors with respect
to any proposed or future legislation.
AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Deloitte & Touche LLP, the Airport’s independent auditor, has not reviewed, commented on, or
approved, and is not associated with, this Official Statement. The report of Deloitte & Touche LLP
relating to Airport’s financial statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013 is included in this
Official Statement in APPENDIX C; however, Deloitte & Touche LLP has not performed any procedures
on such financial statements since the date of such report, and has not performed any procedures on any
other financial information of the Airport, including without limitation any of the information contained
in this Official Statement, and has not been asked to consent to the inclusion of its report, or otherwise be
associated with this Official Statement.
LEGAL COUNSEL
All legal matters incident to the validity and enforceability of the Bonds, including their
authorization, issuance and sale by the Cities, are subject to the approval of Bracewell & Giuliani LLP,
Dallas, Texas, McCall, Parkhurst & Horton L.L.P., Dallas, Texas and Newby Davis PLLC, Fort Worth,
Texas, Co–Bond Counsel. The delivery of the Bonds is subject to the delivery by Co–Bond Counsel of
-85-
their opinions substantially to the effect set forth in the form attached hereto as APPENDIX A. In their
capacity as Co–Bond Counsel, such firms have reviewed the information describing the Bonds in the
Official Statement to verify that such description conforms to the provisions of the Master Bond
Ordinance. The legal fees to be paid to Co–Bond Counsel for services rendered in connection with the
issuance of the Bonds are contingent on the sale and delivery of the Bonds. Certain legal matters will be
passed upon for the Underwriters by Kelly Hart & Hallman LLP, Fort Worth, Texas, and Mahomes
Bolden PC, Dallas, Texas, Co-Counsel for the Underwriters. The legal fees to be paid to such CoCounsel for services rendered to the Underwriters in connection with their purchase of the Bonds are
contingent on the issuance, sale and delivery of the Bonds.
CO–FINANCIAL ADVISORS
First Southwest Company and Estrada Hinojosa & Company, Inc. (“Co–Financial Advisors”)
have acted as Co-Financial Advisors to the Airport in connection with the issuance and sale of the Bonds.
A portion of their fee for such services is contingent upon the sale and issuance of the Bonds. The Co–
Financial Advisors also serve in other capacities with the Airport. All fees and other remuneration
received in such other capacities are separate and distinct from the fees associated with this Bond issue
and are not contingent upon the sale and issuance of the Bonds. First Southwest Company also has a
contract with i–Deal LLC pursuant to which electronic official statement dissemination capacity may be
provided to municipal finance clients such as the Airport through i–Deal’s Prospectus. The Co–Financial
Advisors have not independently verified information in this Official Statement for accuracy or
completeness (except for the information concerning the Co–Financial Advisors). Investors should not
draw any conclusions as to the suitability of the Bonds from, or base any investment decisions upon, the
fact that the Co–Financial Advisors have advised the Board with respect to the Bonds.
UNDERWRITING
Morgan Stanley, as senior manager, on behalf of the managers listed on the cover page
(collectively, the “Underwriters”) has agreed, subject to certain conditions, to purchase the Bonds from
the Cities at an aggregate underwriter’s discount of $502,654.91 from the initial offering price of the
Bonds. The Underwriters will be obligated to purchase all of the Bonds if any Bonds are purchased. The
Bonds to be offered to the public may be offered and sold to certain dealers (including the Underwriters
and other dealers depositing Bonds into investment trusts) at prices lower than the public offering prices
of such Bonds and such public offering prices may be changed, from time to time, by the Underwriters.
The Underwriters and their respective affiliates are full service financial institutions engaged in
various activities, which may include securities trading, commercial and investment banking, financial
advisory, investment management, principal investment, hedging, financing and brokerage activities.
Certain of the Underwriters and their respective affiliates have, from time to time, performed, and may in
the future perform, various investment banking services for the Cities for which they received or will
receive customary fees and expenses.
In the ordinary course of their various business activities, the Underwriters and their respective
affiliates may make or hold a broad array of investments and actively trade debt and equity securities (or
related derivative securities) and financial instruments (which may include bank loans and/or credit
default swaps) for their own account and for the accounts of their customers and may at any time hold
long and short positions in such securities and instruments. Such investment and securities activities may
involve securities and instruments of the Cities.
Morgan Stanley, parent company of Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC., an underwriter of the Bonds,
has entered into a retail distribution arrangement with its affiliate Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. As
-86-
part of the distribution arrangement, Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC may distribute municipal securities to
retail investors through the financial advisor network of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. As part of
this arrangement, Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC may compensate Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC for
its selling efforts with respect to the 2014C Bonds.
J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (“JPMS”), one of the Underwriters of the Bonds, has entered into a
negotiated dealer agreement (the “Dealer Agreement”) with Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (“CS&Co.”) for
the retail distribution of certain securities offerings, including the Bonds, at the original issue prices.
Pursuant to the Dealer Agreement, CS&Co. will purchase Bonds from JPMS at the original issue price
less a negotiated portion of the selling concession applicable to any Bonds that CS&Co. sells.
REGISTRATION AND QUALIFICATION OF THE BONDS FOR SALE
The sale of the Bonds has not been registered under the Federal Securities Act of 1933, as
amended, in reliance upon the exemption provided thereunder by Section 3(a)(2); and the Bonds have not
been qualified under the Securities Act of Texas in reliance upon various exemptions contained therein;
nor have the Bonds been qualified under the securities acts of any other jurisdiction. The Board assumes
no responsibility for qualification of the Bonds under the securities laws of any jurisdiction in which the
Bonds may be sold, assigned, pledged, hypothecated or otherwise transferred. This disclaimer of
responsibility for qualification for sale or other disposition of the Bonds shall not be construed as an
interpretation of any kind with regard to the availability of any exemption from securities registration
provisions.
CONTINUING DISCLOSURE
In the Fiftieth Supplemental Concurrent Bond Ordinance, the Cities have made the following
agreement for the benefit of the holders and beneficial owners of the Bonds. The Cities are required to
observe the agreement for so long as each remains obligated to advance funds to pay the Bonds. Under
the agreement, the Board operates as the Cities’ designated agent with respect to the undertakings. The
Cities will be obligated to provide certain updated financial information and operating data annually, and
timely notice of certain specified events, to the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (“MSRB”).
Annual Reports
The Board, on behalf of the Cities, will provide certain updated financial information and
operating data to the MSRB annually. The information to be updated includes all quantitative financial
information and operating data with respect to the Airport, as of the end of such Fiscal Year or for such
Fiscal Year period, of the general type included in the main text of the Official Statement within the
numbered tables only and in APPENDIX C. The Board will update and provide this information as of the
end of such Fiscal Year or for the twelve month period then ended within six months after the end of each
Fiscal Year ending in or after 2014.
Under the Use Agreement, the Signatory Airlines are contractually obligated to make payments
only if and to the extent of the use of the Airport by such Signatory Airlines during any Fiscal Year.
Consequently, the Signatory Airlines are not “obligated persons” under the Rule (defined below), and no
undertaking is being made by the Airport or any other party with respect to providing continuing
disclosure as to any individual airline. For information relating to any individual airline, see “THE
AIRLINES” and “AIRLINE AGREEMENTS.”
The Cities, or the Board on behalf of the Cities, may provide updated information in full text or
may incorporate by reference certain other publicly available documents, as permitted by the Securities
-87-
Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, Rule 15c2–12 (the “Rule”). The updated information will include
audited financial statements of the Airport, if the Board commissions an audit and it is completed by the
required time. If audited financial statements are not provided by that time, the Board will provide
unaudited financial statements and audited financial statements of the Airport when and if they become
available. Any such financial statements of the Airport will be prepared in accordance with the
accounting principles described in APPENDIX C or such other accounting principles as the Airport may
be required to employ from time to time pursuant to state law or regulation.
The Airport’s current Fiscal Year is October 1 to September 30. Accordingly, it must provide
updated information by March 31 in each year, unless the Airport changes its Fiscal Year. If the Airport
changes its Fiscal Year, it will notify the MSRB of the change.
Disclosure Event Notices
The Cities will provide notice to the MSRB of any of the following events with respect to the
Bonds, if such event is material within the meaning of the federal securities laws: (1) non-payment related
defaults; (2) modifications to rights of Bondholders; (3) Bond calls; (4) release, substitution, or sale of
property securing repayment of the Bonds; (5) the consummation of a merger, consolidation, or
acquisition involving an obligated person or the sale of all or substantially all of the assets of the
obligated person, other than in the ordinary course of business, the entry into a definitive agreement to
undertake such an action or the termination of a definitive agreement relating to any such actions, other
than pursuant to its terms; and (6) appointment of a successor or additional trustee or the change of name
of a trustee.
The Cities will also provide notice to the MSRB of any of the following events with respect to the
Bonds without regard to whether such event is considered material within the meaning of the federal
securities laws: (1) principal and interest payment delinquencies; (2) unscheduled draws on debt service
reserves reflecting financial difficulties; (3) unscheduled draws on credit enhancements reflecting
financial difficulties; (4) substitution of credit or liquidity providers, or their failure to perform; (5)
adverse tax opinions or the issuance by the Internal Revenue Service of proposed or final determinations
of taxability, Notices of Proposed Issue (IRS Form 5701–TEB) or other material notices or
determinations with respect to the tax-exempt status of the Bonds, or other events affecting the taxexempt status of the Bonds; (6) tender offers; (7) defeasances; (8) rating changes; and (9) bankruptcy,
insolvency, receivership or similar event of an obligated person.(1)
The Cities will provide notice of the aforementioned events to the MSRB in a timely manner (but
not in excess of ten business days after the occurrence of the event). The Cities will also provide timely
notice of any failure by the Cities to provide annual financial information in accordance with their
agreement described above under “Annual Reports.”
Availability of Information from the MSRB
The Cities have agreed to provide the foregoing information to the MSRB.
(1)
For the purposes of the event identified in (9), the event is considered to occur when any of the following occur: the
appointment of a receiver, fiscal agent, or similar officer for the obligated person in a proceeding under the U.S. Bankruptcy
Code or in any other proceeding under state or federal law in which a court or governmental authority has assumed jurisdiction
over substantially all of the assets or business of the obligated person, or if such jurisdiction has been assumed by leaving the
existing governing body and officials or officers in possession but subject to the supervision and orders of a court or
governmental authority, or the entry of an order confirming a plan of reorganization, arrangement, or liquidation by a court or
governmental authority having supervision or jurisdiction over substantially all of the assets or business of the obligated person.
-88-
Limitations and Amendments
The Cities have agreed to update information and to provide notices of certain specified events
only as described above. Neither the Cities nor the Board have agreed to provide other information that
may be relevant or material to a complete presentation of its financial results of operations, condition, or
prospects or agreed to update any information that is provided, except as described above. Neither the
Cities nor the Board make any representation or warranty concerning such information or concerning its
usefulness to a decision to invest in or sell Bonds at any future date. The Cities and the Board disclaim
any contractual or tort liability for damages resulting in whole or in part from any breach of the
continuing disclosure agreement or from any statement made pursuant to the agreement, although holders
of the Bonds may seek a writ of mandamus to compel the Cities to comply with their agreement.
The Cities may amend their continuing disclosure agreement to adapt to changed circumstances
that arise from a change in legal requirements, a change in law, or a change in the identity, nature, status,
or type of operations of the Airport, if the agreement, as amended, would have permitted an underwriter
to purchase or sell the Bonds in the offering described herein in compliance with the Rule and either the
holders of a majority in aggregate principal amount of the outstanding Bonds consent or any person
unaffiliated with the Cities (such as nationally recognized bond counsel) determines that the amendment
will not materially impair the interests of the beneficial owners of the Bonds. If the Cities amend their
agreement, they must include with the next financial information and operating data provided in
accordance with their agreement described above under “Annual Reports” an explanation, in narrative
form, of the reasons for the amendment and of the impact of any change in the type of information and
data provided.
Compliance with Prior Undertakings
During the last five years, each of the Cities has complied in all material respects with all
continuing disclosure agreements made by it in accordance with SEC Rule 15c2-12, including continuing
disclosure undertakings with respect to the Airport. The Cities have identified instances in which certain
segments of the Airport’s annual financial information for Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010, which the Cities
believe are immaterial to the operations and financial condition of the Airport, were filed through
incorporation by reference to Official Statements after the scheduled annual filing date for the respective
years. Consolidation of tables and audited financial information in one document filing since Fiscal Year
2012 further assures timely and complete annual filings.
Miscellaneous
In order to provide certain continuing disclosure with respect to the Bonds in accordance with the
Rule, the Airport has entered into a Disclosure Dissemination Agent Agreement (“Disclosure
Dissemination Agreement”) for the benefit of the Holders of the Bonds with Digital Assurance
Certification, L.L.C. (“DAC”), under which the Airport has designated DAC as Disclosure Dissemination
Agent.
The Disclosure Dissemination Agent has only the duties specifically set forth in the Disclosure
Dissemination Agreement. The Disclosure Dissemination Agent’s obligation to deliver the information at
the times and with the contents described in the Disclosure Dissemination Agreement is limited to the
extent the Airport has provided such information to the Disclosure Dissemination Agent as required by
this Disclosure Dissemination Agreement. The Disclosure Dissemination Agent has no duty with respect
to the content of any disclosures or notice made pursuant to the terms of the Disclosure Dissemination
Agreement. The Disclosure Dissemination Agent has no duty or obligation to review or verify any
information in the Annual Report, Audited Financial Statements, notice of event or voluntary report, or
-89-
any other information, disclosures or notices provided to it by the Airport and shall not be deemed to be
acting in any fiduciary capacity for the Airport, the Holders of the Bonds or any other party. The
Disclosure Dissemination Agent has no responsibility for the Airport’s failure to report to the Disclosure
Dissemination Agent a notice event or a duty to determine the materiality thereof. The Disclosure
Dissemination Agent shall have no duty to determine or liability for failing to determine whether the
Airport has complied with the Disclosure Dissemination Agreement. The Disclosure Dissemination
Agent may conclusively rely upon certifications of the Airport at all times.
FORWARD–LOOKING STATEMENTS
The statements contained in this Official Statement, and in any other information provided by the
Cities or the Board, that are not purely historical, are forward–looking statements, including statements
regarding the Cities or the Board’s expectations, hopes, intentions or strategies regarding the future.
Readers should not place undue reliance on forward–looking statements. All forward–looking statements
included in this Official Statement are based on information available to the Cities and the Board on the
date hereof, and the Cities and the Board assume no obligation to update any such forward–looking
statements. It is important to note that the Airport’s actual results could differ materially from those in
such forward–looking statements.
The forward–looking statements herein are necessarily based on various assumptions and
estimates and are inherently subject to various risks and uncertainties, including risks and uncertainties
relating to the possible invalidity of the underlying assumptions and estimates and possible changes or
developments in social, economic, business, industry, market, legal and regulatory circumstances and
conditions and actions taken or omitted to be taken by third parties, including customers, suppliers,
business partners and competitors, and legislative, judicial and other governmental authorities and
officials. Assumptions related to the foregoing involve judgments with respect to, among other things,
future economic, competitive, and market conditions and future business decisions, all of which are
difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond the control of the Cities and
the Board. Any of such assumptions could be inaccurate and, therefore, there can be no assurance that the
forward–looking statements included in this Official Statement will prove to be accurate.
GENERAL INFORMATION
The financial data and other information contained herein have been obtained from the Board’s
records, audited financial statements and other sources which are believed to be reliable. There is no
guarantee that any of the assumptions or estimates contained herein will be realized. All of the
summaries of the statutes, documents and resolutions contained in this Official Statement are made
subject to all of the provisions of such statutes, documents and resolutions. These summaries do not
purport to be complete statements of such provisions and reference is made to such documents for further
information. Reference is made to original documents in all respects.
Additional financial information and operating data relating to the Airport is available from the
MSRB and is hereby incorporated by reference.
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-90-
MISCELLANEOUS
The form and content of this Official Statement has been approved by official action of the Board
on behalf of and at the direction of the Cities for use in connection with the offering and sale of the
Bonds.
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL
AIRPORT BOARD
/s/ Sean P. Donohue
Sean P. Donohue
Chief Executive Officer,
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board
[THE REMAINDER OF THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
-91-
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
APPENDIX A
FORM OF OPINIONS OF CO–BOND COUNSEL
[Letterhead of Co–Bond Counsel]
____________, 2014
CITIES OF DALLAS AND FORT WORTH, TEXAS
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
JOINT REVENUE IMPROVEMENT BONDS
SERIES 2014C
(Non-AMT)
WE HAVE EXAMINED the validity of an issue of the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas
(the “Cities”), entitled Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds, Series
2014C (Non-AMT) (the “Bonds”), dated June 1, 2014, aggregating $124,285,000, bearing interest from
their date of initial delivery until maturity or earlier redemption at the rates per annum set forth in the
pricing certificate authorized by the Fiftieth Supplemental Concurrent Bond Ordinance adopted by the
Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth on February 26, 2014 and March 4, 2014, respectively (collectively, the
“Fiftieth Supplement”) with interest payable on November 1, 2014 and semi-annually thereafter on each
May 1 and November 1 and with said Bonds maturing on the dates set forth therein. The Bonds are
subject to optional and mandatory redemption. Terms not defined herein shall have the meanings set
forth in the Master Bond Ordinance adopted by the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth on September 22,
2010 and September 21, 2010, respectively.
WE HAVE REPRESENTED the Cities and the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board
(the “Board”) as co–bond counsel, for the purpose of rendering an opinion with respect to the
authorization, issuance, delivery, legality and validity of the Bonds under the Constitution and the statutes
of the State of Texas. We have not been requested to examine, and have not investigated or verified, any
statements, records, material or other matters relating to the financial condition or capabilities of the
Board or the Airport, and we express no opinion with respect thereto. Our role in connection with the
Official Statement prepared for use in connection with the sale of the Bonds has been limited as described
therein.
WE HAVE EXAMINED the Constitution and statutes of the State of Texas, particularly Chapter
22 of the Texas Transportation Code, as amended (the “Act”), the Charters of the Cities, certified copies
of the proceedings of the City Councils of the Cities and other proofs authorizing and relating to the
issuance of the Bonds, including a specimen of the Bonds.
IN OUR OPINION the Bonds have been duly authorized, issued and delivered in accordance
with all applicable laws including the Acts and constitute valid and legally binding special obligations of
the Cities, and together with the Outstanding Obligations, are ratably secured by a lien on and a joint
pledge by the Cities of their respective interests in the “Pledged Revenues” and “Pledged Funds” to be
derived from the ownership and operation of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (the “Airport”).
“Pledged Revenues,” are collectively the Gross Revenues, and such other money, income,
revenues or other property as may be specifically included in such term in an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance. “Pledged Funds” mean, collectively, (i) amounts on deposit in the Debt Service Fund, (ii)
amounts on deposit in the Debt Service Reserve Fund, (iii) any amounts that are due and owing, and any
amounts that are paid, under a Credit Agreement executed in lieu of making cash deposits to the Debt
Service Reserve Fund, (iv) any Investment Securities or other investments or earnings belonging to either
A-1
of the funds identified in clauses (i) and (ii), above, and (v) any additional funds, accounts, revenues, or
other moneys or funds of the Cities which hereafter may be, by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance,
expressly and specifically pledged to the payment of all, but not less than all, of the Outstanding
Obligations. The foregoing notwithstanding, the term “Pledged Funds” does not include, unless
specifically provided in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, any amounts deposited to or investments
or earnings belonging to a Rebate Fund to the extent necessary to make a payment to the United States of
America in accordance with Section 148 of the Code. As provided in the Master Bond Ordinance and the
Fiftieth Supplement, the obligations of the Cities to pay money on the Bonds out of Pledged Revenues are
joint, and not several, and except as otherwise provided therein no claim, demand, suit or judgment shall
ever be asserted, entered or collected against or from one City without the other and no individual liability
shall ever exceed in the case of Dallas 7/11ths of the total amount thereof, and in the case of Fort Worth
4/11ths of the total amount thereof; and, except as in the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth
Supplement otherwise provided, such sums shall be payable and collectible solely from the funds in
which Pledged Revenues shall from time to time be on deposit. Certain other obligations of the Cities
under the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth Supplement with respect to the Bonds and the Airport
are several and not joint, the default of which by one City shall not constitute a default by the other.
Reference is hereby made to the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth Supplement for a full and
complete description of the revenues of the Airport pledged to the payment of the Bonds together with a
statement of the rights of the Holders of the Bonds, and the rights, duties and obligations of the Cities and
the Board with respect thereto. It is further our opinion that the Master Bond Ordinance and the Fiftieth
Supplement have been duly and validly authorized and passed and that the Bonds have been duly
authorized and issued in accordance with their terms.
Under the terms and conditions provided in the Master Bond Ordinance and in any supplemental
ordinances authorizing obligations on parity therewith, and the Bonds of this issue, the Cities reserve the
right to issue Additional Obligations secured by a lien on parity with the lien securing this issue of Bonds
under the conditions set forth in said Ordinances.
The Holders of the Bonds do not have the right to require the payment thereof out of any funds
raised or to be raised by taxation.
The rights of the Holders of the Bonds are subject to the provisions of the federal bankruptcy
laws and any other similar laws affecting the rights of creditors of political subdivisions generally, and
may be limited by general principles of equity which permit the exercise of judicial discretion.
IT IS OUR OPINION THAT:
Interest on the Bonds will be excludable from the gross income of the owners for federal income
tax purposes under the statutes, regulations, published rulings and court decisions existing on the date of
this opinion (“Existing Law”). We are further of the opinion that the Bonds are not “specified private
activity bonds” and that, accordingly, interest on the Bonds will not be included as an individual or
corporate alternative minimum tax preference item under Section 57(a)(5) of the Internal Revenue Code
of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).
In expressing the aforementioned opinions, we are relying on representations to be made by the
Cities, the Board, First Southwest Company and Estrada Hinojosa & Company, Inc. (the “Co-Financial
Advisors”) and the Underwriters named in the Underwriting Agreement with respect to the Bonds (the
“Underwriters”) with respect to matters solely within the knowledge of the Cities, the Board, the CoFinancial Advisors, and the Underwriters, respectively, which we have not independently verified, and
have assumed continuing compliance with the covenants in the Fiftieth Supplement relating to those
A-2
sections of the Code that affect the exclusion from gross income of interest on the Bonds for federal
income tax purposes. In the event such representations are determined to be inaccurate or incomplete or
the Cities or the Board fail to comply with the foregoing covenants of the Fiftieth Supplement, interest on
the Bonds could become includable in gross income from the date of delivery regardless of the date on
which the event causing such inclusion occurs.
EXCEPT AS STATED ABOVE, we express no opinion as to any other federal, state or local tax
consequences of acquiring, carrying, owning or disposing of the Bonds. In particular, but not by way of
limitation, we express no opinion with respect to the federal, state or local tax consequences arising from
the enactment of any pending or future legislation. Furthermore we express no opinion as to whether any
person treated as the owner of the Bonds under the Fiftieth Supplement is also properly treated as the
owner for federal tax purposes.
OUR OPINIONS ARE BASED ON EXISTING LAW, which is subject to change. Such
opinions are further based on our knowledge of facts as of the date hereof. We assume no duty to update
or supplement our opinions to reflect any facts or circumstances that may thereafter come to our attention
or to reflect any changes in any law that may thereafter occur or become effective. Moreover, our
opinions are not a guarantee of result and are not binding on the Internal Revenue Service (the “Service”);
rather, such opinions represent our legal judgment based upon our review of existing law and in reliance
upon the representations and covenants referenced above that we deem relevant to such opinions. The
Service has an ongoing audit program to determine compliance with rules that relate to whether interest
on state or local obligations is includable in gross income for federal income tax purposes. No assurance
can be given regarding whether or not the Service will commence an audit of the Bonds. If an audit is
commenced, in accordance with its current published procedures, the Service is likely to treat the Cities as
the taxpayer. We observe that the Cities and the Board have covenanted not to take any action, or omit to
take any action within its control, that if taken or omitted, respectively, may result in the treatment of
interest on the Bonds as includable in gross income for federal income tax purposes.
WE CALL YOUR ATTENTION TO THE FACT that the interest on tax-exempt
obligations, such as the Bonds, is included in a corporation’s alternative minimum taxable income for
purposes of determining the alternative minimum tax imposed on corporations by Section 55 of the Code.
OUR SOLE ENGAGEMENT in connection with the issuance of the Bonds is as co–bond counsel
for the Cities and the Board and, in that capacity, we have been engaged by the Cities and the Board for
the sole purpose of rendering an opinion with respect to the legality and validity of the Bonds and the
organization of the Cities and the Board under the Constitution and laws of the State of Texas, and for no
other reason or purpose. The foregoing opinions represent our legal judgment based upon a review of
existing legal authorities that we deem relevant to render such opinions and are not a guarantee of the
result. We have not been requested to investigate or verify, and have not investigated or verified, any
records, data or other material relating to the Cities or the Board or to the financial condition or
capabilities of the Cities or the Board and we have not assumed any responsibility, and we express no
opinions, with respect thereto. We express no opinion and make no comment with respect to the
marketability of the Bonds and our role in connection with the Official Statement prepared for use in
connection with the sale of the Bonds has been limited as described therein.
A-3
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
APPENDIX B
SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE
The following constitutes a summary of certain portions of the Master Bond Ordinance. This
summary is qualified by reference to other provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance referred to elsewhere
in this Official Statement, and all summaries pertaining to the Master Bond Ordinance in this Official
Statement are, separately and in whole, qualified by reference to the exact terms of the Master Bond
Ordinance, a copy of which may be obtained from the Board.
Selected Definitions
Accrued Aggregate Debt Service means, for any Debt Service Accrual Period, or other period
stated in the Master Bond Ordinance, an amount equal to the sum of the Debt Service with respect to all
Outstanding Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations accruing during that Debt Service
Accrual Period.
Accrued Aggregate Interest means that portion of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service applicable
to interest on Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and accruing during a Debt Service
Accrual Period and transferred to the Debt Service Fund pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance. Such
term includes amounts payable to the counterparty under a Swap Agreement to the extent such amounts
exceed the applicable amount of interest on the Obligations, but does not include termination fees or other
similar charges with respect to Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
Accrued Aggregate Principal means that portion of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service applicable
to Principal Installments of Obligations and principal amounts owed under Parity Credit Agreement
Obligations accruing during a Debt Service Accrual Period and transferred to the Debt Service Fund as
described in clause (i) under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER
BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds.”
Acts mean, collectively, chapters 1201, 1207, 1371, and 1503, Government Code, as amended,
and chapter 22, Transportation Code, as amended.
Additional Obligations means one or more series of bonds, notes, commercial paper obligations,
or other evidences of indebtedness permitted by Applicable Law and issued by the Cities on a parity as to
the Pledged Revenues and Pledged Funds with the Prior Obligations and the Initial Obligations for lawful
purposes as permitted by the Master Bond Ordinance, and includes specifically the Series 2001A Bonds,
the Series 2002A Bonds, the Series 2002B Bonds, the Series 2002C Bonds, the Series 2003A Bonds, the
Series 2003C Bonds, the Series 2004A Bonds, the Series 2004B Bonds, the Series 2006A Bonds, the
Series 2007 Bonds, the Series 2009A Bonds, Series 2010 Bonds, Series 2011A Bonds, Series 2011C
Bonds, Series 2011D Bonds, Series 2011E Bonds, Series 2012A Bonds, Series 2012B Bonds, Series
2012C Bonds, Series 2012D Bonds, Series 2012E Bonds, Series 2012F Bonds, Series 2012G Bonds,
Series 2012H Bonds, Series 2013A Bonds, Series 2013B Bonds, Series 2013C, Series 2013D, Series
2013E, Series 2013F, Series 2013G, Series 2014A and Series 2014B.
Additional Supplemental Ordinance means any ordinance jointly passed subsequent to the
passage of the Master Bond Ordinance by the Cities that supplements the Controlling Ordinances or the
Outstanding Ordinances for the purpose of (i) authorizing and providing the terms and provisions of the
Initial Obligations, the Additional Obligations, and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, (ii) authorizing
and providing the terms and provisions of Subordinate Lien Obligations, Net Revenue Obligations, and
B-1
Credit Agreement Obligations related thereto and on a parity therewith if so stated therein, or (iii) for any
of the other purposes permitted under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE
MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Amendments.”
Administrative Expenses means, to the extent specified in an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, the fees, expenses, and indemnification liabilities payable to the Paying Agent, the Credit
Providers, and others, of which the Board has or is given actual notice at least thirty (30) days prior to the
due date thereof. Said term does not include Credit Agreement Obligations.
Aggregate Debt Service means, for any period and as of any date of calculation, the sum of the
interest and Principal Installments payable with respect to Obligations and the principal amount of and
interest on any Parity Credit Agreement Obligations payable, in each case, during such period. The
calculation of Principal Installments accruing will be determined as provided in paragraph (2) of the
definition of Debt Service below, except that the period for the calculation will be substituted for the Debt
Service Accrual Period.
Aircraft means airplanes, helicopters, and every other contrivance now or hereafter used for the
navigation of, or flight in, air or space.
Airport means the international airport, presently known as the “Dallas/Fort Worth International
Airport” and originally described in the 1968 Ordinance as the “Dallas–Fort Worth Regional Airport,”
that is owned and operated by the Cities acting jointly under the Contract and Agreement in accordance
with Applicable Law, and the term includes all land, structures, and facilities thereof or related thereto of
whatever character and wherever situated, and all future improvements, extensions, and equipment
appertaining thereto and belonging to the Cities for use in connection therewith, and such term also
includes any other airport or airports, the revenues of which are, by official action of the Cities, made a
part of Gross Revenues, but excluding all Special Facilities while the Special Facility Bonds secured
thereby are outstanding, and, to the extent, but only to the extent, stated in an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, excluding such Facilities as are financed with the proceeds of Special Revenue Bonds while
the Special Revenue Bonds secured thereby are outstanding.
Airport Consultant means a professional person, firm or corporation having a wide and
favorable repute for skill and experience in the field of planning and determining the feasibility of airports
and related facilities and undertakings.
Applicable Law means the Acts, and all other laws or statutes, rules or regulations, and any
amendments thereto, of the State or of the United States by which the Cities, the Board, and their powers,
securities (including the Obligations), operations and procedures are, or may be, governed or from which
such powers may be derived.
Architect means a registered licensed professional architect working as a regular employee of the
Board, or working for any firm or joint venture of such architects that has been retained by the Board,
having a favorable repute for skill and experience in the fields of architecture and planning who is entitled
to practice and practicing as such under the laws of the State of Texas.
Authorized Officer means the Chief Executive Officer, Executive Vice President/Chief
Financial Officer, and the Vice President of Treasury Management and any and all successor positions or
titles.
B-2
Board or Airport Board means the operating Board of the Airport whose powers and duties
were continued, expanded and further defined by the Contract and Agreement.
Business Day means any day other than a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday or other day on
which banking institutions in the Cities or in the city where the Designated Payment/Transfer Office of
the Paying Agent/Registrar is located are generally authorized or obligated by law or executive order to
close.
Certificate means a document signed by an Authorized Officer, either attesting to or
acknowledging the circumstances, representations or other matters therein stated or set forth or setting
forth matters to be determined pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance or an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance.
Cities mean collectively the municipal corporations and political bodies known as the City of
Dallas, in the County of Dallas and State of Texas, and the City of Fort Worth, in the County of Tarrant
and State of Texas, and such term will also be deemed to include and refer to, in all appropriate ways, any
successor political body, authority or subdivision if the Airport is ever transferred thereto.
City Council or City Councils mean in each instance the governing body as from time to time
constituted of Dallas or Fort Worth or the plural thereof means and refers to the governing bodies of both
said Cities.
Code means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, the regulations and published rulings
promulgated or published thereto and the provisions of any applicable Section of a successor federal
income tax law.
Contract and Agreement means that certain agreement entitled “Contract and Agreement,”
entered into actually on April 23, 1968, but effective as of April 15, 1968, by and between Dallas and Fort
Worth, which by its terms continues, expands, and further defines the powers and duties of the Board,
creates the Joint Airport Fund and provides for the construction and operation of the Airport.
Controlling Ordinances means the 1968 Ordinance and the Thirtieth Supplemental Concurrent
Bond Ordinance passed by the Cities on February 23, 2000 and February 22, 2000, respectively, and
effective February 23, 2000.
Construction Fund means the Fund by that name created as a part of the Joint Airport Fund in
the Contract and Agreement.
Costs of the Airport means (i) expenses and costs for labor, payments to contractors, builders,
and materialmen in connection with preparing, constructing, otherwise acquiring, equipping, replacing,
extending, improving, and/or restoring any part of the Airport; (ii) the costs of machinery, furnishings,
and equipment used in connection therewith; (iii) the cost of indemnity and fidelity bonds, if any, to
secure the deposits of any moneys in any fund or account of the Cities or the Board relating to the
Airport; any costs or expenses relating to litigation of any nature or kind that relates to the Airport; (iv)
expenses and costs necessary or incidental to a determination of the feasibility or practicability of
constructing or installing any facilities related to the Airport, including the fees and expenses of
engineers, architects, and other professionals or consultants; (v) financing costs, including the fees and
expenses of financial advisors, attorneys, and other professionals and consultants, the costs, fees, and
charges of Credit Providers relating to the execution and delivery of Credit Agreements pertaining to any
matters that relate to Obligations, any other fees and expenses related to the issuance and delivery of
B-3
Obligations, and interest on Obligations that is to be capitalized from the proceeds of Obligations; (vi)
expenses of administration properly chargeable to the construction of improvements to the Airport or
equipping the same, including legal fees and expenses, costs of audits, and costs necessary to place the
same into operation or service; (vii) and costs and expenses related to the acquisition of land to comprise
a part of the Airport; and (viii) any proper expense incurred for any of the foregoing purposes.
Credit Agreement means any agreement of the Cities permitted by Applicable Law that is
entered into with a Credit Provider for the purpose of enhancing or supporting the creditworthiness of all
or a part of a series of Obligations or Subordinate Lien Obligations, and/or to assure the Cities’ financial
ability to honor rights of tender of any of such obligations and to hold, sell, market or remarket any of
such obligations thus tendered according to the specific terms and features of such obligations as
contained and defined in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and/or to make deposits to the Debt
Service Reserve Fund or other applicable fund in lieu of cash deposits thereto, such as, for example only,
municipal bond insurance policies, standby bond purchase agreements, Swap Agreements, revolving
credit agreements, hedge agreements, and letters or lines of credit issued or provided by, and notes, surety
bonds, reimbursement, purchase and other similar agreements with, banks, insurance companies or other
commercial and financial institutions or by and with governmental agencies, entities or departments.
Credit Agreement Obligations means any liability of the Cities to pay any amount of principal,
interest, or other payment on any debt or liability created under a Credit Agreement in favor of a Credit
Provider that is declared by the terms of an Additional Supplemental Ordinance either (i) to be a Parity
Credit Agreement Obligation, or (ii) to be on a parity with Subordinate Lien Obligations.
Credit Provider means the Existing Insurers and includes each party identified and named in an
Additional Supplemental Ordinance that provides credit or liquidity support for, or insurance insuring the
payment of, any amounts due or owing on Obligations, on Subordinate Lien Obligations, or on other
financial undertakings in a Credit Agreement, including a counterparty to the Cities under a Swap
Agreement.
Current Gross Revenues means Gross Revenues less any amounts transferred to the Operating
Revenue and Expense Fund as described in the last paragraph under the caption “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Debt
Service Reserve Fund” or in clause (a) under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF
THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Capital Improvements Fund” or
retained as described under the second to last paragraph under “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds.”
Dallas means the City of Dallas, Texas.
Debt Service means for each Debt Service Accrual Period with respect to a series of Obligations,
and related Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, an amount equal to the sum of:
(1)
interest accruing on each series of Outstanding Obligations, including as to Interim
Obligations and to each series of Variable Interest Rate Obligations, if any, the amount estimated by an
Authorized Officer that will accrue during the Debt Service Accrual Period based on the applicable
Standard Assumptions, and excluding interest funded or projected by an Authorized Officer to be funded
from the proceeds of Additional Obligations; and
(2)
that portion of the next maturing Principal Installment for each series of Outstanding
Obligations which will accrue during the Debt Service Accrual Period, other than a Principal Installment
B-4
of or with respect to Interim Obligations that are to be paid either with the proceeds of other Obligations
or with funds provided by a Credit Provider, and other than amounts scheduled to be paid by a counter
party to a Swap Agreement that is not in default. For the purpose of determining the amount of the next
maturing Principal Installment that will accrue during the Debt Service Accrual Period, the Board and the
Paying Agent will assume that the Principal Installment accrues daily in equal amounts from the next
preceding Principal Installment due date. If there is no preceding Principal Installment due date with
respect to the series of Obligations, the Principal Installments with respect to that series will not begin to
accrue until the later of (A) the date which is one year preceding the first Principal Installment due date of
that series, or (B) the date of issuance of that series. The Board and the Paying Agent will further assume
that no Obligations of the series will cease to be Outstanding except by reason of the payment, through
defeasance or otherwise, of each Principal Installment on the due date thereof; and
(3)
all amounts due and payable on Parity Credit Agreement Obligations during the Debt
Service Accrual Period, including interest amounts payable by the Cities or the Board under a Swap
Agreement during the Debt Service Accrual Period above the amount of interest accruing on a series of
Obligations during such period, so long as the counterparty to that Swap Agreement is not in default.
Debt Service Requirements will be calculated on the assumption that no Obligations Outstanding
at the date of calculation will cease to be Outstanding except by reason of the payment of the Principal
Installments or Sinking Fund Installments thereon when due, except as provided in the Master Bond
Ordinance for Interim Obligations. Such Debt Service requirements will not include termination fees or
other similar charges with respect to Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
Debt Service Accrual Period means the period commencing, as applicable, on the date of
issuance of a series or issue of Obligations or the execution of Parity Credit Agreements or on the day
following the most recent Interest Payment Date or Principal Payment Date, and ending on, but including,
the last day of the calendar month prior to the next succeeding Interest Payment Date or Principal
Payment Date thereafter; provided, however, with respect to provision for the final payment of any one or
more of the Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, such accrual period with respect to such
Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations may be shortened to a period sufficient to provide for
the payment of such Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations in full when due. The Board
may adjust the Debt Service Accrual Period from time to time, by the terms of Additional Supplemental
Ordinances or otherwise, in order to assure that all Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations
are paid in full when due.
Debt Service Fund means the fund designated and created as the “Interest and Sinking Fund” in
the Contract and Agreement, and confirmed and renamed in the Thirtieth Supplement.
Debt Service Reserve Fund means the fund designated and created as the “Reserve Fund” in the
Contract and Agreement, and confirmed and renamed in the Thirtieth Supplement.
Debt Service Reserve Requirement means the total amount required to be on deposit in the
Debt Service Reserve Fund as described in clause (b) under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Debt Service
Reserve Fund” and/or for which alternative funding is provided as described in clause (c) under the
caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds
and Flow of Funds–Debt Service Reserve Fund.”
Depository Bank means the lawful depository bank of the Board at which the Joint Revenue
Fund is to be held pursuant to the Contract and Agreement.
B-5
Event of Default means the occurrence of any of the events or circumstances described under the
caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Events
of Default–Description.”
Existing Insurers means the issuers of municipal bond insurance policies insuring a portion of
the Prior Obligations.
Facilities means any facilities, buildings or equipment comprising a part of or used in connection
with the Airport.
Fiscal Year means the twelve month period commencing on the 1st day of October of any year
and ending at midnight on September 30 of the next succeeding year.
Fort Worth means the City of Fort Worth, Texas.
Gross Revenues means all income and revenues derived directly or indirectly by the Board from
the operation or ownership of the Airport or any part thereof, whether resulting from improvements,
extensions, enlargements, repairs, or betterments to the Airport, additional Facilities, or otherwise, and
expressly including (i) all revenues received by the Board or any municipal corporation or entity
succeeding to the revenues of the Cities from the Airport, (ii) all rentals, tolls, rates or other charges for
the use of the Airport or any Facilities or for the entry upon any part thereof or for any service rendered
by the Board or the Cities in the operation thereof, (iii) any funds transferred to the Operating Revenue
and Expense Fund as described in the last paragraph under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Debt Service
Reserve Fund” or in clause (a) under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE
MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Capital Improvements Fund,” (iv) the rentals
payable under Ground Leases, (v) any funds retained in the Operating and Expense Fund as described
under the second to last paragraph under “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE
MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds” and (vi) any net amounts owing to the Cities
or the Board under a Swap Agreement, but expressly excluding the following:
(A)
rentals or other amounts derived from Net Rent Leases to the extent and for so long as
they are pledged as security for Special Facility Bonds and reserves therefor;
(B)
any moneys received as grants or gifts from the United States of America, the State of
Texas, or other sources, the use of which is limited by the grantor or donor to the construction or
acquisition of capital improvements, additions or extensions to the Airport, except to the extent any such
moneys are received as payments for the use of the Airport;
(C)
all Special Revenues and/or unrestricted federal subsidies, except for such portion thereof
as may be included as a part of “Gross Revenues” under the provisions of an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance;
(D)
the proceeds of any Additional Obligations or Credit Agreements, and the interest or
other investment income realized from the investment of the proceeds of Obligations, and all other
investment income not required to be deposited to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund;
(E)
the proceeds of insurance other than from insurance policies insuring against the loss of
use or business interruption at the Airport;
B-6
(F)
the money on deposit in the Capital Improvements Fund except for such amounts as are
transferred to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund as described in the last paragraph under the
caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds
and Flow of Funds–Debt Service Reserve Fund” or in clause (a) under the caption “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Capital
Improvements Fund”;
(G)
moneys received by the Cities pursuant to interlocal agreements entered into among the
Cities and municipalities having jurisdiction within the boundaries of the Airport under which such
municipalities and the Cities agree to share in certain tax receipts and other revenues lawfully imposed
and collected by such municipalities resulting from the continued development of Airport–owned
property within such municipalities; and
(H)
any and all money deposited to, or required to be deposited to, a Rebate Fund relating to
a Tax–Exempt Obligation.
Ground Lease means the lease of Airport lands required to be executed in connection with the
construction of Special Facilities.
Holder means the registered owner of an Obligation according to an Obligation Register.
Independent Insurance Consultant means a firm of independent professional consultants
knowledgeable in the ownership and operation of publicly–owned properties, including airports, and
having a favorable reputation for skill and experience in the field of insurance consultation.
Interest Payment Date(s) means the date or dates on which interest on Obligations or Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations is payable, as said date or dates are specified in an Outstanding Ordinance
or in Additional Supplemental Ordinances.
Interim Obligations mean Obligations (i) for or with respect to which no Principal Installments
are required to be made other than on the Stated Maturity Date thereof, which date shall be no later than
five (5) years from the date of their delivery to their initial purchasers, and (ii) which are authorized by an
Additional Supplemental Ordinance which declares the Cities’ intent, at the time of issuance, to refund or
refinance all or a part of the same prior to or on such Stated Maturity Date, including commercial paper,
notes, and similar Obligations.
Investment Securities mean any and all of the investments permitted by Applicable Law for the
investment of the public funds of the Board, provided that such investments are at the time made included
in and authorized by the official investment policy of the Airport as approved by the Board from time to
time and are not prohibited by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance.
Joint Airport Fund means the master fund by that name created by the Cities for the purpose of
accurately and adequately recording and accounting for the ownership, operations and properties to the
joint venture evidenced by the Contract and Agreement, all as described and provided in the Contract and
Agreement.
Market Value means the fair market value of Investment Securities calculated as set forth in the
Master Bond Ordinance.
B-7
Maximum Interest Rate means, with respect to any particular Variable Interest Rate Obligations
or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations bearing a Variable Interest Rate, a numerical or other statement of
the rate of interest, which is set forth in the Additional Supplemental Ordinance authorizing such
Obligations, or in a related Credit Agreement with respect to Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, in
each case being the maximum rate of interest such Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations
may bear at a single time or over the period during which they are Outstanding or unpaid, but in no event
exceeding the maximum amount or rate of interest permitted by Applicable Law.
Minimum Interest Rate means, with respect to any particular Variable Interest Rate Obligations,
or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, bearing a Variable Interest Rate, a numerical rate of interest
which may (but need not) be set forth in the Additional Supplemental Ordinance authorizing such
Obligations that is the minimum rate of interest such Obligations will at any time bear.
Net Rent Lease means a lease of Airport property or Facilities entered into by the Board pursuant
to which the lessee agrees to pay to the Board a rental during the term thereof in an amount at least equal
to the principal, interest and any special reserve requirements contained in the ordinance authorizing the
Special Facility Bonds to which such lease relates, as contemplated under Section 8.7A of the 1968
Ordinance and to pay, in addition to such rental, all operation and maintenance expenses applicable to the
Special Facilities to be constructed with said bonds, including, without limitation, any insurance
premiums applicable to such Special Facilities (as may be required by said lease); any and all ad valorem
or other property taxes lawfully levied or assessed against the leasehold interest of the lessee in and to
such Special Facilities and to the Airport land upon which the same are to be situated pursuant to the
Ground Lease executed in connection therewith (such leasehold interest, irrespective of the term thereof,
as distinguished from the remainder or other interest of the Cities therein, being for such purposes the
property of such lessee and not the property of the Cities); any and all lawful excise or other types of
taxes imposed on or in respect of such properties; and the expenses of upkeep thereof of every kind and
character including the repair or ordinary restoration thereof.
Net Revenues mean the amount remaining after deducting Operation and Maintenance Expenses
from Gross Revenues.
Newspaper means newspapers printed in the English language, published at least once each
calendar week and of general circulation within the Cities.
1968 Ordinance means the “1968 Regional Airport Concurrent Bond Ordinance,” passed by the
City Councils, respectively, on November 11, 1968, and November 12, 1968, as amended and
supplemented by the other Outstanding Ordinances, such ordinance having authorized the initial bonds
issued by the Cities for the purpose of financing the Airport and establishing the terms and provisions of
and the security for additional bonds to be issued for the purposes of the Airport.
Obligation Register means, as to each series of Obligations, the register or registers maintained
pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance.
Obligations mean the Prior Obligations, the Initial Obligations, and the Additional Obligations.
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund means the Fund by that name established as a part of
the Joint Airport Fund in the Contract and Agreement and referred to in the Master Bond Ordinance.
Operation and Maintenance Expenses means all reasonable and necessary current expenses of
the Board (paid or accrued) of operating, maintaining, and repairing the Airport. Without limiting the
B-8
generality of the foregoing, such term shall include insurance premiums, refunds/payments to be made to
airlines pursuant to agreements between the Board and such airlines, the reasonable charges of any Paying
Agent and any other depository bank appertaining to the Airport, contractual services, professional
services required by this Master Bond. Ordinance or by the Board, salaries and administrative expenses,
labor and the cost of materials and supplies used for current operation; but. shall not include the costs of
improvements, extensions, enlargements or betterments, which according to standard accounting
principles are chargeable as capital replacements or improvements.
Outstanding when used with reference to Obligations, including Obligations acquired by a
Credit Provider with the proceeds of a Credit Agreement, means, as of any date, Obligations theretofore
or thereupon being authenticated and delivered under the Outstanding Ordinances or an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance, except:
(i)
Obligations which have been fully paid at or prior to their maturity or on or prior to a
redemption date;
(ii)
Obligations (or portions thereof) for the payment of which moneys equal to the principal
amount or Redemption Price thereof, as the case may be, with interest to the date of maturity or
redemption, will be held by a Paying Agent or a trustee in cash in trust and set aside for payment at
maturity or redemption on a redemption date and for which notice of redemption has been given or
provision has been made therefor;
(iii)
Obligations in lieu of or in substitution for which other Obligations have been
authenticated and delivered pursuant to an Additional Supplemental Ordinance; and
(iv)
Obligations for which payment has been provided by defeasance as described under the
caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–
Discharge of Ordinance–Discharge by Defeasance.”
Outstanding Obligations mean (i) the Prior Obligations while, when, after, to the extent, and for
so long as any of the same are Outstanding, and (ii) the Initial Obligations while, when, after, to the
extent, and for so long as any of the same are Outstanding, and (iii) any Additional Obligations, while,
when, after, to the extent, and for so long as any of the same are Outstanding.
Outstanding Ordinances means the Master Bond Ordinance and the following ordinances that
supplement and amend the same, to-wit:
(i)
the Thirty-First Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2000A Ordinance”), effective February 23, 2000;
(ii)
the Thirty-Third Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2001A Ordinance”), effective November 14, 2001;
(iii)
the Thirty-Fourth Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2002A Ordinance”), effective August 14, 2002;
(iv)
the Thirty-Fifth Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2002B Ordinance”), effective August 14, 2002;
B-9
(v)
the Thirty-Sixth Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2002C Ordinance”), effective August 14, 2002;
(vi)
the Thirty-Seventh Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2003A Ordinance”), effective April 9, 2003;
(vii)
the Concurrent Amending Bond Ordinance (the
“Amending Ordinance”), effective April 9, 2003;
(viii) the Thirty-Eighth Concurrent Bond Ordinance (the
“2003C Ordinance”), effective April 9, 2003;
(ix)
the Fortieth Supplemental Concurrent Bond Ordinance
(the “2004B Ordinance”), effective April 28, 2004;
(x)
the Forty-Second Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2007 Ordinance”), effective June 27, 2007; and
(xi)
the Forty-Third Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance (the “2009A Ordinance”), effective August 26, 2009.
Parity Credit Agreement Obligation means a Credit Agreement Obligation that is declared by
an Additional Supplemental Ordinance to be payable from and secured by a lien on Pledged Revenues
and Pledged Funds on a parity with the Outstanding Obligations.
Paying Agent means any paying agent for a series or issue of Obligations appointed pursuant to
the Master Bond Ordinance and its successor or successors.
Person means any individual, corporation, partnership, joint venture, association, joint stock
company, trust, unincorporated organization or government or any agency or political subdivision thereof.
Pledged Funds mean, collectively, (i) amounts on deposit in the Debt Service Fund, (ii) amounts
on deposit in the Debt Service Reserve Fund, (iii) any amounts that are due and owing, and any amounts
that are paid, under a Credit Agreement executed in lieu of making cash deposits to the Debt Service
Reserve Fund, (iv) any Investment Securities or other investments or earnings belonging to either of the
funds identified in clauses (i) and (ii), above, and (v) any additional funds, accounts, revenues, or other
moneys or funds of the Cities which hereafter may be, by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance,
expressly and specifically pledged to the payment of all, but not less than all, of the Outstanding
Obligations. The foregoing notwithstanding, the term “Pledged Funds” does not include, unless
specifically provided in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, any amounts deposited to or investments
or earnings belonging to a Rebate Fund to the extent necessary to make a payment to the United States of
America in accordance with Section 148 of the Code.
Pledged Revenues mean collectively (i) Gross Revenues, and (ii) such other money, income,
revenues or other property as may be specifically included in such term in an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance.
Principal Installment means, with respect to Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement
Obligations, any amounts, other than interest payments, including any Sinking Fund Installments, which
are stated to be due or required to be made on or with respect to an Obligation or Parity Credit Agreement
B-10
Obligation, which, when made, would reduce the amount of the Obligation or series of Obligations that
remain Outstanding or would retire and pay the same in full, and which are not otherwise paid from other
funds of the Airport or from the proceeds of other obligations of the Airport, including Obligations.
Principal Payment Date(s) means the date or dates upon which Principal Installments are due as
specified in an Outstanding Ordinance or an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, to and including the
Stated Maturity Date of an Obligation.
Prior Obligations - mean the bonds heretofore issued by the Cities, bearing the following titles
and series designations, having been authorized and issued under and pursuant to the respective
Outstanding Ordinances as identified below, and that are Outstanding on the effective date of this
Ordinance, to-wit:
(i)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2000A;
(ii)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Improvement and Refunding Bonds, Series 2001A;
(iii)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Improvement and Refunding Bonds, Series 2002A;
(iv)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2002B;
(v)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2002C;
(vi)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2003C;
(vii)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Improvement Bonds, Series 2003A;
(viii) Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Improvement Bonds, Series 2004B;
(x)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2007; and
(xi)
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue
Bonds, Series 2009A.
Project means any addition, improvement, expansion or extension to the Airport to be financed
with all or a portion of the proceeds of Obligations, as determined by the Board.
Rebate Fund means any fund established by an Outstanding Ordinance or an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance in connection with the issuance of any Obligation that is a Tax–Exempt
Obligation, to ensure compliance with the provisions of Section 148 of the Code, including, in particular,
Section 148(f) of the Code. For purposes of the foregoing and of the Master Bond Ordinance and the
B-11
Outstanding Ordinances, the Board and the Cities are permitted to rely on a firm of certified public
accountants, Bond Counsel or other persons who specialize in the exemption from federal income
taxation of interest payable on Tax–Exempt Obligations, and the Cities may include in Additional
Supplemental Ordinances covenants relating to Tax Exempt Obligations, to a Rebate Fund, and to the use
and application of money on deposit in the funds created or confirmed in the Master Bond Ordinance or
in the funds or accounts created in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance.
Redbird means the airport presently belonging to Dallas and formerly bearing the name “Redbird
Airport,” now known as the Dallas Executive Airport.
Redemption Price means, with respect to any Obligation, the principal amount thereof plus the
applicable premium, if any, payable upon redemption thereof pursuant to the terms of such Obligation or
its authorizing Outstanding Ordinance or Additional Supplemental Ordinance.
Registrar means any registrar for Obligations appointed pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance
(which may include the Paying Agent and its successors or assigns).
Risk Manager means the insurance risk manager of the Airport in the control and employ of the
Board, or such other officer or employee of the Board having the responsibility to acquire and maintain
insurance on the Board’s behalf.
Sinking Fund Installment means, with respect to any series of Obligations, the portion of the
Accrued Aggregate Debt Service required by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance to be deposited to
the Debt Service Fund in all events on a future date to be held on deposit or applied, in either case, for the
mandatory redemption or retirement, in whole or in part, of any Outstanding Obligations of said series
having a stated maturity after said future date. Said future date is deemed to be the date when such
Sinking Fund Installment is due and payable.
Special Facilities means hangars, aircraft overhaul, maintenance and repair shops, storage
facilities, garages and other buildings, structures, Facilities and appurtenances being a part of or related to
the Airport and financed wholly or in part with the proceeds of Special Facility Bonds.
Special Facility Bonds means bonds payable solely from all or a portion of the rentals received
from any one or more Net Rent Leases appertaining to Special Facilities.
Special Revenues means any one or all (i) taxes or special charges, other than tolls and charges
imposed for entry to the Airport, that are levied or imposed for use of the Airport, or on the price of
goods, products, or services sold or provided at the Airport pursuant to Applicable Law, such as, but not
limited to, passenger facilities charges imposed pursuant to 49 U.S. Code, Sec. 40117, as amended, or any
successor or similar law, sales and/or use taxes received by the Board from any source, hotel occupancy
taxes, and special taxes or surcharges imposed on automobile rental or use charges, and (ii) ad valorem
taxes received by the Board from any source. Special Revenues will not include moneys received by the
Cities pursuant to interlocal agreements entered into among the Cities and municipalities having
jurisdiction within the boundaries of the Airport under which such municipalities and the Cities agree to
share in certain tax receipts and other revenues lawfully imposed and collected by such municipalities
resulting from the continued development of Airport–owned property within such municipalities.
Special Revenue Bonds mean bonds, notes or other obligations issued for the purposes of the
Airport that are made payable from Special Revenues pursuant to the right to issue the same as described
B-12
under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness–Special Revenue Bonds.”
Standard Assumptions mean, subject to the last sentence of this paragraph, wherever in the
Master Bond Ordinance a calculation of Debt Service during any current or future Debt Service Accrual
Period with respect to Interim Obligations is required by application of the Standard Assumptions, the
Debt Service will be computed by assuming that the principal amount of the Interim Obligations will be
continuously refinanced and will remain Outstanding until the first Fiscal Year for which interest on the
Obligations has not been capitalized or otherwise funded or provided for, at which time (which will not be
beyond the Stated Maturity Date of the Interim Obligations) it will be assumed (A) that the Outstanding
principal amount of the series of Interim Obligations will be refinanced with a series of Additional
Obligations that will be amortized over a period not to exceed twenty-five (25) years in such manner as
will cause the maximum Debt Service Requirement applicable to such series in any twelve (12) month
period not to exceed 110% of the minimum Debt Service Requirements applicable to such series for any
other twelve (12) month period, and (B) that the series of Additional Obligations will bear interest at a
fixed interest rate estimated by the Board’s financial advisor to be the interest rate such series of
Additional Obligations would bear if issued on such terms on the date of such estimate. Notwithstanding
any to the contrary, for the purposes of setting rates, fees and charges for the then current Fiscal Year, the
Board may assume an interest rate that is equal to the average rate over the last twelve months plus 50
basis points.
Subject to the last sentence of this paragraph, wherever in the Master Bond Ordinance a
calculation of Debt Service during any current or future Debt Service Accrual Period with respect to each
series of Variable Interest Rate Obligations that are not Interim Obligations is required by application of
the Standard Assumptions, the Debt Service will be computed by assuming that such Obligations will
bear interest at the highest of (i) the actual rate on the date of calculation, or, if such Obligations are not
yet Outstanding, the initial rate, if established and binding, (ii) if the Obligations have been Outstanding
for at least twelve months, the average rate over the twelve months immediately preceding the date of
calculation, or (iii) (A) if the Obligations are Tax Exempt Obligations, the most recently published
“Revenue Bond Index,” published by the financial news publication presently known as The Bond Buyer,
or comparable index if no longer published, plus fifty basis points, or (B) if the Obligations are not Tax
Exempt Obligations, the interest rate on direct obligations of the United States with comparable
maturities, plus 50 basis points; provided, however, for the purpose of the verifying prior compliance with
the rate covenants, such Obligations will be deemed to bear interest at the actual rate borne during any
prior test period. Notwithstanding any to the contrary, for the purposes of setting rates, fees and charges
for the then current Fiscal Year, the Board may assume an interest rate that is equal to the average rate
over the last twelve months plus 50 basis points.
State means the State of Texas.
Stated Maturity Date means the date on which an Obligation matures and the full amount owed
thereon is in all events due and payable, as specified in Additional Supplemental Ordinances.
Subordinate Lien Obligations mean bonds, notes or other obligations issued pursuant to and in
accordance with the Master Bond Ordinance as described under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Additional Indebtedness–Subordinate Lien
Obligations.”
Swap Agreement means a Credit Agreement with respect to a series of Obligations pursuant to
which the Cities or the Board agrees to pay to a qualified counter party an amount of money in exchange
B-13
for the counter party’s promise to pay all or a portion of the actual amount of interest due and payable on
such series according to its terms as it becomes due. For the purposes of this definition, a counter party is
not qualified unless it holds a current rating for claims–paying ability by at least two nationally
recognized rating agencies at least equal to the rating of each such rating agency assigned to the Initial
Obligations without reference to any Credit Agreement.
Tax–Exempt Obligation means any Obligation the interest on which is excludable from the
gross income of the Holder for federal income tax purposes under Section 103 of the Code.
Thirtieth Supplement means the Dallas–Fort Worth International Airport Thirtieth
Supplemental Concurrent Bond Ordinance.
Variable Interest Rate means a variable or adjustable interest rate that varies from time to time
based on a formula or reference to specified financial indicators, or by negotiation, auction, or revisions
through another method from time to time and to be borne by all or a part of a series of Obligations or
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, all as specified in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance or Credit
Agreement.
Variable Interest Rate Obligations mean Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations
which bear a Variable Interest Rate.
Funds and Flow of Funds
Funds. The Master Bond Ordinance (i) confirms and renames the “Interest and Sinking Fund”
(created in the 1968 Ordinance) as the “Debt Service Fund,” (ii) confirms and renames the “Reserve
Fund” (created in the 1968 Ordinance) as the “Debt Service Reserve Fund,” and (iii) confirms and
continues the “Capital Improvements Fund,” the “Operating Revenue and Expense Fund,” and the
“Construction Fund,” and the following special funds, as confirmed and continued within the Joint
Airport Fund, are governed by the terms of the Master Bond Ordinance:
(i)
the Debt Service Fund;
(ii)
the Debt Service Reserve Fund;
(iii)
the Capital Improvements Fund;
(iv)
the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund; and
(v)
the Construction Fund.
The Cities may authorize the creation of special or general accounts within any of such Funds and
may prescribe the terms applicable thereto in Additional Supplemental Ordinances; provided, however,
the Board may authorize special and general accounts within any such Funds for accounting purposes.
The Debt Service Fund and the Debt Service Reserve Fund, and any and all accounts created therein, if
any, are special trust funds, to be held by the Board for the benefit of the Holders of Obligations, the
Credit Providers holding Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, and Persons to whom Administrative
Expenses are owed, due and payable. Unless required otherwise by an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, all of such funds not expressly required by the Master Bond Ordinance or an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance to be held by a trustee, may be held in any bank or lawful depository of the
funds of the Board, including the Treasurer. Any other funds, accounts or moneys required to be created
B-14
or held under the terms of any Additional Supplemental Ordinance will be held at the place or places
specified in such Additional Supplemental Ordinance. All funds and accounts created or confirmed in the
Master Bond Ordinance and in any Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and the books and records of
account with respect thereto, will be kept and maintained in such manner as will record on a regular basis
all deposits therein and the source thereof, withdrawals therefrom and the purposes therefor, and the
earnings realized with respect thereto. All moneys on deposit in the special funds described under this
caption on the date of delivery of any of the Initial Obligations shall be held therein and thereafter shall be
maintained, supplemented, invested, and applied as directed in the Master Bond Ordinance and in
Additional Supplemental Ordinances, as applicable.
Flow of Funds. All Gross Revenues, when and as received by the Board, will be promptly
deposited to the credit of the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund.
Unless made more frequent by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the Board will transfer,
only to the extent required, amounts on deposit in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund monthly on
or before the last Business Day of each month to the following Funds and in the following order of
priority:
(i)
First, to the Debt Service Fund, an amount equal to the lesser of (A) all funds
available for transfer, or (B) an amount equal to the Accrued Aggregate Debt Service for such
monthly period, subject to the provisions set forth under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–
Adjustments in Transfer Requirements”;
(ii)
Second, if and to the extent required by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance
pursuant to which Obligations are issued and/or related Parity Credit Agreements are authorized,
to a special account or accounts, such amount as is necessary to pay any Administrative Expenses
that are due and payable during the succeeding month;
(iii)
Third, to the Debt Service Reserve Fund, the lesser of (A) all funds available for
transfer, or (B) subject to the alternative funding methods permitted under the Master Bond
Ordinance and described herein, up to the amount required to cause the amount on deposit therein
to be equal to the lesser of (y) the Debt Service Reserve Requirement, or (z) the amount then
required to be on deposit therein according to said sections, plus any amounts required to restore
or replenish any deficiencies in the Debt Service Reserve Fund so that the amounts required by
the Master Bond Ordinance are on deposit therein when, as, and in the amounts therein required;
(iv)
Fourth, to any other fund or account required by any Additional Supplemental
Ordinance authorizing Obligations and/or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, the amounts
required to be deposited therein; and
(v)
Fifth, to a special account or fund, if any, created by the Cities in an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance, for the purpose of paying the principal and redemption price of, the
interest on, and reserves for Subordinate Lien Obligations, and paying Credit Agreement
Obligations that are declared to be on a parity therewith.
Unless otherwise directed by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, during each month, subject
to the transfers as described above under this subcaption, the Board is authorized to expend or set aside
any money on deposit in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund for the following purposes, in the
following order of priority:
B-15
(i)
First, expending such money for the purpose of paying the Operation and
Maintenance Expenses of the Board in accordance with the current annual budget of the Board;
and
(ii)
Second, setting aside into a separate account an amount sufficient to pay
Operation and Maintenance Expenses for the ensuing period of ninety (90) days, as estimated by
an Authorized Officer.
Gross Revenues remaining unexpended at the close of business on the last day of each Fiscal
Year, after expending or setting aside the money required for the purposes set forth in the above
paragraphs of this subcaption, will be deposited to the credit of the Capital Improvements Fund for use,
deposit and application as described under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF
THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Capital Improvements Fund”;
provided, however, an Authorized Officer may, at such time, elect to keep all or a portion of such
unexpended funds in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund.
Notwithstanding the other provisions of this subcaption, the Board is not required to set aside or
pay any amounts to a Credit Provider or to a Paying Agent in respect of Administrative Expenses except
as requested by such Persons and approved by an Authorized Officer. Notwithstanding the other
provisions of this subcaption, Gross Revenues received from or through the United States of America, the
State of Texas, or other sources, the use of which is limited, shall be used as Gross Revenues in
compliance with any requirements placed on the use of such funds.
Adjustments in Transfer Requirements. The Accrued Aggregate Debt Service required to be
transferred to the Debt Service Fund by subsection (i) of the second paragraph of the immediately
preceding subcaption for such monthly period will be reduced by an amount equal to the total of any
moneys already on deposit in the Debt Service Fund and any account created therein, or on deposit in
another Pledged Fund, if any, that is created in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and after taking
into account investment earnings actually realized and on deposit therein (inclusive of accrued interest
and amortization of original issue discount or premium), excess deposits made on account of Variable
Rate Obligations and the assumed interest rates thereof, and money deposited therein from the proceeds
of Obligations as capitalized interest or otherwise. It is provided, however, that the amounts required to be
transferred will never be reduced to an amount below the amount necessary to pay all amounts then due
and owing on the Obligations as capitalized interest or otherwise and Parity Credit Agreement
Obligations when due and payable. In the event the counterparty to a Swap Agreement becomes
obligated to make payments to the Board, such amounts will be deposited to the Debt Service Fund. The
Board may at any time increase the amounts of any transfers required under the subcaption “SUMMARY
OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow
of Funds” from funds on deposit in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund, or from any other lawfully
available moneys, so long as such transfers do not reduce the amounts required to be transferred to any
particular fund or account as described under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS
OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds.”
Debt Service Fund. (a) The Board will pay, out of the Debt Service Fund, to the respective
Paying Agents for any of the Obligations from time to time Outstanding, or directly to a Credit Provider
holding a Parity Credit Agreement Obligation, as applicable (i) on the date specified in the Outstanding
Ordinances and in Additional Supplemental Ordinances or Credit Agreements pursuant to which Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations are created, but in no event later than each Interest Payment Date, the
amount (as determined by each Paying Agent or other party designated in each applicable Outstanding
Ordinance and Additional Supplemental Ordinance) required for the payment of interest on the
B-16
Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations due on such Interest Payment Date, and (ii) on the
date specified in the Outstanding Ordinances and Additional Supplemental Ordinances or Credit
Agreements pursuant to which Parity Credit Agreement Obligations are created, but in no event later than
the redemption date, the amount required for the payment of accrued interest on Obligations or Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations to be redeemed or paid unless the payment of such accrued interest is
otherwise provided for. Such amounts paid to Paying Agents will be held and applied by the Paying
Agents paying the amounts owing on the Obligations with respect to which such transfers were made and
upon demand for such payment by a proper Holder.
(b)
The Board will pay, out of the Debt Service Fund, to the respective Paying Agents, on the
dates specified in the Outstanding Ordinances and each Additional Supplemental Ordinance, but in no
event later than each Principal Payment Date for any of the Obligations from time to time Outstanding or
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations coming due, the amount (as determined by each Paying Agent or
other party designated in each applicable Additional Supplemental Ordinance) required for the payment
of any Principal Installments and any Redemption Price that are due on Obligations, and similar amounts
that are due and payable on Parity Credit Agreement Obligations on such Principal Payment Date and
such amounts paid to Paying Agents or Credit Providers will be held and applied by the Paying Agents or
Credit Providers as directed in each Outstanding Ordinance and in each Additional Supplemental
Ordinance.
(c)
The amount accumulated in the Debt Service Fund for each Sinking Fund Installment
may, and if so directed and authorized by an Additional Supplemental Ordinance shall, be applied prior to
a day preceding the due date of such Sinking Fund Installment, as fixed in the Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, to:
(i)
the purchase of Obligations of the series and maturity for which such Sinking
Fund Installment was established, at prices (including any brokerage and other charges) not
exceeding the Redemption Price payable from Sinking Fund Installments for such Obligations
when such Obligations are redeemable by application of said installments plus unpaid interest
accrued to the date of purchase, such purchases to be made in such manner as is specified in the
Additional Supplemental Ordinance, or
(ii)
the redemption of Obligations pursuant to the provisions of the applicable
Additional Supplemental Ordinance authorizing such Obligations, if then redeemable by their
terms, at a price not exceeding the Redemption Price.
(d)
If a stated Interest Payment Date or a Principal Payment Date, or a date fixed for
redemption of Obligations or Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, is not a Business Day, then the
Interest Payment Date, Principal Payment Date or redemption date will be deemed to be the next
succeeding Business Day and no interest will accrue between the stated day and the applicable succeeding
Business Day.
Debt Service Reserve Fund. (a) Moneys on deposit in or required by a Credit Agreement to be
deposited to the Debt Service Reserve Fund shall be used solely and exclusively for the purposes of
making transfers to the Debt Service Fund in the event the moneys in the Debt Service Fund are not
sufficient to make transfers to the Paying Agents, or payments to Credit Providers for the payment of
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, on the dates and in the full amounts required by the Master Bond
Ordinance, by any Additional Supplemental Ordinance, or by any Credit Agreement.
B-17
(b)
Subject to the rights reserved in the immediately following paragraph (c), the Debt
Service Reserve Fund shall be established and maintained in an amount equal to the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement, as such amount is determined in accordance with the following paragraphs of this
subcaption, to–wit:
(i)
The amount of the Debt Service Reserve Requirement to be deposited and
maintained in the Debt Service Reserve Fund on account of the Prior Obligations is an amount
equal to the average annual Debt Service on and with respect to the Prior Obligations calculated
as of November 1 of each year, unless otherwise directed by the Board; and
(ii)
The amount of the Debt Service Reserve Requirement to be deposited,
accumulated, and maintained, or alternatively funded in accordance with the immediately
following paragraph (c) on account of each respective series of Additional Obligations will be
established and funded, or funding will be provided therefor, in accordance with the provisions of
Additional Supplemental Ordinances authorizing their issuance, but will be in an amount that is
not less than the average annual Debt Service that will be required to be paid on or with respect to
such Additional Obligations that are from time to time Outstanding, except that no increase in the
Debt Service Reserve Requirement is required on account of any series of Interim Obligations
that are secured, guaranteed, or insured by a Credit Provider.
For the purposes of this paragraph (b), computations with respect to Variable Interest Rate
Obligations will be made by applying the applicable Standard Assumptions.
(c)
The Debt Service Reserve Requirement required on account of the issuance of each
respective series of Additional Obligations will be funded either (i) by including the required amount in
the principal amount of the Obligations being issued, (ii) by requiring the required amount to be deposited
to the Debt Service Reserve Fund from Gross Revenues in approximately equal monthly installments
over a period not exceeding sixty (60) months following the delivery of such Initial Obligations or
Additional Obligations, respectfully, (iii) by entering into one or more Credit Agreements, such as surety,
insurance, other similar contracts, letters of credit and similar arrangements, with an insurance company
or companies or a bank or banks, insuring or providing amounts up to the portion of the Debt Service
Reserve Requirement applicable to the Obligations being issued, or (iv) by any combination of such
methods. Such Credit Agreements must provide for the payment of the principal of and interest on the
Obligations when due, and in order to avoid a default thereof, up to an amount equal to the Debt Service
Reserve Requirement applicable to the Obligations to which they relate, to the extent cash funds in the
Debt Service Reserve Fund do not contain the amount required to be on deposit therein from time to time.
The total dollar amount of the insured or guaranteed liability under the Credit Agreement with respect to
the payment of such Obligations will be deemed for all purposes of the Master Bond Ordinance to satisfy
a corresponding amount of the Debt Service Reserve Requirement. In order for a Credit Agreement to be
effective in satisfying in whole or in part the Debt Service Reserve Requirement, the execution of such
Credit Agreement must not result in or cause the then underlying credit rating on the Obligations to be
lowered or withdrawn by a majority of the credit rating agencies then having a contract credit rating with
respect to the Obligations. A determination by the Cities that the terms and provisions of a particular
Credit Agreement are in compliance with the requirements of this subcaption is conclusive. To the extent
such agreements or contracts are entered into, the Cities may pay the costs thereof from amounts that
would otherwise be deposited to the Debt Service Reserve Fund as described in clause (iii) of the second
paragraph under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds.”
B-18
If, at any time, a transfer is required from the Debt Service Reserve Fund for the purposes stated
in paragraph (a) of this subcaption, the Board will make such transfer on the dates on which transfers are
required to be made to the Paying Agents under the Master Bond Ordinance or an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance.
Subject to such limitations as may be contained in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the
Cities have the right and option to apply money in the Debt Service Reserve Fund to redeem Obligations
or to pay related Parity Credit Agreement Obligations in advance of their maturity date when and if the
same are subject to redemption at the option of the Cities in an amount by which the redemption lowers
the Debt Service Reserve Requirement.
Any funds on deposit in the Debt Service Reserve Fund in excess of the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement from time to time may be transferred to the Debt Service Fund or, at the discretion of the
Board, may be applied to pay Costs of the Airport, or transferred to the Operating Revenue and Expense
Fund.
Capital Improvements Fund. (a) Moneys transferred to the Capital Improvements Fund, as
described above in the penultimate paragraph under the caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds,”
shall be used for any purpose permitted by Applicable Law related to the Airport.
(b)
Notwithstanding the above provisions of this subcaption, moneys on deposit in the
Capital Improvements Fund will be used to prevent a default in the payment of any Obligations or Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations.
Restoration of Deficiencies. Should the Debt Service Fund or the Debt Service Reserve Fund,
or any other fund or account of any of the types described in the second paragraph under the subcaption
“SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow
of Funds–Flow of Funds,” contain less than the amount required to be on deposit therein, then such
deficiency will be restored from Pledged Revenues over a period not longer than during the ensuing
Fiscal Year, and further transfers to the Capital Improvements Fund pursuant to the penultimate
paragraph under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds” will be suspended until such deficiency has
been restored.
Construction Fund. Except as otherwise provided in the Master Bond Ordinance or in an
Additional Supplemental Ordinance, moneys deposited in the Construction Fund and the moneys within
said Fund shall be used solely for the purpose of defraying a part of the Costs of the Airport.
Disbursements from the Construction Fund will be made pursuant to the customary practices of the
Airport. All disbursements from the Construction funds shall be accounted for and recorded in the
appropriate records of the Airport. When improvements made with Obligation proceeds, will have been
completed in accordance with the plans and specifications, and when all amounts due, including all
proper incidental expenses, will have been paid, the Authorized Officer shall file with the Board a
certificate so stating, and thereupon the Board shall cause the transfer of all moneys remaining in the
Construction Fund, if any, to the Capital Improvements Fund.
Investments. Subject to restrictions set forth in a Credit Agreement, if any, amounts in any fund
or account may, to the extent permitted by Applicable Law, be invested in Investment Securities. All
investments will be made by or upon written instruction of an Authorized Officer in accordance with
Applicable Law and the Board’s investment policy approved by the Board from time to time. Such
B-19
investments will mature in such amounts and at such times as may, in the judgment of such Authorized
Officer, be necessary to provide funds when needed to make timely payments from such fund or account.
In order to avoid loss in the event of a need for funds, the Board may, in lieu of a liquidation of
investments in the fund or account needing funds, exchange such investments for investments in another
fund or account that may be liquidated at no, or at a reduced, loss.
Except as otherwise provided in the Master Bond Ordinance, obligations purchased as an
investment of moneys in any fund or account created in or confirmed by the Master Bond Ordinance will
be deemed at all times to be a part of such fund or account and the income or interest earned, profits
realized or losses suffered by a fund or account due to the investment thereof will be retained in, credited
or charged, as the case may be, to such fund or account. It is provided, however, that earnings may be
used as provided in the fifth paragraph under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS
OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Flow of Funds” and in an
Additional Supplemental Ordinance.
In computing the amount in the Debt Service Reserve Fund, obligations purchased as an
investment of moneys therein shall be valued at their Market Value annually prior to the adoption of the
annual budget for the Airport.
Except as otherwise provided in the Master Bond Ordinance, the Board will sell or cause to be
sold at the best price obtainable, or present for redemption or exchange, any Investment Security
purchased as an investment pursuant to the Master Bond Ordinance whenever it is necessary in order to
provide moneys to meet any payment or transfer from the fund or account for which such investment was
made.
To the extent not invested in Investment Securities, funds and accounts shall be fully secured in
the same manner as is required for the public funds of the Board.
Effect of Deposits With Paying Agents. (a) Whenever Pledged Revenues are on deposit with a
Paying Agent in the amounts required in an Outstanding Ordinance, or in an Additional Supplemental
Ordinance, then the Cities and the Board will be released from any further obligations of payment of the
interest on or the principal or Redemption Price of Obligations with respect to which the deposits and
transfers were made. The Holders of the Obligations with respect to which such moneys are held shall
look solely to the appropriate Paying Agents for payment of the interest on or the principal or Redemption
Price of the applicable Obligations from such moneys.
(b)
Moneys transferred to a Paying Agent will be set aside and continuously held uninvested
(unless otherwise provided in an Outstanding Ordinance or in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance) in
a special trust fund or account held by the Paying Agent and will be used for the sole and exclusive
purpose of paying the amounts due and owing on the Obligations with respect to which such transfers
were made and upon demand for such payment by the proper Holders. Any moneys remaining unclaimed
for a period specified in any Applicable Law relating to the escheat of property or money will be
distributed by the Paying Agent in accordance with such law.
(c)
Obligations, for the full payment of the principal amount or Redemption Price of which
moneys have been provided to the appropriate Paying Agents as described in this subcaption, will no
longer be deemed to be Outstanding from and after the maturity or redemption date thereof and all
interest thereon will cease to accrue from and after said date.
B-20
(d)
Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs (a) and (b) of this subcaption, an
Additional Supplemental Ordinance may require the payment of amounts deposited with the Paying
Agent to be paid to a Credit Provider if offsetting and comparable amounts are deposited by the Credit
Provider with the applicable Paying Agent for the purpose of making direct payment to the Holders of the
applicable Obligations.
Additional Indebtedness
Additional Obligations. No Additional Obligations will be issued under the Master Bond
Ordinance unless the following instruments are executed:
(i)
A certificate, dated as of the date of delivery of the Additional Obligations,
executed by an Authorized Officer, certifying, in effect, that:
(A)
All conditions precedent have been satisfied which are provided for in
the Master Bond Ordinance and in each Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the
provisions of which relate to or further restrict the issuance of Additional Obligations;
and
(B)
No Event of Default has occurred and is then continuing under the
Master Bond Ordinance or under any Additional Supplemental Ordinances that will not
be cured by the issuance of the Additional Obligations; and
(ii)
A written order, executed by an Authorized Officer, directing that the Additional
Obligations will be authenticated if the same are required to be authenticated under the terms of
the Additional Supplemental Ordinance; and
(iii)
A Certificate executed by an Authorized Officer certifying that the Cities have
received at least one of the following:
(A)
An Airport Consultant’s written report setting forth projections of Gross
Revenues and Operation and Maintenance Expenses, and the report indicates that (I) the
estimated Net Revenues for each of three (3) consecutive Fiscal Years beginning with the
first Fiscal Year in which Debt Service is due on or with respect to the Additional
Obligations proposed to be issued, and for the payment of which provision has not been
made as indicated in the report of such Airport Consultant from the proceeds of such
Additional Obligations and/or from interest that has been capitalized from the proceeds of
previously issued Obligations, are equal to at least 125% of the Debt Service that will be
due and owing and scheduled to be paid during each of such three (3) consecutive Fiscal
Years, after taking into consideration any additional Debt Service to be paid during such
period on or with respect to the Additional Obligations then proposed to be issued and
any reduction in Debt Service that may result from the issuance thereof, and after
applying the Standard Assumptions with respect to Outstanding or proposed Interim
Obligations or Variable Interest Rate Obligations and (II) the schedule of rentals, rates
and charges then in effect meets the requirements described in clause (iii) under the
caption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND
ORDINANCE–Particular Covenants–Rates, Charges and Free Use of Land”; or
(B)
A certificate, executed by the Chief Financial Officer of the Board,
showing that (I) for either the Board’s most recent complete Fiscal Year, or for any
consecutive twelve (12) out of the most recent eighteen (18) months, the Net Revenues
B-21
were equal to at least 125% of the maximum Debt Service on or with respect to all
Outstanding Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations scheduled to be paid
during the then current or any future Fiscal Year after taking into consideration the
issuance of the Additional Obligations then proposed to be issued, and after applying the
Standard Assumptions with respect to Outstanding or proposed Interim Obligations or
Variable Interest Rate Obligations and (II) the schedule of rentals, rates and charges then
in effect meets the requirements described in clause (iii) under the caption “SUMMARY
OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Particular
Covenants–Rates, Charges and Free Use of Land.”
The Cities will include in each Additional Supplemental Ordinance authorizing the issuance of
Initial Obligations and Additional Obligations a requirement that an amount equal to the Debt Service
Reserve Requirement will be deposited into or made available for the purposes of the Debt Service
Reserve Fund or the Debt Service Fund, either (i) by including the required amount in the principal
amount of the Obligations being issued, (ii) by requiring the required amount to be deposited to the Debt
Service Reserve Fund from Gross Revenues in approximately equal monthly installments over a period
not exceeding sixty (60) months following the delivery of such Initial Obligations or Additional
Obligations, respectively, (iii) by executing a Credit Agreement with one or more qualified Credit
Provider(s) as described in paragraph (c) under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Debt Service
Reserve Fund” by which the Credit Provider(s) agree(s) to make deposits to either the Debt Service
Reserve Fund or the Debt Service Fund in an amount equal to or greater than the amount of the Debt
Service Reserve Requirement allocable to the Obligations being issued, in either case, if necessary to pay
the Obligations and the Parity Credit Agreement Obligations when due, or (iv) any combination of the
methods permitted by clauses (i) through (iii).
Subordinate Lien Obligations. The Cities reserve the right (i) to issue bonds, notes or other
obligations for the purpose of further developing, improving, repairing, or maintaining the Airport, or
refunding and refinancing previously issued or created indebtedness of the Cities relating to the Airport,
and (ii) to enter into Credit Agreements creating Credit Agreement Obligations in connection therewith,
that are, in each case, secured by and payable solely from the money on deposit from time to time in a
special fund or account described pursuant to clause (v) under the second paragraph under the subcaption
“SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow
of Funds–Flow of Funds,” upon and having such terms, conditions, and provisions as the Cities deem
appropriate, and, if desired, to additionally pledge Special Revenues thereto.
Subordinate Lien Obligations, and Credit Agreement Obligations created in connection therewith,
if any, will be authorized, and their terms and provisions prescribed, in Additional Supplemental
Ordinances.
Special Revenue Bonds. The Cities reserve the right (i) to issue bonds, notes or other
obligations for the purpose of paying Costs of the Airport or otherwise further developing, improving,
repairing, expanding, or maintaining the Airport, or refunding and refinancing previously issued or
created indebtedness of the Cities relating to the Airport, and (ii) to enter into related credit support
agreements having such terms as are permitted by Applicable Law, that are, in each case, exclusively or
partially secured by and payable from a first and superior lien on Special Revenues for such purposes, in
such form, and having such terms and provisions as are permitted by Applicable Law.
B-22
The rights of the Cities described in the paragraph immediately above include, but are not limited
to, the right to pledge Special Revenues to the payment of, and as additional security for, Subordinate
Lien Obligations.
Special Revenues, when and while they are pledged to secure the payment of Special Revenue
Bonds or Subordinate Lien Obligations may be deposited to such funds and accounts of the Board as may
be required by Applicable Law or as directed in the documents and agreements authorizing or relating to
their issuance.
Special Revenue Bonds may be authorized, and their terms prescribed, in such ordinances,
resolutions, indentures, or other proceedings as determined by the Cities.
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations. Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and the rights and
obligations of the Credit Providers holding the same will be as specifically provided in Additional
Supplemental Ordinances.
Special Facility Bonds. The Cities have the right to enter into contracts, leases or other
agreements pursuant to which the Board will agree to construct and pay all costs of construction of
Special Facilities to be financed by the issuance by the Cities of Special Facility Bonds. Such Bonds may
be issued upon and subject to certain conditions, including the following:
(i)
A Net Rent Lease will be entered into between the parties thereto pursuant to
which the lessee agrees to the matters specified in the definition of such term and agrees to cause
the payments there required and the rentals therein to be payable over a period not longer than the
latest maturity of the Special Facility Bonds.
(ii)
A second lease, the “Ground Lease,” for at least the same term as the Net Rent
Lease, will be entered into between the parties to provide for additional rentals for the ground
upon which such Special Facilities are to be located, which Ground Lease will provide for rental
payments to the Board payable in periodic installments in amounts not less than as required
pursuant to a schedule or schedules for rental of ground space at the Airport as fixed from time to
time by the Board, which ground rental payments will constitute a part of Gross Revenues.
(iii)
No Special Facility Bonds will ever be payable in whole or in part from Gross
Revenues. After such Special Facility Bonds have been fully paid and retired all revenues
derived from the leasing or operation or use of such Special Facilities will be a part of Gross
Revenues and will be subject to all provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance relating thereto.
Particular Covenants
Rates, Charges and Free Use of Land. The Cities covenant and agree as follows:
(i)
The Board will fix, place into effect, directly or through leases, contracts or
agreements with users of the Airport, a schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges for the use,
operation and occupancy of the Airport premises and Facilities and the services appertaining
thereto, which is reasonably estimated to produce the amounts provided in paragraphs (ii) and
(iii), next below. From time to time and as often as it appears necessary, the Executive Director
of the Airport and other Authorized Officers will make recommendations to the Board as to the
revision of the schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges.
Upon receiving such
recommendations, the Board will revise, insofar as it may legally do so, the rentals, rates, fees
B-23
and charges for the use, operation and occupancy of the Airport, its Facilities, and the services
appertaining thereto in order continually to fulfill the requirements of this covenant. This
covenant will not be construed to require adjustment or revision in long–term agreements which
by their terms are not subject to adjustment or revision.
(ii)
The schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges required by paragraph (i), next
above, will be at least sufficient to produce in each Fiscal Year Gross Revenues sufficient to pay
(a) the Operation and Maintenance Expenses, plus (b) 1.25 times the amount of Accrued
Aggregate Debt Service accruing during each Fiscal Year, respectively, plus (c) an amount equal
to the amounts required to pay any other obligations payable from Gross Revenues of the Airport,
including Subordinate Lien Obligations, but excluding Special Revenue Bonds and Special
Facility Bonds, and plus (d) any additional amounts required by the terms of an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance.
(iii)
The schedule of rentals, rates, fees and charges required by paragraph (i), next
above, will be at least sufficient to produce in each Fiscal Year Current Gross Revenues sufficient
to pay the amounts provided in clauses (a), (c) and (d) of paragraph (ii), next above, plus 1.00
times the amount of Accrued Aggregate Debt Service accruing during each Fiscal Year,
respectively.
(iv)
The Board will cause all rentals, fees, rates and charges pertaining to the Airport
to be collected when and as due, will prescribe and enforce rules and regulations for the payment
thereof and for the consequences of nonpayment for the rental, use, operation and occupancy of
and services by the Airport, and will provide methods of collection and penalties to the end that
the Gross Revenues and the Current Gross Revenues will be adequate to meet the respective
requirements hereof.
(v)
To the full extent lawfully permissible, no free use of the land, public roads and
ways comprising a part of the Airport will be allowed or permitted for commercial purposes by
private or commercial concerns providing direct service to the traveling public, and no rights–of–
way, easements, access or uses on or across said lands or public roads and ways for commercial
purposes will be granted except through easements, franchises or permits granted, and for
consideration fixed, by the Board.
Budgets and Expenditures. (a) For each Fiscal Year, the Board will, in accordance with the
terms, provisions and requirements of the Contract and Agreement, prepare and annually submit to the
Cities an annual budget containing estimates of expenditures and anticipated Gross Revenues for the next
ensuing Fiscal Year.
(b)
All Operation and Maintenance Expenses will be reasonable and the total expenditures
for the purchase of services, goods or commodities will not exceed in any year the total expenditures thus
set forth in the annual budget except on the express approval of the Board and the Cities in accordance
with the Contract and Agreement.
Transfers of Airport or Facilities. So long as any Obligations are outstanding and unpaid, the
Cities will not sell, transfer, or in any manner dispose of or otherwise alienate, any part of the property
comprising the Airport. It is provided, however, that:
(1)
the Cities may acquire additional property as an extension to the Airport
additional to that reflected within the preliminary boundaries contained in the Board’s overall
B-24
preliminary plan of the Airport and will be authorized to grant rights of foreclosure in connection
with mortgages, pledges, or other encumbrances of the land or revenues thereof fixed in
connection with such acquisition and the Special Facilities to be placed therein, such mortgages
and pledges being authorized subject to the restrictions applicable to Special Facilities; and
(2)
the Cities have the right to sell or otherwise dispose of any property, real or
personal, which is no longer necessary, appropriate or required for the use of, profitable to, or for
the best interests of the Board in operation of the Airport. The net proceeds of any sale pursuant
to this provision will be used for the purpose of replacing properties or equipment at the Airport,
if necessary, or will be deposited into the Capital Improvements Fund; except that the proceeds
from the sales of surplus land may be distributed to the Cities as a return of capital under the
Contract and Agreement.
Notwithstanding the provisions of the first paragraph of this subcaption, the Cities retain, reserve,
and have the right and privilege of transferring, selling, leasing or disposing of the entire properties and
Facilities constituting the Airport to another political body or political subdivision of the State of Texas
which is authorized by law to own and operate airports, subject to the following conditions, to–wit:
(1)
The governing body of such political entity by lawfully adopted and effective
ordinance, order, resolution or by other appropriate action, expressly and unequivocally assumes
each and every, all and singular, the covenants, obligations, duties and responsibilities of the
Cities and the Board imposed by the Master Bond Ordinance, the Outstanding Ordinances and all
ordinances supplemental thereto or adopted in connection with the issuance of any future issues
of Obligations.
(2)
If such properties and Facilities comprising the Airport are sold to such political
body and such sale is on a deferred–payment basis, such deferred payment will be junior and
subordinate to all payments required to be made to or on account of any Obligations from time to
time outstanding; or, if the purchase price is to be made in cash at the time of sale, no part thereof
shall be or shall have been derived from Gross Revenues.
The Contract and Agreement. The Cities covenant and agree for the benefit of the Holders of
the Obligations that they will honor, fulfill, and enforce the Contract and Agreement between themselves,
as amended. The Cities reserve the right by mutual agreement to additionally amend or supplement the
Contract and Agreement from time to time in such respects as they consider appropriate so long as the
effect of such amendment will not be to impair or diminish the rights of the Holders of Obligations; and
they have the right to dissolve the Contract and Agreement upon transfer of the Airport in accordance
with the Master Bond Ordinance.
Standard of Operation. The Airport will be maintained in an efficient, operating condition; and
such improvements, enlargements, extensions, repairs and betterments will be made thereto as are
necessary or appropriate in the prudent management thereof to insure its economic and efficient operation
at all times, to maintain it in good repair, working order and operating condition; and such standards will
be maintained as may be required in order that the same will be approved by all proper and competent
agencies of the Federal Government for the landing and taking–off of Aircraft operating in scheduled
service, and as a terminal point of the Cities for the receipt and dispatch of passengers, property and mail
by Aircraft.
Rules and Regulations. The Board will establish and enforce reasonable rules and regulations
for the use and occupancy, management, control, operation, care, repair and maintenance of the Airport.
B-25
The Board will comply with all valid acts, rules, regulations, orders and directives of any executive,
administrative or judicial body applicable to the Airport, unless the same are contested in good faith, all to
the end that it will remain operative at all times.
Federal Financial Assistance. The Board will, insofar as it may legally do so, maintain,
preserve, keep, and operate the Airport in such manner as will qualify the Airport to receive maximum
financial aid from Federal or State sources, which aid may be sought and procured if available on fair and
reasonable terms (in the sole opinion of the Board) which are not inconsistent with the provisions of the
Master Bond Ordinance and when in the best interests of the overall financial and operating conditions of
the Airport and the Joint Airport Fund.
Casualty Insurance. Except to the extent provided by others, the Board will at all times
maintain insurance for such of the Facilities, in such amounts (including deductible amounts) and against
such losses or damages, as are customarily insured by the owners of publicly–owned properties, including
airports, having similar properties and operations as the Airport. All such insurance maintained by the
Board will be either obtained from a responsible insurance company or companies authorized to do
business in the State, to the extent such insurance is obtainable at commercially reasonable rates, or
provided through a program of self–insurance.
The Board will annually determine, following consultation with an Independent Insurance
Consultant or the Risk Manager, the Facilities to be insured and the type and amount (including
deductible amounts) of insurance to be obtained by the Board.
Use and Occupancy, Liability, and Other Insurance. The Board, subject to the approval of the
City Attorneys of the Cities, may carry with a responsible insurance company or companies authorized
and qualified under the laws of the State of Texas insurance covering the risk of loss of revenues during
necessary interruptions, total or partial, due to damage or destruction of the Airport, however caused,
upon and subject to the following conditions:
(1)
Such requirement is only to the extent not provided for in leases and agreements
with the Board, and in any event will be in such amount as the Executive Director estimates as
being sufficient to provide a full normal income during the period of interruption.
(2)
Such insurance covers a reasonable period of reconstruction, as estimated by the
Executive Director; and the same may exclude losses sustained by the Cities during the first
fourteen (14) days of any total or partial interruption of use.
(3)
If at any time the Board is unable to obtain such insurance to the extent above
required, at reasonable prices, it will carry such insurance to the extent reasonably obtainable.
In ascertaining a full normal income for such insurance, the Executive Director will give
consideration to the expected, as well as current and prior revenues, from the leasing or other operation or
use of such facilities or from other sources, and may also make allowances for any probable decrease in
operation and maintenance costs while use is interrupted. Any proceeds of such insurance will be
deposited to the credit of the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund and will be subject to the uses and
applied as provided for moneys in said Fund.
Insurance in the form and amount recommended by the City Attorneys of the Cities will be
obtained insuring against liability to any person sustaining death, bodily injury or property damage by
reason of material defects or want of repair in or about the Airport, or by reason of the negligence of any
B-26
employee, and against such other liability to persons and property to the extent attributed to the ownership
and operation of the Airport.
Land Title and Rights. No funds from the proceeds of Obligations will be paid for labor or to
contractors, builders or materialmen on account of the construction, improvement or enlargement of the
Airport unless such improvements or enlargements are located on lands good and marketable title to
which is owned or can be acquired by the Cities in fee simple, or over which the Cities have acquired or
can acquire easements or rights sufficient for the purposes of such improvements and enlargements.
Additionally, no payments will ever be made from the proceeds of any Obligations for the acquisition of
real property or any interest therein unless and until the Cities have received an opinion of the City
Attorneys of the Cities to the effect that upon acquisition all necessary and good and sufficient title to
such property or the interest therein to be acquired, free and clear of encumbrances, will be vested in the
Cities and subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Board pursuant to the terms of the Contract and
Agreement.
Encumbrances by Cities, Board, or Others. The Cities will not issue any bonds or other
obligations payable from the Gross Revenues or Net Revenues and having a lien on a parity with or senior
to the Obligations, except as provided in the Master Bond Ordinance, and it is covenanted and agreed that
no mortgages or other liens of any kind shall be permitted to be attached or imposed upon any lands
constituting a part of the Airport, except as expressly provided otherwise in the Master Bond Ordinance.
Additionally the Board shall require the inclusion in all Net Rent Leases and Ground Leases provisions to
the effect that the same are taken subject to the terms and provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance; that
the lessee shall not enter into any contracts of a nature such that liens of any nature or kind are permitted
to become attached to the remainder interests of the Board and the Cities thereunder; that the holders of
such leasehold interests, when rendering or otherwise declaring the fair market value thereof, within the
taxing jurisdictions in which situated and when required by law, shall render the fair market value of the
lessee’s interest, irrespective of the term thereof, based upon the value of a comparable facility situated on
private property. All or other interest in the Board as Airport and publicly owned property, including the
remainder or other interest, shall be and remain always exempt from and not subject to ad valorem
taxation. The holders of such leases shall never suffer or permit to be imposed or attached to any such
leasehold interests any liens for taxes. No action or default on the part of such lessees shall be construed
to create a lien on the interests of the Cities in such Facilities or land.
Representations as to Pledged Funds and Pledged Revenues. The Cities represent and
warrant that they are authorized by Applicable Law to authorize and issue the Obligations and to pledge
the Pledged Funds and Pledged Revenues in the manner and to the extent provided in the Master Bond
Ordinance, and that the Pledged Funds and Pledged Revenues so pledged are and will be and remain free
and clear of any pledge, lien, charge or encumbrance thereon or with respect thereto prior to, or of equal
rank with, the pledge and lien created in or authorized by the Master Bond Ordinance except as expressly
provided for Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
The Obligations and the provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance are and will be the valid and
legally enforceable special obligations of the Cities in accordance with their terms and the terms of the
Master Bond Ordinance, subject only to any applicable bankruptcy or insolvency laws or to any
Applicable Law affecting creditors’ rights generally.
The Cities will at all times, to the extent permitted by Applicable Law, defend, preserve and
protect the pledge of the Pledged Funds and Pledged Revenues and all the rights of the Holders and the
Credit Providers under the Master Bond Ordinance and all Credit Agreements against all claims and
demands of all persons whomsoever.
B-27
Events of Default
Description. Each of the following occurrences or events for the purposes of the Master Bond
Ordinance is an “Event of Default.”
(1)
The failure to make payment of the Principal Installment of any of the
Obligations when the same become due and payable;
(2)
The failure to pay any installment of interest on Obligations when the same
become due and payable;
(3)
The failure to pay when due any amounts, whether principal, interest, or other
payment, that are due and owing on any Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and such failure
continues for a period of sixty (60) days after the due date thereof;
(4)
Default in any covenant, undertaking, or commitment contained in the Contract
and Agreement, the failure to perform which materially affects the rights of the Holders,
including, but not limited to, their prospect or ability to be repaid in accordance with the terms
and provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance, and the continuation thereof for a period of sixty
(60) days after written notice of such default by any Holder;
(5)
The Cities or the Board discontinue or unreasonably delay or fail to carry out
with reasonable dispatch the reconstruction of any part of the Airport which is destroyed or
damaged and which materially affects the revenue producing capacity thereof;
(6)
An order or decree is entered by a court of competent jurisdiction with the
consent and acquiescence of the Cities appointing a receiver or receivers for the Airport or of the
rentals, rates, revenues, fees or charges derived therefrom; or if any order or decree having been
entered without the consent and acquiescence of the Cities is not vacated or discharged or stayed
on appeal within ninety (90) days after entry; and
(7)
The Cities default in the due and punctual performance of any other of the
covenants, conditions, agreements and provisions contained in the Obligations, or a Parity Credit
Agreement Obligation, or in the Master Bond Ordinance, or in any of the provisions of the
Outstanding Ordinances that are continued, restated, or incorporated into the Master Bond
Ordinance or in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and if such default continues for thirty
(30) days after written notice specifying such default and requiring the same to be remedied shall
have been given to the Cities or to the Board by the Holders of not less than two percent (2%) in
aggregate principal amount of the Obligations then Outstanding, or by a Credit Provider that is
granted the authority to give and to withdraw such notices under the terms of an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance.
Remedies for Defaults. Upon the happening and continuance of any of the Events of Default as
provided in the preceding subcaption, then and in every case any Holder and any Credit Provider holding
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, including, but not limited to, a trustee or trustees therefor, may
proceed against the Cities and the Board, for the purpose of protecting and enforcing the rights of the
Holders and Credit Providers holding Parity Credit Agreement Obligations under the Master Bond
Ordinance and any Additional Supplemental Ordinance, by mandamus or other suit, action or special
proceeding in equity or at law, in any court of competent jurisdiction, for any relief permitted by law,
including the specific performance of any covenant or agreement contained in the Master Bond Ordinance
B-28
or in any Outstanding Ordinance, or thereby to enjoin any act or thing which may be unlawful or in
violation of any right of the Holders or of Credit Providers holding Parity Credit Agreement Obligations
under the Master Bond Ordinance or any combination of such remedies. It is provided, however, that all
of such proceedings at law or in equity will be instituted, strictly subject to the provisions of the Master
Bond Ordinance, and will be had and maintained for the equal benefit of all Holders, and, as applicable,
the Credit Providers holding Parity Credit Agreement Obligations. Each right or privilege of any Holders
and of any Credit Provider holding a Parity Credit Agreement Obligation (or trustee therefor) is in
addition to and cumulative of any other right or privilege and the exercise of any right or privilege by or
on behalf of any Holders or Credit Provider holding Parity Credit Agreement Obligations will not be
deemed a waiver of any other right or privilege thereof.
Pursuant to the Fiftieth Supplement, in the event of the occurrence of an Event of Default, the
right of acceleration of the Stated Maturity Date or the mandatory redemption date of any Bond or of any
Parity Credit Agreement Obligation is not granted as a remedy, and the right of acceleration for the Bonds
is expressly denied by the Fiftieth Supplement.
Amendments
Additional Supplemental Ordinances Without Holders’ Consent. (a) Subject to any
limitations contained in an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the Cities may, from time to time and at
any time, adopt and implement Additional Supplemental Ordinances without consent of or notice to the
Holders, for the following purposes:
(i)
To cure any formal defect, omission or ambiguity in the Master Bond Ordinance
if such action is not adverse to the interest of the Holders or to the Credit Providers holding the
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations;
(ii)
To grant to or confer upon the Holders of any series of Obligations any additional
rights, remedies, powers, authority or security which may lawfully be granted or conferred and
which are not contrary to or inconsistent with the Master Bond Ordinance as theretofore in effect;
(iii)
To add to the covenants and agreements of the Cities and the Board in the Master
Bond Ordinance, other covenants and agreements to be observed by the Cities and the Board
which are not contrary to or inconsistent with the Master Bond Ordinance as theretofore in effect;
(iv)
To add to the limitations and restrictions in the Master Bond Ordinance, other
limitations and restrictions to be observed by the Cities which are not contrary to or inconsistent
with the Master Bond Ordinance as theretofore in effect;
(v)
To confirm, as further assurance, any pledge or lien created or to be created by
the Master Bond Ordinance, of the Pledged Funds and Pledged Revenues, or to subject to the lien
or pledge of the Master Bond Ordinance additional revenues, properties or collateral;
(vi)
To authorize the issuance of the Initial Obligations, Additional Obligations, and
Subordinate Lien Obligations and to prescribe the terms, forms and details thereof not
inconsistent with the Master Bond Ordinance and, in connection therewith, to create such
additional funds and accounts, and to effect such amendments of the Master Bond Ordinance as
may be necessary for such issuance, provided that no Additional Supplemental Ordinance will be
inconsistent with the limitations described under the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN
B-29
PROVISIONS OF
Amendment”; or
THE
MASTER
BOND
ORDINANCE–Amendments–Powers
of
(vii)
To make modifications in the Master Bond Ordinance or in an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance that are necessary in the opinion of bond counsel selected by the Cities
to conform to requirements of federal tax or securities law or other Applicable Law and that do
not, in the opinion of such counsel, adversely affect the rights and security of the Holders to be
paid in full when due.
(b)
Additional Supplemental Ordinances adopted for any of the purposes permitted by this
subcaption need not, in order to be valid, be signed or accepted by any other Person. Copies of all
Additional Supplemental Ordinances and Credit Agreements will be filed with each Credit Provider and
the Paying Agent.
Powers of Amendment. Any modification or amendment of the Master Bond Ordinance and of
the rights and obligations of the Cities and the Board and of the Holders may be made by an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance, with the written consent (i) of the Holders of more than a majority of the
combined principal amount of the Obligations then Outstanding, or (ii) in case less than all of the several
series of Obligations then Outstanding are affected by the modification or amendment, of the Holders of
more than a majority in principal amount of the Obligations of each series so affected and Outstanding at
the time such consent is given; provided, however, no such modification or amendment will permit a
change in the terms of redemption or maturity of the principal of any Outstanding Obligation, or of any
installment of interest thereon, or a reduction in the principal amount of the Redemption Price thereof, or
in the rate of interest thereon, without the consent of the Holder of such Obligation, and provided further
that no such modification or amendment may be made without the prior written consent of such of the
Credit Providers as are granted the right of such consent under the provisions of an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance. The Cities may obtain and receive an opinion of counsel selected by the Board,
as conclusive evidence as to whether Obligations of any particular series or maturity would be so affected
by any such modification or amendment of the Master Bond Ordinance.
Consent of Holders or Credit Providers. (a) The Cities may at any time adopt an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance making a modification or amendment as set forth under the subcaption
“SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Amendments–
Powers of Amendment,” to take effect when and as provided in this paragraph (a) or in paragraph (b) of
this caption. A copy of such Additional Supplemental Ordinance (or brief summary thereof or reference
thereto) together with a request for consent addressed to the Holders whose consent is required, will
promptly after adoption be mailed by the Board to the appropriate Holders (but failure to mail such copy
and request will not affect the validity of the Additional Supplemental Ordinance when consented to as
herein provided). Such Additional Supplemental Ordinance will not be effective unless and until the
Cities will have received the written consents of the proper Holders having the percentages described in
the immediately preceding subcaption. Any such consent will be continuously binding upon the Holder
giving such consent and upon any subsequent Holder thereof and of any Obligations issued in exchange
therefor (whether or not such subsequent Holder thereof has notice thereof), unless such consent is
revoked in writing by the Holder giving such consent or a subsequent Holder thereof by filing with the
Cities, prior to the time action is taken in response to such consents. At any time thereafter notice, stating
in substance that the Additional Supplemental Ordinance (which may be referred to as an Additional
Supplemental Ordinance adopted by the Cities on a stated date) has been consented to by the Holders of
the required percentages of Obligations and will be effective as hereinafter described, will be given to the
Holders (whose consent was required) by the Cities by mailing such notice to such Holders (but failure to
mail such notice will not prevent such Additional Supplemental Ordinance from becoming effective and
B-30
binding). The Additional Supplemental Ordinance making such amendment or modification will be
conclusively binding upon the Cities, the Board, each Paying Agent, all Holders, and all Credit Providers
at the expiration of 30 days after the mailing by the Cities of such last mentioned notice, except in the
event of a final decree of a court of competent jurisdiction setting aside such Additional Supplemental
Ordinance in a legal action or equitable proceeding for such purpose commenced within such 30–day
period; provided, however, that the Cities and any Paying Agent during such 30–day period and any such
further period during which any such action or proceeding may be pending will be entitled in their
reasonable discretion to take such action, or to refrain from taking such action, with respect to such
Additional Supplemental Ordinance as they may deem expedient.
(b)
Unless the right is limited by the terms of an Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the
Cities reserve and will have the continuing right to amend the Master Bond Ordinance as described under
the subcaption “SUMMARY OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–
Amendments–Powers of Amendment” and this subcaption, without the consent of or notice to the
Holders as described under paragraph (a) of this subcaption, if such amendment is approved by each
Credit Provider which is existing at the time the amendment is proposed by the Cities. Such right is
hereby granted to such Credit Providers and the exercise of such right shall require no further action.
Discharge of Ordinance
Discharge by Payment. (a) When all Obligations and Subordinate Lien Obligations have been
paid in full as to principal, interest and premium, if any, and all Credit Agreement Obligations and
Administrative Expenses have been paid in full, or when all Obligations, Subordinate Lien Obligations
and all Credit Agreement Obligations become due and payable, whether at maturity or by prior
redemption and the Cities have provided for the payment of the whole amount due or to become due
thereon by depositing with the Paying Agents the entire amount due and to become due thereon, and the
Cities also have paid or caused to be paid all Administrative Expenses, then all of the terms, provisions,
pledges and liens of the Master Bond Ordinance and any applicable Additional Supplemental Ordinances
will be released.
(b)
The terms, provisions, pledges and liens of the Master Bond Ordinance and any
applicable Additional Supplemental Ordinances will be released on less than all of the Obligations as and
to the extent funds are provided to the Paying Agents as described under the caption “SUMMARY OF
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE MASTER BOND ORDINANCE–Funds and Flow of Funds–Effect of
Deposits With Paying Agents.”
Discharge by Defeasance. (a) Subject to compliance with the requirements of paragraph (b)
immediately below, and of any Additional Supplemental Ordinance, the Cities reserve the right to
discharge their obligations to pay the principal of, premium, if any, and interest and the purchase price (if
tender provisions are applicable), on all or any portion of the Obligations, and their obligation to pay all
Administrative Expenses and all Parity Credit Agreement Obligations and thereby to obtain a release of
the terms, provisions, pledges and liens of the Master Bond Ordinance and any applicable Additional
Supplemental Ordinances as to all or any part of the Obligations and related Parity Credit Agreement
Obligations (i) by depositing or causing to be deposited with a trustee or escrow agent moneys derived
from any lawful source, expressly including the issuance of Additional Obligations, which, together with
the interest earned on or capital gains or profits to be realized from the investment of such moneys in
“Government Securities” or in other investments authorized in clause (b)(iii) immediately below will be,
as determined by a firm of independent and nationally recognized certified public accountants selected by
the Cities, sufficient to pay the principal of, purchase price, if applicable, premium, if any, and interest on
such Obligations to maturity, or to a date fixed by the Cities for the redemption of such Obligations, and
B-31
to pay interest thereon to maturity or to the date fixed for redemption, and to pay all Administrative
Expenses as may be reasonably estimated by the Cities to become payable under the Master Bond
Ordinance on account of the Obligations being discharged by defeasance and to pay all other Parity Credit
Agreement Obligations relating to the Obligations being discharged and estimated to become due and
payable, and (ii) by delivering to said trustee or escrow agent irrevocable instructions of the Cities to
make the payments described in clauses (b)(ii) and (b)(iii) immediately below by delivery to said trustee
or escrow agent of a Certificate and an opinion of counsel selected by the Cities that all conditions
precedent with respect to such defeasance have been complied with.
(b)
To implement a defeasance of all or a part of the Obligations or related Parity Credit
Agreement Obligations under paragraph (a) above, the Cities will make provision with said trustee or
escrow agent for:
(i)
the establishment of an irrevocable trust pursuant to a trust agreement creating a
trust separate and apart from the Master Bond Ordinance and each applicable Outstanding
Ordinance or Additional Supplemental Ordinance, and will therein deposit and maintain such
moneys, Government Securities or other investments, interest earnings, profits and capital gains;
(ii)
the payment, out of such moneys, Government Securities, and other investments
to the Holders of the Obligations being defeased, or to Credit Providers with respect to Parity
Credit Agreement Obligations, at their dates of maturity, or at the dates fixed for redemption, of
the full amount to which the Holders of such Obligations and Credit Providers with respect to
Parity Credit Agreement Obligations would be entitled in payment of principal, premium and
interest to the dates of such maturity or redemption; and
(iii)
the investment of such moneys at the direction of the Cities in either:
(A)
Government Securities; or
(B)
if the Obligations being defeased are insured by a Credit Provider that
has issued and maintains in effect a policy of municipal bond insurance with respect to
such Obligations, either in Government Securities or in such other investments as are
authorized by Applicable Law and are approved by the Credit Provider issuing such
policy, with all of such investments maturing in sufficient amounts and at such times as
are necessary to make available the moneys required for the purposes stated in clause (ii),
above, as determined by a firm of independent and nationally recognized certified public
accountants selected by the Cities and acceptable to the Trustee.
(c)
If Variable Interest Rate Obligations are to be defeased, the Maximum Interest Rate must
be assumed unless a lesser, actual rate to maturity or applicable redemption date is ascertainable or unless
a Credit Provider guarantees a lesser rate.
(d)
After compliance with the requirements of paragraphs (a) and (b) immediately above, the
Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations, with respect to which moneys have been provided
and investments in government securities have been made, will no longer be Outstanding, and the terms,
provisions, pledges and liens of the Master Bond Ordinance will be automatically released as to such
Obligations and Parity Credit Agreement Obligations.
(e)
For the purposes of this subcaption, “Government Securities” means and is limited to (i)
direct, non–callable obligations of the United States of America and securities that are fully and
B-32
unconditionally guaranteed as to the timely payment of principal and interest by the United States of
America, or to which direct obligations or guarantees the full faith and credit of the United States of
America has been pledged, (ii) Refcorp interest strips, CATS, TIGRS, STRPS, and (iii) defeased
municipal bonds rated AAA by Standard & Poor’s Corporation or Aaa by Moody’s Investors Services,
Inc., or their successors, or, if such firms are no longer issuing such ratings, the highest ratings granted by
another nationally recognized rating agency.
B-33
APPENDIX C
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
C-1
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT
Members of the Board of Directors
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the business-type activities and the remaining
fund information of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (“Airport”), as of and for the year ended
September 30, 2013, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the
Airport’s basic financial statements.
Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements
Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in
accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes
the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair
presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or
error.
Auditor’s Responsibility
Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted
our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those
standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the
financial statements are free from material misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in
the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the
assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error.
In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Airport’s
preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are
appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of
the Airport’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating
the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates
made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.
We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for
our audit opinions.
Opinions
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the
respective financial position of the business-type activities and the aggregate remaining fund information
of the Airport, as of September 30, 2013, and the respective changes in financial position and, where
applicable, cash flows thereof for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally
accepted in the United States of America.
Other Matters - Required Supplementary Information
Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that management's
discussion and analysis and the schedules of funding progress for pensions and other post-employment
benefits be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information, although not a part
of the basic financial statements, is required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board who
considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an
appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to
the required supplementary information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the
United States of America, which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the
information and comparing the information for consistency with management’s responses to our
inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic
financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because
the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any
assurance.
February 7, 2014
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS (Unaudited)
The following discussion and analysis of the financial performance and activity of the Dallas/Fort Worth
International Airport (“DFW” or “the Airport”) provides an introduction and understanding of DFW’s Basic
Financial Statements for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2013. The Airport is a business-type
activity. As such, DFW’s Basic Financial Statements and Required Supplementary Information consist of
Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”); Statement of Net Position; Statement of Revenues,
Expenses, and Changes in Net Position; Statement of Cash Flows; and Notes to the Basic Financial
Statements. Also included are the Statement of Fiduciary Net Position; Statement of Changes in
Fiduciary Net Position; and Schedules of Funding Progress for the Airport Fiduciary Funds which have a
December 31st year end. The MD&A has been prepared by management and should be read in
conjunction with the Basic Financial Statements and the attached notes.
DFW’s Controlling Documents
DFW was created by a Contract and Agreement between the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth (the Cities),
dated April 15, 1968, for the purpose of developing and operating an airport as a joint venture between
the Cities. In addition, DFW is governed by two other key documents. The 1968 Concurrent Bond
Ordinance and the 30th Supplemental Bond Ordinance were amended and restated by the Master Bond
Ordinance, and approved by the Cities of Fort Worth and Dallas on September 21, 2010 and September
22, 2010, respectively. The Master Bond Ordinance became effective on July 5, 2013 after the required
approval of bondholders was obtained. Bonds are issued under provisions of the Master Bond
Ordinance, Supplemental Bond Ordinances, as approved by the Cities of Fort Worth and Dallas, and
Applicable Laws, including Chapter 22 of the Texas Transportation Code, Chapter 1371 of the Texas
Government Code, as amended. Management believes DFW is in compliance with all bond covenants.
The Lease and Use Agreements (Use Agreement) define DFW’s rate setting methodology and business
relationships with the airlines. DFW’s current ten-year Use Agreement with the signatory airlines became
effective October 1, 2010. Collectively, the abovementioned documents are referred to as the
“Controlling Documents.”
Each year, management prepares an Annual Budget (approved by the DFW Board and the Cities) of
projected expenses for the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund (commonly referred to as the “102
Fund”). Management also prepares an annual Schedule of Charges which is the basis for charging the
airlines, tenants, and other airport users for DFW services during the fiscal year.
The Use Agreement created three primary cost centers: the “Airfield”, “Terminal”, and “DFW.” The
airfield and terminal cost centers are “residual” in nature. DFW can only charge the airlines for the net
cost to operate these cost centers (including debt service) primarily through landing fees and terminal
rentals. The Use Agreement also requires certain cash transfers from capital accounts to the 102 Fund
each year through FY 2017.
DFW can generate net revenues or profits in the DFW cost center which includes non-airline business
units such as concessions, parking, rental car, commercial development, and transportation (e.g.
employee busing). If DFW generates net revenues in excess of the “upper threshold” ($63.2 million in
FY 2013), 75% of the excess is to be used to reduce landing fees in the following fiscal year. If the DFW
cost center generates revenues below the lower threshold ($42.2 million), landing fees are increased so
that the DFW cost center will achieve the lower threshold.
If net revenues from the DFW Cost Center are budgeted above the upper threshold, airline landing rates
are reduced at the beginning of the fiscal year. Conversely, if net revenues are budgeted below the lower
threshold, then the airlines are assessed incremental landing rates to achieve the lower “threshold”
amount in the current fiscal year by adjusting rates at the beginning of the fiscal year. The “upper
threshold” and “lower threshold” amounts are adjusted annually for inflation.
3
At the end of each fiscal year, any excess funds in the 102 Operating Fund are transferred to the Capital
Improvement Fund. Funds transferred to the Capital Improvement Fund are allocated among three
accounts: the joint capital account, DFW capital account and rolling coverage capital account. The joint
capital account generally requires approval from both DFW and the airlines prior to any expenditure of
funds, while the DFW capital account may be used at the DFW’s sole discretion for any legal purpose.
The joint capital account receives funds primarily from natural gas royalties and the sale of land. The
DFW capital account is funded primarily from excess revenues of DFW Cost Center, subject to upper
threshold limits discussed previously.
The rolling coverage account was initially funded from the Capital Improvement Account when the lease
agreement was signed. The rolling coverage balance is transferred or “rolled” into the 102 Fund each
year to fund debt service coverage requirements. It is then transferred back into the rolling coverage
account at the end of the fiscal year. If additional coverage is required in any year, it is added to rates
and charges and is collected during the fiscal year.
Although DFW uses the word “fund” to designate the source and prospective use of proceeds, DFW is
an enterprise fund and does not utilize traditional “fund accounting” commonly used by government
organizations. The following table summarizes the primary funds used by DFW and whether the related
assets and liabilities are restricted or not restricted:
Fund
Fund Description
Primary Use
Number
101
Capital Assets and Long Term Debt Capital Assets / Debt
102
Operating Revenues and Expenses
Operations
252
Passenger Facility Charges (PFC)
Capital/Debt Service
320
Joint Capital Account (non-JRB)
Capital
321-328 Capital (JRB)
Bond Proceeds
Restricted (R),
Not Restricted (NR)
R
NR
R
NR
R
330s
Joint Capital (JRB)
Capital
R
340
DFW Capital (non-JRB)
Capital
NR
350
Rolling Coverage
Rate Covenant
NR
500s
Debt Service Sinking
Principal and Interest
R
600s
Debt Service Reserve
Reserve
R
907
Public Facility Improvement
RAC Facility
Corporation (RAC)
RAC Transportation
Public Facility Improvement
Grand Hyatt Operations
Corporation (Hotel)
Grand Hyatt Improvements
910
JRB - Joint Revenue Bond
RAC - Rent-A-Car Center
4
NR
R
NR
R
The basic financial statements
s
in
nclude all off DFW’s fund
ds. DFW ma
anages its d
day-to-day airport
operations
s primarily thrrough the 102
2 Operating Fund
F
in accord
dance with th
he Controlling Documents. The
Airport’s financial sta
atements include all of the transacttions of the Public Facility Improvement
on (PFIC), which
w
operates the Grand Hyatt Hotel and collects customer faccility chargess and
Corporatio
customer transaction charges
c
from the Rental Car
C companie
es. Although the PFIC is a legally sepa
arate
entity, the
e financial tran
nsactions of the
t PFIC hav
ve been comb
bined into the
e Airport’s Enterprise Fund
d due
to their nature
n
and siignificance to
o the Airport.. The PFIC is considere
ed a blended
d componentt unit
because the compone
ent units’ gov
verning bodie
es are substtantively the same as DF
FW’s, the primary
governme
ent.
Operation
nal and Financial Highlig
ghts
DFW utilizes a perform
mance measurement proc
cess that is cclosely aligne
ed with the A
Airport’s Strategic
Plan show
wn in the grap
phic below.
5
DFW management believes that if it focuses on achieving the four Key Drivers/Results, it will be well
positioned to achieve its primary business goal of Growing the Core Business.
Grow the Core Business
Total passengers for the FY 2013 were 60.3 million, a 2.0 million increase over FY 2012. Enplanements
were 30.1 million in FY 2013, a 1.0 million (3.4%) increase over FY 2012, primarily driven by new and
increased air service from low cost carriers like Spirit, hub carrier American Airlines (“AA”), and
international carriers. The market share for AA (which includes American Eagle and Executive Airlines)
decreased to 82% in FY 2013 compared to 84% in FY 2012. DFW’s second largest carrier was Delta
with 5% passengers in FY 2013 compared to 4% in FY 2012.
During FY 2013, DFW achieved 54 new and
announced destinations, including Zacatecas
and Hermosillo, Mexico on American Eagle;
and Bogota, Columbia (began November 21,
62
60.3
2013); and Roatan, Honduras (began
60
November 2013) on AA. Equally important, FY
58.3
57.8
58
2013 international seat capacity was 14.3%
56.4
55.9
56
better than FY 2012 with a total of 8.3 million
seats. In addition to the new air service
54
mentioned above, growth resulted from new
52
AA service to Seoul, Korea and Lima, Peru;
FY 09
FY 10
FY 11
FY 12
FY 13
new service on AeroMexico to Mexico City,
Spirit to Cancun and San Jose del Cabo, and WestJet to Calgary; and incremental service on Korean Air
to Seoul (from five times per week to daily).
Passengers
(Millions)
Aircraft operations increased 4.8% to 675,000 in FY 2013 and total landed weights increased 4.9% to
38.3 billion pounds in FY 2013, primarily due to new service from Spirit and AA. Spirit has continued to
expand rapidly and now serves 26 cities from DFW, while AA has been aggressively adding back the
capacity that they cut during the bankruptcy process. Also, AA is replacing their MD80 aircraft with
larger 737-800 models. Even with the increased activity, AA’s share of DFW’s landed weights
decreased to 74% in FY 2013 from 75% in FY 2012.
Cargo tons decreased from 660,000 in FY 2012 to 647,000 in FY 2013 due to continued sluggish
economic recovery and slower rates of growth in emerging economies. DFW ended the fiscal year with
46 average weekly non-integrator international cargo departures compared with 52 at the end of FY
2012. This decrease was mainly due to China Cargo Airlines and Air Cargo Germany (ACG) pulling out
of the market.
Keep DFW Cost Competitive
Two of the Airport industry’s measures of cost competitiveness are airline cost and passenger airline
cost per enplanement (CPE). Airline cost represents the fees paid by the airlines primarily for landing
fees and terminal rentals. Those fees are derived from DFW’s cost to provide the services less transfers
from the DFW Cost Center. DFW has historically been one of the lowest cost large hub airports in the
country. Both of these metrics will increase in the future as DFW issues bonds to finance its Terminal
Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP). The airlines agreed to pay these higher costs when they
approved the capital program as part of the Use Agreement. Airline cost was $235.6 million in FY 2013,
a $39.3 million (20.0%) increase over FY 2012, and CPE increased from $6.54 in FY 2012 to $7.20 in
FY 2013 primarily due to increased debt service costs. Despite these increases, DFW is competitively
positioned, being one of the lowest cost large hub airports in North America, especially when considering
airline costs such as delay costs which do not show up on DFW’s books.
To help keep airline costs low and maximize discretionary capital funds, DFW works to increase the net
revenues, or profit, from its non-airline business units (i.e., parking, concessions, rental car and
6
The Use Agreement also included $220 million (net of grants) of other pre-approved joint capital account
projects for the airfield, roads and bridges, utilities, and parking. In addition, DFW intends to fund the
renewal and replacement of non-terminal capital including airfield, roadways, parking, utilities, support
facilities, infrastructure, rolling stock, and equipment from the DFW capital account. During FY 2013, the
airlines approved $90.6 million of new projects through the majority-in-interest (MII) process. For a
comprehensive review of DFW’s capital programs and funding plan, please see a copy of the DFW
Financial Plan, available on DFW’s web page under the Investors/financials tab.
As of September 30, 2013, DFW had 293 approved capital projects in process for a total estimated cost
of $2.99 billion through completion. As of September 30, 2013, $1.26 billion of this total had been
expended and an additional $593.2 million was under contract and committed; leaving approximately
$1.14 billion remaining to be spent. In addition to TRIP, the more significant projects include
reconstruction of Terminal A Enhanced Parking Garage ($176.7 million), Southgate commercial
development expansion ($93M), replacement of the parking control system and toll plazas ($57.3 million),
reconstruction of Taxiway “L” ($51.1M), Terminal B North Stinger gate expansion ($40 million),
construction of a new DART Rail Station adjacent to Terminal A ($35.6M million), and construction of a
Terminal B/D International gate expansion ($21 million).
DFW Business and Operations Overview
The following table highlights changes in the Airport’s key operating statistics for FY 2013 and FY 2012.
For the Year Ended
Key Operating Information
FY 2013
2012
Total Passengers (000s)
60,283
58,312
Total Seats (000s)
73,612
70,375
Enplanements (000s)
30,128
29,127
Cost per Enplaned Passenger
$
Aircraft Operations (000s)
Landed Weight (in millions of pounds)
Average Landing Fee (per thousand pounds)
Cargo Landed Weight (in millions of pounds)
Cargo Tons (000s)
$
7.20
$
6.54
675
644
38,331
36,523
2.72
$
2.98
3,025
3,099
647
660
FY 2013 Compared to FY 2012
Enplanements were 30.1 million in FY 2013, a 3.4% improvement over the prior year of 29.1 million
primarily driven by new and increased air service from international, low cost, and legacy carriers.
Aircraft operations increased 4.8% to 675,000 in FY 2013 from 644,000 in FY 2012 and total landed
weights increased 4.9% to 38.3 billion pounds in FY 2013 from 36.5 billion pounds in FY 2012, due
mainly to increased flight activity combined with the use of larger aircraft by the airlines.
The airline industry uses passenger airline cost per enplanement (CPE) as a key efficiency measure.
CPE is calculated by dividing airline cost (total passenger airline payments for landing fees and terminal
rents, less airline rebates for new air service) by the number of enplanements. DFW’s CPE in FY 2013
was $7.20, an increase of $0.66 (10.1%) from $6.54 in FY 2012, primarily due to higher operating and
9
net debt service costs charged to the airline cost centers and less revenue transfers per the terms of the
Use Agreement.
Cargo tons decreased 2.0% to 647,000 in FY 2013 from 660,000 in FY 2012 due to the sluggish
economic recovery as well as slowing rates of growth in emerging economies. DFW ended the fiscal
year with 46 average weekly international cargo departures compared with 52 at the end of FY 2012.
Revenues, Expenses, and Change in Net Position:
The following table is a summary of Revenues, Expenses, Non-operating expenses, net, and increase
(decrease) in Net Position for the years ended September 30, 2013 and 2012. Detailed descriptions and
variances of the components of revenues, expenses and net non-operating expenses are described in
the following sections.
For the Year Ended (000s)
Change in Net Position
Operating revenues
Operating expenses
Operating loss
Non-operating expenses, net
Loss before capital contributions and
special item
Capital contributions
Special Item
Decrease in Net Position
$
$
FY2013
577,481
(637,546)
(60,065)
(79,647)
$
FY 2012*
533,630
(643,119)
(109,489)
(61,927)
(139,712)
(171,416)
20,960
(32,283)
(151,035)
24,900
(146,516)
$
* The cost of the A irport Service Incentive Program (A SIP) has been reclassed f rom
Operating expenses to Contra revenue account f or comparison purposes.
DFW’s Controlling Documents require that DFW establish rates, fees and charges adequate to provide
for the payment of operating costs (excluding depreciation) and debt service (including principal and
coverage). In years when depreciation is greater than principal payments, as in FY 2013 and FY 2012,
DFW’s Change in Net Position on a Generally Accepted Accounting Principle (GAAP) basis can be
expected to be a negative amount. Also, there may be timing differences between the recognition of
certain costs for rate recovery and for GAAP. For example, the recognition of certain environmental costs
that are part of TRIP are recognized immediately through GAAP but will be reflected in the rates as part
of future services.
However, on a cash flow basis, the airport’s rate setting methodology has resulted in DFW meeting and
exceeding its debt covenants in FY 2013 (see Liquidity section pg.16-17). DFW generated $202.1 million
of net cash flow provided by operating activities.
10
Operating Revenues:
The following table highlights the major components of operating revenues for the fiscal years ended
September 30, 2013 and 2012. Significant variances are explained below.
For the Ye a r Ende d (000s)
FY 2013
FY 2012*
$ 100,610
$
105,956
Ope ra ting Re ve nue s
Landing fees
Terminal rent and use fees
Federal Inspection Services (FIS)
Other airline
109,722
81,206
21,805
17,650
320
Tota l a irline re ve nue
Parking
(216)
232,457
204,596
116,092
110,841
Concessions
68,229
65,702
Ground and facilities leases
34,297
33,508
Rent-A-Car lease and rentals
31,425
27,746
Grand Hyatt Hotel
31,032
28,775
Employee transportation
12,345
10,200
Rent-A-Car customer transportation charges
11,106
11,683
Natural gas
8,498
8,709
Taxi and limo fees
8,133
8,217
Other non-airline
Tota l non-a irline re ve nue
Tota l Ope ra ting Re ve nue s
$
23,867
23,653
345,024
577,481
329,034
533,630
$
*The cost of A SIP has been reduced f rom FY 12 airline revenue f or comparison purposes.
FY 2013 Compared to FY 2012
Total Airline Revenue consists of fees paid by signatory and non-signatory airlines for the use of the
airfield and terminals at DFW based on DFW’s cost to provide related facilities. Landing fees for
passenger and cargo carriers are assessed per 1,000 pounds of maximum approved landed weight for
each specific aircraft as certified by the FAA. Signatory airlines are the airlines that sign a Use
Agreement with DFW. Landing fees, including passenger and cargo fees, decreased $5.3 million (5.0%)
from $105.9 million in FY 2012 to $100.6 million in FY 2013, primarily due to a larger transfer from the
DFW cost center to the Airfield cost center. This transfer, as defined in the Use Agreement, is based on
net non-airline revenue which also increased from FY 2012 to FY2013.
Terminal rents and use fees (“Terminal Revenues”) include terminal rent from gates leased primarily by
signatory airlines and gate use fees from DFW-owned gates. The Controlling Documents require the
signatory airlines to pay terminal rent equal to the cost of terminal operations, plus allocated debt service
and overhead, minus concessions revenue. Terminal revenues increased $28.5 million (35.1%) from
$81.2 million in FY 2012 to $109.7 million in FY 2013 due to an increase in rates necessary to cover the
increased debt service incurred from TRIP.
Federal Inspection Service (FIS) fees per departing international passenger in Terminal D increased $4.1
million (23.5%), from $17.7 million in FY 2012 to $21.8 million in FY 2013 due to an increase in
international passengers combined with a per passenger fee increase from $7.76 to $8.63 related to
higher allocated costs to DFW’s inspection facilities.
11
Other airline revenue consists of bad debt and aircraft parking charges. Other airline revenue increased
$0.5M due to the recovery of previously recognized bad debt.
Parking fees are charged based on the length of time and parking product. DFW’s primary parking
products include terminal ($18-20 per day), express ($10-13 per day) and remote ($8 per day). Parking
revenues increased $5.3 million (4.8%) from $110.8 million in FY 2012 to $116.1 million in FY 2013 due
to an increase in originating passengers, select rates, and an increase in DFW Valet parkers. Terminal
parking revenues accounted for 61.8% and 66.4% of total parking revenues in FY 2013 and FY 2012,
respectively.
Concession revenues increased $2.5 million (3.8%), from $65.7 million in FY 2012 to $68.2 million in FY
2013, primarily due to an increase in enplaned passengers, and increased food and beverage and
advertising sales.
Ground and facility lease revenues consist primarily of ground leases of Airport property, various facility
leases, Hyatt Regency Hotel, and other. Ground and facility lease revenue increased $0.8 million (2.4%)
from $33.5 million in FY 2012 to $34.3 million in FY 2013 primarily due to an increase in the average
lease rate per acre and additional leased properties.
Rent-A-Car (RAC) lease and rentals revenue consists of ground leases plus a percentage rent based on
gross revenues. RAC revenues increased $3.7 million (13.4%), from $27.7 million in FY 2012 to $31.4
million in FY 2013, primarily due to increased average daily rental rates and an increase in destination
passengers. Percentage rent accounted for 85.2% of the total RAC rental revenues in FY 2013 and
84.6% in FY 2012.
The Grand Hyatt Hotel operations include room rental, food and beverage and other revenues.
Revenues increased $2.2 million (7.6%), from $28.8 million in FY 2012 to $31.0 million in FY 2013
primarily due to higher food and beverage sales and higher average room rates.
Employee transportation revenues are derived primarily from a monthly fee paid by airlines and other
tenants to pay for the cost of employee transportation services between remote parking lots and the
terminals. Employee transportation revenues increased $2.1 million (20.6%) from $10.2 million in FY
2012 to $12.3 million in FY 2013 primarily due to an increase in fees required to cover the costs to
provide the transportation services.
RAC customer transportation revenue is derived from a $2.20 per rental day transaction fee that is used
to fund operation and maintenance of the bus fleet to transport passengers between the airport terminals
and the RAC. RAC customer transportation revenue decreased $0.6 million (5.1%), from $11.7 million in
FY 2012 to $11.1 million in FY 2013 due to timing differences in collections offsetting slightly higher
transaction days.
Taxi and limo fees (Ground Transportation) revenues represent the access, decal, and application fees
charged to taxicab, limousine, shared ride, and courtesy van companies and providers. These revenues
remained relatively flat at $8.1 million in FY 2013.
Natural gas revenues include royalties and property and surface use fees resulting from natural gas
drilling. Natural gas revenues remained relatively flat at $8.5 million in FY 2013.
Other non-airline revenue is comprised of General Aviation fees related to fueling and aircraft service
fees; the fuel farm fees paid by the airlines to retire the debt incurred to construct the fueling system and
overhead of the fuel farm; non-airline utilities; pass-through and reimbursable revenues from airline and
tenants; building code/standard fees; and other miscellaneous revenues offset by non-airline bad debt.
Other revenue remained flat at $23.9 million in FY 2013 compared to $23.7 million in FY 2012.
12
Operating Expenses:
The following table highlights the major components of operating expenses for the fiscal years ended
September 30, 2013 and 2012. Significant variance explanations follow.
For the Year Ended (000s)
FY 2013
FY 2012*
$ 169,635
$
177,367
147,854
130,206
21,918
21,754
26,103
27,487
21,914
20,146
Operat in g Expenses
Salaries, wages, and benefits
Contract services
Equipment and supplies
Utilities
G rand Hyatt Hotel
Insurance
G eneral, administr ative and other charges
Depreciation and amortization
Total Operat ing Expenses
$
5,177
7,177
237,768
637,546
$
4,307
6,507
255,344
643,119
* The cost of ASIP has been m oved from Equipm ent and suppli es to contra airline revenue for comparison purposes.
FY 2013 Compared to FY 2012
Salaries, wages and benefits decreased $7.8 million (4.4%) from $177.4 million in FY 2012 to $169.6
million in FY 2013 primarily due to lower pension contributions and less employees resulting from the
outsourcing of bussing and the early retirement program that was completed in FY 2012, an increase in
the amount of payroll capitalized for construction activity, and lower health insurance costs. DFW
employed 1,755 and 1,856 full time employees as of September 30, 2013 and 2012, respectively.
Contract services include grounds and facility maintenance, busing services, financial and legal services,
software and hardware maintenance, advertising, planning, and other professional services. Contract
services increased $17.7 million (13.6%), from $130.2 million in FY 2012 to $147.9 million in FY 2013,
primarily due to increased contract busing and marketing costs.
Equipment and supplies primarily consists of non-capitalized equipment, materials, fuel for vehicles, and
supplies used to maintain and operate the Airport. Equipment and supplies increased $0.2 million
(0.7%), from $21.7 million in FY 2012 to $21.9 million in FY 2013, primarily due to an increase in
operating supplies offset partially by lower fuel costs.
Utilities represent the cost of electricity, natural gas, potable water, trash removal, and
telecommunications services. Utilities decreased $1.4 million (5.1%), from $27.5 million in FY 2012 to
$26.1 million in FY 2013, primarily due to lower electrical costs.
Grand Hyatt Hotel operations include room, food and beverage and other expenses. Operating costs
increased $1.8 million (9.0%) from $20.1 million in FY 2012 to $21.9 million in FY 2013. These costs
increased to match the increased demand for rooms, food and beverages, and other hotel services.
General, administrative and other charges increased $0.7 million (10.8%), from $6.5 million in FY 2012
to $7.2 million in FY 2013, primarily due to higher business development and training activities.
Depreciation and amortization decreased $17.5 million (6.9%), from $255.3 million in FY 2012 to $237.8
million in FY 2013. The decrease is primarily due a reduction in the accelerated depreciation on assets
being replaced by TRIP.
13
Non-Operating Revenues and Expenses:
The following table highlights non-operating revenues and expenses for the fiscal years ended
September 30, 2013 and 2012.
F o r th e Y e a r E n d e d (0 0 0 s)
N o n -o p e r a ti n g r e v e n u e s (e x p e n se s)
P a s s e n g e r fa c ilit y c h a rg e s
FY 2013
$
R A C c u s t o m e r fa c ilit y c h a rg e s
In t e re s t in c o m e
In t e re s t e x p e n s e o n re ve n u e b o n d s
115,565
F Y 2012
$
20,191
19,713
4,804
6,027
(2 2 5 , 4 4 5 )
O t h e r, n e t
(2 0 0 , 5 6 5 )
5,238
T o ta l N o n -o p e r a ti n g e x p e n se s
$
109,133
(7 9 , 6 4 7 )
3,765
$
(6 1 , 9 2 7 )
FY 2013 Compared to FY 2012
Congress established Passenger Facility Charges (PFCs) in 1990 as part of the Aviation Safety and
Capacity Expansion Act of 1990. DFW currently collects a $4.50 Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) from
enplaned passengers to pay for the cost to design and construct eligible airport capital projects or to
repay debt service issued to build such projects. DFW estimates that 87.4% of all enplaned passengers
were required to pay PFCs in FY 2013. PFC collections are recorded as revenue when earned and
deposited in the 252 PFC Fund, then used to pay eligible debt service costs or eligible pay-as-you-go
capital projects. PFC revenues increased $6.5 million (6.0%), from $109.1 million in FY 2012 to $115.6
million in FY 2013 as a result of more passengers.
RAC customers pay a $4.00 facility charge for each transaction day to pay for the debt service and
capital improvements to the RAC facility. RAC customer facility charges (CFCs) increased $0.5 million
(2.5%), from $19.7 million in FY 2012 to $20.2 million in FY 2013 as a result of additional transaction
days.
Interest expense on revenue bonds increased $24.8 (12.4%) million from $200.6 million in FY 2012 to
$225.4 million in FY 2013 due to an increase in borrowing associated with TRIP.
Other net non-operating revenues/expenses are comprised primarily of write-offs of capital and other
assets, insurance proceeds, and other miscellaneous receipts and payments. This category increased
$1.4 million (36.8%) from $3.8 million in FY 2012 to $5.2 million in FY2013 primarily due to additional
insurance payments for hail damage.
Capital Contributions:
The following table highlights capital contributions for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2013 and
2012.
For the Year Ended (000s)
FY 2013
FY 2012
Capital contributions
Federal and state grant reimbursements
$
20,960
$
24,900
Total capital contributions
$
20,960
$
24,900
14
FY 2013 Compared to FY 2012
DFW receives Airport Improvement Program (AIP) and other grants through the Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) and other Federal and State agencies. Airport grant reimbursements decreased
$3.9 million (15.7%) from $24.9 million in FY 2012 to $21.0 million in FY2013 due to smaller program
drawdowns resulting from lower available government discretionary funding.
Special Item:
DFW recorded $32.3 million in asbestos removal costs incurred in conjunction with TRIP. These costs
were immediately recognized for GAAP purposes but are being financed as part of TRIP.
Assets, Liabilities, and Net Position:
The following table provides a condensed summary of DFW’s net position as of September 30, 2013 and
2012. A discussion of significant items follows.
Summary of Net Position
Assets:
Current and other assets
Capital assets
T otal assets
Liabilities:
Current and other liabilities,
excluding debt
Noncurrent liabilities
Long- term debt outstanding:
due within one year
due in more than one year
T otal liabilities
Total net position
Total revenues
Total expenses
Total change in net position
As of September 30 (000s)
2013
2012*
$
2,980,662
4,527,878
7,508,539
$
$
1,810,010
4,237,129
6,047,139
271,135
29,040
230,406
10,872
91,915
6,166,739
6,558,829
949,710
76,210
4,628,906
4,946,394
1,100,745
744,239
(895,274)
(151,035)
$
$
$
$
$
697,167
(843,683)
(146,516)
* The cost of the Ai rport Service I ncentive Program (ASI P) has been recl assed from
O perat ing expenses to Contra revenue account f or com parison purposes.
Total current and other assets increased $1.2 billion from FY 2012 to FY 2013 primarily due to the bond
proceeds received, but not yet applied to capital expenditures. Total capital assets increased $290.8
million due to increased construction-in-progress and the completion of additional projects. Total
liabilities increased $1.6 billion from FY 2012 to FY 2013 primarily due to the issuance of new debt.
15
The following table summarizes net position as of September 30, 2013 and 2012.
As of September 30 (000s)
2013
2012
$
229,838
$
371,192
Net Position
Net investment in capital assets
Restricted net position:
PFIC
Passenger facility charges
Public safety and other
Total restricted
Unrestricted net position
11,395
28,588
2,888
42,871
677,001
Total Net Position
$
949,710
12,909
50,032
2,759
65,700
663,853
$
1,100,745
Net investment in capital assets decreased $141.4 million primarily due to depreciation outpacing bond
principal payments and the difference in rate and GAAP treatment for TRIP related asbestos removal.
Restricted net position, PFIC decreased $1.5 million in FY 2013 primarily due to a slightly higher usage
of cash.
Restricted net position, PFC’s represent the cash and investments held from the collection of PFCs that
will be used in the future to pay eligible debt service. PFCs paid approximately 49% and 56% of the total
debt service in FY 2013 and FY 2012, respectively. The PFC balance decreased $21.4 million in FY
2013 as funds have been used to pay eligible debt service in excess of PFC revenues.
Restricted net position, public safety and other represents cash obtained during seizures and arrests.
These funds may only be used for public safety and security purposes as defined by Federal law. Also
represented are funds collected from concessionaires to operate joint marketing programs.
Liquidity and Financing
As of September, 30, 2013, DFW had total cash and investments of $2.8 billion, of which $686 million
was unrestricted. Unrestricted cash and investments may be used for any lawful airport purpose,
including capital expenditures, the payment of operation and maintenance expenses, and the payment of
debt service if the debt service revenue fund should ever be inadequate. The unrestricted cash and
investments are sufficient to cover 587 days of operating expenses as compared to 583 days in FY
2012.
As of September 30, 2013, DFW has $6.3 billion of fixed rate bonds outstanding. Currently, DFW has no
swaps or variable rate debt. DFW issued four refunding series bonds during FY 2013 and achieved
$105.7 million in net present value savings and $137.0 million in actual savings on future debt service.
DFW funds major renewal projects like the TRIP or runway improvements and expansion projects
through the issuance of debt, net of available FAA discretionary funding. Minor renewals and
replacements are generally funded out of the DFW capital account. As part of the Use Agreement, the
Airlines approved the issuance of bonds to fund the TRIP and $220 million of other capital projects. The
issuance of additional debt requires airline approval, with some exceptions for commercial development.
DFW issued the series 2012H, 2013A, 2013B and 2013C bonds totaling $955.8 million for the TRIP and
$534.0 million for non-TRIP projects during FY 2013. Depending upon contract terms, DFW may be
required to identify and have available funds (joint/DFW capital, grants, debt, and PFCs) before it can
16
enter into a contract for capital programs. DFW is currently monitoring the cash flow and contracting
requirements for the TRIP and other approved projects, and expects to issue additional bonds in the
future to meet capital funding needs.
Generally, DFW capitalizes interest on major capital programs like the TRIP between the time of
borrowing and date of beneficial occupancy. DFW uses PFCs to pay a portion of eligible debt service on
outstanding debt. The remaining debt service is paid through rates, fees and charges. Additional
information on long-term capital asset activity and debt activity are disclosed in notes 4 and 6 to the
financial statements.
The Controlling Documents require DFW to annually adopt a Schedule of Charges that is: (1) reasonably
estimated to produce Gross Revenues in an amount sufficient to at least pay Operation and
Maintenance Expenses plus 1.25 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service and (2) reasonably estimated
to at least produce Current Gross Revenues in an amount sufficient to pay Operation and Maintenance
Expenses plus 1.00 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service. DFW’s Gross Revenues Coverage ratio was
1.53 and 1.52 for the fiscal years September 30, 2013 and September 30, 2012, respectively; while
Current Gross Revenues covered debt service improved to 1.21 from 1.18 for the same periods,
respectively.
DFW is rated A (stable outlook) by Fitch, A2 (stable outlook) by Moody’s, and A+ (stable outlook) by
Standard and Poor’s. During FY 2013 Fitch and Moody’s lowered their rating from A+(negative outlook)
and A1 (negative outlook), respectively, due primarily to DFW’s planned issuance of debt to fund the
TRIP. Standard and Poor’s did not change their rating. Management believes that after TRIP is
completed, the Airport will remain cost competitive, have high levels of liquidity, and strong debt service
coverage.
Request for Information
This financial report is designed to provide a general overview of the Airport’s finances for all those with
an interest. Questions concerning any of the information presented in this report or requests for
additional information should be addressed to the Office of the Executive Vice President and Chief
Financial Officer, 3200 East Airfield Drive, P.O. Box 619428, DFW Airport, Texas 75261-9428.
17
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Statement of Net Position
As of September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
Assets
Cu rrent as s ets
Cas h and c as h equi vale nts (not es 1, 2)
$
152,477
Res tri ct ed c as h and c as h equi val ents (not es 1, 2, 8)
200,001
I nve st me nts (not es 1, 2)
417,496
Res tri ct ed i nves t ment s (not es 1, 2, 8)
72,629
A c coun ts rec eiv able, net of allowanc e f or doubt ful ac c ount of $0. 6 (not e 1)
28,798
M aterial s and suppl ies inv ent ori es (note 1)
2,216
Ot her c urrent as s ets
4,781
T otal c urrent ass et s
878,398
Non-c urrent as set s
Res tri ct ed Cas h and c as h equ ival ents (not es 1, 8)
330,151
I nve st me nts (not es 1, 2)
116,520
Res tri ct ed i nves t ment s (not es 1, 2, 8)
1, 525,572
Capit al as set s , net (notes 1, 4)
Non-deprec iable
905,856
Deprec iabl e, net
3, 622,022
T otal c apit al as s ets , net
4, 527,878
B ond is sue c ost
50,762
Net pens ion and other p ost em ploy m ent benefi t as set s (not e 9, 10)
55,993
Ot her res t ri ct ed a ss et s
23,265
Tot al non-current as s ets
6, 630,141
7, 508,539
To tal assets
L iab il iti es
Cu rrent li abilit ies
A c coun ts pay able and other current lia bilit ies (not e 5)
90,420
Current pay able f rom res tric t ed as s ets (not es 1, 8)
180,715
Current porti on of joi nt revenue bonds pay able (notes 1, 6)
91,915
Tot al current li abilit ies
363,050
Long-t erm liab ilit ies
Long-t erm liabil iti es (note 15)
10,860
Long-t erm liabil iti es pay able from res tric t ed as s ets (not e 15)
18,180
J oint rev enue bonds pay able (not e 6)
6, 166,739
T otal long-t erm liabi lit ies
6, 195,779
6, 558,829
To tal li abi li ties
Net Po siti on (notes 7, 8)
Net Inv es tm ent in Capital A s set s
229,838
Res tri ct ed f or:
P FI C (not e 11)
11,395
P as s enger f aci lit y c harges (notes 1, 6)
28,588
P ublic s afet y and other (not e 1 )
2,888
T otal res tric ted
42,871
Unres tric t ed
677,001
$
T otal Net P osi tio n
See accompanying notes to the basic financial statements.
18
949,710
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Net Position
For The Year Ended September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
O perati ng revenu es
Landing f ees (note 1)
$
Term inal rent and use fees (note 1)
100, 610
109, 722
Fed eral I nspe ct ion Serv ic es (FI S ) (note 1)
21, 805
Ot her ai rl ine
320
232, 457
To tal airl in e reven ue
P arki ng
116, 092
Concessi ons
68, 229
Ground and f ac ilit ies leas es
34, 297
Rent -A -Car rent al
31, 425
Grand Hyat t Hot el
31, 032
E mpl oyee t rans port ation
12, 345
Rent -A -Car c us tom er t ransp ort ati on c harge
11, 106
Nat ural gas
8, 498
Taxi and l im o f ees
8, 133
Ot her non-airli ne
23, 867
345, 024
T otal no n-air li ne revenue
577, 481
Total o perati ng revenu es
O perati ng expen ses
S alaries , wages and benefi ts
169, 635
Cont ract services
147, 854
E quipm ent and suppl ies
21, 918
Ut ilit ies
26, 103
Grand Hyat t Hot el
21, 914
I nsurance
5, 177
General, admin is trati ve and other
7, 177
Deprec iati on and am ort izati on
237, 768
Total o perati ng expen ses
637, 546
(60, 065)
O perati ng lo ss
No n-op erating reve nues (expenses)
P as senger facil ity charges
115, 565
RA C c us tom er f acilit y charge
20, 191
I nterest incom e
4, 804
I nterest ex pense on revenue bonds
(225, 445)
Ot her, net
5, 238
(79, 647)
Total n on-o peratin g expenses, net
(139, 712)
L oss before capi tal con tri bu ti on s an d speci al item
Cap ital co ntrib utio ns
Fed eral and s tat e grant reim bursem ent s
20, 960
20, 960
Total cap ital co ntrib utio ns
S pe cial i tem
Asbes tos remov al (note 15)
(32, 283)
Net Po siti on
Dec rease in net posit ion
(151, 035)
Tot al net pos it ion, beginning of y ear
Total n et po siti on, end of year
See accompanying notes to the basic financial statements.
$
19
1,100, 745
949, 710
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Statement of Cash Flows
For The Year Ended September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
Cash fl ows from operati ng activi ties:
Cash rec eiv ed f rom operations
$
589, 236
Cash paid to out si de v endors
(217, 552)
Cash paid to em ploy ees
(169, 555)
Net c as h prov ided by operati ng ac ti vi ties
202, 129
Cash fl ows from capi tal a nd related fi nanci ng activi ties:
A c quis iti on and c ons truc tion of c apit al ass et s
(523, 295)
B ond is suanc e cos t s
(7, 983)
P roce eds from s ale of rev enue bonds
2,731, 905
P remi ums from s ale of bonds
210, 470
P ay ment s t o es c row agent
(1,261, 886)
Underwriter's dis count and f ees
(11, 501)
P rinc ipal paid on rev enue bonds
(76, 210)
I nteres t paid on rev enue bonds
(232, 351)
Capit al grants
21, 032
P as sen ger fac il ity ch arges
115, 602
Rent al car finan ci ng f ees
20, 105
Net c as h prov ided by c apital and relate d
financ ing ac ti vit ies
985, 888
Cash fl ows from in vesti ng acti vities :
Int eres t rec eiv ed on t im e depos it s and inv es tm ents
5, 097
Purc has e of tim e deposi ts a nd inv es tm ent s
(2,157, 285)
Sal e of t im e depos it s and inv es tm ents
1,174, 104
Net c as h us ed for inve st ing act iv it ies
(978, 084)
209, 933
Net i ncrease i n c ash an d cash equi val ents
Cas h and c as h equiva lents , beginn ing of y ear
472, 696
Cas h and c as h equiva lents , end of the period
$
Unres t ri ct ed c as h and c as h equi val ents
682, 629
152, 477
Res t ric ted cas h and c as h Equiv alent s
530, 152
Cas h and c as h equiva lents , end of the period
$
682, 629
Rec onc iliat ion of operatin g los s t o net cas h
provi ded by operat ing act iv it ies :
Operati ng los s
(60, 065)
A djus tm ent s t o rec onci le operat ing los s t o net c as h
provi ded by operat ing act iv it ies :
Deprec iat ion and am orti zat ion
237, 768
Changes in as set s and liabi lit ies :
A cc ount s rec eiv able
4, 613
Mat erials , s upplies and i nvent ories
(198)
Ot her c urrent ass et s
(1, 397)
Net pens ion ass et
579
P ayroll ex pens es
80
A cc ount s pay able and ot her li abilit ies
20, 749
Net c as h prov ided by operati ng ac ti vi ties
$
202, 129
S upplem ent al d is cl osure of non-cas h ac tiv it ies
A s set s ac quired under c apit al l eas e
19
A mort iz ati on of bond premi um/ dis c ount
(17, 715)
A mort iz ati on of bond is s uance c os ts
5, 044
A mort iz ati on of bond defeas em ent los s
3, 099
Capit al Contribut ions
(72)
Capit aliz ed interes t
(21, 278)
Unpaid purc hases of Capit al as s ets in acc ount s pay able and ac c rued li abilit ies
See accompanying notes to the basic financial statements.
20
54, 999
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Statement of Fiduciary Net Position
As Of December 31, 2012
(Amounts in Thousands)
A s s e ts
Ca s h
In v e s tme n t in Ma s te r Tr u s t a t f a ir v a lu e
Re c e iv a b le s
Du e f r o m b r o ke r f o r s e c u r itie s s o ld
A c c r u e d in te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s
T o tal as s e ts
$
172
4 6 0 ,8 1 5
1 ,0 0 7
791
4 6 2 ,7 8 5
L ia b ilitie s
Du e to b r o ke r f o r s e c u r itie s p u r c h a s e d
A c c r u e d ma n a g e m e n t f e e s
Cla ims /p r e miu ms p a y a b le
A c c r u e d tr a n s a c tio n f e e s
T o t a l lia b ilit ie s
2 ,4 5 3
N e t p o s itio n h e ld in tr u s t fo r b e n e fits
See accompanying notes to the basic financial statements.
1 ,8 4 8
313
274
18
21
$ 4 6 0 ,3 3 2
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Position
For the year ended December 31, 2012
(Amounts in Thousands)
A d d itio n s
C o n tr ib u tio n s
Pla n m e m b e r s c o n tr ib u tio n s
Em p lo y e r c o n tr ib u tio n s
$
To ta l c o n tr ib u tio n s
1 ,7 1 2
3 2 ,6 5 5
3 4 ,3 6 7
Pla n s ' in te r e s t in M a s te r Tr u s t In v e s tm e n t In c o m e
L e s s : In v e s tm e n t f e e s
4 4 ,9 7 1
( 1 ,8 5 5 )
To ta l in v e s tm e n t in c o m e
4 3 ,1 1 6
T o t a l a d d it io n s
7 7 ,4 8 3
D e d u c tio n s
B e n e f its p a id to p la n m e m b e r s a n d b e n e f ic ia r ie s
A d m in is tr a tiv e f e e s
T o tal d e d u cto n s
2 3 ,2 0 5
322
2 3 ,5 2 7
N e t in c r e a s e
5 3 ,9 5 6
N e t p o s itio n
A t b e g in n in g o f th e y e a r
4 0 6 ,3 7 6
A t e n d o f th e ye ar
See accompanying notes to the basic financial statements.
$
22
4 6 0 ,3 3 2
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Footnote Reference
Note
Page
1.
Summary of Significant Accounting and Reporting Policies
24
2.
Deposits and Investments
31
3.
Related-Party Transactions
38
4.
Capital Assets
39
5.
Accounts Payable and Other Current Liabilities
40
6.
Debt
41
7.
Net Investment in Capital Assets
44
8.
Restricted Net Position
45
9.
Retirement Plans
46
10.
Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB)
49
11.
PFIC Background and Financial Information
53
12.
Commitments and Contingencies
55
13.
Self-Insurance/Risk Management
55
14.
Concentration of Credit Risk
56
15.
Pollution Remediation
56
16.
Subsequent Events
57
23
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(1)
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING POLICIES
(a) Reporting Entity
The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW or the Airport) was created by the Contract
and Agreement between the City of Dallas, Texas, and the City of Fort Worth, Texas, effective
April 15, 1968 (Contract and Agreement), for the purpose of developing and operating an
airport as a joint venture of the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth (the Cities) in accordance with
the Contract and Agreement. The initial capital was contributed by the Cities. The Cities
approve DFW’s annual budget and all bond sales, but have no responsibility for the DFW’s
debt service requirements.
The DFW Airport Board of Directors (the Board) is composed of 12 members, 11 of whom are
voting members (seven of which are appointed by Dallas and four by Fort Worth) in
accordance with each city’s ownership interest in the Airport. The 12th position rotates between
the Airport’s host cities of Irving, Grapevine, Euless or Coppell and is non-voting. The Board is
a semi-autonomous body charged with governing the Airport and may enter into contracts
without approval of the City Councils.
The Board appoints the Chief Executive Officer, who is charged with the day-to-day operations
of the Airport. The Chief Executive Officer hires a management team to assist him in that
responsibility.
DFW’s financial statements include all of the transactions of the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport
Public Facility Improvement Corporation (“PFIC”). The PFIC operates the Grand Hyatt Hotel
and the Rent-A-Car facility (“RAC”). Grand Hyatt net proceeds are primarily derived from room
rentals and the sale of related hotel goods and services. The RAC collects customer facility
and customer transportation charges from rental car customers and oversees facility
improvements and transportation services.
Although the PFIC is a legally separate entity, the financial transactions of PFIC have been
included into the Airport’s Enterprise Fund due to their nature and significance to the Airport
and to comply with Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB): Statement 14, The
Financial Reporting Entity as amended by GASB 39 Determining whether Certain
Organizations are Component Units, and Statement 61, The Financial Reporting Entity. The
PFIC is considered a blended component unit because the component units governing bodies
consist of members of the Airport staff, appointed by the Airport. The Airport as the primary
government, exercises substantial control over the PFIC. In addition, the component units
provide direct benefits exclusively or almost exclusively to the Airport, through the transfer of
funds necessary to pay Airport debt.
DFW’s Facility Improvement Corporation (“FIC”) is also a legally separate entity. The financial
transactions of the FIC have been included into the Airport’s Enterprise Fund due to their
nature and significance to the Airport and to comply with Governmental Accounting Standards
Board (GASB): Statement 14, The Financial Reporting Entity as amended by GASB 39
Determining whether Certain Organizations are Component Units, and Statement 61, The
Financial Reporting Entity. The FIC is considered a blended component unit because the
component units governing bodies consist of members of the Airport staff, appointed by the
Airport. The Airport as the primary government, exercises substantial control over the FIC. The
FIC is used solely for conduit financing purposes. The FIC has no assets or liabilities as of
September 30, 2013. See footnotes 6(b) and 11 for a further discussion of the FIC.
24
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
DFW has two fiduciary pension plans covering substantially all DFW employees with the plan
year ended December 31, 2012: the Retirement Plans for Employees (Employee Plan) and for
DPS (Department of Public Safety) Covered Employees (DPS Plan) of the Dallas/Fort Worth
International Airport Board (Retirement Plans, collectively). DFW offers a deferred
compensation plan 401(a) for employees hired on or after January 1, 2010 (excludes
Department of Public Safety employees.)
DFW has a single-employer defined Other Post Employment Benefit Plan (OPEB) providing
retiree health care for qualified retired employees ages 65 or younger with the plan year ended
December 31, 2012.
\
(b) Basis of Accounting
The accounts of the Airport are organized into an Enterprise Fund which represents the
business-type activities; and two Pension Trust Funds and one OPEB Trust Fund which
represent the fiduciary activities. The Airport uses a separate set of self-balancing accounts for
each fund, including assets, liabilities, net assets, revenues, and expenses. The Airport
includes its fiduciary pension plans in its financial statements.
The Basic Financial Statements and Required Supplementary Information (RSI) of the Airport
consist of Management’s Discussion and Analysis; Statement of Net Position; Statement of
Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position; Statement of Cash Flows; Statement of
Fiduciary Net Position; Statement of Changes in Fiduciary Net Position; Notes to the Basic
Financial Statements; and Schedules of Funding Progress. The funds are categorized into two
generic fund types as follows:
Enterprise Fund – The financial statements of the Enterprise Fund use the economic resource
measurement focus and are presented on the accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are
recorded when earned. DFW’s operating revenues are derived from fees paid by airlines,
tenants, concessionaires, patrons who park at DFW, natural gas royalties, hotel transactions,
and others. The fees are based on usage rates established by DFW and/or methodologies
established in the Use Agreement.
Expenses are recognized when incurred. The Airport constructs facilities to provide services to
others, which are financed in part by the issuance of its revenue bonds. Airline users generally
contract to pay amounts equal to the Airport’s operating and maintenance expenses (excluding
depreciation), debt service and coverage requirements, and any other obligations payable from
the revenues of the Airport.
Fiduciary Funds – The financial statements of the Fiduciary Funds include the Pension trust
funds and OPEB trust fund, and use the economic resource measurement focus and are
presented on the accrual basis of accounting. The Fiduciary Funds are maintained to account
for assets held by the Airport in a trustee capacity for active and retired employees.
Contributions are recognized in the period in which the contributions are due.
Benefits, refunds, claims and premiums are recognized when due and payable in accordance
with the terms of each plan. The Fiduciary Funds’ fiscal year end is December 31 of each year.
The amounts presented in these financial statements are as of and for the year ended
December 31, 2012.
25
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(c) Basis of Presentation
Adoption of GASB Statements
During the year ended September 30, 2013, DFW adopted GASB Statements: No. 60,
Accounting and Financial Reporting for Service Concession Arrangement; No. 61, The
Financial Reporting Entity; No. 62, Codification of Accounting and Financial Reporting
Guidance Contained in Pre-November 30, 1989 FASB and AICPA Pronouncements; No. 63,
Financial Reporting of Deferred Outflows of Resources, Deferred Inflows of Resources, and
Net Position; and No. 64, Derivative Instruments: Application of Hedge Accounting Termination
Provisions, an amendment of GASB No. 53.
GASB Statement No. 60 is intended to improve financial reporting by addressing issues related
to service concession agreements (SCAs), which are a type of public-private or public-public
partnership. As of September 30, 2013, DFW has no service concession agreements.
GASB Statement No. 61 is intended to improve the reporting for a governmental financial
reporting entity, modifying the existing requirements for the assessment of potential component
units in determining what should be included in the financial reporting entity, the display of
component units, and certain disclosure requirements. The adoption of GASB 61 did not have
an impact on DFW’s financial position, results of operation or cash flows. GASB 61 did result in
additional disclosures included in footnote 11.
GASB Statement No. 62 incorporates into GASB’s authoritative literature certain accounting
and financial reporting guidance that is included in following pronouncements issued on or
before November 30, 1989, which does not conflict with or contradict GASB pronouncements:
Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Statements and Interpretations; Accounting
Principles Board Opinions; Accounting Research Bulletins of the American Institute of Public
Accountants (AICPA) Committee on Accounting Procedure. The adoption of GASB 62 did not
have an impact on DFW’s financial position, results of operation or cash flows.
GASB Statement No. 63 improves financial reporting by standardizing the presentation of
deferred outflows of resources and deferred inflows of resources and their effects on a
government’s net position. As of September 30, 2013, DFW has no deferred inflows or outflows
of resources.
GASB Statement No. 64 improves financial reporting by clarifying the circumstances in which
hedge accounting should continue when a swap counterparty, or a swap counterparty’s credit
support provider, is replaced. As of September 30, 2013, DFW has no derivative instruments.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 65, “Items Previously Reported as Assets and Liabilities.”
This Statement specifies the items that were previously reported as assets and liabilities that
should now be reported as deferred outflows of resources, deferred inflows of resources,
outflows of resources, or inflows of resources. The requirements of this Statement are effective
for financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2012. DFW is evaluating the
effect that Statement 65 will have on its financial statements.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 66, “Technical Corrections – 2012; an amendment of
GASB Statements No. 10 and No. 62.” The requirements of this Statement are effective for
financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2012. DFW is evaluating the
effect that Statement 66 will have on its financial statements.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 67, “Financial Reporting for Pension Plans; an
amendment of GASB Statement No. 25.” This Statement replaces the requirements of
26
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Statements No. 25 and No. 50 related to pension plans that are administered through trusts or
equivalent arrangements. The requirements of Statements No. 25 and No. 50 remain
applicable to pension plans that are not administered through trust or equivalent arrangements.
The requirements of this Statement are effective for financial statements for fiscal years
beginning after June 15, 2013. DFW is evaluating the effect that Statement 67 will have on its
financial statements.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 68, “Accounting and Financial Reporting for Pensions; an
amendment of GASB Statement No. 27.” This Statement replaces the requirements of
Statements No. 27 and No. 50 related to financial statement disclosure of plan information for
pensions that are administered through trusts or equivalent arrangements. The requirements
of Statements No. 27 and No. 50 remain applicable for pensions that are not administered as
trusts or equivalent arrangements. The requirements of this Statement are effective for financial
statements for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2014. DFW is evaluating the effect that
Statement 68 will have on its financial statements.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 70, “Accounting and Financial Reporting for
Nonexchange Financial Guarantees.” Effective in 2014, this statement will enhance
comparability of financial statements among governments by requiring consistent reporting by
those governments that extend nonexchange financial guarantees and by those governments
that receive nonexchange financial guarantees. DFW is evaluating the effect that Statement 70
will have on its financial statements.
The GASB has issued Statement No. 71, “Pension Transition for Contributions Made
Subsequent to the Measurement Date.” Effective in 2015, this statement amends GASB
Statement 68 to require that, at transition, a beginning deferred outflow of resources is
recognized for its pension contributions made subsequent to its measurement date of the
beginning net pension liability. DFW is evaluating the effect that Statement 71 will have on its
financial statements.
Operating and Non-Operating Revenues
The Airport distinguishes between operating revenues and non-operating revenues based on
the nature of revenues and expenses. In general, revenues and related expenses resulting
from providing services such as landing, parking, hotel transactions, terminal rental, ground
rental and natural gas leases are considered operating. These revenues result from exchange
transactions in which each party receives and gives up essentially equal values. Revenues are
reported net of the Air Service Incentive Program (ASIP) cost of $9.8 million (Landing Fees
$3.8 million, Turn Fees $3.9 million and Federal Inspection Service $2.1 million.)
Non-operating revenues, such as interest income, passenger facilities charges and customer
facility charges, result from non-exchange transactions or ancillary activities. Non-operating
expenses primarily consist of the interest expense on joint revenue bonds. Grants are
recorded as capital contributions.
(d) Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Investments
Cash and cash equivalents
For purposes of the statements of cash flows, the Airport considers cash on hand, money
market funds, and investments with an original maturity of three months or less, when originally
purchased, to be cash equivalents, whether unrestricted or restricted. All bank balances are
moved to collateralized overnight sweep accounts.
27
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Investments
All investments held at fiscal year-end with maturities of more than one year from the date of
purchase are stated at fair value. Investments with a maturity of one year or less from the date
of purchase are reported at amortized cost.
The Airport may invest in obligations of the United States or its agencies, obligations of the
State of Texas or its agencies, and certificates of deposits; municipal obligations and
repurchase agreements having a rating not less than A; and certain bankers’ acceptances,
commercial paper, SEC regulated money market mutual funds, local government investment
pools, and guaranteed investment contracts.
Under the current investment policy, the fiduciary funds invest in money market funds,
domestic equities, international equities, private equity funds and fixed income instruments.
(e) Accounts Receivable
Receivables are reported at their gross value when earned. The Airport’s collection terms are
20 days. The allowance for uncollectible accounts is based on a weighted aging calculation.
As a customer’s balance is deemed uncollectible, the receivable is cleared and the amount is
written off. If the balance is subsequently collected, such payments are applied to the
allowance account.
The allowance for doubtful accounts was $0.6 million for fiscal year 2013. This allowance is
netted against the Accounts Receivable balance.
(f)
Materials and Supplies Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of average cost or market and consist primarily of
expendable parts and supplies held for consumption within the next year.
(g) Capital Assets
All capital assets are stated at historical cost or, if donated, at the fair value on the date
donated. The capitalization threshold for real property is $50,000 and $15,000 for personal
property with a useful life greater than one year.
Depreciation is calculated on the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives:
Buildings
Improvements other than buildings
Vehicles
Other machinery and equipment
10 - 50 years
10 - 50 years
2 - 20 years
3 - 30 years
Repairs and maintenance are charged to operations as incurred unless they have the effect of
improving or extending the life of the asset, in which case they are capitalized as part of the
cost of the asset.
Construction-in-progress is composed of costs attributable to construction of taxiways, roads,
terminal improvements, systems installation and conversion, and various other projects.
28
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(h) Capitalized Interest
Interest is capitalized on bonds outstanding, until the asset is placed in service, net of interest
earned on the unexpended bond proceeds. The total DFW capitalized interest was $21.3
million in FY 2013.
(i)
Grants and Federal Reimbursements
Grants and Federal reimbursements are recorded as revenue in the accounting period in which
eligibility requirements have been met on projects.
(j)
Passenger Facilities Charge (PFC)
The PFC program is authorized by federal legislation and allows an airport to impose a fee for
use of its facilities up to $4.50 on revenue enplaning passengers. PFC’s may only be used for
FAA approved projects. DFW collects PFC’s at the $4.50 level allowed by regulations. PFC’s
are collected by the air carriers when the ticket is purchased and remitted to the airport on a
monthly basis. As of September 30, 2013, the FAA has approved ten applications for the Airport
for a total collection authority of $5.7 billion through October 2038. The remaining collection
authority is $3.8 billion. DFW is currently collecting and expending PFC’s under PFC Application
10; applications 1 – 9 are closed.
(k) Deferred Compensation Plans
The Airport offers a deferred compensation plan, created in accordance with Internal Revenue
Code Section 457, to all Airport employees to allow them to defer a portion of their salaries up
to IRS limits until future years. The deferred compensation is not available to employees until
termination, retirement, death, or an unforeseeable emergency. Amounts are held in trust for
the benefit of the Airport’s employees and are not subject to claims of the Airport’s general
creditors. The Airport is not the trustee of the Deferred Compensation Plan.
The 457 Deferred Compensation Plan balances totaling $60.8 million for 2013 are not reported
in the assets or liabilities of the Airport in accordance with GASB Statement 32, Accounting and
Financial Reporting for Internal Revenue Code Section 457 Deferred Compensation Plans.
Beginning January 2010, DFW requires employees, excluding Public Safety Officers, hired
after January 1, 2010 to participate in a deferred compensation plan, created in accordance
with Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a), in which employees are required to defer 1% to
3% of their salaries, based on tenure. All new employees are also eligible to participate in the
457 Plan for employees hired after January 1, 2010. DFW will match up to 7% of employee
contributions to both the 401(a) and 457 plans.
The deferred compensation is not available to employees until termination, retirement, death, or
an unforeseeable emergency. Amounts are held in trust for the benefit of the Airport’s
employee and are not subject to claims of the Airport’s general creditors. The Airport is not the
trustee of the Plan.
The 401(a) Deferred Compensation Plan balances totaling $1.5 million for 2013 are not
reported in the assets or liabilities of the Airport in accordance with GASB Statement 32,
Accounting and Financial Reporting for Internal Revenue Code Section 457 Deferred
Compensation Plans.
29
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(l)
Retirement Plans
It is the policy of the Airport to fund the pension costs of its two retirement plans annually.
Pension costs are comprised of normal cost and amortization of unfunded actuarial accrued
liability and of unfunded prior service cost. The Airport currently carries a Net Pension Asset of
$53.4 million as of September 30, 2013, which is the cumulative difference between the annual
pension costs and contribution made to the two retirement pension plans.
DFW made contributions of $27.6 million in FY 2013. In prior years, DFW funded its pension
plans in excess of the actuarial requirements because it currently has an actuarial accrued
liability.
The Pension Plan is accounted for in accordance with GASB Statement 25, Financial Reporting
for Defined Benefit Pension Plans and Note Disclosures for Defined Contribution Plans, GASB
Statement 27, Accounting for Pensions by State and Local Governmental Employers and as
amended by GASB Statement 50, Pension Disclosures.
Investments are stated at fair value. Fair value of a financial instrument is the amount that
would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between
market participants at the measurement date. Purchases and sales of securities are recorded
on a trade-date basis. Interest income is recorded on the accrual basis. Dividends are recorded
on the ex-dividend date. Net appreciation includes the Plans’ gains and losses on investments
bought and sold as well as held during the year. Investments are valued at fair value based on
quoted market values when available. Purchases and sales of securities are recorded on a
trade-date basis.
(m) Other Post-Employment Benefits (OPEB) Plan
It is the policy of the Airport to fund the OPEB cost annually. OPEB costs are comprised of
normal cost and amortization of the unfunded actuarial accrued liability. The Airport currently
carries a Net OPEB Asset of $2.6 million as of September 30, 2013, which is the cumulative
difference between the annual OPEB costs and contribution made to the OPEB Plan. DFW
made a contribution of $2.9 million in FY 2013.
The OPEB plan is accounted for in accordance with GASB Statement 43, Financial Reporting
for Post-employment Benefit Plans Other than Pension Plans and GASB Statement 45,
Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Post-Employment Benefits Other than
Pensions. Claims and premiums are recognized when due and payable. Investments are
stated at fair value.
(n) Restricted Assets and Liabilities
Restricted assets consist of cash, investments, and other resources that are legally restricted
by third parties to certain uses. Capital funds are restricted to pay the costs of certain capital
projects as defined in various supplemental bond ordinances. PFC program funds are
restricted to pay the cost of FAA approved capital projects and any debt incurred to finance
those projects. Debt service funds are restricted to make payments for principal and interest as
required by the specific bond ordinances. Public safety funds obtained from seizures are
restricted to specified security or public safety uses. Concessionaires pay a fee to support joint
marketing programs.
Liabilities payable from restricted assets are the accounts payable, accrued interest, and
current portion of long-term debt associated with the purchase and construction of the capital
projects funded by the restricted assets.
30
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(o) Compensated Absences
DFW employees earn 12 days of sick leave per year with a maximum accrual of 130 days.
Unused sick leave for terminated employees is not paid and, therefore, not accrued.
DFW employees are granted Time Off with Pay (“TOP”) at rates of 15 to 30 days per year
depending on length of employment and position. Employees may accumulate up to a
maximum of two times their annual accrual rate. Upon termination, employees are paid for any
unused TOP. The accumulated TOP is recorded as a liability when earned and is reflected in
the accounts payable.
Estimated TOP usage due within one year is expected to remain at the same level. The
calculation of the liability is based on the pay or salary rates in effect as of the end of the fiscal
year (in thousands).
Balance as of September 30, 2012
TOP used during the year
TOP earned during the year
Balance as of September 30, 2013
$
$
8,433
(9,227)
9,119
8,325
(p) Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting
principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain
reported amounts and disclosures. Accordingly, actual results could differ from those
estimates.
(2)
DEPOSITS AND INVESTMENTS
(a)
Deposits - DFW
As of September 30, 2013, DFW’s cash balance (including amounts under restricted assets –
see Note 8) represents $682.6 million of cash and cash equivalents. The bank balances for the
cash and cash equivalents accounts were approximately $690.5 million on September 30,
2013. The balance of cash and cash equivalents is kept in money market accounts, high yield
savings accounts, or in deposit accounts swept nightly. The money market accounts are
collateralized by the assets of the funds. The sweep accounts, deposits and high yield savings
are collateralized by pledged securities.
Description
Cash
Cash: interest - bearing accounts
Money market funds
Total cash and cash equivalents
$
$
2013
4,639
272,990
405,000
682,629
Money Market Funds are regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under
the Investment Company Act of 1940. These funds are pooled monies from investors to
purchase short-term investments, such as Treasury bills, certificates of deposit, and short-term
31
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
bonds (known as commercial paper) issued by large corporations, that meet certain standards
set forth by the SEC for credit quality, liquidity, and diversification.
DFW investments in money market funds are reflected in the financial statements as cash
equivalents for FY 2013 as follows (in thousands):
The risk rating for money market funds is AAAm by Standard and Poor’s, Aaa by Moody’s and
AAAmmf by Fitch.
(b)
Investments – DFW
As of September 30, 2013 the fair market values and associated credit ratings from Standard
and Poor’s (S&P) of the DFW’s investments are as follows (in thousands):
2013
Maturities (in years)
Investment
U.S. Agencies and Instrumentalities:
Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corp
Federal Farm Credit Banks
Federal Home Loan Bank
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp
Federal National Mortgage Corp
Commercial Paper:
Board of Governors Univ of NC Total
Boston Water & Sewer
Chicago Ill Midway
Coca Cola Co.
ING Funding LLC (US)
Lower Colorado River Authority
Maryland Health & Higher Education
San Francisco Public Utilities
Trinity Health Corporation
University of California
Univ of TX System Permanent Fund
University of Utah
Vanderbilt University
Wells Fargo & Company
Municipals (Bonds, Obligations):
Connecticut Housing Finance Authority
Dayton OH Metro Library
Louisianna State
Montgomery County TN
New Jersey State Econ Dev Auth
Seatte WA Municipal Light & Power
Total investments
Fair Value
$
226,065
567,562
246,471
366,004
90,852
< 1 year
$
161,153
435,578
226,508
30,016
-
1 - 5 years S&P Rating
$
64,912
131,984
19,963
335,988
90,852
AA+
AA+
AA+
AA+
AA+
8,499
24,996
57,679
180,382
54,996
30,900
13,084
16,899
19,995
25,000
40,000
25,000
31,250
49,971
8,499
24,996
57,679
180,382
54,996
30,900
13,084
16,899
19,995
25,000
40,000
25,000
31,250
49,971
-
A-1+
A-1
A-1
A-1+
A-1
A-1
A-1+
A-1+
A-1+
A-1+
A-1+
A-1+
A-1+
A-1
1,000
7,348
21,518
4,313
17,055
4,195
$ 2,131,034
7,348
11,620
6,453
4,195
$ 1,461,522
1,000
9,898
4,313
10,602
$ 669,512
AAA
AA
AA
AA+
A+
AA
The book value of investments presented above is $2,132,217.
32
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(c)
Interest Rate Risk – DFW
Investment portfolios are designed with the objectives of preserving capital while attaining the
best possible rate of return commensurate with DFW’s investment risk constraints and the cash
flow characteristics of each portfolio.
Return on investments, although important, is
subordinate to the safety and liquidity objectives.
In accordance with DFW’s investment policy, two strategies are employed when market
conditions vary. In markets where time risk is rewarded, investments are for longer terms. In
markets where time risk is not rewarded, investments are for shorter terms and allow for
flexibility to reinvest funds when markets improve.
DFW has identified various purposes for the use of investments and has established maximum
maturities for each of these purposes.
The following table summarizes by purpose the maximum investment maturities.
Purpose
Maturity
Hotel Opr & FFE
1 year
Interest and Sinking
1 year
Operating
1 year
Passenger Facility Charges
1 year
RAC Funds-CTC
1 year
RAC Funds-CFC
2 years
Bond Funds
3 years
DFW Capital
3 years
Hotel Capital
3 years
Joint Capital
5 years
Debt Service Reserve
75%-5 yrs & 25% 10 yrs
Operating Reserve
75%-5 yrs & 25% 10 yrs
Rolling Coverage
75%-5 yrs & 25% 10 yrs
The following table summarizes the DFW total investments as a percentage of maturities.
2013
Maturity
Less than one year
% of Investment
69%
One to five years
31%
33
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(d)
Credit Risk - DFW
Credit Risk is the risk that an issuer or other counterparty to an investment will not fulfill its
obligations. DFW’s investment policy provides for the following types of investments with
ratings for each investment type.
Investment Type
Minimum Ratings
U.S. Treasury Notes and Bills
N/A
U.S. Agencies and Instrumentalities
N/A
Texas Agencies and Instrumentalities
N/A
Certificates of Deposit
N/A
Banker’s Acceptances
Short-Term A1/P1
A or equivalent by one nationally recognized
ratings agency
A or equivalent by one nationally recognized
ratings agency
A or equivalent by one nationally recognized
ratings agency
AAA by one recognized ratings agency
AAA or AAAm by one recognized ratings
agency
A1/P1 by two recognized ratings agencies
Municipals (Bonds, Obligations)
Repurchase Agreements
Guaranteed Investment Contract
Money Market Mutual Funds
Money Market Funds & Local Government Pools
Commercial Paper
(e)
Concentration of Credit Risk – DFW
DFW limits the amounts that can be invested in any individual investment unless the
investment is fully collateralized or guaranteed by the federal government. As of September
30, 2013, DFW was in compliance with its investment policy. DFW’s top four investments
account for 66.0% of the total fair market value as of September 30, 2013: Federal Farm Credit
Banks (26.6%), Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (17.2%), Federal Home Loan Bank
(11.6%), and Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (10.6%).
(f)
Custodial Risk – DFW
For deposits, custodial risk is the risk that in the event of financial institution failure, DFW would
not be able to recover its deposit. DFW’s deposits are either federally insured and/or
collateralized. For investments, custodial risk is the risk that in the event of a failure of the
outside party (holder of the investment), DFW would not be able to recover the value of the
investment or collateral securities. DFW’s investments are held in DFW’s name.
(g)
Investments – DFW’s Fiduciary Pension Plans
DFW has contracted with JP Morgan Chase Bank (“Trustee”) for custody and safekeeping of
investments, accounting for transactions based on the instructions of investment managers,
and payment of benefits to participants, subject to the policies and guidelines established by
DFW. The funds of the Pension Plans are invested in accordance with Texas Public
Investment Code.
34
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
The Retirement Plans’ assets are carried at fair value and as of December 31, 2012 include
investments of (in thousands):
Investment
Common stocks
U.S. Treasury and agency securities
Money market funds and notes
Mutual funds
Corporate bonds
ADR/Foreign stocks
MLP/ Exchange traded notes
Asset backed bonds
Limited Partnership
Commingled funds
Total Investments
(h)
2012
$ 136,712
51,834
43,838
29,320
39,806
16,331
15,509
6,549
57,984
46,534
$ 444,417
Interest Rate Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary Pension Plans
Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in interest rates will adversely affect the fair value of an
investment. Generally, the longer the maturity of an investment, the greater sensitivity of its fair
value to changes in market interest rates. The investment strategy of the Plans is to emphasize
total return in the form of aggregate return from capital appreciation, dividend, and interest
income. The primary objectives over a five year period for the plan assets are to maintain the
purchasing power of the current assets and all future contributions by producing positive real
rates of return on the plan assets, meet or exceed the actuarially assumed rate of return, and
provide an acceptable level of volatility in both the long and short-term periods. As of
December 31, 2012, the maturity values are as follows (in thousands):
Investment
U.S. government securities
Mortgage backed securities
CMO/REMIC
Total governmental
Corporate bonds
Asset backed bonds
Commercial mortgage backed bonds
MLP/Exchange traded notes
Total non-governmental
2012 Maturity (in years)
6-10
11-15
16+
0-5
$
9,366
-
$ 11,151
296
-
-
9,366
$ 11,447
$ 26,794
3,387
$ 30,181
$
35
$
7,512
663
$
Total
3,290
13,534
$ 31,319
14,493
-
122
122
$
8,175
$ 17,068
$ 45,934
$ 10,565
-
$
129
15,509
$
2,447
3,033
-
$ 39,806
3,516
3,033
15,509
$ 10,565
$ 15,638
$
5,480
$ 61,864
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(i)
Credit Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary Pension Plans
Credit Risk is the risk that an issuer or other counterparty to an investment will not fulfill its
obligations. This risk is measured by the assignment of rating by nationally recognized rating
agencies such as S&P and Moody’s. The following tables show the rating of the Plan’s
investments as of December 31, 2012.
Rating
AAA/
AA/
A+/
BBB+/
BBB-/
Not
AA+
AA-
A/A-
BBB
BB+
Rated
Total
U.S. government securities
$ 29,002
$ 289
-
$ 1,871
$ 31,319
Mortgage backed securities
-
-
-
-
-
14,493
14,493
CMO/REMIC
-
-
-
-
-
122
122
$ 29,002
$ 289
$
-
$ 16,486
$ 45,934
$
354
$ 3,305
$ 14,778
$ 16,520
$ 4,761
$
88
$ 39,806
Asset backed bonds
3,516
-
-
-
-
-
3,516
Commercial mortgage backed bonds
3,033
-
-
-
-
-
3,033
-
-
-
-
-
15,509
15,509
$ 6,903
$ 3,305
$ 14,778
$ 16,520
$ 4,761
$ 15,597
$ 61,864
Long Term Bond Investm ents
Total governm ental
Corporate bonds
MLP/Exchange traded notes
Total non-governm ental
(j)
$
157
157
$
$
-
-
$
$
Concentration of Credit Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary Pension Plans
Concentration of credit risk is the risk of loss attributed to the magnitude of the Plan’s
investments in a single user. DFW has approved the following guidelines of assets allocation
for the Plans:
Asset Class
Minimum
Maximum
Target
Domestic equity
30.0%
50.0%
35.0%
International global equity
10.0%
30.0%
20.0%
Domestic fixed income
10.0%
30.0%
15.0%
Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS)
0.0%
10.0%
5.0%
Non-core bonds
0.0%
15.0%
10.0%
Real estate
0.0%
10.0%
5.0%
Private equity
0.0%
10.0%
5.0%
Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs)
0.0%
10.0%
5.0%
Cash
0.0%
10.0%
0.0%
There were no investments exceeding the category parameters of the investment guidelines at
December 31, 2012.
36
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(k)
Custodial Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary Pension Plans
All investments are held in DFW’s Retirement Plans name.
(l)
Investments – DFW’s Fiduciary OPEB Plan
DFW has contracted with JP Morgan Chase Bank (“Trustee”) for custody and safekeeping of
investments, accounting for transactions based on the instructions of investment managers,
and payment of benefits to participants, subject to the policies and guidelines established by
DFW. The OPEB Trust Fund is invested in accordance with Texas Public Investment Code.
The OPEB Plan assets are carried at fair value as of December 31, 2012 and include the
following investments (in thousands):
Description
2012
Money market funds
Mutual funds
1,750
14,648
Total Investments
(m)
$
16,398
Interest Rate Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary OPEB Plan
Interest rate risk is the risk that changes in interest rates will adversely affect the fair value of an
investment. Generally, the longer the maturity of an investment, the greater sensitivity of its fair
value to changes in market interest rates. The investment strategy of the Plans is to emphasize
total return in the form of aggregate return from capital appreciation, dividend, and interest
income. The primary objectives over a five year period for the plan assets are to maintain the
purchasing power of the current assets and all future contributions by producing positive real
rates of return on the plan assets, meet or exceed the actuarially assumed rate of return, and
provide an acceptable level of volatility in both the long and short-term periods. As of December
31, 2012, DFW had no investments that are exposed to interest rate risk.
(n)
Credit Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary OPEB Plan
Credit Risk is the risk that an issuer or other counterparty to an investment will not fulfill its
obligations. This risk is measured by the assignment of rating by nationally recognized rating
agencies such as S&P and Moody’s. As of December 31, 2012, DFW had no investments that
are exposed to credit risk.
37
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(o)
Concentration of Credit Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary OPEB Plan
Concentration of credit risk is the risk of loss attributed to the magnitude of the Plan’s
investments in a single user. DFW has approved the following guidelines of assets allocation
for the Plans:
Asset Class
Minimum
Maximum
Target
Indexed equity mutual fund
40.0%
60.0%
50.0%
Intermediate bond fund
40.0%
60.0%
50.0%
DFW has determined that currently all securities purchased for the plan have readily
ascertainable market values and shall be easily marketable. In calendar year 2012, the total
contributed amount of $1.7 million was invested into a short term investment fund and the
remainder amount of $14.6 million was invested into Vanguard Total Bond (43%) and
Vanguard Institutional Index (57%) funds through the Trustee. There were no individual
investments exceeding the parameters of the investment guidelines at December 31, 2012.
(p)
Custodial Risk – DFW’s Fiduciary OPEB Plan
All investments are held in DFW’s OPEB Plan name.
(3)
RELATED-PARTY TRANSACTIONS
DFW makes certain payments routinely to the Cities. Payments to Fort Worth, primarily for legal
services, bond fees, water purchases, task force costs, and facilities rentals, for the year ended
September 30, 2013 were approximately $1.5 million. Payments to Dallas, primarily for legal
services, water purchases, task force costs, and bond fees, for the year ended September 30, 2013
were approximately $1.5 million.
“Remainder of the page intentionally left blank”
38
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(4)
CAPITAL ASSETS
Changes in capital assets for the year ended September 30, 2013 were as follows (in thousands):
2013
Description
Balance
September 30,
2012
Adjustments
Balance
and Completed
Less
September 30,
Projects
Retirements
2013
Additions
Capi tal assets no t being de preciated
Land
$
Construction in progress
T otal capital assets not depreciated
295,987
$
-
$
1
$
(288) $
-
295,700
513,980
534,260
(438,084)
610,156
809,967
534,260
(438,083)
2,303,376
11,602
217,887
2,409,531
13,784
118,083
(15,505)
2 ,525,893
986,457
2,027
52,663
(17,349)
1 ,023,798
(288)
905,856
(26,482)
2 ,506,383
Depreciabl e capital assets
Bui ldings improvements
$
Improvements other than buil dings
Machinery and equipment
Vehi cl es
T otal depreciable capita l assets
163,004
611
21,459
(10,121)
174,953
5,862,368
28,024
410,092
(69,457)
6 ,231,027
861,200
63,292
-
(22,689)
901,803
1,027,511
89,563
-
(15,487)
1 ,101,587
470,733
69,162
-
(16,329)
523,566
75,762
15,751
-
(9,464)
82,049
2,435,206
237,768
-
(63,969)
2 ,609,005
Accumul ated depreci ation
Bui ldings improvements
$
Improvements other than buil dings
Machinery and equipment
Vehi cl es
T otal accumul ated depreci atio n
T otal , net capital assets
$
4,237,129
$
324,516
$
(27,991) $
(5,776) $
4 ,527,878
During the fiscal year, the Airport recorded additional depreciation expense resulting from changes
to remaining useful lives of assets or acceleration of depreciation for assets being replaced or
renovated as follows:
1) The Airport approved the demolition and construction of Terminal A Garage which resulted
in a change in the remaining useful life and the recording of an additional depreciation
expense of $1.8 million.
2) The Airport changed the scope of the baggage system replacement project which resulted in
a change in the remaining useful life and an additional depreciation expense of $12.6 million.
3) The ongoing Terminal Replacement and Improvement Program (TRIP) resulted in the
recording of additional depreciation for the Terminal buildings of $16.5 million.
39
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(5)
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES
A detail of accounts payable and other current liabilities for the year ended September 30, 2013 are
as follows (in thousands):
Accrued expenses
Unearned revenue
Signatory airline refunds
Time off with pay
$
Accounts payable
Payroll and employee benefits
Other deposits
Insurance
Total
$
2013
36,699
14,090
8,648
8,325
7,189
6,961
4,376
4,132
90,420
“Remainder of the page intentionally left blank”
40
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(6)
DEBT
A summary of bond indebtedness changes during the year ended September 30, 2013 follows (in
thousands):
Original
Issue
Amount
Series: Maturity (Due) : Interest Rate
Beginning
Balance
Additions
Ending
Balance
Reduction
Amounts
Due within
One Year
Gross DFW Debt Payable
Airport - Joint Revenue Bonds - (JRB)
2001A: 11/02 - 11/35 : 5.500% - 5.875%
2002A: 11/03 - 11/35 : 5.000% - 5.500%
2003A: 11/13 - 11/35 : 5.000% - 6.000%
2004B: 11/06 - 11/35 : 3.000% - 5.750%
2007: 11/08 - 11/23 : 4.500% - 5.000%
2009A: 11/10 - 11/24 : 3.000% - 5.000%
2010A: 11/11 - 11/45 : 5.000% - 5.250%
2011A: 11/11 - 11/21 : 0.350% - 4.442%
2011C: 11/11 - 11/35 : 1.000% - 5.000%
2011D: 11/12 - 11/24 : 2.000% - 5.000%
2011E: 11/12 - 11/18 : 0.900% - 3.120%
2012A: 11/12 - 11/14 : 4.000% - 4.000%
2012B: 11/12 - 11/35 : 5.000% - 5.000%
2012C: 11/12 - 11/45 : 3.250% - 5.250%
2012D: 11/12 - 11/42 : 5.000% - 5.000%
2012E: 11/13 - 11/35 : 1.000% - 5.000%
2012F: 11/13 - 11/35 : 3.000% - 5.000%
2012G: 11/13 - 11/35 : 2.000% - 5.000%
2012H: 11/25 - 11/45 : 4.156% - 5.000%
2013A: 11/26 - 11/45 : 5.000% - 5.000%
2013B: 11/26 - 11/50 : 4.000% - 5.000%
2013C: 11/34 - 11/45 : 4.750% - 5.000%
2013D: 11/14 - 11/33 : 2.000% - 5.250%
2013E: 11/14 - 11/33 : 4.000% - 5.500%
2013F: 11/14 - 11/33 : 3.000% - 5.250%
$
650,000
375,000
1,457,700
207,000
102,455
281,005
304,395
111,355
151,840
221,750
1,700
260,735
1,170,310
144,840
98,220
241,065
304,395
107,795
149,100
221,750
106,240
1,000
433,770
274,925
475,000
300,495
270,535
-
$
294,080
480,000
372,240
450,000
242,000
416,315
225,310
251,960
$
(1,700)
(260,735)
(949,455)
(51,685)
(1,190)
(25,895)
(1,820)
(5,485)
(18,035)
(13,835)
-
$
220,855
93,155
97,030
215,170
304,395
107,795
147,280
216,265
88,205
1,000
419,935
274,925
475,000
300,495
270,535
294,080
480,000
372,240
450,000
242,000
416,315
225,310
251,960
$
13,245
1,485
2,665
28,890
10,815
1,075
11,565
12,295
675
3,185
3,035
2,985
-
4,561,875
2,731,905
(1,329,835)
5,963,945
Plus/Less: Unamortized discount/premium, net
193,543
210,470
(21,318)
382,695
-
Less: Deferred loss on refunding
(50,302)
(40,783)
3,099
(87,986)
-
Total Gross DFW Debt Payable
DFW Net Debt Payable
3,862,500
$
$ 4,705,116
$ 2,901,592
$ (1,348,054)
$ 6,258,654
91,915
$
91,915
The Airport frequently issues bonds for capital construction projects. These bonds are subject to
the arbitrage regulations. As of September 30, 2013, there was no liability for rebate of arbitrage.
41
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(a)
Joint Revenue Bonds
DFW was created by a Contract and Agreement between the Cities of Dallas and Fort Worth
(the Cities), dated April 15, 1968, for the purpose of developing and operating an airport as a
joint venture between the Cities. In addition, DFW is governed by two other key documents.
The 1968 Concurrent Bond Ordinance and the 30th Supplemental Bond Ordinance were
amended and restated by the Master Bond Ordinance, and approved by the Cities of Fort
Worth and Dallas on September 21, 2010 and September 22, 2010, respectively. The Master
Bond Ordinance became effective on July 5, 2013 after the required approval of bondholders
was obtained.
Bonds are issued under provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance,
Supplemental Bond Ordinances, as approved by the Cities of Fort Worth and Dallas, and
Applicable Laws, including Chapter 22 of the Texas Transportation Code, Chapter 1371 of the
Texas Government Code, as amended. Management believes DFW is in compliance with all
bond covenants. The Lease and Use Agreements (Use Agreement) define DFW’s rate setting
methodology and business relationships with the airlines. DFW’s current ten-year Use
Agreement with the signatory airlines became effective October 1, 2010. Collectively, the
abovementioned documents are referred to as the “Controlling Documents.”
Revenues derived from the ownership and operations of the Airport are pledged to meet debt
service requirements of the bonds issued pursuant to the Controlling Ordinances. The
Controlling Documents require DFW to annually adopt a Schedule of Charges that is: (1)
reasonably estimated to produce Gross Revenues in an amount at least sufficient to pay
Operation and Maintenance Expenses plus 1.25 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service and
(2) reasonably estimated to at least produce Current Gross Revenues in an amount at least
sufficient to pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses plus 1.00 times Accrued Aggregate
Debt Service.
Annual transfers from the Capital Improvement Funds are considered part of Gross Revenues,
but not Current Gross Revenues. At the end of each fiscal year, any excess funds in the 102
Operating fund are transferred to the Capital Improvement Fund. Funds transferred to the
Capital Improvement Fund are allocated among three accounts, as provided in the 2010 Use
Agreement. The Joint Capital Account generally requires approval from both DFW and the
airlines prior to any expenditure of funds. The DFW Capital Account may be used at the
discretion of the Airport.
Rolling Coverage is funded by excess revenues from the Rolling Coverage sub-cost center,
which unless used during the fiscal year is equal to the amount transferred at the beginning of
the fiscal year, plus any incremental coverage collected during the fiscal year to ensure that
rolling coverage is equal to 1.25 times Accrued Aggregate Debt Service.
Effective July 1, 2011, PFC Application 11-10-C-00-DFW authorized the collection and use of
$4.2 billion for the purpose of paying debt service on 14 approved PFC projects. PFC
collections are approved at the $4.50 level. PFC’s remitted to the Airport by the airlines are
deposited into a separate fund, and to the extent available, transferred monthly to the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund in an amount sufficient to pay eligible debt service on
the 14 approved projects. These transferred funds are considered Gross Revenues of the
Airport for the purpose of meeting its rate covenants. However, PFC’s may only be used for
the purpose of paying eligible debt service on approved PFC projects.
All outstanding DFW bonds are senior lien parity bonds. As such they are supported by a
pledge of Gross Revenues, which includes PFC’s although those PFC’s may be used only for
eligible debt service on PFC approved projects. Failure to collect PFC revenues in an amount
sufficient to pay eligible debt service on PFC approved projects may lead to increases in other
42
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
costs at DFW, which would be paid to the Airport in the form of higher landing fees and terminal
rents.
In addition, PFC revenue is pledged to pay debt service to the extent that debt service is
eligible and funds are available. Total principal and interest remaining to be paid on the bonds
is $11.5 billion, with annual requirements over the next five years ranging from $363.2 million to
$389.3 million. Revenue bond principal is due annually on November 1st, while interest is due
semiannually on November 1st and May 1st.
(b)
Facility Improvement Corporation Revenue Bonds – conduit financing
The Facility Improvement Corporation (“FIC”) is a duly incorporated nonprofit public
instrumentality of the State of Texas, created by the Airport’s owner cities, pursuant to Chapter
22 of the Texas Transportation Code for the purpose of providing tax exempt conduit financing
for airlines and other qualified tenants within the boundaries of the Airport. Bonds are issued by
the FIC on behalf of the beneficial party, and pursuant to a facility agreement are payable solely
by the beneficial party. Neither DFW nor the FIC has any obligation for the repayment of these
bonds. As of September 30, 2013, the outstanding balance of conduit bonds was $794.4
million.
(c)
Fiscal Year 2013 Debt Issuance
In October 2012, the Airport issued $294.1 million of fixed rate joint revenue refunding bonds
(Series 2012G) for the purpose of refunding the Series 2002A bonds and partially refunding the
Series 2004B bonds. The refunding resulted in future debt service (actual) savings of $24.3
million and net present value economic gain of $38.1 million. In December, 2012 the Airport
issued $480.0 million of fixed rate joint revenue improvement bonds (Series 2012H). These
bonds were issued primarily to fund the Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program (TRIP).
In May 2013, DFW issued $372.2 million of fixed rate joint revenue improvement bonds (Series
2013A) for the purpose of primarily funding TRIP. In June 2013, DFW issued $450.0 million of
fixed rate joint revenue improvement bonds (Series 2013B) for the purpose of primarily funding
non-TRIP projects. In July 2013, DFW issued $242.0 million of fixed rate joint revenue
improvement bonds (Series 2013C) for the purpose of primarily funding TRIP and additional
capitalized interest requirements.
In August 2013, DFW issued $416.3 million of fixed rate joint revenue refunding bonds (Series
2013D) for the purpose of partially refunding outstanding Series 2003A bonds. The refunding
resulted in future debt service (actual) savings of $23.9 million and net present value economic
gain of $22.0 million. Also, in August 2013, DFW issued $225.3 million of fixed rate joint
revenue refunding bonds (Series 2013E) for the purpose of partially refunding outstanding
Series 2003A bonds. The refunding resulted in future debt service (actual) savings of $52.8
million and net present value economic gain of $26.1 million.
In September 2013, DFW issued $252.0 million of fixed rate joint revenue refunding bonds
(Series 2013F) for the purpose of partially refunding outstanding Series 2003A bonds. The
refunding resulted in future debt service (actual) savings of $36.0 million and net present value
economic gain of $19.6 million.
The FY 2013 refunding activities resulted in a refunding loss which is the difference between
the reacquisition price of the new bonds and the net carrying value of the old debt. The
deferred loss of $41.1 million is reported in the accompanying basic financial statements as a
reduction of bonds payable.
43
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(d)
Debt Service Requirement
Annual debt service requirements to maturity for bonds are as follows (in thousands):
Year ending
September 30
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019 - 2023
2024 - 2028
2029 - 2033
2034 - 2038
2039 - 2043
2044 - 2048
2049 - 2050
Joint Revenue Bonds (JRB)
Principal
Interest
Total
$
91,915 $
271,240 $
363,155
77,980
286,722
364,702
91,010
283,479
374,489
102,310
279,499
381,809
114,520
274,757
389,277
690,860
1,281,642
1,972,502
838,075
1,090,899
1,928,974
1,075,135
854,164
1,929,299
1,145,805
555,402
1,701,207
1,000,525
310,188
1,310,713
720,810
57,222
778,032
15,000
928
15,928
$ 5,963,945 $
5,546,141 $ 11,510,086
As of September 30, 2013, the Airport held approximately $472.1 million in reserve funds,
interest and sinking funds for use in payment of the above debt service requirements. Certain
amounts of the joint revenue bonds may be redeemed at a premium at various dates at the
option of the Cities.
The Airport has legally defeased certain bonds by placing the proceeds of the new bonds in an
irrevocable trust to provide for all future debt service payments on the old bonds. Accordingly,
the trust account assets and the liability for these defeased bonds are not included in the
Airport’s basic financial statements. The total amount of defeased bonds that remain
outstanding at September 30, 2013 is $974.4 million.
(7)
NET INVESTMENT IN CAPITAL ASSETS
Net investment in capital assets are comprised of the following amounts at September 30 (in
thousands):
2013
Net investment in capital assets:
Capital assets
Less: long-term debt payable, portion used for
capital activities, and capital related payables
Total net investment in capital assets
44
$ 4,527,878
(4,298,040)
$ 229,838
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(8)
RESTRICTED NET POSITION
The following table details assets and liabilities payable from restricted assets and the calculation of
restricted net position reported in the financial statements (in thousands):
Description
Assets:
Current
Cash and cash equivalents
Investments
Public
Safety and
Other
$
Debt Service
Total
73,815 $
-
122,717 $
72,629
-
97
3,372
73,815
195,346
-
272,630
Non-current
Cash and cash equivalents
Investments
Deferred Financing Charges
Accounts receivable and other
Total noncurrent assets
2,696
192
2,888
6,071
5,343
11,414
319,526
1,237,319
14
1,556,859
279,239
50,762
330,001
1,858
9,014
17,716
28,588
330,151
1,525,572
50,762
23,265
1,929,750
Total current and noncurrent assets
2,985
14,786
1,630,674
525,347
28,588
2,202,380
97
97
3,372
3,372
73,815
73,815
2,412
101,019
91,915
195,346
-
79,696
101,019
91,915
272,630
-
19
19
18,161
18,161
-
-
18,180
18,180
97
3,391
91,976
195,346
-
290,810
2,888
11,395
1,538,698
330,001
28,588
1,911,570
-
-
(1,612,513)
(330,001)
-
-
-
73,815
Payable from restricted assets:
Current
Accounts payable
Accrued interest on revenue bonds
Long-term liabilities due w ithin one year
Total current payable from
restricted assets
Non-current
Unearned revenue, other long-term
Total noncurrent payable from
restricted assets
Total current and noncurrent liabilities
Restricted assets less liabilities
Reclass to investm ent in
capital assets
Less: Long term debt associated w ith
reserves and financing charges
Add: Accounts payable capital projects
and retainage
Net Position, restricted
$
2,888
$
Capital
3,372 $
-
Total currrent assets
97
-
PFIC
Passenger
Facility
Charges
$
11,395
45
$
-
$
-
$
(1,942,514)
$
28,588
200,001
72,629
73,815
$
42,871
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(9)
RETIREMENT PLANS
(a) Plan Descriptions
DFW has two fiduciary defined-benefit pension plans covering substantially all DFW
employees: the employees of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Retirement Plans and the
Department of Public Safety (DPS) Retirement Plans (Retirement Plans, collectively) that were
established by Board resolution. Both plans are single-employer public employee retirement
system plans in which the assets are held in an investment trust. Employees vest after five
years of service and are eligible for early retirement at ages 55-61 and full retirement benefits
at age 62 and after. Pension benefits increase by a cost of living adjustment each January 1.
The fiscal year-end for the Retirement Plans is December 31. Copies of the Retirement Plans’
annual report may be obtained by writing to the Finance Department, DFW Airport, Post Office
Drawer 619428, DFW Airport, Texas 75261-9428.
Employee Plan - All regular employees, other than DPS officers, are covered by the Employee
Plan. Benefits vest after five years of service. DFW employees who retire are entitled to an
annual retirement benefit, payable monthly for life in an amount equal to a percentage of final
average monthly compensation times credited service plus an annual cost of living adjustment
(as defined by the Employee Plan). Employees can also elect a limited lump-sum distribution.
The Employee Plan also provides early retirement, death, and disability benefits. As of January
1, 2010, the Employee Plan was closed to new employees.
DPS Plan - The DPS Plan was established effective October 1, 1999, when the assets and
liabilities accrued by public safety officers eligible for the DPS Plan prior to October 1, 1999
were transferred from the Employee Plan to the DPS Plan in compliance with the requirements
of IRS Code Section 414(1). The public safety officers who retired or terminated employment
prior to October 1, 1999, were not eligible for the DPS Plan and will continue to receive their
benefits, if any, from the Employee Plan.
The DPS Plan permits early retirement at ages 55 to 61, or upon satisfaction of the “Rule of 80”
or the “25 and out” rule. The “Rule of 80” is the attainment of age 50 and the completion of the
number of years of benefit service that when added to the participant’s age equals the sum of
80. The “25 and out” rule is the attainment of twenty-five (25) years of benefit service in a DPS
covered position. DPS covered employees receive pension benefits in the form of a qualified
joint and survivor annuity; however, an employee may request optional forms of pension benefit
payments upon written request to the Plan Administrator. Other forms of payment of
accumulated plan benefits include lump-sum distribution upon retirement or termination or
equal monthly payments for life.
(b)
Funding Policies
DFW determines each Retirement Plans’ funding policy. In general, DFW contributes an
amount approximately equal to the actuarially determined pension cost for the year. In some
years, however, DFW funds additional contributions to help retire the unfunded liability sooner.
The significant actuarial assumptions used to compute the actuarially determined contribution
requirement are the same as those used to compute the actuarial accrued liability.
Both pension plans provide that employees with five or more years of service are entitled to
annual pension benefits, beginning at normal retirement age of 62, equal to a certain
percentage of their final average monthly compensation for each year of credited service, less
a certain percentage of anticipated primary insurance benefits. The final average monthly
46
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
compensation is determined by utilizing the average monthly rate of compensation of the last
36 completed months immediately prior to the date of service determination.
Employer contributions are generally made annually and recognized as additions in the period
in which employee services are performed. Employee contributions are required for the DPS
Plan, but not permitted for the Employee Plan.
The actuarially determined contribution requirements for the DFW’s fiscal years are computed
through an actuarial valuation performed as of January 1 each year. The annual actuarial
valuation is performed to determine the adequacy of current contribution rates, to describe the
current financial condition of the Plans and to analyze changes in the Plans' condition.
Significant actuarial assumptions for valuations performed January 1, 2013, are as follows:
Significant Actuarial
Assumptions
Employee Plan
DPS Plan
Actuarial cost method
Entry Age Normal
Entry Age Normal
Amortization method
Level dollar, closed
Level percent, closed
Remaining Amortization period
22 years
22 years
Actuarially assumed investment
rate of return
7.25% per annum
compounded annually
7.25% per annum
compounded annually
a. Non-Disabled
Retirement Plans 2000
Healthy Mortality Table
Retirement Plans 2000
Healthy Mortality Table
b. Disabled
Retirement Plans 2000
Disability Mortality Table
Retirement Plans 2000
Disability Mortality Table
Mortality rates for males and
females
Retirement, disablement and
separation rate
Graduated rates based on age Graduated rates based on age
(detailed in actuary's report)
(detailed in actuary's report)
Cost of living adjustment
3.0% per annum
Variable Rate (3.75% to
6.25%) of increase based on
years of services which
includes inflation rate (3%)
3.0% per annum
Variable Rate (3.75% to
11.50%) of increase based on
years of services which
includes inflation rate (3%)
Method used for determining
actuarial value of assets
5-year Moving Average
5-year Moving Average
Payroll growth rate
Employee Contribution Rate
not applicable
not applicable
3.75% per annum
7% of compensation
Projected salary increase
47
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
DFW’s annual pension costs, contributions, percent contributed, and net pension asset is as
follows (in thousands):
Employee Plan
DFW Year ended
September 30, 2013
September 30, 2012
September 30, 2011
Annual
Pension
Cost
$ 22,133
21,181
19,729
DFW Year ended
September 30, 2013
September 30, 2012
September 30, 2011
Annual
Pension
Cost
$ 6,116
5,661
4,577
Airport
Contribution
$21,424
20,820
19,201
Percentage
Contributed
97%
98%
97%
Net
Pension
Asset
$ 38,434
39,143
39,503
DPS Plan
Airport
Contribution
$ 6,219
5,899
4,787
Percentage
Contributed
102%
104%
105%
Net
Pension
Asset
$ 14,950
14,847
14,610
As of January 1, 2013, the most recent actuarial valuation date, the funding status of the plans
is as follows (in thousands):
Employee
Actuarial accrued liabilities
Actuarial value of assets
(Unfunded) actuarial accrued liability
$
Funded ratio
Annual covered payroll
(Unfunded) actuarial accrued liability
as a percentage of covered payroll
2013
DPS
Total
450,882
323,794
$ (127,088)
$165,805
111,366
$ (54,439)
$ 616,687
435,160
$ (181,527)
71.8%
65,638
67.2%
$ 24,583
70.6%
$ 90,221
(193.6%)
(221.4%)
(201.2%)
$
The schedule of funding progress, presented as Required Supplementary Information (RSI)
following the notes to the financial statements, presents multi-year trend information about
whether the actuarial values of plan assets are increasing or decreasing over time relative to
the actuarial accrued liability for benefits.
48
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(c)
Net Pension Asset
DFW net pension assets for its Employee and DPS plans for DFW’s fiscal year 2013 are as
follows (in thousands):
2013
Annual required contribution
Interest on net pension asset
Adjustment to annual required contribution
Annual pension cost
Employer contributions
Increase in net pension (asset)
Net pension (asset), beginning of year
Net pension (asset), end of year
(10)
Employees
plan
DPS plan
$
$
$
21,424
(2,838)
3,547
22,133
21,424
709
(39,143)
(38,434)
6,219
(1,076)
974
6,117
6,219
(102)
(14,847)
$ (14,949)
Total
$
$
27,643
(3,914)
4,521
28,250
27,643
607
(53,990)
(53,383)
OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (OPEB)
(a)
Plan Descriptions
General
The OPEB Plan is a single-employer defined benefit other than pension plan covering qualified
retirees of DFW. The OPEB Plan was established and derives its authority from a DFW
resolution effective September 2007. The OPEB Plan is administered by the DFW Board with
the Executive Vice President of Administration and Diversity and the Vice President of Human
Resources serving as the “Plan Administrators.” The management of the assets and any
amendments of the Plan are the responsibility of the DFW Board’s Retirement Committee, the
Executive Vice President - CFO and the Vice President of Treasury Management.
The fiscal year-end for the OPEB Plan is December 31. Copies of the OPEB annual report
may be obtained by writing to the Finance Department, DFW Airport, Post Office Drawer
619428, DFW Airport, Texas 75261-9428.
OPEB Plan Eligibility
The OPEB Plan provides retiree health care for qualified retired employees ages 65 or younger
and their eligible dependents when required criteria are met. To be eligible as a retiree, an
employee must be enrolled in one of DFW’s medical plans, be eligible for retirement under one
of DFW’s pension plans, and begin drawing pension benefits immediately upon retirement.
Failure to immediately draw pension benefits will result in loss of eligibility for medical
coverage.
To be eligible as a retiree’s dependent, dependent(s) must be either a legal spouse; unmarried
children and under age 25 who are dependent on the retiree for at least 50% of their support
and claimed on the retiree’s income tax return; unmarried grandchildren under age 25 who are
dependent on the retiree for at least 50% of their support, reside in the retiree’s household, and
claimed on the retiree’s income tax return; or unmarried children at any age if mentally or
physically incapable of self-support. Normal retirement benefits for general employees and
DPS employees begin when they complete five years of service and age 62.
49
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Health Care Benefit
The health care coverage offered to active employees is available to retirees under age 65 and
their eligible dependents. The benefit includes medical, prescription drug, and vision coverage.
Medical plans offered include Aetna Select and Aetna Choice POS II.
Retiree Medical Subsidy
As of January 1, 2003, DFW provides a subsidy to eligible employees who retire to purchase
medical coverage prior to Medicare eligibility. The subsidy is for pre-65 OPEB medical benefits
only, and offers a credit of $20 per month of completed year of service up to a maximum benefit
of $400 per month. These credits have no cash value and can only be used toward purchasing
medical coverage from DFW. Retirees pay the total amount charged to DFW, less the retiree’s
subsidy, if applicable.
To be eligible for the subsidy, retirees must have retired after January 1, 2003, have 10 or more
years of service, have been enrolled continuously in a DFW medical plan, and immediately
draw retirement benefits.
Medicare Supplement Plan
DFW offers a PPO Medicare Supplement Plan for retirees and/or their spouses age 65 or older.
The retiree and/or spouse must transfer to the Medicare Supplement Plan by the first of the
month following their 65th birthday if they choose to remain on the DFW Plan. Retirees pay the
total amount charged to DFW.
Effective January 1, 2010, Medicare eligible retirees are no longer eligible for prescription drug
coverage under the DFW Retiree Medical Plan. To be eligible for the Medicare Supplement
Plan, a retiree or spouse must be 65 years of age and currently enrolled in a DFW medical
plan, have applied for the Medicare Supplement Plan 2 months prior to turning age 65, and
transition to a Medicare Supplement Plan the 1st of the month following their 65th birthday.
(b)
Funding Policies
DFW determines the OPEB funding policy. In general, DFW contributes an amount
approximately equal to the actuarially determined OPEB ARC for the year. In some years,
however, DFW funds additional contributions to help retire the unfunded liability sooner. The
significant actuarial assumptions used to compute the actuarially determined contribution
requirement are the same as those used to compute the actuarial accrued liability.
Employer contributions are generally made annually and recognized as additions in the period
in which employee services are performed. Employee contributions are not permitted.
The actuarially determined contribution requirements for the DFW’s fiscal years are computed
through an bi-annual actuarial valuation performed as of January 1. The annual actuarial
valuation is performed to determine the adequacy of current contribution rates, to describe the
current financial condition of OPEB, and to analyze changes in condition.
Actuarial valuations involve estimates of the value of reported amounts and assumptions about
the probability of events in the future. Amounts determined regarding the funded status of the
plan and the annual required contributions of the employer are subject to continual revision as
actual results are compared to past expectations and new estimates are made about the future.
The required schedule of funding progress presented as required supplementary information
provides multiyear trend information that shows whether the actuarial value of plan assets is
increasing or decreasing over time relative to the actuarial accrued liability for benefits.
50
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Projections of benefits are based on the plan and include the types of benefits in force at the
valuation date and the pattern of sharing benefit costs between DFW and the plan members to
that point. Actuarial calculations reflect a long-term perspective and employ methods and
assumptions that are designed to reduce short-term volatility in actuarial accrued liabilities and
the actuarial value of assets. Significant actuarial assumptions are as follows:
OPEB Plan
Valuation Date
Actuarially ass umed inv estment return
January 1, 2013
7.25% per annum compounded annually
Mortality rates for males and females
Retirement Plans 2000 Healthy Mortality Table
projected to 2011 using scale AA
Graduated rates based on age (detailed in
actuary's report)
Individual Entry-Age Acturial Cost Method
3.0% per annum
3.75% per annum
8.0% for 2013, grading down to 4.5% in 2020,
continuing at 4.5% in 2021 and beyond
Retirement, disablement and separation
rates
Actuarial cost method
General inflation
Payroll growth rate
Health cost trend rates
Method used for determining actuarial value
of assets
Amortization method
Remaining am ortization
Market value of assets
Level percent, closed
24 years
DFW’s annual OPEB costs, contributions, percent contributed, and net OPEB asset is as
follows (in thousands):
OPEB Plan
DFW's Year ended
September 30, 2013
September 30, 2012
September 30, 2011
Annual
OPEB
Cost
$ 2,875
2,823
3,222
Airport
Contribution
$ 2,902
2,806
3,192
Percentage
Contributed
101%
99%
99%
Net
OPEB
Asset
$ 2,609
2,583
2,599
The funding status of the OPEB plan as of January 1, 2013, representing the most recent
valuation date, is as follows (in thousands):
2013
Actuarial accrued liabilities
Actuarial value of assets
(Unfunded) actuarial accrued liability
Funded ratio
$ 25,184
16,121
$ (9,063)
64.0%
51
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(c)
Net OPEB Assets
DFW’s net OPEB assets for DFW’s fiscal year 2013 are as follows (in thousands):
2013
Annual required contribution
$
Interest on net OPEB asset
Adjustment to annual required contribution
Annual OPEB cost
Employer contributions
Increase in net OPEB (asset)
Net OPEB (asset), beginning of year
Net OPEB (asset), end of year
$
2,902
(187)
160
2,875
2,902
(27)
(2,582)
(2,609)
“Remainder of the page intentionally left blank”
52
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(11)
PFIC BACKGROUND AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION
The Public Facility Improvement Corporation (“PFIC”) is a duly incorporated public instrumentality of
the State of Texas, created on December 14, 2000 by the Airport’s owner cities. The PFIC was
created pursuant to Chapter 22 of the Texas Transportation Code for the purpose of financing,
equipping and operating one or more public facilities within the boundaries of the Airport. The PFIC
currently operates the Grand Hyatt Hotel and collects and manages the funds of the DFW RAC
Facility.
Grand Hyatt Hotel
The Grand Hyatt Hotel opened in 2005. The Hotel has 298 rooms and is located within International
Terminal D. The Hotel is managed by the Hyatt International Corporation under the terms of a fixed
fee management agreement between Hyatt and the PFIC. In 2001, the PFIC issued approximately
$75 million of Hotel Revenue Bonds for the construction of the Hotel. The Hotel was constructed by
the Airport under the terms of a Hotel Development Agreement, entered into between the Airport and
the PFIC. All hotel revenues are remitted to the PFIC. The PFIC reimburses the Hyatt for all
operating expenses of the Hotel. Under the terms of 2012 Facility Agreement between the PFIC and
the Airport, the PFIC transfers monthly to the Airport the amount of accrued debt service and
coverage relating to bonds, issued by the Airport in 2012, which retired the 2001 PFIC Hotel Revenue
Bonds. In addition, the PFIC makes a monthly contribution to a Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment
(FF&E) Account and to a Capital Account for the continual renewal and improvement of the hotel.
Any excess funds are held by the PFIC and may be used for improvements to the Hotel or for other
projects, approved by the Owner Cities.
Consolidated Rent-A-Car Facility
In 1998 and 1999, the FIC issued approximately $160 million of bonds for construction of a
consolidated rental car facility. These bonds were secured by a facility agreement between the FIC
and the Rent-A-Car (“RAC”) companies, which provided that the RAC companies would collect and
remit to a trustee a Customer Facility Charge (“CFC”) for each rent-a-car transaction day. In FY 2011,
DFW issued 2011A Joint Revenue Bonds for the purpose of retiring all of the outstanding Rent-A-Car
bonds issued by the FIC. In 2012, the Owner Cities approved the RAC Facility as an authorized PFIC
Project and approved the transfer of all RAC assets, liabilities, and responsibilities from the FIC to the
PFIC. The RAC companies, under the terms of the 2008 Bus Funding Agreement, agreed to continue
collecting the CFC after the FIC bonds were refunded. In conjunction with the issuance of 2011A
Bonds, the PFIC transfers to the Airport the monthly amount of accrued aggregate debt service plus
any incremental coverage on the 2011A Bonds from the CFC revenues. The CFC was $4.00 per
transaction day during FY 2013.
Additionally, the RAC companies collect a Customer Transportation Charge (“CTC”), which is
remitted directly to the PFIC to pay for the costs of operating and maintaining the bus fleet, which
transports customers to and from the terminals and the RAC facility. The CTC was $2.20 per
transaction day during FY 2013.
53
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
Condensed PFIC financial statements are as follows (in thousands):
PFIC
$ 67,104
13,412
80,516
Airport
$ 811,294
4,527,878
2,088,851
7,428,023
DFW
$ 878,398
4,527,878
2,102,263
7,508,539
3,372
3,372
359,678
6,195,779
6,555,457
363,050
6,195,779
6,558,829
Net Investment in Capital Assets
Restricted net position
Unrestricted net position
Net Position
11,395
65,750
$ 77,144
229,838
31,476
611,251
872,566
229,838
42,871
677,001
949,710
Operating revenues
PFIC
Airport
Total operating revenues
$ 42,138
$ 42,138
Operating Expenses
PFIC
Airport
Depreciation and amortization
Total operating expenses
$ 31,584
$ 31,584
Current assets
Capital assets
Other assets
Total assets
Current liabilities
Long-term liabilities
Total liabilities
$
$
$
$
$
10,554
Operating income (loss)
535,343
535,343
368,193
237,768
605,961
$
$
$
$
$
(70,619)
31,584
368,193
237,768
637,546
(60,065)
Non-operating revenues (expenses)
Transfers for debt service
Transfers for capital assets
Capital contributions
Special item
Change in net position
Net position, beginning of year
Net position, end of year
$ 20,343
(19,635)
(6,942)
$ 4,320
72,824
$ 77,144
(99,990)
19,635
6,942
20,960
(32,283)
$ (155,355)
1,027,921
872,566
(79,647)
20,960
(32,283)
$ (151,035)
1,100,745
$ 949,710
Net cash provided by operating activities
Net cash provided by (used for) capital and
related financing activities
Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year
$ 10,988
$
$
(6,502)
15,830
20,316
28,294
$ 48,610
992,390
(993,914)
189,617
444,402
$ 634,019
54
$
42,138
535,343
577,481
191,141
$
202,129
985,888
(978,084)
209,933
472,696
$ 682,629
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(12)
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
a) Contingencies
In the ordinary course of its business, the Airport is involved in various minor legal proceedings
involving general contractual and employment relationships, personal injury claims, and a
variety of other matters. The Airport does not believe there are any pending legal proceedings
that will have a material impact on the Airport’s financial position.
b) Federal Grants
The Airport has received Federal grants for specific purposes including Department of
Homeland Security (DHS) and Airport Improvement Program (AIP) that are subject to review
and audit by the grantor agencies. Such audits could lead to requests for reimbursement to the
grantor agency for expenditures disallowed under terms of the grant. In the opinion of
management of the Airport, disallowed costs, if any, would not be material.
c) Personal Injury liability
A number of suits have been filed against the Airport related to accidents on Airport property.
The Board is fully insured to the extent of the statutory limit under the tort claims act.
d) Construction
As of September 30, 2013 the Airport had entered into construction contracts totaling $2.1
billion, of which $593.2 million is still outstanding.
(13)
SELF-INSURANCE/RISK MANAGEMENT
DFW maintains self-insured liability for employee medical and workers’ compensation claims. DFW
utilizes a third-party company to provide stop loss coverage on individual health claims and a thirdparty administrator to manage workers compensation claims in accordance with Texas state
statutes and limits. DFW accrues the estimated cost of self-insurance liabilities based on annual
actuarial reviews. Changes in liabilities in FY 2013 and FY 2012 for all Airport self-insured
programs are detailed below (in thousands).
Description
2013
Beginning balance
Plus: Current year claims and changes in estimates
Less: Payments
Ending balance
$
$
4,131 $
19,464
(19,463)
4,132 $
2012
3,824
22,948
(22,641)
4,131
DFW is exposed to various risks of loss related to theft, damage to and destruction of assets, and
natural disasters for which DFW carries commercial insurance. Specific details regarding
deductibles and coverage can be found in the statistical section. Any settlement payments covered
by commercial insurance did not exceed coverage for the last three years.
55
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
(14)
CONCENTRATION OF CREDIT RISK
DFW’s customers are principally concentrated within the airline industry. DFW periodically
evaluates the financial condition of its customers and typically does not require collateral. DFW
received approximately $200.6 million (34.2%) of its revenues during fiscal year 2013 from
American Airlines (including American Eagle). American Airlines (including American Eagle and
Executive Airlines) had 82% of passengers and 74% of landed weights in FY 2013.
(15)
POLLUTION REMEDIATION
DFW has one subsurface area of land that is currently under an agreed-upon order by the Texas
Commission for Environmental Quality (TCEQ) for remediation of a jet fuel leak in the underground
pipeline in which Terminal B and Terminal C are affected. DFW has been under the agreed-upon
order since 1999. All site-assessments, site investigation, corrective measures feasibility study and
design of a remediation action plan (RAP) have been completed for this area. Cleanup activities
and removal /neutralization and site restoration are in progress. Required monitoring and sampling
of the site continue as planned. As of September 30, 2013, the remaining estimated liability is
approximately $1.5 million which consists of mobile extraction events, well monitoring and
reporting. It cannot be readily determined at this date when the restoration project will be complete
and whether additional funding will be necessary. Accordingly, the estimated liability has not been
changed.
DFW’s Northwest Cargo Voluntary Cleanup Program (“VCP”), an area of approximately 150 acres
of land located in the Northwest Cargo Area, has completed voluntary pre-clean up remedial
activities that include site assessment, site investigation and corrective measures feasibility study
for a chlorinated solvent plume and a small area of additional jet fuel contamination. The December
5, 2011 revision of the Northwest Cargo VCP Remediation Implementation document represents
the currently approved Response Action Plan submitted to the TCEQ. These costs represent the
best estimate of the stated technology types proposed. The Environmental department is in the
process of exploring alternative technologies that are expected to reduce the expense and time
frame associated with the cleanup. Until acceptable proposals are received from qualified bidders,
this change should not be considered the in place approach nor associated expense. As of
September 30, 2013, the total liability of $10 million continues to be a reasonable estimate.
In FY 2013, DFW estimated and booked $0.7M in short term remediation liability for leaked
hydraulic fluid. Clean-up work is scheduled for FY 2014.
Environmental liabilities include an accrual for asbestos removal incurred in conjunction with the
Terminal Renovation & Improvement Program (TRIP). The majority of the Asbestos Containing
Material (ACM) is in the form of fire proofing materials originally sprayed onto the ceiling of the
terminal roofs for fire proofing purposes, which is governed by Federal law. As part of the 1970
Federal Clean Air Act (CAA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set standards
known as National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) which require the
mitigation of this risk. The extent and cost has been estimated through facility testing by DFW
Airport’s Environmental Affairs Department (EAD) in conjunction with DFW’s Airport Development &
Engineering (ADE) and TRIP team. The estimates and assumptions used for these forecasts were
based on a number of factors including actual asbestos findings and removal costs from terminal
sections recently completed, e.g., Terminal A – section A, testing on future areas within the scope
of the TRIP program, design calculations of scheduled areas in the TRIP terminals yet to be
mitigated and applying the historical cost of remediation per square foot. In FY 2013, DFW
estimated and recorded a liability and a special item of $32.3 million. This liability was recognized in
accordance with GASB 49, upon occurrence of an obligating event defined as the commencement
of the respective sections of the Terminal renovations on that specific area undergoing renovation
which is when the ACM becomes friable and represents a health risk subject to NESHAP
56
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Notes To The Basic Financial Statements
September 30, 2013
remediation expenditures were $14.1 million, reducing the initial liability to $18.2 million as of
September 30, 2013.
(16)
SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
(a) AMR Bankruptcy
On November 29, 2011, AMR Corporation, the parent company of American Airlines, Inc.
(“AA”), American Eagle, Inc., and other affiliates of AMR, filed voluntary petitions for Chapter
11 reorganization in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York. AMR
assumed all unexpired leases for nonresidential real property at DFW Airport, including the
Use Agreement, and cured any defaults under such leases by paying any amounts that
were due and owing under the leases. On December 9, 2013, the AMR Corporation
emerged from bankruptcy and under its court approved Plan for Reorganization officially
merged with the US Airways Group forming the new American Airlines Group, Inc. (AAG).
(b) Fiscal Year 2014 Debt Issuance
In November 2013, the Airport issued $109.1 million of fixed rate joint revenue improvement
bonds (Series 2013G) for the purpose of funding non-TRIP and DFW Capital projects.
“Remainder of the page intentionally left blank”
57
REQUIRED SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Schedule of Funding Progress - Pension
September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
(Unaudited)
The following presents the funding progress from January 1, 2008 to January 1, 2013:
V a l u a ti o n
d a te
A c tu a ri a l
va lu e
o f a sse ts
(A V A )
A c tu a ri a l
a c c ru e d
l i a b i l i ty
(A A L )
(1 )
(2 )
(3 )
U n fu n d e d
a c tu a ri a l
a c c ru e d
(l i a b i l i ty )
(U A A L )
(2 ) – (3 )
(4 )
Funded
ra ti o
(2 )/ (3 )
(5 )
Annua l
c o v e re d
p a y ro l l
(6 )
UAAL
as % of
p a y ro l l
(4 )/ (6 )
(7 )
Em p lo ye e P la n
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 3
$ 323,794
$ 450,882
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 2
305,799
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 1
$
(1 2 7 , 0 8 8 )
71.8%
$ 65,638
(1 9 3 . 6 % )
426,122
(1 2 0 , 3 2 3 )
71.8%
72,477
(1 6 6 . 0 % )
288,351
397,573
(1 0 9 , 2 2 2 )
72.5%
74,812
(1 4 6 . 0 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 0
261,084
348,720
(8 7 , 6 3 6 )
74.9%
77,625
(1 1 2 . 9 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 9
245,813
329,225
(8 3 , 4 1 2 )
74.7%
77,665
(1 0 7 . 4 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 8
232,884
300,825
(6 7 , 9 4 1 )
77.4%
73,475
(9 2 . 5 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 3
111,366
165,805
(5 4 , 4 3 9 )
67.2%
24,583
(2 2 1 . 4 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 2
104,620
156,222
(5 1 , 6 0 2 )
67.0%
23,900
(2 1 5 . 9 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 1
98,341
146,158
(4 7 , 8 1 7 )
67.3%
23,786
(2 0 1 . 0 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 0
90,216
130,853
(4 0 , 6 3 7 )
68.9%
22,179
(1 8 3 . 2 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 9
85,048
125,564
(4 0 , 5 1 6 )
67.7%
21,388
(1 8 9 . 4 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 8
80,483
116,431
(3 5 , 9 4 8 )
69.1%
20,130
(1 7 8 . 6 % )
D P S P la n
58
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Schedule of Funding Progress - OPEB
September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
(Unaudited)
The following presents the funding progress from January 1, 2008 to January 1, 2013:
V a lu a ti o n
d a te
A c tu a ri a l
va lu e
o f a sse ts
(A V A )
A c tu a ri a l
a c c ru e d
li a b i l ity
(A A L )
(1 )
(2 )
(3 )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 3
$ 1 6 ,1 2 1
$ 2 5 ,1 8 4
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 1
1 1 ,1 1 2
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 1 0
U n fu n d e d
a c tu a ria l
a c c ru e d
(l ia b i li ty )
(U A A L )
(2 ) – (3 )
(4 )
$
Funded
ra tio
(2 )/ (3 )
(5 )
Annua l
c o v e re d
p a y ro l l
(6 )
UAAL
a s % of
p a y ro ll
(4 )/ (6 )
(7 )
(9 ,0 6 3 )
64.0%
$ 9 0 ,2 2 1
(1 0 . 0 % )
3 5 ,4 4 7
(2 4 ,3 3 5 )
31.3%
9 8 ,5 9 7
(2 4 . 7 % )
8 ,3 3 7
3 8 ,0 5 8
(2 9 ,7 2 1 )
21.9%
9 9 ,8 0 4
(2 9 . 8 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 9
6 ,3 4 3
3 2 ,5 7 2
(2 6 ,2 2 9 )
19.5%
9 9 ,0 5 3
(2 6 . 5 % )
Ja n u a ry 1 , 2 0 0 8
5 ,4 0 3
3 2 ,1 5 1
(2 6 ,7 4 8 )
16.8%
9 3 ,6 0 5
(2 8 . 6 % )
59
Dallas/Fort Forth International Airport
Combining Statements of Fiduciary Net Position
As of December 31, 2012
(Amounts in Thousands)
Fid u c ia r y A c t iv it ie s
A s s e ts
Ca s h
In v e s tme n t in Ma s te r Tr u s t a t f a ir v a lu e
Re c e iv a b le s
Du e f r o m b r o ke r f o r s e c u r itie s s o ld
A c c r u e d in te r e s t a n d d iv id e n d s
T o tal as s e ts
L ia b ilit ie s
Du e to b r o ke r f o r s e c u r itie s p u r c h a s e d
A c c r u e d m a n a g e me n t f e e s
Cla ims /p r e m iu ms p a y a b le
A c c r u e d tr a n s a c tio n f e e s
T o t a l lia b ilit ie s
N e t p o s itio n h e ld in tr u s t fo r b e n e fits
Em p lo y e e
DP S
O P EB
P la n
P la n
P la n
$
128
3 3 0 ,6 6 1
$
44
1 1 3 ,7 5 6
$
1 6 ,3 9 8
T o tal
$
172
4 6 0 ,8 1 5
750
589
3 3 2 ,1 2 8
257
202
1 1 4 ,2 5 9
1 6 ,3 9 8
1 ,0 0 7
791
4 6 2 ,7 8 5
1 ,3 7 5
233
11
1 ,6 1 9
473
80
4
557
274
3
277
1 ,8 4 8
313
274
18
2 ,4 5 3
$ 3 3 0 ,5 0 9
$ 1 1 3 ,7 0 2
$ 1 6 ,1 2 1
60
$
4 6 0 ,3 3 2
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Combining Statements Of Changes in Fiduciary Net Position
For The Year Ended December 31, 2012
(Amounts in Thousands)
Fi du ciary Acti viti es
Empl oyee
DPS
OPEB
Pl an
Pl an
Plan
To tal
Additions
Cont ri butions
Pl an m embers cont ribut ions
Em ployer cont ri butions
$
23,534
$
1, 712
6, 219
$
2,902
$
1, 712
32, 655
23,534
7, 931
2,902
34, 367
32,508
(1,379)
11, 178
(476)
1,285
-
44, 971
(1, 855)
T otal in vestmen t i ncome
31,129
10, 702
1,285
43, 116
T otal add itio ns
54,663
18, 633
4,187
77, 483
Benef it s paid to plan mem bers and benef iciaries
Adm inist rative fees
T otal ded uctons
16,921
231
17,152
5, 084
80
5, 164
1,200
11
1,211
23, 205
322
23, 527
Net in crease
37,511
13, 469
2,976
53, 956
292,998
100, 233
13,145
406, 376
T otal con tri bu ti on s
Plans' i nterest in Mast er Trust Invest ment i ncom e
Less: Investm ent f ees
Deductions
Net Position
At begi nn ing o f the year
At end of th e year
$
330,509
61
$
113, 702
$
16,121
$
460, 332
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Grand Hyatt Hotel
Financial Position, Revenue and Expenses
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2013
(Amounts in Thousands)
Grand
Hyatt
$
31,032
21,508
9,524
Operating revenues
Operating expenses
Operating income
Current assets
Other assets
Total assets
$
Current liabilities
Long-term liabilities
Total liabilities
3,373
5,401
8,774
3,373
3,373
Net Position
$
62
5,401
APPENDIX D
DTC INFORMATION
The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”), New York, New York, will act as securities depository
for the Bonds. The Bonds will be issued as fully-registered Bonds registered in the name of Cede & Co.
(DTC’s partnership nominee) or such other name as may be requested by an authorized representative of
DTC. One fully-registered Bond certificate will be issued for each maturity of the Bonds, each in the
aggregate principal amount of such maturity, and will be deposited with DTC.
DTC, the world’s largest securities depository, is a limited-purpose trust company organized
under the New York Banking Law, a “banking organization” within the meaning of the New York
Banking Law, a member of the Federal Reserve System, a “clearing corporation” within the meaning of
the New York Uniform Commercial Code, and a “clearing agency” registered pursuant to the provisions
of Section 17A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. DTC holds and provides asset servicing for over
3.5 million issues of U.S. and non-U.S. equity issues, corporate and municipal debt issues, and money
market instruments (from over 100 countries) that DTC’s participants (“Direct Participants”) deposit with
DTC. DTC also facilitates the post-trade settlement among Direct Participants of sales and other
securities transactions in deposited securities, through electronic computerized book-entry transfers and
pledges between Direct Participants’ accounts. This eliminates the need for physical movement of
securities certificates. Direct Participants include both U.S. and non-U.S. securities brokers and dealers,
banks, trust companies, clearing corporations, and certain other organizations. DTC is a wholly-owned
subsidiary of The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (“DTCC”). DTCC is the holding company for
DTC, National Securities Clearing Corporation and Fixed Income Clearing Corporation, all of which are
registered clearing agencies. DTCC is owned by the users of its regulated subsidiaries. Access to the DTC
system is also available to others such as both U.S. and non-U.S. securities brokers and dealers, banks,
trust companies, and clearing corporations that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a
Direct Participant, either directly or indirectly (“Indirect Participants”). DTC has a Standard & Poor’s
rating of AA+. The DTC Rules applicable to its Participants are on file with the Securities and Exchange
Commission. More information about DTC can be found at www.dtcc.com.
Purchases of Bonds under the DTC system must be made by or through Direct Participants,
which will receive a credit for the Bonds on DTC’s records. The ownership interest of each actual
purchaser of each Bond (“Beneficial Owner”) is in turn to be recorded on the Direct and Indirect
Participants’ records. Beneficial Owners will not receive written confirmation from DTC of their
purchase. Beneficial Owners are, however, expected to receive written confirmations providing details of
the transaction, as well as periodic statements of their holdings, from the Direct or Indirect Participant
through which the Beneficial Owner entered into the transaction. Transfers of ownership interests in the
Bonds are to be accomplished by entries made on the books of Direct and Indirect Participants acting on
behalf of Beneficial Owners. Beneficial Owners will not receive certificates representing their ownership
interests in Bonds, except in the event that use of the book-entry system for the Bonds is discontinued.
To facilitate subsequent transfers, all Bonds deposited by Direct Participants with DTC are
registered in the name of DTC’s partnership nominee, Cede & Co., or such other name as may be
requested by an authorized representative of DTC. The deposit of Bonds with DTC and their registration
in the name of Cede & Co. or such other DTC nominee do not effect any change in beneficial ownership.
DTC has no knowledge of the actual Beneficial Owners of the Bonds; DTC’s records reflect only the
identity of the Direct Participants to whose accounts such Bonds are credited, which may or may not be
the Beneficial Owners. The Direct and Indirect Participants will remain responsible for keeping account
of their holdings on behalf of their customers. Conveyance of notices and other communications by DTC
D-1
to Direct Participants, by Direct Participants to Indirect Participants, and by Direct Participants and
Indirect Participants to Beneficial Owners will be governed by arrangements among them, subject to any
statutory or regulatory requirements as may be in effect from time to time. Beneficial Owners of Bonds
may wish to take certain steps to augment the transmission to them of notices of significant events with
respect to the Bonds, such as redemptions, tenders, defaults, and proposed amendments to the Bond
documents. For example, Beneficial Owners of Bonds may wish to ascertain that the nominee holding the
Bonds for their benefit has agreed to obtain and transmit notices to Beneficial Owners. In the alternative,
Beneficial Owners may wish to provide their names and addresses to the registrar and request that copies
of notices be provided directly to them.
Redemption notices shall be sent to DTC. If less than all of the Bonds within a maturity are being
redeemed, DTC’s practice is to determine by lot the amount of the interest of each Direct Participant in
such maturity to be redeemed.
Neither DTC nor Cede & Co. (nor any other DTC nominee) will consent or vote with respect to
Bonds unless authorized by a Direct Participant in accordance with DTC’s MMI Procedures. Under its
usual procedures, DTC mails an Omnibus Proxy to the Airport as soon as possible after the record date.
The Omnibus Proxy assigns Cede & Co.’s consenting or voting rights to those Direct Participants to
whose accounts Bonds are credited on the record date (identified in a listing attached to the Omnibus
Proxy).
All payments on the Bonds will be made to Cede & Co., or such other nominee as may be
requested by an authorized representative of DTC. DTC’s practice is to credit Direct Participants’
accounts upon DTC’s receipt of funds and corresponding detail information from the Airport or the
Paying Agent/Registrar, on payable date in accordance with their respective holdings shown on DTC’s
records. Payments by Participants to Beneficial Owners will be governed by standing instructions and
customary practices, as is the case with Bonds held for the accounts of customers in bearer form or
registered in “street name,” and will be the responsibility of such Participant and not of DTC, the Paying
Agent/Registrar, or the Airport, subject to any statutory or regulatory requirements as may be in effect
from time to time. Payment of redemption proceeds, distributions, and dividend payments to Cede & Co.
(or such other nominee as may be requested by an authorized representative of DTC) is the responsibility
of the Airport or the Paying Agent/Registrar, disbursement of such payments to Direct Participants will
be the responsibility of DTC, and disbursement of such payments to the Beneficial Owners will be the
responsibility of Direct and Indirect Participants.
DTC may discontinue providing its services as depository with respect to the Bonds at any time
by giving reasonable notice to the Airport or the Paying Agent/Registrar. Under such circumstances, in
the event that a successor depository is not obtained, Bond certificates are required to be printed and
delivered.
The Airport may decide to discontinue use of the system of book-entry-only transfers through
DTC (or a successor securities depository). In that event, Bond certificates will be printed and delivered
to DTC.
The information in this Section concerning DTC and DTC’s book-entry system has been obtained
from sources that the Airport believes to be reliable, but neither the Airport nor the Underwriters take any
responsibility for the accuracy thereof.
D-2
APPENDIX E
REPORT OF AIRPORT CONSULTANT
E-1
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
Appendix E
REPORT OF THE AIRPORT CONSULTANT
on the proposed issuance of
CITIES OF DALLAS AND FORT WORTH, TEXAS
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
JOINT REVENUE IMPROVEMENT AND REFUNDING BONDS
Series 2014B through 2014G
Prepared for
The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board
DFW Airport, Texas
Prepared by
LeighFisher
Burlingame, California
May 1, 2014
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
May 1, 2014
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
Chief Executive Officer
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board
P. O. Drawer 619428
DFW Airport, Texas 75261
Re:
Report of the Airport Consultant
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Joint Revenue Improvement and Refunding Bonds,
Series 2014B through 2014G
Dear Mr. Donohue:
We are pleased to submit this Report of the Airport Consultant on the proposed
issuance of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Joint Revenue Improvement and
Refunding Bonds (Bonds) by the City of Dallas and the City of Fort Worth (the Cities).
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (the Airport or DFW) is operated on behalf of
the Cities by the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board (the Board). This letter
and the accompanying attachment and financial exhibits constitute our report.
The Board is implementing, through approximately 2020, a Terminal Renewal and
Improvement Program (TRIP) and other capital improvements at the Airport (collectively
referred to in this report as the Capital Program), estimated to cost $4.701 billion, of
which $3.512 billion has been or is to be funded with the proceeds of Joint Revenue
Improvement Bonds. In 2010 through 2013, the Board issued Joint Revenue Improvement
Bonds to fund $2.428 billion of the costs of the Capital Program. In 2014, to fund
$0.468 billion of the costs of the Capital Program, the Board proposes to issue additional
Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds (referred to in this report as the 2014 New Money
Bonds) as follows:
Proposed 2014 New Money Bonds
Principal amount
Final maturity
2014B (AMT)
2014C (Non-AMT)
2014D (AMT)
2014G (Taxable)
$182,250,000
129,930,000
258,645,000
54,945,000
$625,770,000
2045
2045
2045
2037
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
In 2011 through March 2014 the Board issued Joint Revenue Refunding Bonds in the
principal amount of $2.874 billion to refund outstanding Bonds. Later in 2014, the
Board proposes to issue additional Joint Revenue Refunding Bonds (referred to in this
report as the 2014 Refunding Bonds) as follows:
Proposed 2014 Refunding Bonds
Final maturity
Principal amount
2014E (AMT)
2014F (Non-AMT)
$ 83,710,000
104,600,000
$188,310,000
2026
2027
The proposed 2014 New Money Bonds and 2014 Refunding Bonds are referred to
collectively in this report as the 2014 Bonds.
The report also addresses Joint Revenue Improvement Bonds that the Board plans to
issue in 2016 (referred to in this report as the 2016 Bonds) to fund the remaining
$0.616 billion of the costs of the Capital Program, as follows:
Planned 2016 Bonds
Principal amount
2016A (Non-AMT)
2016B (AMT)
2016C (AMT)
$106,265,000
535,625,000
108,505,000
$750,395,000
Final maturity
2045
2045
2045
The proposed 2014 Bonds and planned 2016 Bonds may not be issued with the names or
in the sequence or amounts assumed for this report.
The elements of the Capital Program, their estimated costs, and the funding plan are
summarized in the attachment and in Exhibit A.*
Bond Ordinances
The Cities issue Joint Revenue Bonds under the terms of the Master Bond Ordinance
adopted by the Cities in September 2010. The Fiftieth Supplemental Concurrent Bond
Ordinance, adopted by the Cities in March 2014, provides for the issuance of the
proposed 2014 Bonds.
*All financial exhibits are provided at the end of the attachment “Background,
Assumptions, and Rationale for the Financial Forecasts.”
E-2
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
The Master Bond Ordinance and all supplemental ordinances are collectively referred
to in this report as the Bond Ordinances. Capitalized terms are used as defined in the
Bond Ordinances or in the Airline Agreement (discussed later), except as defined
otherwise.
Outstanding Bonds
As of April 1, 2014, the Board had outstanding Bonds in the following series and
principal amounts:
Principal amount
2004B
2007
2009A
2010A
2011A
$
Final maturity
91,670,000
94,365,000
186,280,000
304,395,000
96,980,000
2035
2023
2024
2045
2021
2011C
2011D
2011E
2012A
2012B
2012C
146,205,000
216,265,000
76,640,000
1,000,000
407,640,000
274,250,000
2035
2035
2018
2014
2035
2045
2012D
2012E
2012F
2012G
2012H
2013A
475,000,000
297,310,000
267,500,000
291,095,000
480,000,000
372,240,000
2042
2035
2035
2035
2045
2045
2013B
2013C
2013D
2013E
2013F
2013G
2014A
450,000,000
242,000,000
416,315,000
225,310,000
251,960,000
109,060,000
201,515,000
$5,974,995,000
2050
2045
2033
2033
2033
2043
2032
The proposed 2014 Refunding Bonds are expected to be issued to refund all the
outstanding 2004B Bonds and 2007 Bonds to achieve interest cost savings and
restructure the principal payment schedule.
E-3
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
The estimated sources and uses of funds from the sale of the proposed 2014 New
Money Bonds are shown in Exhibit B. The forecast debt service requirements of all
outstanding Bonds, proposed 2014 Bonds, and planned 2016 Bonds are shown in
Exhibit C.
Gross Revenues
The proposed 2014 Bonds are to be Additional Obligations under the Bond Ordinances
and are to be secured by and payable from the Gross Revenues of the Airport on a
parity with all outstanding Bonds issued under the Bond Ordinances. Gross Revenues
include (1) all rentals, landing fees, and other charges and payments received from
airlines and other tenants and users of the Airport, and (2) any Special Revenues to the
extent they are specifically included in Gross Revenues under the provisions of a
Supplemental Bond Ordinance, and (3) amounts transferred to or retained in the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund.
Passenger Facility Charge Revenues
The Board has authority from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to impose a
passenger facility charge (PFC) of $4.50 per eligible enplaned passenger at the Airport
and has received authority to use PFC revenues to pay certain of the debt service
requirements of outstanding Bonds and the proposed 2014 Bonds. Although not
designated as Special Revenues under the Bond Ordinances, for the purposes of this
report, PFC revenues committed to the payment of Bond debt service are included in
Gross Revenues. By agreement with the airlines signatory to the Airline Agreement, the
Board also intends to apply PFC revenues to be derived from any future increase in the
PFC, up to a maximum of $7.50 per eligible enplaned passenger, to the maximum extent
approved by the FAA to pay Bond capital and financing costs.
The forecast sources and uses of PFC revenues are shown in Exhibit F, assuming
continued imposition of a $4.50 PFC. As shown, beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011*, the
Board has used or anticipates using all PFC revenues to pay Bond debt service.
Rental Car Customer Facility Charge Revenues
In June 2011, the Board issued its Joint Revenue Refunding Bonds, Taxable Series 2011A
(the 2011A Bonds or 2011A Rental Car Refunding Bonds), in the principal amount of
approximately $111 million to refund the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Facility Improvement Corporation Rental Car Facility Charge Revenue Bonds, Taxable
Series 1998 and Series 1999. The 1998 and 1999 Rental Car Facility Charge Bonds
financed the costs of constructing consolidated rental car facilities at the Airport.
*The Board’s Fiscal Year ends September 30.
E-4
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
Effective with the issuance of the 2011A Bonds, the Public Facility Improvement
Corporation (PFIC) assumed the obligations of the Facility Improvement Corporation.
Rental car companies operating at the Airport collect a customer facility charge (CFC)
from all rental car customers. All CFC revenues are remitted by the rental car
companies to the PFIC. Under the provisions of a June 2011 agreement between the
PFIC and the Board, CFC revenues are, to the extent available, to be timely paid by the
PFIC to the Board in amounts sufficient to meet the debt service requirements of the
2011A Bonds. Although not designated as Special Revenues under the Bond
Ordinances, for the purposes of this report, CFC revenues committed to the payment of
Bond debt service (Successor Rental Car Facility Charges) are included in Gross
Revenues.
Forecast CFC revenues and their use to pay the debt service requirements of the 2011A
Rental Car Refunding Bonds are shown in Exhibit G.
Hotel Revenues
In April 2001, the PFIC issued its Airport Hotel Revenue Bonds, Series 2001, in the
principal amount of $75 million to fund certain costs of constructing the Grand Hyatt
hotel (the Hotel) at the Airport (the 2001 PFIC Hotel Bonds). The 2012C Hotel
Refunding Bonds were issued to refund the entire approximate $72 million outstanding
principal amount of the 2001 PFIC Hotel Bonds.
Under the provisions of an April 2012 agreement between the PFIC and the Board,
revenues derived from operation of the Hotel are, to the extent available after the
payment of certain Hotel operating expenses, to be paid by the PFIC to the Board in
amounts sufficient to meet the debt service requirements (including 25% coverage) of
the 2012C Hotel Refunding Bonds. Although not designated as Special Revenues under
the Bond Ordinances, for the purposes of this report, Hotel revenues committed to the
payment of Bond debt service are included in Gross Revenues.
Forecast Hotel revenues and their use to pay the debt service requirements of the 2012C
Hotel Refunding Bonds are shown in Exhibit H.
Rate Covenant
Under Section 6.3(b) of the Master Bond Ordinance, the Cities covenant that the Board
will place into effect rentals, fees, and charges for the use, operation, and occupancy of
the Airport that are reasonably estimated to produce, in each Fiscal Year, Gross
Revenues to enable the Board to:
(1) Pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses;
E-5
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
(2) Meet at least 125% of the Accrued Aggregate Debt Service of all outstanding
Joint Revenue Bonds and any parity Obligations;
(3) Meet at least 100% of the debt service requirements of any subordinate
obligations; and
(4) Pay any other amounts required under the Bond Ordinances.
Under Section 6.3(c) of the Master Bond Ordinance, the Board further covenants to
place into effect rentals, fees, and charges for the use, operation, and occupancy of the
Airport that are reasonably estimated to produce, in each Fiscal Year, Current Gross
Revenues, defined as Gross Revenues less any amounts transferred to the Operating
Revenue and Expense Fund from the Debt Service Reserve Fund or the Capital
Improvements Fund or remaining unexpended and retained in the Operating Revenue
and Expense Fund at the end of such Fiscal Year, that enable the Board to:
(1) Pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses;
(2) Meet at least 100% of the Accrued Aggregate Debt Service of all outstanding
Joint Revenue Bonds and any parity obligations;
(3) Meet at least 100% of the debt service requirements of any subordinate
obligations; and
(4) Pay any other amounts required under the Bond Ordinances.
Such provisions of Sections 6.3(b) and 6.3(c) of the Master Bond Ordinance are referred
to collectively in this report as the Rate Covenant. Forecasts of debt service coverage
calculated according to the requirements of the Bond Ordinances and demonstrating
compliance with the Rate Covenant are presented in Exhibit I.
Airline Agreement
Effective the beginning of FY 2011, the Board and American Airlines executed an
Airport Lease and Use Agreement (the Airline Agreement) that extends through
FY 2020. The Board subsequently entered into substantially identical agreements with
other airlines serving the Airport. Airlines that are signatory to the Airline Agreement,
referred to collectively in this report as the Signatory Airlines, accounted for
approximately 99% of enplaned passengers and 98% of landed weight at the Airport in
FY 2013.
Under the Airline Agreement, rentals, fees, and charges are calculated according to
cost-recovery rate-making principles for the Airfield and Terminal Cost Centers. A
E-6
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
Rolling Coverage Account within the Capital Improvements Fund is to be funded to
ensure that the requirements of the Rate Covenant are met or exceeded.
In November 2011, AMR Corporation and its subsidiaries American Airlines and
American Eagle Airlines filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. In July 2012,
American and American Eagle accepted the Airline Agreement in bankruptcy. As part
of the reorganization plan, approved in December 2013, AMR Corporation and
US Airways Group merged to create American Airlines Group, the new holding
company for American, US Airways, and their regional airline affiliates. The merged
American-US Airways will operate as American. The Airport was the busiest airport in
the pre-merger American system and is expected to continue to be the busiest airport in
the combined American-US Airways system. American, American Eagle, and US
Airways together accounted for 86% of enplaned passengers at the Airport in FY 2013.
In executing the Airline Agreement, the Signatory Airlines agreed to the Capital
Program and its funding plan. A majority-in-interest (MII) of the Signatory Airlines
must approve the Bond financing of any additional capital projects in order for debt
service and coverage requirements to be included in the calculation of their rentals, fees,
and charges. For capital projects in the Terminal Cost Center, MII is defined as a
numerical majority of the Signatory Airlines accounting for 51% or more of Terminal
Rents paid by the Signatory Airlines or any five Signatory Airlines accounting for 60%
or more of Terminal Rents paid by the Signatory Airlines. For capital projects in the
Airfield Cost Center, MII is defined as a numerical majority of the Signatory Airlines
accounting for 51% or more of Landing Fees paid by the Signatory Airlines or any five
Signatory Airlines accounting for 60% or more of Landing Fees paid by the Signatory
Airlines. No capital projects beyond those in the approved Capital Program were
assumed for this report.
Scope of Report
This report was prepared to evaluate the ability of the Board to generate sufficient
Gross Revenues, including PFC revenues, Successor Rental Car Facility Charges, and
Hotel revenues, to pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses; pay the debt service
requirements of outstanding Bonds, the proposed 2014 Bonds, and planned 2016 Bonds;
and meet the Bond debt service coverage requirements of the Rate Covenant.
In preparing the report, we analyzed:
•
Future airline traffic demand at the Airport, giving consideration to the demographic and economic characteristics of the Dallas-Fort Worth region, historical
trends in airline traffic, the role of the Airport as the principal connecting hub
for the merged American-US Airways, the potential effects of the expiration of
E-7
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
flight restrictions at Dallas Love Field, and other factors that will affect future
traffic
•
Estimated sources and uses of funds for the Capital Program and associated
annual Bond debt service requirements
•
Historical and estimated future PFC revenues, rental car CFC revenues, and
Hotel revenues and the use of certain of such revenues to pay Bond debt
service
•
Historical relationships among revenues, expenses, and airline traffic at the
Airport
•
The facilities to be provided as part of the Capital Program and other
operational considerations affecting revenues and expenses
•
The Board’s policies and contractual agreements relating to the use and
occupancy of Airport facilities, including the calculation of airline rentals, fees,
and charges under the Airline Agreement; the operation of concession
privileges; and the leasing of buildings and grounds
We also identified key factors upon which the future financial results of the Airport
may depend and formulated assumptions about those factors. On the basis of those
assumptions, we assembled the financial forecasts presented in the exhibits at the end of
the report. A forecast period through FY 2020 is shown to cover the period of the
Capital Program and the term of the Airline Agreement. Estimates of project costs,
financing assumptions, and debt service requirements were provided by the sources
noted in the exhibits.
Forecast Debt Service Coverage
Exhibit I and the following tabulation present the forecasts of Net Revenues (Gross
Revenues less Operation and Maintenance Expenses), Accrued Aggregate Debt Service
requirements, and Bond debt service coverage. The 125% Bond debt service coverage
required by Section 6.3(b) of the Master Bond Ordinance is forecast to be exceeded in
each year of the forecast period.
E-8
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
Fiscal
Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
(in thousands)
Accrued
Net
Aggregate Debt
Revenues [A]
Service [B]
$423,898
524,228
588,751
628,958
675,972
692,089
699,783
Debt service
coverage ratio
[A/B]
$282,130
364,212
415,533
442,709
479,224
487,644
491,437
150%
144
142
142
141
142
142
Exhibit I also presents the calculation of Bond debt service coverage by Current
Revenues, demonstrating that the required 100% coverage required by Section 6.3(c) of
the Master Bond Ordinance is forecast to be exceeded in each year.
Forecast Airline Payments per Enplaned Passenger
Exhibit E-1 and the following tabulation present the forecasts of payments to be made
to the Board by the passenger airlines in the form of Terminal Rents, Landing Fees, and
other rentals, fees, and charges under the Airline Agreement.
Fiscal
Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
(in thousands)
Passenger
Enplaned
airline
passengers [D]
payments [C]
246,133
323,326
378,444
402,272
440,886
442,141
449,352
*
Airline payments
per enplaned
passenger [C/D]
30,600
30,000
30,000
30,500
31,000
31,500
32,000
*
*
*
$8.04
10.78
12.61
13.19
14.22
14.04
14.04
*
The forecasts are based on information and assumptions that were provided by or
reviewed with and agreed to by Airport management. The forecasts reflect Airport
management’s expected course of action during the forecast period and, in Airport
management’s judgment, present fairly the expected financial results of the Airport.
Those key factors and assumptions that are significant to the forecasts are set forth in
E-9
Mr. Sean P. Donohue
May 1, 2014
the attachment, “Background, Assumptions, and Rationale for the Financial Forecasts.”
The attachment should be read in its entirety for an understanding of the forecasts and
the underlying assumptions.
In our opinion, the underlying assumptions provide a reasonable basis for the forecasts.
However, any forecast is subject to uncertainties. Inevitably, some assumptions will not
be realized and unanticipated events and circumstances may occur. Therefore, there
will be differences between the forecast and actual results, and those differences may be
material. Neither LeighFisher nor any person acting on our behalf makes any warranty,
express or implied, with respect to the information, assumptions, forecasts, opinions, or
conclusions disclosed in this report. We have no responsibility to update this report to
reflect events and circumstances occurring after the date of the report.
We appreciate the opportunity to serve as the Board’s Airport Consultant for the
proposed 2014 Bonds.
Respectfully submitted,
LEIGHFISHER
E-10
Attachment
BACKGROUND, ASSUMPTIONS, AND RATIONALE
FOR THE FINANCIAL FORECASTS
REPORT OF THE AIRPORT CONSULTANT
on the proposed issuance of
CITIES OF DALLAS AND FORT WORTH, TEXAS
DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
JOINT REVENUE IMPROVEMENT AND REFUNDING BONDS
Series 2014B through 2014G
E-11
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
E-12
CONTENTS
Page
AIRLINE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS ..............................................................................
E-19
Airport Facilities .......................................................................................................
Airport Service Region .............................................................................................
Economic Basis for Airline Traffic ..........................................................................
Historical Socioeconomic Indicators ..................................................................
Economic Profile by Industry Sector..................................................................
Economic Outlook ....................................................................................................
Outlook for the U.S. Economy ............................................................................
Outlook for the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA Economy ........................
Airport Role ..............................................................................................................
Airport’s Role as an International Gateway ......................................................
Airport’s Role as a Connecting Hub ..................................................................
Airport’s Role in American’s System .................................................................
AMR Restructuring and Merger with US Airways ..........................................
Airport’s Role as an Air Cargo Hub...................................................................
Competition with Dallas Love Field ..................................................................
Competition with Fort Worth Alliance Airport ................................................
Competition with Fort Worth Meacham International Airport ......................
Historical Airline Traffic ..........................................................................................
Enplaned Passengers ...........................................................................................
Originating and Connecting Passengers ...........................................................
Airline Aircraft Departures and Fleet Mix ........................................................
Airline Competition and Market Shares............................................................
Domestic Passenger Demand and Airline Service by Destination..................
Distribution of Passengers between the Airport and Love Field ....................
Passenger Service by Airline ..............................................................................
Air Cargo ..............................................................................................................
Aircraft Operations..............................................................................................
Aircraft Landed Weight ......................................................................................
Key Factors Affecting Future Airline Traffic .........................................................
Economic and Political Conditions ....................................................................
Financial Health of the Airline Industry............................................................
Airline Service and Routes..................................................................................
Airline Competition and Airfares ......................................................................
Airline Consolidation and Alliances ..................................................................
Availability and Price of Aviation Fuel .............................................................
Aviation Safety and Security Concerns .............................................................
Capacity of the National Air Traffic Control System .......................................
Capacity of the Airport .......................................................................................
E-19
E-21
E-25
E-25
E-28
E-35
E-35
E-36
E-36
E-37
E-37
E-43
E-50
E-53
E-53
E-56
E-57
E-57
E-57
E-59
E-61
E-61
E-64
E-71
E-71
E-76
E-76
E-76
E-80
E-80
E-80
E-82
E-82
E-83
E-84
E-84
E-85
E-86
E-13
CONTENTS (continued)
Page
AIRLINE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS (continued)
Base Forecast and Assumptions .........................................................................
Stress Test Forecast and Assumptions ...............................................................
Landed Weight Forecast and Assumptions ......................................................
E-89
E-90
E-90
FINANCIAL ANALYSIS .........................................................................................
E-91
Framework for Airport Financial Operations ........................................................
Bond Ordinances .................................................................................................
Airline Agreement ...............................................................................................
Capital Program .......................................................................................................
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program ................................................
Other Capital Program Elements .......................................................................
Sources of Funds.......................................................................................................
Federal Grants-in-Aid .........................................................................................
Passenger Facility Charge Revenues..................................................................
Joint Revenue Bonds ...........................................................................................
Bond Debt Service Requirements .......................................................................
Operation and Maintenance Expenses ...................................................................
Revenues ...................................................................................................................
Airline Revenues ......................................................................................................
Airport Cost Centers ...........................................................................................
Allocation of Requirements to Cost Centers .....................................................
Landing Fees ........................................................................................................
Airline Terminal Rents and Use Fees.................................................................
Airline Payments per Enplaned Passenger .......................................................
Nonairline Revenues ................................................................................................
Terminal Concession Revenues ..........................................................................
Parking Revenues ................................................................................................
Rental Car Privilege Fees ....................................................................................
Ground Transportation Fees...............................................................................
Nonterminal Concessions ...................................................................................
Commercial Development Revenues.................................................................
Employee Transportation Fees ...........................................................................
Utilities Expense Reimbursements.....................................................................
Miscellaneous Income .........................................................................................
Investment Income ..............................................................................................
Natural Gas Revenues .........................................................................................
Hotel Revenues ....................................................................................................
Application of Revenues ..........................................................................................
Application of PFC Revenues..................................................................................
Debt Service Coverage .............................................................................................
Base Forecasts and Stress Test Projections .............................................................
E-91
E-91
E-92
E-92
E-92
E-93
E-93
E-93
E-94
E-94
E-96
E-96
E-97
E-97
E-98
E-98
E-99
E-100
E-101
E-101
E-101
E-102
E-104
E-105
E-105
E-105
E-106
E-106
E-106
E-107
E-107
E-107
E-108
E-109
E-109
E-110
E-14
TABLES
Page
1
Gate Distribution and Use by Airline ...........................................................
E-22
2
Historical Socioeconomic Data......................................................................
E-26
3
Distribution of Nonagricultural Employment by Industry Sector.............
E-30
4
Largest Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA Private Sector Employers......
E-31
5
Employment Forecasts ...................................................................................
E-36
6
Enplaned Passengers at Busiest U.S. Airports .............................................
E-38
7
Originating Passengers at Busiest U.S. Airports..........................................
E-39
8
Connecting Passengers at Busiest U.S. Airports ..........................................
E-40
9
International Enplaned Passengers at Busiest U.S. Gateway Airports ......
E-41
10
Airline Service at Selected U.S. Airports ......................................................
E-42
11
American and US Airways Service at Their Principal Airports .................
E-45
12
Air Cargo at Busiest U.S. Airports ................................................................
E-54
13
Historical Domestic and International Enplaned Passengers ....................
E-58
14
Historical Originating and Connecting Passengers ....................................
E-60
15
Airlines Serving the Airport ..........................................................................
E-62
16
Historical Airline Shares of Enplaned Passengers ......................................
E-63
17
Scheduled Domestic Airline Service by Destination ...................................
E-67
18
Shares of Originating and Enplaned Passengers .........................................
E-72
19
Scheduled Service by Passenger Airline ......................................................
E-73
20
Scheduled International Airline Service.......................................................
E-74
21
Historical Air Cargo .......................................................................................
E-77
22
Historical Aircraft Operations.......................................................................
E-78
23
Historical Aircraft Landed Weight ...............................................................
E-79
24
Airline Traffic Forecasts .................................................................................
E-87
E-15
FIGURES
Page
1
Terminal Layout Plan ....................................................................................
E-20
2
Airport Service Region...................................................................................
E-23
3
Comparison of Seat Capacity at Selected South Central U.S. Airports .....
E-24
4
Trends in Unemployment Rates ...................................................................
E-27
5
Changes in Economic Indicators and Originating Passengers ...................
E-29
6
Seat Capacity at Busiest Connecting Hub Airports .....................................
E-44
7
Seat Capacity Provided by American at Its Principal System Airports.....
E-48
8
Airline Shares of Enplaned Passengers ........................................................
E-64
9
Airline Shares of Originating Passengers .....................................................
E-65
10
Domestic Passenger Origin-Destination Pattern .........................................
E-66
11
Trends in Domestic Passenger Airline Yields ..............................................
E-70
12
Forecast Enplaned Passengers ......................................................................
E-88
E-16
FINANCIAL EXHIBITS
Page
A
Project Costs and Funding Sources for the Capital Program .....................
E-112
B
Sources and Uses of New Money Bond Funds ............................................
E-113
C
Bond Debt Service Requirements .................................................................
E-114
D
Operation and Maintenance Expenses .........................................................
E-117
E
Operating Revenues .......................................................................................
E-118
E-1
Calculation of Passenger Airline Payments .................................................
E-120
F
Sources and Uses of PFC Revenues ..............................................................
E-121
G
Sources and Uses of Rental Car CFC Revenues...........................................
E-122
H
Sources and Uses of Hotel Revenues............................................................
E-123
I
Application of Revenues and Debt Service Coverage.................................
E-124
J-1
Summary of Forecast Financial Results: Base Passenger Forecast ............
E-126
J-2
Summary of Projected Financial Results: Stress Test Passenger Forecast
E-127
E-17
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
E-18
AIRLINE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS
AIRPORT FACILITIES
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport opened in 1974, occupies approximately
17,200 acres in Dallas and Tarrant counties, and is located approximately 17 miles
equidistant from the centers of the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth. Airport access is
provided by a six-lane north-south spine roadway, International Parkway, running
from State Highway 183 south of the Airport to State Highways 114/121 and
Interstate 635 north of the Airport. All public traffic passes through control plazas
at the north and south exits on International Parkway where parking and vehicle
access fees are collected.
The Airport has seven air carrier runways, five north-south parallels and two
northwest-southeast diagonals, ranging in length from 9,000 feet to 13,400 feet.
Separations between the runways permit the simultaneous arrival of aircraft onto
four runways in good visibility and onto three runways in virtually all weather
conditions.
Figure 1 shows a site plan of the five passenger terminals at the Airport.
Terminals B and D to the west of International Parkway and Terminals A, C, and E
to the east of International Parkway provide 155 loading-bridge-equipped gates for
large jet aircraft (some of which are out of service during construction of the
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Plan). Terminals A, B, and C accommodate
American Airlines and its affiliates operating as American Eagle*; Terminal D
accommodates American, Sun Country Airlines, and foreign-flag airlines; and
Terminal E accommodates other airlines. The 27-gate international Terminal D,
opened in 2005, accommodates international passenger arrivals and departures.
An 810-room Hyatt Regency hotel is located adjacent to Terminal C and a 300-room
Grand Hyatt hotel is located above Terminal D. A dedicated transit system, Skylink,
connects the secure (airside) areas of all terminals, with two stations at each
terminal. A system of roadways and buses connects nonsecure (landside) areas of
the Airport. An extension of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) light rail system
to the Airport, scheduled to be completed in mid-2014, will serve a station at
Terminal A.
Approximately 42,100 public and 7,500 employee parking spaces are provided on
Airport property in parking garages adjacent to the terminals and in surface lots
served by shuttle buses. Some of the public spaces are temporarily out of service for
TRIP construction.
*As of April 2014, regional airline service operated as American Eagle is operated by
Envoy Air and Executive Airlines (both wholly owned subsidiaries of American
Airlines Group), Chautauqua Airlines, ExpressJet Airlines, and SkyWest Airlines.
E-19
COMMON
AMERICAN
EAGLE
AMERICAN
EAGLE
TERMINAL B
TERMINAL A
AMERICAN
TERMINAL C
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
TERMINAL D
AMERICAN
(Short-term lease)
COMMON
AIR
CANADA
UNITED
JET BLUE
ALASKA
DELTA
TERMINAL E
WESTJET
VIRGIN AMERICA
FRONTIER
US
AIRWAYS
VACANT
SPIRIT
DFW765 F-0011.ai
Skylink staƟon
Figure 1
TERMINAL LAYOUT PLAN
Dallas/Fort Worth InternaƟonal Airport
Under construcƟon
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth InternaƟonal Airport records.
E-20
A consolidated rental car facility, accommodating all on-Airport rental car
companies, is located near the south Airport entrance. The Airport site also
accommodates a regional distribution center for UPS Air Cargo, other air cargo
facilities, operations and maintenance centers for American Airlines, and other
airline and Airport support facilities.
Table 1 summarizes the distribution of gates by terminal and lessee airline and
shows gate use in terms of average daily departures and departing seats per gate.
Of the 155 gates at the terminals, 136 are leased and 19 are operated by the Board on
a common-use basis. For all gates, including those that are out of service for TRIP
construction, the average use, as scheduled for July 2014, is 6.1 departures per gate
per day.*
AIRPORT SERVICE REGION
The Airport is the principal air carrier airport serving the Dallas-Fort Worth region
and north central Texas. The Airport’s primary service region is the 9,300-squaremile, 13-county Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA),
shown on Figure 2. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the
Census, the estimated population of the MSA in 2013 was 6,811,000. In 2012, the
latest year for which data are available, the estimated population of the City of
Dallas was 1,241,000 and the estimated population of the City of Fort Worth was
778,000.
The Airport’s secondary service region is defined by the location of (and airline
service provided at) the nearest commercial service airports. As shown on Figure 2,
the nearest airports providing daily mainline airline service (generally on aircraft
with 100 seats or more), other than from Dallas Love Field, are those serving Austin
and Oklahoma City. These communities, each approximately 200 miles from the
Airport, are classified as small or medium air traffic hubs by the FAA. Houston,
approximately 250 miles from the Airport, is the nearest community classified by the
FAA as a large air traffic hub.
Figure 3 provides a graphical comparison of scheduled airline service (as measured
in terms of departing seats) provided at airports within a 400-mile radius of the
Airport with more than 1,000 average daily departing seats scheduled in July 2014.
As shown, the Airport has the most airline service of any airport in the south central
United States. The respective roles of the Airport and Dallas Love Field in serving
the MSA are discussed in the later section, “Competition with Dallas Love Field.”
*Throughout this report, data for aircraft departures and seats as scheduled for
July 2014 are from advance airline schedule filings, which are subject to change.
E-21
Table 1
GATE DISTRIBUTION AND USE BY AIRLINE
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
July 2014
Average daily (a)
A
Number of gates
Terminal
B
C
D
E
American and affiliates
American
American Eagle
Subtotal American
25
-25
-38
38
Delta
United
Spirit
US Airways
Virgin America
Frontier
Alaska
JetBlue
Air Canada
WestJet
Subtotal other airlines
------------
------------
25
38
--
1
Subtotal, leased gates
Common use gates (b)
Airport total
25 39
_____________________________
Departing
seats
Departing
seats
per gate
Total
Departures
Departures
per gate
----
72
38
110
499
286
785
6.9
7.5
7.1
73,193
13,748
86,941
1,017
362
790
------------
6
6
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
26
6
6
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
26
42
34
28
19
6
5
4
3
3
1
145
6.9
5.7
7.0
4.9
5.5
5.0
4.0
2.9
2.7
1.0
5.6
4,435
2,744
4,496
3,167
746
694
529
331
200
136
17,478
739
457
1,124
792
746
694
529
331
200
136
672
29 18
26
136
926
6.8
104,083
765
9
9
19
18
1.0
3,310
174
29 27
35
155
944
6.1
107,393
693
29 18
-- -29 18
------------
--
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
(a) Scheduled departures and seats on domestic and international flights.
(b) Gates used mainly by foreign-flag and charter airlines and to accommodate off-schedule and other irregular
operations. Excludes two common use gates at Terminal E used by Air Canada and WestJet. Includes eight
gates at Terminal E out of use during TRIP construction.
Sources: Average daily departures and seats: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed
February 2014.
Number of leased gates by airline and terminal (as of January 2014): Dallas/Fort Worth International
Airport records.
E-22
Ardmore
44
JEFFERSON
69
MARSHALL
OKLAHOMA
Burkburnett
Wichita Falls
Municpal Airport
WICHITA
CHOCTAW
BRYAN
Hugo
70
70
Durant
LOVE
Wichita Falls
Denison
377
LAMAR
287
CLAY
ARCHER
MONTAGUE
Paris
82
Sherman
Gainesville
Bowie
GRAYSON
COOKE
281
DELTA
81
DENTON
WISE
Decatur
OUNG
380
Commerce
JACK
Lewisville
Fort Worth Meacham
International Airport
Weatherford
180
Fort Worth
PALO PINTO
SOMERVELL
Stephenville
RAINS
80
35E
Mineola
KAUFMAN
DALLAS Lancaster
JOHNSON
WOOD
Dallas
Cleburne
HOOD
69
Dallas Love Field
20
SMITH
VAN
ZANDT
35W
ERATH
377
HUNT
Grand Prairie
Arlington
TARRANT
Mansfield
Burleson
Granbury
Sulphur Springs
ROCKWALL
820
PARKER
20
EASTLAND
635
Irving
30
Plano
Richardson
Garland
Dallas-Ft. Worth
International Airport
Mineral Wells
HOPKINS
Greenville
380
COLLIN
Fort Worth
Alliance Airport
Graham
McKinney
Denton
Bridgeport
HENS
271
FANNIN
75
Tyler Pounds
Regional Airport
Gun Barrel City
Tyler
Waxahachie
Ennis
287
31
175
ELLIS
155
45
67
77
HILL
Athens
HENDERSON
Corsicana
81
69
NAVARRO
Hillsboro
67
Jacksonville
287
BOSQUE
ANDERSON
TEXAS
281
COMANCHE
CHE
FREESTONE
35
Palestine
Mexia
HAMILTON
MCLENNAN
Waco Regional
CORYELL
Airport
Waco
84
LIMESTONE
LEON
LEGEND
Road miles from DFW to:
Primary Airport service region (Dallas-Fort WorthArlington Metropolitan Statistical Area)
Population density:
1 dot represents 100 people
Large or medium hub airport as
defined by the FAA for 2012
Small hub airport as defined by
the FAA for 2012
Oklahoma
City
Tulsa
ARKANSAS
Fayetteville
Little Rock
Lubbock
El Paso
Source: U.S. Census data, 2010.
0
15
Graphic scale in miles
OKLAHOMA
State boundary
County boundary
15
Amarillo
Other airport
DFW765 F-0001
MILLS
79
DFW
Midland/
Odessa
TEXAS
Houston
AusƟn
San Antonio
Harlingen
E-23
LOUISIANA
Baton
Rouge
New
Orleans
30
AusƟn
Oklahoma City
Houston
Tulsa
San Antonio
Little Rock
Lubbock
Fayetteville
Midland/Odessa
Amarillo
Baton Rouge
New Orleans
Harlingen
El Paso
195
208
246
263
274
319
320
334
339
340
438
499
538
633
Figure 2
AIRPORT SERVICE REGION
Dallas/Fort Worth InternaƟonal Airport
E-24
= 15,000 average daily deparƟng seats
NEW MEXICO
Midland/Odessa
Lubbock
Amarillo
Corpus ChrisƟ
San Antonio
AusƟn
TEXAS
Source: OAG AviaƟon Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
Tulsa
Houston (Hobby)
Houston (Bush)
Dallas Love Field
Wichita
Dallas/Fort Worth
InternaƟonal Airport
ile
s
0m
40
Oklahoma City
OKLAHOMA
KANSAS
Notes: The area of the circle for each airport is proporƟonal to the number of seats on scheduled deparƟng Ňights.
Airports shown are those within a 400-mile radius of the Airport having more than 1,000 average daily deparƟng
seats scheduled for July 2014.
LEGEND
ARIZONA
COLORADO
LiƩle Rock
Baton Rouge
LOUISIANA
Shreveport
ARKANSAS
FayeƩeville
SpringĮeld
MISSOURI
ALABAMA
Figure 3
COMPARISON OF SEAT CAPACITY AT
SELECTED SOUTH CENTRAL U.S. AIRPORTS
Jackson
MISSISSIPPI
TENNESSEE
KENTUCKY
DFW765 F-0002
ECONOMIC BASIS FOR AIRLINE TRAFFIC
In general, the population and economy of an airport’s service region are the
primary determinants of originating passenger numbers at the airport. Connecting
passenger numbers are primarily determined by airline decisions to provide
connecting service at the airport. As discussed in the later section “Historical Airline
Traffic,” approximately 42% of DFW’s passengers are originating passengers; the
remaining 58% are passengers connecting between flights.
The following sections provide a discussion of the economic basis for originating
passenger traffic at the Airport in terms of historical socioeconomic indicators for the
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA and the economic profile of the MSA by industry
sector.
Historical Socioeconomic Indicators
Table 2 shows historical population, per capita income, and nonagricultural
employment data for the MSA, the State of Texas, and the nation.
Population. Between 1990 and 2000, the population of the MSA increased an
average of 2.6% per year, compared with increases of 2.1% per year for the State of
Texas and 1.2% per year for the nation as a whole. Much of the MSA population
growth resulted from in-migration caused by employment opportunities and a
relatively low cost of living. Between 2000 and 2013, population growth in the MSA
continued to exceed that in the nation, although at a lower average rate (2.0%) than
in the previous decade. In 2013, the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA accounted
for approximately 26% of the population of the State of Texas.
Nonagricultural Employment. The MSA experienced strong growth in
employment between 1990 and 2000 when MSA employment grew an average of
3.3% per year, compared with average growth of 1.9% per year for the nation as a
whole. During and after the 2001 recession, MSA employment decreased more than
for the nation as a whole, but since 2003, employment growth has been stronger
than for the nation. Nonagricultural employment in the MSA increased 10.3%
between 2003 and 2007 (compared with a 5.8% increase for the nation), decreased
2.6% between 2007 and 2010 (compared with a 5.6% decrease for the nation), and
increased 8.9% between 2010 and 2013 (compared with a 4.6% increase for the
nation). Employment by industry sector is discussed in the later section “Economic
Profile by Industry Sector.”
E-25
E-26
5,777
5,943
6,082
6,211
6,342
6,453
6,571
6,703
6,811
2.6%
2.1
2.2
2.0
1.9
1.8
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
1990-2000
2000-2003
2003-2007
2007-2010
2010-2012
2010-2013
2.1%
1.7
2.0
1.9
1.6
1.6
25,245
25,641
26,061
26,448
22,778
23,360
23,832
24,309
24,802
17,057
20,944
21,320
21,690
22,031
22,394
1.2%
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.7
0.7
309,326
311,583
313,874
316,129
295,517
298,380
301,231
304,094
306,772
249,464
282,162
284,969
287,625
290,108
292,805
United
States
10,341
10,576
10,880
11,190
9,737
10,063
10,391
10,604
10,304
7,101
9,432
9,514
9,416
9,367
9,494
129,917
131,497
133,739
136,368
133,747
136,125
137,645
136,852
130,876
109,487
131,881
131,919
130,450
130,100
131,509
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
3.3%
2.9%
1.9%
(1.2)
(0.2)
(0.5)
2.5
2.6
1.4
(0.9)
(0.2)
(1.9)
2.7
2.6
1.5
2.6
2.7
(100.0)
2,862
2,932
3,016
3,090
2,764
2,856
2,938
2,974
2,864
2,001
2,763
2,775
2,705
2,663
2,696
Nonagricultural employment
(thousands) (b)
State of
United
MSA
Texas
States
2.3%
(1.8)
1.7
(1.8)
2.8
n.a.
43,656
45,552
46,136
n.a.
44,522
45,899
46,062
46,729
43,326
$36,219
45,505
44,963
43,795
43,063
43,379
2.3%
(0.5)
2.2
(0.6)
3.1
n.a
40,119
41,954
42,638
n.a.
39,045
40,400
40,826
42,286
39,523
$30,320
38,007
38,479
37,466
37,474
37,784
1.7%
0.3
2.0
(1.4)
1.7
n.a
42,288
43,173
43,735
n.a.
42,190
43,421
44,076
43,586
42,119
$33,998
40,424
40,868
40,582
40,773
41,689
Per capita income
(2012 dollars) (c)
State of
United
Texas
States
MSA
(a) Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, www.census.gov, accessed April 2014.
(b) Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov, accessed April 2014.
(c) Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, www.bea.gov, accessed February 2014. Adjusted to 2012 dollars
using the U.S. Department of Labor Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers.
MSA = Metropolitan Statistical Area comprising the 13 counties shown on Figure 2 for all years.
n.a. = not yet available.
Notes: Population numbers are estimated as of July 1 each year.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
4,044
5,235
5,376
5,483
5,576
5,666
1990
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
MSA
Population
(thousands) (a)
State of
Texas
Table 2
HISTORICAL SOCIOECONOMIC DATA
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA, State of Texas, and United States
Unemployment Rates. As shown on Figure 4, average unemployment rates
for the MSA were consistently lower than those for the United States as a whole
during the 1990s. However, the 2001 recession affected the MSA more severely than
the nation, with MSA unemployment rates exceeding national rates between 2001
and 2007. The unemployment rate in the MSA increased sharply beginning in
November 2008, later than experienced in most of the nation, and peaked at 8.6% in
January 2010. During the 2008-2009 recession, the unemployment rate was
consistently lower in the MSA than for the nation as a whole. In the fourth quarter
of 2013, the MSA unemployment rate was 5.8%, compared with a national rate of
6.7%.
E-27
Per Capita Income. Strong economic growth in the MSA during the 1990s
resulted in an average increase in per capita income of 2.3% per year, compared with
1.7% per year for the nation as a whole. However, between 2000 and 2010, per
capita income for the MSA increased an average of only 0.2% per year (compared
with 0.5% per year for the nation). Between 2010 and 2012, per capita income for the
MSA recovered, increasing an average of 2.8% per year (compared with 1.7% per
year for the nation). Per capita income for the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA in
2012 was 5.5% higher than for the United States, a decreased margin from 2000,
when per capita income was 12.6% higher.
While inflation-adjusted per capita income for the MSA has decreased since 2000,
the MSA has consistently had a lower cost of living than the nation as a whole, a key
factor in attracting businesses and residents. The American Chamber of Commerce
Researchers Association (ACCRA) reported a composite 2013 cost of living index of
95.9 for Dallas and 97.4 for Fort Worth, compared with a national index of 100.0. In
particular, Dallas and Fort Worth rank lower in housing costs. The 2013 ACCRA
cost-of-housing index indicated that average housing costs were 24.0% lower in
Dallas than in the nation as a whole.
Historical Socioeconomic Indicators and Originating Passengers. Figure 5
presents a comparison of historical growth rates for population, per capita income,
nonagricultural employment, and originating passengers in the MSA and the United
States between 2000 and 2012 (the most recent year for which complete data are
available.) Over the 12 years, originating passenger numbers at the Airport
decreased at an average annual rate of 0.1%, the same as that for per capita income.
Economic Profile by Industry Sector
Table 3 presents the percentage distribution of nonagricultural employment by
industry sector in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA and the nation in 1990,
2000, 2007 (before the 2008-2009 recession), 2010, and 2013. Table 4 lists the largest
private employers in the MSA in 2013. The companies listed accounted for
approximately 9% of total nonagricultural employment in the MSA in 2013, with the
remaining 91% accounted for by smaller businesses and organizations and public
sector employers. The following sections provide a summary of each industry
sector, discussed in order of MSA employment share.
E-28
Services. As in the United States as a whole, the services sector (professional,
business, education, health, leisure, hospitality, and other services combined) is the
largest industry sector in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA and has experienced
strong growth since 1990. The sector accounted for 42.2% of MSA employment in 2013,
an increase from a 30.8% share in 1990. The services sector accounted for almost half of
the increase in MSA employment between 1990 and 2000. Growth in the services sector
was again strong between 2000 and 2007. In contrast to most other industry sectors, the
services sector again added jobs between 2007 and 2010, and strong growth continued
between 2010 and 2013. Over the 2007-2013 period as a whole, 175,700 service sector
jobs were added in the MSA, 58,200 jobs (42.5%) in the education and health subsector;
58,200 jobs (33.1%) in the professional and business subsector; 38,600 jobs (22.0%) in the
leisure and hospitality subsector, and 4,200 jobs (2.4%) in the other services subsector.
E-29
E-30
23.7
12.0
17.1
8.1
4.6
3.7
100.0%
2,001
Trade, transportation, and utilities
Government
Manufacturing
Financial activities
Mining, logging, and construction
Information
Total
Total employment (thousands)
2,763
22.7
11.4
12.8
7.5
6.0
4.4
100.0%
14.0%
8.8
8.6
3.7
35.1%
2,938
21.3
12.4
10.1
8.0
6.4
3.0
100.0%
15.1%
10.7
9.4
3.6
38.8%
2,862
20.7
13.6
8.8
8.0
5.5
2.8
100.0%
14.9%
12.4
9.8
3.5
40.7%
3,116
20.6
12.4
8.3
8.2
5.8
2.5
100.0%
16.0%
12.5
10.1
3.5
42.2%
2013
109,487
20.7
16.8
16.2
6.0
5.5
2.5
100.0%
9.9%
10.0
8.5
3.9
32.3%
1990
131,881
19.9
15.8
13.1
5.8
5.6
2.8
100.0%
12.6%
11.5
9.0
3.9
37.0%
137,645
19.4
16.1
10.1
6.0
6.1
2.2
100.0%
13.0%
13.3
9.8
4.0
40.1%
129,917
19.0
17.3
8.9
5.9
4.8
2.1
100.0%
12.9%
15.1
10.0
4.1
42.1%
United States
2000
2007
2010
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov, accessed February 2014. Data for 2013 are preliminary.
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
MSA=Metropolitan Statistical Area.
10.0%
8.4
8.5
3.8
30.8%
Services
Professional and business
Education and health
Leisure and hospitality
Other
Subtotal services
1990
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA
2000
2007
2010
Table 3
DISTRIBUTION OF NONAGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY SECTOR
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA and United States
135,930
19.0
16.0
8.8
5.8
4.9
2.0
100.0%
13.6%
15.5
10.4
4.0
43.5%
2013
Table 4
LARGEST DALLAS-FORT WORTH-ARLINGTON MSA PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYERS
2013
Rank
1
2
3
4
5
Company
Wal-Mart Stores
Texas Health Resources
Bank of America
American Airlines Group
Baylor Health Care System
Headquartered
in MSA
Fortune 500
company
*
Department stores
Health-care services
Financial services
Airline
Health-care services
34,700 (a)
21,100
20,000
19,200
16,900
*
*
*
*
Aerospace
Telecommunications
Financial services
Semiconductors
Health-care services
16,000
15,800 (b)
14,500
14,000
9,400
*
*
*
*
*
Principal industry
Number
of MSA
employees
6
7
8
9
10
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
AT&T
JP Morgan Chase & Co.
Texas Instruments
Parkland Health & Hospital System
11
12
13
14
15
Energy Future Holdings
United Parcel Service
Target
HCA North Texas Division
Raytheon Co.
*
*
*
*
*
*
Energy
Package delivery service
Department stores
Health-care services
Defense systems
9,400
9,200
8,700
8,500
8,500
16
17
18
19
20
Southwest Airlines
Verizon Communications
Citigroup
Bell Helicopter Textron
Wells Fargo
*
*
*
*
Airline
Telecommunications
Financial services
Aerospace
Financial services
7,700
7,300
7,200
7,000
6,000
Health-care services
Health-care services
Financial services
Supermarkets
Health-care services
5,900
5,600
5,500
5,500 (b)
5,300
21
Cook Children's Health Care System
22
Children's Medical Center
23
Fidelity Investments
24
Tom Thumb Food & Pharmacy
25
Methodist Health System
_________________________________
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Notes: Ranking of MSA employers based on number of employees as of July 19, 2013. Government
entities are not shown.
(a)
(b)
Data are for 2010. Wal-Mart Stores did not respond to the 2013 survey.
Data are for 2012. AT&T and Tom Thumb did not respond to the 2013 survey.
Sources: Company ranking: Dallas Business Journal, “2014 Book of Lists.”
Status as a Fortune 500 company: www.fortune.com, accessed February 2014.
E-31
Among the largest MSA employers in the professional and business services
subsector are HP Enterprise Services (formerly Electronic Data Systems) and Sabre
Holdings.
According to the Greater Dallas Chamber of Commerce, in 2013 approximately
134,000 students were enrolled at 12 four-year degree-granting universities and
colleges in the region. Seven community college districts reported a combined
enrollment of approximately 193,000 students. Major universities in the MSA
include Southern Methodist University, Texas Christian University, Texas Woman’s
University, the University of North Texas, the University of Texas at Arlington, and
the University of Texas at Dallas.
According to the Greater Dallas Chamber of Commerce, the MSA is home to more
than 80 hospitals with nearly 20,000 beds, with the health care industry supporting
over 600,000 jobs. Research activities at the University of Texas Southwestern
Medical Center in Dallas support economic growth in the biotechnology and life
science industries. Other major health care employers include the Baylor Health
Care System, Texas Health Resources, Hospital Corporation of America (HCA)
North Texas, Children's Medical Center, and Parkland Health and Hospital System.
The MSA is also a major convention destination. According to the Dallas
Convention and Visitors Bureau, the MSA has approximately 75,000 hotel rooms,
among the highest number of any metropolitan area in the country.
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities. The trade, transportation, and utilities
sector accounts for a greater share of employment in the MSA (20.6% in 2013) than
in the nation as a whole (19.0%), although the sector’s share has steadily decreased
since 1990, when it accounted for 23.7% of MSA employment. The sector added
153,300 jobs in the MSA between 1990 and 2000. Employment in the sector then
decreased slightly (by 4,400 jobs) between 2000 and 2007, and between 2007 and
2010, lost a further 33,200 jobs. The sector saw a strong recovery between 2010 and
2013 with the addition of 50,700 jobs.
The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA is an important business and distribution
center and is known as the nation’s largest inland port. The MSA is served by six
interstate highways, including I-35, a heavily traveled North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA) trade route connecting Mexico, the United States, and Canada.
All of the nation’s largest rail lines serve the MSA and coordinate with road freight
carriers at four intermodal freight centers.
According to a 2013 study by the University of North Texas Center for Economic
Development and Research, the Airport has an estimated $31 billion annual direct
economic impact on the MSA. The Airport’s central location means that it is within
a 4-hour flight of almost all major cities in the continental United States, Canada,
and Mexico. As discussed in the later section, “Airport’s Role as a Connecting
Hub,” the Airport is the headquarters and principal connecting hub for American
E-32
Airlines. The scope and frequency of airline service between the Airport and all
regions of the nation and the world are cited as reasons for the decision of many
companies to locate facilities in the MSA, for example AT&T, which relocated its
headquarters from San Antonio to downtown Dallas in 2008.
International trade is also an important component of the MSA economy. Primary
MSA exports include computer products, electrical machinery, and aircraft. Four
foreign trade zones at 11 sites in the MSA (including one at the Airport) stimulate
international trade by allowing companies to defer or avoid U.S. Customs duties
and certain other taxes. The economy of the MSA also benefited from the 1993
passage of NAFTA, which reduced tariffs and trade barriers among Canada,
Mexico, and the United States. The MSA’s location and transportation infrastructure
position it to benefit particularly from trade with Mexico.
American Airlines Group, the parent company of American Airlines and
US Airways, is the second-largest employer in the MSA, employing approximately
19,200 people in 2013. Other major transportation employers in the MSA are
Southwest Airlines, which operates from, and has its headquarters at, Dallas Love
Field; FedEx, which operates a regional distribution center at Fort Worth Alliance
Airport; and UPS Air Cargo, which operates a regional distribution center at the
Airport. Major trade employers in the MSA include Wal-Mart Stores (the largest
MSA employer) and JC Penney.
Government. The government sector accounted for 12.4% of MSA
employment in 2013, a smaller share than in the nation as a whole (16.0%), although
government employment has steadily increased since 1990. In 2013, the local
government subsector accounted for approximately 75% of sector jobs, and the
federal and State government subsectors accounted for approximately equal shares
of the remainder. Between 1990 and 2000, 74,900 jobs were added in the sector.
Between 2000 and 2007, employment in the sector grew by 47,200 jobs, and between
2007 and 2010, another 25,500 jobs were added in the government sector (the only
industry sector besides services to experience an increase during the recession).
Between 2010 and 2013, the number of government sector jobs then decreased
slightly (by 2,500 jobs). Over the 2007-2013 period as a whole, there was a net
increase of 23,000 government sector jobs in the MSA.
The MSA is home to several regional headquarters of federal agencies, including the
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the
Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas. Military installations in the MSA include the
Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base Fort Worth, which provides training for naval
air and surface reserve forces. Further federal government employment is
attributable to the production of military aircraft in the area.
E-33
Manufacturing. The manufacturing sector accounted for 8.3% of MSA
employment in 2013, a slightly lower share than for the nation as a whole (8.8%).
MSA employment in the manufacturing sector decreased by 56,200 jobs between
2000 and 2007 and by a further 45,300 jobs between 2007 and 2010 before recording
an increase of 7,000 jobs between 2010 and 2013. Over the 2007-2013 period as a
whole, MSA employment in the manufacturing sector decreased by 38,300 jobs, by
far the largest decrease in any sector.
Manufacturing industries in the MSA include computer and electronic products and
aerospace products and parts. MSA employers in these industries include Lockheed
Martin Aeronautics, Raytheon, Texas Instruments, and Bell Helicopter Textron.
Financial Activities. The financial activities sector accounted for 8.2% of
MSA employment in 2013, higher than the share for the nation as a whole (5.8%),
and similar to the MSA share in 1990 (8.1%). Between 1990 and 2000, employment
in the sector increased by 46,500 jobs. Between 2000 and 2007, employment in the
sector increased by a further 25,100 jobs. As a result of the national banking and
credit crisis, between 2007 and 2010, the sector lost 4,200 jobs. Between 2010 and
2013, the sector fully recovered, gaining 25,200 jobs.
The MSA is a national banking center, with major employers including Bank of
America, JP Morgan Chase & Co., Citigroup, Wells Fargo & Co., and Fidelity
Investments. Comerica Bank relocated its headquarters from Detroit to Dallas in
2007.
Mining, Logging, and Construction. The mining, logging, and construction
sector accounted for 5.8% of MSA employment in 2013, an increase from 4.6% in
1990, and higher than the sector’s 2013 share of employment in the nation as a whole
(4.9%). The sector experienced strong growth between 1990 and 2000, with
73,100 jobs added, the greatest increase of any sector in percentage terms.
Decreases in employment and housing prices in the MSA during the 2008-2009
recession were lower than in the nation as a whole. Employment in the sector
decreased 16.8% (31,600 jobs) between 2007 and 2010, compared with a 25.4%
decrease in the nation as a whole. The decrease in MSA employment in this sector
was higher than in any other sector in percentage terms. Between 2010 and 2013,
sector employment the MSA increased by 25,400 jobs, recovering to close to prerecession levels.
According to the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller Home Price Index, in June 2012,
Dallas home prices were 5.0% below the pre-recession peak prices reached in June
2007. By June 2013, Dallas home prices had recovered to 2.6% above June 2007 peak
prices. For the nation as a whole, the Case-Shiller Home Price Index shows that
home prices in June 2012 were 27.4% below June 2007 peak prices and in June 2013
were still 20.1% below peak prices. The less severe contraction in housing is
attributable, in part, to the fact that home prices in the MSA did not increase as
E-34
much as those in the nation during the residential housing boom. The Standard &
Poor’s/Case-Shiller Home Price Index for Dallas shows that home prices in June
2007 were 26% higher than in June 2000, whereas peak home prices in the nation
were 77% higher.
Information. The information sector accounted for 2.5% of MSA
employment in 2013, higher than its share of national employment (2.0%). Between
1990 and 2000, the sector added 49,000 jobs, but between 2000 and 2013 lost
44,500 jobs. The information sector has been strongly affected by the financial
troubles of the telecommunications industry, in particular those of Nortel and its
supplier firms. Major information sector employers in the MSA are AT&T, Verizon
Communications, and Sprint Nextel.
ECONOMIC OUTLOOK
Outlook for the U.S. Economy
Between the fourth quarter of 2007 and the second quarter of 2009, the U.S.
economy, as measured by real gross domestic product (GDP), contracted 4.1%.
National GDP growth resumed in the second half of 2009, but economic growth
since then has not been strong enough to replace the jobs lost during the 2008-2009
recession.
Continued U.S. economic growth will depend on, among other factors, recovery in
the housing market, the effectiveness of monetary stimulus, the health of the
financial and credit markets, the strength of the U.S. dollar versus other currencies,
energy prices, the ability of the federal government to reduce historically high
deficits, inflation remaining within the range targeted by the Federal Reserve, and
the economic health of trading partners.
The Perryman Group published forecasts for the national economy in January 2014.
As shown in Table 5, nationwide nonagricultural employment is forecast to increase
1.7% in 2014 and at an average annual rate of 1.6% for 2013 through 2018.
E-35
Table 5
EMPLOYMENT FORECASTS
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA, State of Texas, and United States
Historical
average annual
increase
2000-2013 (b)
Nonagricultural employment
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA (c) (d)
United States
State of Texas (c)
0.9%
0.2
1.3
Forecast annual increase (a)
2013-2014
2013-2018
2.8%
1.7
2.8
2.4%
1.6
2.3
MSA = Metropolitan Statistical Area comprising the 12 counties shown on Figure 2 for all years.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Source: The Perryman Group: The Perryman Economic Forecast, Winter 2013, January 2014.
Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (see Table 2).
Forecast growth rate for wage and salary employment.
Weighted average forecast growth rates for the Dallas-Plano-Irving and Fort Worth-Arlington
metropolitan divisions.
Outlook for the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA Economy
The MSA experienced the effects of economic recession between 2007 and 2010,
although job losses in the MSA were not as severe as for the nation as a whole.
Recovery from the recession in the MSA has been stronger than for the nation as a
whole, with 2013 nonagricultural employment in 6.1% higher than the 2007 prerecession level. Continued economic growth will generally depend on the same
factors as listed above for the nation. As shown in Table 5, The Perryman Group
forecasts that nonagricultural employment in the MSA will increase 2.8% in 2014 and
will increase at a higher average rate (2.4%) than in the nation (1.6%) between 2013
and 2018.
AIRPORT ROLE
Table 6 presents data on the numbers of enplaned passengers at the busiest
U.S. airports. By this measure, in FY 2013, the Airport ranked fourth.
Table 7 presents data on numbers of originating passengers at the busiest
U.S. airports. By this measure, in FY 2013, the Airport ranked tenth.
Table 8 presents data on numbers of connecting passengers at the busiest
U.S. airports. By this measure, in FY 2013, the Airport ranked second.
Historical trends in passenger traffic at the Airport relative to national trends are
discussed in the later section, “Historical Airline Traffic.”
E-36
Airport’s Role as an International Gateway
Table 9 presents data on the number of international passengers enplaned at the
busiest U.S. gateway airports. As discussed in the later section, “International
Airline Service,” service is provided by both American and foreign-flag airlines
between the Airport and destinations in Asia, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean,
Central America, Europe, Mexico, the Middle East, and South America. In FY 2012,
the Airport was the tenth busiest international passenger gateway to the United
States, and the fourth busiest U.S. gateway for passengers from Mexico and Central
America.
Airport’s Role as a Connecting Hub
Table 10 presents data on domestic and international airline service as scheduled for
July 2014 (measured by average daily scheduled departing seats) at the Airport and
other U.S. connecting hub airports. Figure 6 presents the data graphically.
The Airport has for many years served as the busiest connecting hub in American’s
route system and will continue to be the busiest connecting hub for the new
American Airlines formed by the merger with US Airways. The Airport was also a
connecting hub for Delta Air Lines until January 2005. In FY 2013, an estimated 58%
of the Airport’s passengers were connecting, nearly all between the flights of
American, American Eagle, and affiliate airlines. The combined AmericanUS Airways share of scheduled departing seats at the Airport in July 2014 (83.9%) is
the second highest share among the merged airline’s hub airports after Charlotte
Douglas International Airport (91.6%).
[REMAINDER OF PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
E-37
Table 6
ENPLANED PASSENGERS AT BUSIEST U.S. AIRPORTS
12 months ended September 30
Enplaned passengers (million)
2000 2006 2008 2010 2012 2013
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
2000-2008 2008-2013
Rank
2013
City (airport)
1
2
3
4
5
Atlanta
Los Angeles (International)
Chicago (O'Hare)
Dallas/Fort Worth (a)
Denver
39.3
31.1
33.5
30.6
17.8
41.0
29.3
37.0
30.1
22.5
43.5
29.5
34.6
29.0
24.4
42.6
28.5
32.0
28.2
24.8
45.4
31.3
32.3
29.2
25.7
45.3
32.0
31.9
30.1
25.5
1.3%
(0.7)
0.4
(0.6)
4.0
0.8%
1.7
(1.6)
0.7
0.8
6
7
8
9
10
New York (Kennedy)
San Francisco
Charlotte
Las Vegas
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
15.9
18.8
10.1
16.0
17.3
20.5
16.2
14.3
21.8
20.6
23.8
18.1
17.2
21.6
19.9
22.7
19.1
18.0
18.9
18.8
24.5
21.2
19.8
19.9
19.6
24.7
21.5
21.0
19.8
19.5
5.2
(0.5)
6.8
3.8
1.8
0.8
3.4
4.2
(1.7)
(0.4)
11
12
13
14
15
Miami
Houston (Bush)
Newark
Orlando (International)
Seattle-Tacoma
16.3
16.1
17.1
14.2
13.5
15.5
20.2
17.7
16.9
14.6
16.4
20.3
17.9
17.7
16.0
16.7
19.4
16.6
16.7
15.2
19.0
19.2
17.2
17.2
16.1
19.2
18.8
17.2
16.9
16.5
0.1
2.9
0.6
2.8
2.1
3.2
(1.5)
(0.8)
(0.9)
0.7
16
17
18
19
20
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
Detroit
Philadelphia
Boston
New York (LaGuardia)
16.6
17.2
11.1
12.9
11.7
17.2
17.3
15.3
13.4
12.9
16.7
17.3
15.7
13.2
11.9
15.3
15.4
14.8
13.3
11.8
15.9
15.7
14.7
14.3
12.6
16.2
15.6
14.7
14.6
13.2
0.1
0.1
4.4
0.3
0.2
(0.7)
(2.0)
(1.3)
2.0
2.2
21
22
23
24
25
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
Baltimore/Washington
Washington (Dulles)
Washington (Reagan)
Chicago (Midway)
7.3
8.9
7.9
6.8
6.9
10.2
10.2
11.2
8.9
8.9
11.3
10.3
11.5
8.8
8.4
10.6
10.6
11.2
8.5
8.5
11.4
11.2
10.9
9.3
9.4
11.5
11.0
10.6
9.8
9.8
5.6
1.9
4.8
3.2
2.5
0.4
1.2
(1.7)
2.3
3.1
26
27
28
29
30
Salt Lake City
Honolulu
San Diego
Tampa
Portland, Oregon
8.8
10.4
7.7
7.5
6.6
10.3
9.6
8.6
9.2
6.9
10.2
9.5
9.2
9.1
7.3
9.8
8.7
8.4
8.1
6.5
9.6
9.0
8.7
8.2
7.1
9.6
9.5
8.8
8.3
7.3
1.9
(1.1)
2.3
2.4
1.4
(1.1)
0.0
(0.9)
(1.9)
0.0
Average for airports listed
1.7%
0.5%
Notes: Airports shown are the top 30 U.S. airports ranked by number of enplaned passengers for the
12 months ended September 30, 2013.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
(a) Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, T100 database, accessed April 2014, except as noted.
E-38
Table 7
ORIGINATING PASSENGERS AT BUSIEST U.S. AIRPORTS
12 months ended September 30
Rank
2013
1
2
3
4
5
City (airport)
Originating passengers (millions)
2000 2006 2008 2010 2012 2013
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
2000-2008 2008-2013
Los Angeles (International)
New York (Kennedy)
Las Vegas
San Francisco
Orlando (International)
22.9
12.3
13.8
14.3
13.3
22.6
16.8
18.0
11.7
16.0
22.9
18.7
17.8
13.6
16.7
21.9
17.9
15.9
14.6
15.7
23.6
19.4
17.0
16.0
16.2
24.2
19.5
16.7
16.5
16.1
0.0%
5.4
3.2
(0.6)
2.9
1.1%
0.8
(1.2)
4.0
(0.7)
6
7
8
9
10
Chicago (O'Hare)
Atlanta
Denver
Boston
Dallas/Fort Worth
15.6
15.3
9.2
11.8
12.4
16.7
13.9
11.7
12.7
12.6
16.4
15.0
12.9
12.5
12.5
14.5
13.6
12.4
12.6
11.5
15.5
14.2
13.3
13.6
12.3
15.6
14.3
13.9
13.7
12.6
0.6
(0.2)
4.3
0.7
0.2
(1.0)
(1.0)
1.6
1.9
0.1
11
12
13
14
15
Seattle-Tacoma
New York (LaGuardia)
Newark
Miami
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
10.2
10.8
13.1
9.6
10.5
11.0
11.9
13.3
9.1
12.5
12.0
10.8
13.8
9.0
11.6
11.3
10.8
11.5
9.3
10.2
11.9
11.4
11.9
10.5
10.5
12.0
11.9
11.7
10.7
10.5
2.1
0.0
0.7
(0.8)
1.2
0.0
1.8
(3.3)
3.7
(2.0)
16
17
18
19
20
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
San Diego
Baltimore/Washington
Houston (Bush)
7.1
8.0
7.4
7.5
6.5
9.7
8.2
8.3
8.3
8.0
10.3
8.4
8.9
8.4
9.5
9.8
8.0
8.0
8.2
7.3
10.5
8.3
8.3
8.1
7.6
10.5
8.6
8.3
7.9
7.9
4.8
0.7
2.3
1.4
4.8
0.4
0.4
(1.2)
(1.2)
(3.7)
21
22
23
24
25
Detroit
Washington (Reagan)
Tampa
Honolulu
Philadelphia
8.3
5.9
7.0
8.3
6.5
8.1
7.4
8.7
7.8
9.6
8.9
7.0
8.5
7.7
8.8
7.3
6.9
7.5
7.0
7.7
7.7
7.5
7.6
7.3
7.6
7.8
7.7
7.7
7.6
7.6
0.9
2.1
2.5
(1.0)
3.8
(2.8)
2.1
(1.9)
(0.2)
(2.8)
26
27
28
29
30
Portland, Oregon
Chicago (Midway)
Washington (Dulles)
Salt Lake City
St. Louis
5.5
5.7
4.8
4.1
5.6
5.9
6.4
7.2
5.1
5.5
6.2
5.9
6.8
5.7
5.5
5.6
5.5
6.1
5.0
5.0
6.0
5.9
6.0
5.1
5.1
6.2
6.0
6.0
5.4
5.1
1.6
0.4
4.3
4.1
(0.3)
(0.1)
0.6
(2.5)
(1.0)
(1.5)
Average for airports listed
1.6%
(0.1)%
Notes: Airports shown are the 30 busiest U.S. airports, as ranked by number of originating passengers for the
12 months ended September 30, 2013.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
Sources: LeighFisher analysis of U.S. Department of Transportation, Origin-Destination Survey of Airline
Passenger Traffic, Domestic and International, Databank 1B and T100 databases, accessed April 2014.
E-39
Table 8
CONNECTING PASSENGERS AT BUSIEST U.S. AIRPORTS
12 months ended September 30
Rank
2013
1
2
3
4
5
City (airport)
Atlanta
Dallas/Fort Worth
Charlotte
Chicago (O'Hare)
Denver
Connecting passengers (millions)
2000
2006 2008 2010 2012
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
2013 2000-2008 2008-2013
24.0
18.2
8.4
17.9
8.6
27.1
17.6
10.3
20.3
10.8
28.5
16.5
13.5
18.2
11.6
29.0
16.7
14.7
17.5
12.4
31.2
16.9
16.1
16.7
12.4
31.1
17.5
17.1
16.3
11.6
2.2%
(1.2)
6.1
0.2
3.7
1.7%
1.2
4.9
(2.2)
0.0
6
7
8
9
10
Houston (Bush)
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Miami
Detroit
Los Angeles (International)
9.6
6.8
6.7
8.9
8.2
12.2
8.1
6.4
9.2
6.7
10.8
8.3
7.4
8.4
6.5
12.1
8.6
7.5
8.0
6.7
11.6
9.1
8.5
8.0
7.7
11.0
9.0
8.5
7.9
7.7
1.5
2.6
1.4
(0.8)
(2.9)
0.4
1.7
2.7
(1.3)
3.5
11
12
13
14
15
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
Philadelphia
Newark
New York (Kennedy)
San Francisco
8.6
4.7
4.0
3.6
4.5
8.9
5.7
4.4
3.7
4.5
8.3
6.9
4.1
5.1
4.5
7.3
7.1
5.1
4.9
4.6
7.6
7.0
5.3
5.0
5.2
7.6
7.1
5.5
5.3
4.9
(0.5)
5.1
0.3
4.5
0.1
(1.8)
0.5
6.0
0.6
1.6
16
17
18
19
20
Washington (Dulles)
Seattle-Tacoma
Salt Lake City
Chicago (Midway)
Las Vegas
3.1
3.4
4.7
1.2
2.2
4.0
3.6
5.2
2.5
3.8
4.7
4.0
4.5
2.5
3.9
5.1
3.9
4.8
3.0
3.0
4.9
4.2
4.5
3.5
2.9
4.6
4.5
4.3
3.7
3.1
5.5
2.1
(0.4)
9.8
7.2
(0.5)
2.6
(1.1)
8.1
(4.1)
21
22
23
24
25
Baltimore/Washington
Washington (Reagan)
Honolulu
Houston (Hobby)
Cleveland
1.4
0.9
2.0
1.1
2.0
1.8
1.5
1.8
1.2
1.4
1.9
1.8
1.8
1.0
1.2
2.5
1.6
1.7
1.2
1.4
3.0
1.8
1.7
1.4
1.3
3.1
2.1
1.9
1.7
1.5
4.0
9.3
(1.7)
(0.7)
(6.3)
9.7
3.0
1.2
10.1
4.5
26
27
28
29
30
New York (LaGuardia)
Dallas (Love)
St. Louis
Portland, Oregon
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
0.9
0.7
9.5
1.1
0.2
1.0
0.8
1.6
1.1
0.5
1.0
1.1
1.4
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.1
0.9
0.9
0.8
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.0
0.9
1.4
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.0
2.0
4.9
(21.4)
0.4
20.6
5.8
2.6
(3.1)
0.6
1.0
Average for airports listed
1.0%
1.3%
Notes: Airports shown are the 30 busiest U.S. airports, as ranked by number of connecting passengers for the
12 months ended September 30, 2012.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
Sources:
LeighFisher analysis of U.S. Department of Transportation, Origin-Destination Survey of Airline
Passenger Traffic, Domestic and International, Databank 1B and T100 databases, accessed April 2014.
E-40
Table 9
INTERNATIONAL ENPLANED PASSENGERS AT BUSIEST U.S. GATEWAY AIRPORTS
12 months ended September 30
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
2000-2008 2008-2013
Rank
2013
City (airport)
2000
Enplaned passengers (thousands)
2006 2008
2010
2012
1
2
3
4
5
New York (Kennedy)
Miami
Los Angeles (International)
Newark
Chicago (O'Hare)
9,021
7,959
7,951
4,388
4,948
9,503 11,068 11,243
7,295 8,029 8,268
8,074 8,293 7,662
4,863 5,476 5,603
5,603 5,595 5,185
6
7
8
9
10
Atlanta
San Francisco
Houston (Bush)
Washington (Dulles)
Dallas/Fort Worth (a)
3,076
3,780
2,604
1,899
2,371
4,059
3,997
3,540
2,501
2,840
4,586
4,256
3,883
2,925
2,716
4,454
4,130
4,071
2,963
2,662
4,703
4,519
4,260
3,196
2,956
4,891
4,663
4,312
3,327
3,292
5.1
1.5
5.1
5.5
1.7
1.6
2.3
2.7
3.3
4.9
11
12
13
14
15
Honolulu
Boston
Orlando (International)
Philadelphia
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
2,468
2,077
1,195
1,237
577
1,953
1,927
1,075
1,748
1,052
1,753
1,832
1,278
1,836
1,565
1,779
1,830
1,551
1,849
1,532
2,121
2,029
1,860
1,893
1,756
2,340
2,016
1,944
1,925
1,795
(4.2)
(1.6)
0.8
5.1
13.3
7.5
2.4
11.0
1.2
3.5
16
17
18
19
20
Seattle-Tacoma
Detroit
Charlotte
Las Vegas
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
1,084
1,873
430
495
1,419
1,115
1,834
987
970
1,234
1,429
1,936
1,137
1,142
1,315
1,335
1,382
1,269
1,097
1,097
1,504
1,552
1,454
1,378
1,081
1,673
1,596
1,495
1,443
1,132
3.5
0.4
12.9
11.0
(0.9)
4.0
(4.7)
7.1
6.0
(3.7)
21
22
23
24
25
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Denver
New York (LaGuardia)
Baltimore/Washington
San Diego
460
605
682
264
144
884
917
732
285
154
906
1,143
597
202
125
1,028
958
538
194
125
1,097
871
676
266
269
1,094
935
826
331
299
8.8
8.3
(1.7)
(3.3)
(1.7)
4.8
(4.9)
8.5
13.1
24.4
26
27
28
29
30
Tampa
Chicago (Midway)
San Antonio
Portland, Oregon
Orange County
192
0
104
229
--
207
86
97
270
1
188
34
82
351
--
200
44
72
230
11
240
177
187
238
83
254
249
245
231
202
(0.2)
122.6
(3.0)
5.5
3.6
7.8
64.0
31.6
(10.0)
373.6
Average for airports listed
2013
12,354 12,802
9,630 10,062
8,269 8,499
5,661 5,545
5,169 5,262
2.6%
0.1
0.5
2.8
1.5
2.2%
3.0%
5.8
0.6
0.3
(1.5)
2.3%
Notes: Airports shown are the top 30 U.S. airports (excluding airports in Puerto Rico, the islands of the Pacific
Trust and the U.S. Virgin Islands), as ranked by number of international enplaned passengers for the
12 months ended September 30, 2012.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
(a) Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
Source: U.S. Department of Transportation, T100 database, accessed April 2014, except as noted.
E-41
Table 10
AIRLINE SERVICE AT SELECTED U.S. AIRPORTS
July 2014
City (airport)
Atlanta
Los Angeles (International)
Chicago (O'Hare)
Dallas/Fort Worth
New York (Kennedy)
Average daily scheduled
departing seats
Domestic International
Total
Busiest hubbing airline
Average daily
scheduled
Airline share
departing
of airport
Airline (a)
seats
total
146,562
90,021
97,689
92,774
42,094
21,593
33,226
23,388
14,619
59,447
168,154
123,246
121,077
107,393
101,540
Delta
American
United
American
Delta
137,006
22,669
53,923
90,108
26,990
81.5%
18.4
44.5 (b)
83.9
26.6 (c)
Denver
San Francisco
Charlotte
Las Vegas
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
85,787
63,211
69,796
65,928
67,327
3,702
17,979
8,412
4,971
3,264
89,489
81,190
78,209
70,899
70,591
United
United
American
Southwest
American
34,905
35,003
71,660
31,666
37,565
39.0
43.1
91.6
44.7
53.2
Seattle-Tacoma
Houston (Bush)
Miami
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
Newark
61,163
50,832
29,229
61,302
40,709
7,528
17,521
37,091
4,405
22,399
68,691
68,352
66,320
65,707
63,108
Alaska
United
American
Delta
United
32,425
54,690
48,169
49,658
42,720
47.2
80.0
72.6
75.6
67.7
Boston
Detroit
Orlando (International)
Philadelphia
New York (LaGuardia)
48,599
52,445
48,197
45,908
49,781
10,606
6,246
9,035
9,851
3,752
59,204
58,691
57,232
55,759
53,533
JetBlue
Delta
Southwest
American
Delta
14,842
46,345
17,417
42,949
22,530
25.1 (d)
79.0
30.4
77.0
42.1 (e)
Baltimore/Washington
Chicago (Midway)
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood
Washington (Dulles)
Washington (Reagan)
40,366
39,442
30,034
24,063
36,819
1,762
1,091
9,631
13,957
1,080
42,128
40,533
39,665
38,020
37,899
Southwest
Southwest
JetBlue
United
American
30,545
37,076
8,537
23,961
22,682
72.5
91.5
21.5
63.0
59.8
Salt Lake City
San Diego
Honolulu
Portland, Oregon
Tampa
36,333
33,151
24,301
28,783
26,476
716
1,276
8,867
1,034
1,387
37,048
34,427
33,168
29,817
27,862
Delta
Southwest
Hawaiian
Alaska
Southwest
26,785
14,184
15,381
11,356
10,648
72.3
41.2
46.4
38.1
38.2
Notes: Airports shown are the 30 busiest airports, as ranked by number of scheduled departing seats in July 2014.
Rows may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
Includes regional airline affiliates. American includes US Airways and Southwest includes AirTran.
American's market share of seats is 36.9%.
American's market share of seats is 13.2%.
American's market share of seats is 22.0%.
American's market share of seats is 28.3%.
Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
E-42
The combination of the Airport’s geographic location, the airfield and terminal
facilities provided, and American’s strategy of concentrating service at the Airport
has resulted in the Airport becoming one of the most important airline hubs in the
nation. The number of departing seats scheduled by American from the Airport for
July 2014 is second only to the number of seats scheduled by Delta from its primary
hub in Atlanta. As shown on Figure 6, Houston Bush, Denver, and Atlanta are the
closest large connecting hub airports.
Airport’s Role in American’s System
Table 11 presents data on service (average daily scheduled aircraft departures and
departing seats) provided by American and its American Eagle affiliates and
US Airways and its US Airways Express affiliates from selected U.S. airports.* Data
are presented for the Airport and the next nine busiest U.S. airports in the combined
American-US Airways system, ranked by average daily departing seats as
scheduled for July 2014. Data are also shown for former American hubs at LambertSt. Louis International Airport, Mineta San José International Airport, and San Juan
Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport and for former US Airways hubs at
Las Vegas McCarran International Airport and Pittsburgh International Airport.
Data also include operations by Trans World Airlines, which American acquired in
2001, and America West Airlines, which merged with US Airways in 2005.**
Figure 7 presents the data on American’s scheduled seats from its busiest 10 U.S.
airports graphically.
*As of April 2014, US Airways Express affiliates included Air Wisconsin,
Chautauqua, Mesa Airlines, Piedmont Airlines, PSA Airlines, Republic Airlines,
SkyWest Airlines, and Trans States Airlines.
**In all discussions of airline service and passenger traffic by airline in this report,
unless otherwise noted, data for merged airlines are accounted for with the
surviving airline (i.e., America West Airlines, Trans World Airlines, and
US Airways with American; Northwest Airlines with Delta Air Lines; Continental
Airlines with United Airlines; Midwest Airlines with Frontier Airlines; and
AirTran Airways with Southwest Airlines).
E-43
E-44
United Airlines
American Airlines
400
s
mi le
Dallas/Fort Worth
h
Denver
Source: OAG AviaƟon Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
Atlanta
Detroit
= 50,000 average daily deparƟng seats
Houston (Bush)
Chicago (Midway)
Chicago (O’Hare)
MinneapolisSaint Paul
Note: The area of the circle for each airport is proporƟonal to the number of scheduled seats on domesƟc and
internaƟonal Ňights of the principal hubbing airline and its regional airline aĸliates at that airport for July 2014.
Airports shown are the 20 busiest U.S. airports as measured by numbers of connecƟng passengers for the
12 months ended September 30, 2012. See Table 8.
Delta Air Lines
Southwest Airlines
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Salt Lake City
Alaska Airlines
LEGEND
LLos Angeles
San Francisco
SeaƩle-Tacoma
Miami
Washington
(Dulles)
Figure 6
SEAT CAPACITY AT BUSIEST CONNECTING HUB AIRPORTS
Scheduled DomesƟc and InternaƟonal DeparƟng Seats
CharloƩe
BalƟmoreWashington
Philadelphia
Newark
New York
(Kennedy)
DFW765 F-0005
E-46
247
139
103
154
151
82
86
74
124
130
5
114
104
226
--
10,683
4,514
4,691
7,610
5,338
3,096
3,141
2,521
4,934
4,315
190
4,003
5,033
6,522
--
Dallas/Fort Worth
Charlotte
Miami
Chicago (O'Hare)
Philadelphia
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Washington (Reagan)
Los Angeles (International)
New York (LaGuardia)
New York (Kennedy)
Las Vegas
St. Louis
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pittsburgh
San José, California
2000
Dallas/Fort Worth
Charlotte
Miami
Chicago (O'Hare)
Philadelphia
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Washington (Reagan)
Los Angeles (International)
New York (LaGuardia)
New York (Kennedy)
Las Vegas
St. Louis
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pittsburgh
San José, California
City (airport)
10,040
11,423
2,527
12,546
9,789
6,990
5,619
2,634
7,376
804
1,482
6,137
3,893
10,162
1,073
2004
14,271
19,337
2,675
14,101
14,728
6,765
6,817
2,414
8,249
1,228
2,012
6,054
3,764
5,766
1,167
14,504
22,036
2,914
14,483
16,055
6,529
7,487
1,941
8,554
1,436
1,111
4,466
3,598
3,213
803
14,347
21,628
3,420
15,258
16,042
5,125
8,814
2,011
7,331
1,655
772
779
2,459
2,180
257
12,937
23,133
3,692
16,185
18,481
6,019
11,014
3,296
5,545
1,304
81
903
1,651
2,264
357
July
2006
2008
2010
2012
Daily scheduled aircraft departures:
American Eagle and US Airways Express
211
291
291
275
274
238
337
366
359
384
45
48
50
59
64
245
271
285
297
316
213
292
301
292
309
119
111
101
88
102
123
129
141
151
181
66
63
48
43
62
191
202
202
167
99
21
31
34
37
25
22
33
17
11
1
156
144
92
12
14
64
59
56
38
23
257
131
56
36
38
24
27
17
6
7
Daily scheduled departing seats:
American Eagle and US Airways Express
Table 11 (page 2 of 3)
AMERICAN AND US AIRWAYS SERVICE AT THEIR PRINCIPAL AIRPORTS
13,748
22,026
3,357
16,449
16,007
6,292
11,160
3,376
4,425
1,388
-1,140
-2,332
292
286
361
68
316
294
95
193
63
80
27
-18
-39
6
2014
(1.5)%
26.1
(14.3)
13.3
16.4
22.6
15.7
1.1
10.6
(34.3)
67.2
11.3
(6.2)
11.7
--
(3.8)%
14.5
(18.7)
12.2
9.0
9.7
9.4
(2.8)
11.3
(36.7)
45.2
8.2
(11.3)
3.2
--
9.6%
17.9
3.6
3.7
13.2
(1.7)
7.4
(7.4)
3.8
15.6
(6.9)
(7.6)
(1.9)
(25.0)
(7.0)
8.3%
11.3
3.0
3.9
9.0
(4.1)
3.5
(7.6)
1.4
12.9
(6.1)
(12.3)
(3.2)
(31.8)
(8.2)
(0.9)%
(0.0)
2.4
2.1
(0.0)
(0.6)
6.9
9.7
(10.4)
(0.6)
(100.0)
(20.4)
(100.0)
(5.2)
(15.5)
(0.3)%
(0.2)
5.1
1.8
(0.3)
(0.9)
5.4
4.6
(14.3)
(3.8)
(100.0)
(24.0)
(100.0)
(5.9)
(17.2)
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
2000-2004
2004-2008
2008-2014
E-47
82,836
48,741
38,367
55,868
43,565
39,889
21,136
29,737
26,361
23,967
17,164
56,779
16,409
42,105
10,240
Dallas/Fort Worth
Charlotte
Miami
Chicago (O'Hare)
Philadelphia
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Washington (Reagan)
Los Angeles (International)
New York (LaGuardia)
New York (Kennedy)
Las Vegas
St. Louis
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pittsburgh
San José, California
2006
2008
2010
807
543
259
529
470
338
235
186
302
105
167
203
113
173
50
801
606
264
526
470
313
243
161
300
104
129
150
99
80
39
773
618
293
491
464
283
240
146
247
104
58
48
69
53
19
82,251
46,553
40,381
55,433
43,115
37,037
18,174
24,338
22,864
18,997
21,510
13,795
15,828
25,874
6,415
90,192
49,787
40,752
52,570
42,732
38,685
20,885
22,052
21,937
16,672
21,766
14,694
14,915
11,578
4,507
87,973
56,223
42,182
50,440
41,477
35,806
20,795
20,097
21,975
15,385
17,034
12,674
12,544
6,221
3,678
86,523
61,074
43,920
45,016
42,457
33,463
20,721
19,052
18,272
14,419
7,839
5,837
7,595
4,552
1,985
84,700
64,355
45,276
43,317
43,286
35,561
21,784
21,706
16,127
14,512
6,771
5,420
5,554
4,629
1,968
Daily scheduled departing seats:
All American and US Airways operations
722
487
256
561
437
330
220
204
304
112
151
211
121
364
60
759
653
309
491
468
302
262
173
177
95
46
45
45
55
19
2012
Daily scheduled aircraft departures:
All American and US Airways operations
2004
July
90,108
71,660
48,169
44,732
42,949
37,565
22,682
22,669
15,176
13,419
6,865
5,014
3,363
4,953
1,927
804
667
335
496
464
298
279
185
158
99
44
46
20
58
17
2014
(0.2)%
(1.1)
1.3
(0.2)
(0.3)
(1.8)
(3.7)
(4.9)
(3.5)
(5.6)
5.8
(29.8)
(0.9)
(11.5)
(11.0)
(2.4)%
(0.1)
(5.1)
1.6
0.0
(1.3)
(0.5)
(5.3)
1.4
(17.4)
5.2
(18.6)
(8.2)
(8.0)
(4.9)
2000-2004
1.7%
4.8
1.1
(2.3)
(1.0)
(0.8)
3.4
(4.7)
(1.0)
(5.1)
(5.7)
(2.1)
(5.6)
(30.0)
(13.0)
2.7%
5.6
0.9
(1.6)
1.9
(1.4)
2.5
(5.7)
(0.3)
(1.8)
(3.8)
(8.3)
(4.8)
(31.6)
(10.3)
2004-2008
0.4%
4.1
2.2
(2.0)
0.6
0.8
1.5
2.0
(6.0)
(2.3)
(14.1)
(14.3)
(19.7)
(3.7)
(10.2)
0.1%
1.6
4.0
(1.0)
(0.2)
(0.8)
2.3
2.3
(10.2)
(0.7)
(16.4)
(17.9)
(23.6)
(5.2)
(12.6)
2008-2014
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
Note: Airports shown are the 10 busiest U.S. airports, as ranked by departing seats on American, US Airways, and their regional affiliates for July 2014, plus
San Juan, St. Louis, and San José, formerly hubs for American, and Las Vegas and Pittsburgh, formerly hubs for US Airways.
Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
795
489
315
526
436
348
225
253
288
240
123
482
171
508
73
2000
Dallas/Fort Worth
Charlotte
Miami
Chicago (O'Hare)
Philadelphia
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
Washington (Reagan)
Los Angeles (International)
New York (LaGuardia)
New York (Kennedy)
Las Vegas
St. Louis
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Pittsburgh
San José, California
City (airport)
Table 11 (page 3 of 3)
AMERICAN AND US AIRWAYS SERVICE AT THEIR PRINCIPAL AIRPORTS
E-48
Source:
Note:
LEGEND
Phoenix
(Sky Harbor)
Dallas/
Fort Worth
OAG AviaƟon Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
The area of the circle for each airport is proporƟonal to the number of scheduled seats on all deparƟng Ňights at
that airport in July 2014. Airports shown are the 10 busiest system airports for American and US Airways
combined as ranked by scheduled deparƟng seats on domesƟc and internaƟonal Ňights of American, American
Eagle, US Airways, and US Airways Express in July 2014. See Table 11.
= 50,000 average daily deparƟng seats
Los Angeles
Chicago (O’Hare)
CharloƩe
New York
(Kennedy)
Figure 7
SEAT CAPACITY PROVIDED BY AMERICAN AT ITS
PRINCIPAL SYSTEM AIRPORTS
Miami
Washington
(Reagan)
Philadelphia
New York
(LaGuardia)
DFW765 F-0006
For July 2014, an average daily total of 90,108 seats on 804 departing flights are
scheduled from the Airport by American and its affiliates. In the combined
American-US Airways system, the number of seats scheduled by American,
US Airways, and their affiliates from the Airport for July 2014 is 1.3 times the
number of seats scheduled by the airlines from Charlotte; 1.9 times the number
scheduled from Miami; and more than twice the number of seats scheduled from the
next busiest hubs at Chicago O’Hare, Philadelphia, and Phoenix Sky Harbor.
With the 1999 acquisition of Reno Air, American increased its service in the West
and adding a hub at San José. With the 2001 acquisition of Trans World, American
added a hub at St. Louis and increased its presence at the New York area airports.
American has since closed its San José and St. Louis hubs and reduced service at
New York Kennedy. American has also reduced service at Chicago O’Hare.
In the 2005 merger between America West and US Airways, America West hubs at
Las Vegas and Phoenix were added to US Airways hubs at Charlotte and
Philadelphia. US Airways also had large operations at Boston, New York LaGuardia,
Pittsburgh, and Washington Reagan. US Airways subsequently reduced service at
Boston, Las Vegas, and New York LaGuardia, and closed the Pittsburgh hub.
US Airways service at Reagan increased following a 2012 transaction with Delta in
which US Airways relinquished landing-takeoff slots and facilities at LaGuardia in
return for landing-takeoff slots at Reagan.
Aircraft Fleet. As of September 2013, American operated a fleet of
620 mainline aircraft – 221 B-737, 92 B-757, 70 B-767, 56 B-777, and 171 MD-80 – a
reduction from 904 aircraft in the combined American-Trans World fleet in June
2001. The American Eagle airlines operated an additional 278 aircraft (ATR 72,
CRJ 200, CRJ 700, ERJ 135, ERJ 140, ERJ 145, and E-175). US Airways operated a
fleet of 344 mainline aircraft – 253 A320, 19 A330, 18 B-737, 24 B-757, 10 B-767, and
20 E-190. US Airways Express operated an additional 281 aircraft (DH-8, CRJ 200,
CRJ 700, CRJ 900, E-170, and E-175).
In July 2011, American announced the largest aircraft order in aviation history as
part of its strategy to modernize its fleet with more fuel-efficient aircraft. The firm
order for 460 narrowbody aircraft to be delivered between 2013 and 2022 consists
of 100 current-generation B-737, 100 next-generation B-737-MAX, 130 currentgeneration A320, and 130 next-generation A320-NEO aircraft. American intends to
use the aircraft to replace MD-80, B-757, B-767-200, and older B-737 aircraft. The
new aircraft will give American the flexibility to choose between variants of the
B-737 and A320 to provide seating capacities ranging between 120 and 180 seats.
American expects the new aircraft to be up to 35% more fuel efficient on a per-seat
basis than the aircraft they are replacing. In addition to the 2011 narrowbody
aircraft order, American has purchase commitments for 13 B-777-300 aircraft to be
delivered in 2013 and 2014; 5 B-777-200 aircraft to be delivered between 2014 and
2016; and 42 B-787 aircraft to be delivered beginning in 2014.
E-49
In January 2013, American announced a 12-year agreement with Republic Airways
to operate up to 100 E-175 aircraft as American Eagle. The aircraft seat
76 passengers in a two-cabin configuration and are the largest aircraft in the
American Eagle fleet. The acquisition is part of American’s strategy to better match
aircraft size with market demand and was effected by the terms of the new pilot
agreement as described in the later section “AMR Restructuring and Merger with
US Airways.” As of September 2013, Republic also operated 58 E-170 and E-175
aircraft for US Airways Express.
Oneworld and Other Alliances. American has increased the reach of its
network through alliances and code-sharing agreements. American is a member of
the Oneworld alliance, which includes Air Berlin, British Airways, Cathay Pacific
Airways, Finnair, Iberia Airlines of Spain, Japan Airlines, LAN Airlines, Malaysia
Airlines, TAM Airlines, Qantas Airways, Qatar Airways, Royal Jordanian Airlines,
and S7 Airlines and their affiliates. Oneworld member airlines exchange passengers
with one another on preferential terms and frequently code-share. As scheduled for
July 2014, British Airways will provide nonstop service from the Airport to its
London Heathrow hub, Qantas Airways to Brisbane, and Qatar Airways to its Doha
hub. American provides nonstop service to Oneworld hub airports in Buenos Aires,
Lima, Madrid, Santiago, and Tokyo. The Airport ranks as the third busiest
Oneworld U.S. gateway, after Miami and New York Kennedy.
In July 2010, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) granted antitrust
immunity to American, British Airways, Finnair, Iberia, and Royal Jordanian,
thereby permitting the airlines to coordinate transatlantic service, capacity, and
airfares. In October 2010, American, British Airways, and Iberia agreed to the terms
of a joint business agreement whereby revenues and costs will be shared on certain
transatlantic routes. In November 2010, American received antitrust immunity for a
similar transpacific joint business agreement with Japan Airlines.
As of March 2014, American also maintains code-sharing agreements and other
commercial relationships with various airlines, including Alaska Airlines, which has
served the Airport since September 2005, JetBlue Airways, which has served the
Airport since May 2012, and WestJet, which has served the Airport since April 2013.
AMR Restructuring and Merger with US Airways
After reporting losses in 2001 through 2005, AMR reported net profits in 2006 and
2007 as average fares increased and growth in domestic capacity was contained. As
discussed in the later section, “Key Factors Affecting Future Airline Traffic,” high
fuel prices precipitated a profitability crisis in the U.S. airline industry in the
summer of 2008. The crisis led most U.S. airlines, including American, to reduce
domestic capacity in the second half of 2008. Although fuel prices decreased in late
2008, airlines continued to reduce capacity as a result of the global economic
recession and decreased passenger demand. American reduced its seat-mile
capacity by 3.8% in 2008 and by a further 7.2% in 2009.
E-50
Restructuring in Bankruptcy. In October 2009, AMR announced its
“FlightPlan 2020” strategy to achieve profitability. Key components of this strategy
were emphasizing service from its “cornerstone” markets of Chicago,
Dallas/Fort Worth, Los Angeles, Miami, and New York while closing its St. Louis
hub and decreasing nonhub flights; pursuing joint venture and other commercial
agreements with partner airlines, such as British Airways and Japan Airlines; and
reducing its unit costs by replacing MD-80 aircraft with more fuel-efficient B-737
aircraft. While the FlightPlan 2020 strategy provided operational benefits, it did not
adequately address structural deficiencies impeding American’s ability to compete,
and in November 2011, AMR filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, citing a
need to reduce labor and other costs. In January 2012, US Airways announced that
it had hired consultants to advise on a potential merger with American. In February
2012, AMR presented a restructuring plan for a standalone airline that envisioned
annual cost reductions of $2 billion from restructuring debt and leases, grounding
inefficient aircraft, improving supplier contracts, and reducing employee costs. The
plan also envisioned annual revenue improvements of $1 billion from increased
flying, to be made possible by the relaxation of work rules and scope provisions,
fleet renewal and optimization, and service improvements.
Following unsuccessful negotiations between American and its nine employee
workgroups, in March 2012, AMR filed a motion with the bankruptcy court seeking
to reject all of its collective bargaining agreements. In April 2012, US Airways and
all three unions representing American employees announced an agreement on
terms for collective bargaining agreements in the event of an American-US Airways
merger. The proposed merger had also gained the backing of creditors, and in
August 2012, American and US Airways announced a nondisclosure agreement to
share information related to a possible merger. In September 2012, the bankruptcy
court approved American’s request to reject its collective bargaining agreements,
and by December 2012, all nine workgroups had approved new collective
bargaining agreements with American. As well as providing for reduced employee
benefit costs and increased productivity, these agreements allow American to
increase the outsourcing of flying to the American Eagle airlines and to participate
in domestic code-sharing. In January 2013, American announced a new corporate
identity including a new logo and aircraft livery and other marketing initiatives and
service enhancements.
American-US Airways Merger. In February 2013, American and US Airways
announced an agreement under which the two airlines would combine in an
all-stock transaction to form the world’s largest airline as measured by seat-mile
capacity. The merger was subject to approval by, among others, the bankruptcy
court (through its approval of the reorganization plan) and the U.S. Department of
Justice (through its review under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements
Act).
In August 2013, the Department of Justice filed a lawsuit seeking to block the merger
on the grounds that it would reduce competition and lead to higher airfares. A
E-51
settlement of the lawsuit was announced in November 2013. Under the settlement
agreement, American will divest 52 pairs of landing-takeoff slots and five gates at
Washington Reagan, 17 pairs of slots and two gates at New York LaGuardia, and
two gates and associated airport facilities at Boston Logan, Chicago O’Hare, Dallas
Love, Los Angeles, and Miami. Also as part of the settlement, the combined airline
agreed to maintain hubs at Charlotte, Chicago O’Hare, New York Kennedy, Los
Angeles, Miami, Philadelphia, and Phoenix for a period of three years ”generally
consistent with its historical operations.” (The DFW hub was not mentioned in the
settlement because the State of Texas withdrew as a plaintiff in the lawsuit.) The
settlement agreement paved the way for American to emerge from bankruptcy and
complete the merger with US Airways in December 2013. The integration of the
airline under a single operating certificate is expected to be completed by the end of
2015.
The combined airline is named American, is headquartered in Fort Worth, and
accounts for 24.7% of U.S. seat-mile capacity and 6.0% of worldwide airline seat-mile
capacity (based on 2013 scheduled seat-mile capacity). The combined airline is a
member of the Oneworld alliance (US Airways was formerly a member of the Star
Alliance).
The merger creates a new holding company, the American Airlines Group, to
replace AMR Corporation and US Airways Group. US Airways stockholders own
28% of the new holding company and American creditors and employees own the
remaining 72%. Most senior management positions at the airline are held by
ex-US Airways Group managers The board of the new holding company consists of
three AMR representatives, four US Airways Group representatives, and five AMR
creditor representatives. The new holding company also owns regional affiliate
airlines Envoy, Executive, Piedmont, and PSA.
The merger announcement advertised the following air service features and benefits
of the combination:
y
Enhanced ability to compete with other global airlines, particularly United
and Delta
y
Improved financial performance through approximately $1.0 billion in
synergies from increased revenues and decreased expenses
y
Preservation of service to all destinations and continued operation of hubs
at Charlotte, Chicago O’Hare, Dallas/Fort Worth, Los Angeles, Miami, New
York Kennedy, Philadelphia, and Phoenix
y
Increased choices and service for American corporate account holders and
frequent flyers
y
Enhanced employee compensation and benefits
E-52
Of the approximate $1.0 billion in expected synergies in 2015, $900 million are
estimated to be in revenue benefits from a more extensive network, which makes the
airline more attractive to corporate travel buyers and frequent flyers, and from a
diverse fleet, which allows capacity to be better matched to demand route-by-route.
One-time costs to combine operations are estimated to be approximately $1.2 billion
over three years.
Unlike the earlier Delta-Northwest and United-Continental mergers, the rationale
for the American-US Airways merger did not center on a more extensive
international network. Of the 62 airports served by US Airways but not served by
American, only 13 are outside of the United States, and all but one (Tel Aviv) are in
Canada, Europe, or Latin America, regions both served by American. By contrast,
Northwest added 18 international airports to Delta’s route system, mostly in Asia
where Delta’s route system was weak, and Continental added 63 international
airports to United’s route system, mostly in Latin America, where United’s route
system was weak.
Analysts cite weakness in the combined American-US Airways network in Asia,
where, in July 2014, American is scheduled to serve 4 airports, compared with
14 airports for Delta and 20 airports for United. American expects closer
relationships with Oneworld partner airlines, in particular its joint business
agreement with Japan Airlines, to counteract this weakness.
Airport’s Role as an Air Cargo Hub
Table 12 presents data on the tonnage of cargo enplaned and deplaned at the busiest
U.S. airports. In 2012, the Airport ranked eleventh among U.S. airports in terms of
total air cargo tonnage. In common with most U.S. airports, the Airport has seen
reduced air cargo activity. The cargo tonnage enplaned and deplaned at the Airport
in 2012 was 33% less than in 2000. The Airport is one of five regional hubs for
integrated cargo operator UPS Air Cargo. According to UPS, it operates a 49,000square foot freight facility and a 323,000-square-foot sort facility with the capacity to
sort 46,000 packages per hour. The airline operates an average of 8 daily flight
departures per weekday from the Airport. In addition to UPS Air Cargo, as of
December 2013, 14 other all-cargo airlines provided service at the Airport, as shown
in the later Table 15.
Competition with Dallas Love Field
Dallas Love Field is the only other airport in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA
that provides scheduled passenger airline service. Love Field is owned and
operated by the City of Dallas and is located on 1,300 acres approximately 5 miles
from downtown Dallas and 12 miles from the Airport. Love Field has two air carrier
runways and its passenger terminal has 20 aircraft gates in use. Love Field also
accommodates extensive general and business aviation activities.
E-53
Table 12
AIR CARGO AT BUSIEST U.S. AIRPORTS
Calendar Years
Rank
2012
1
2
3
4
5
City (airport)
Total cargo (metric tons in thousands)
2000 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
2000-2008
2008-2012
Memphis
Anchorage
Louisville
Miami
Los Angeles
2,489
1,804
1,520
1,643
2,039
3,555
2,253
1,739
1,779
1,914
3,692
2,691
1,983
1,831
1,907
3,695
2,347
1,975
1,807
1,629
3,916
2,543
2,188
1,842
1,696
4,016
2,450
2,168
1,930
1,772
5.1%
3.3
3.3
1.2
(2.8)
6
7
8
9
10
New York (Kennedy)
Chicago (O'Hare)
Indianapolis
Newark
Atlanta
1,818
1,469
1,165
1,082
894
1,706
1,475
932
985
862
1,636
1,558
987
975
747
1,452
1,264
1,040
887
655
1,344
1,377
1,013
856
659
1,283
1,254
989
744
646
(2.8)
(1.9)
(1.4)
(2.5)
(3.8)
(3.0)
(0.2)
(1.2)
(4.3)
(0.3)
11
12
13
14
15
Dallas/Fort Worth
Cincinnati
Oakland
Houston (Bush)
Ontario
905
391
685
368
464
742
413
645
401
549
758
43
668
409
494
653
36
622
412
437
645
371
511
423
356
603
539
481
438
413
(4.0)
(25.7)
(1.2)
1.4
(0.8)
(2.0)
96.3
(6.2)
1.5
(1.4)
16
17
18
19
20
Honolulu
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Seattle-Tacoma
Phoenix (Sky Harbor)
441
559
870
457
375
435
571
563
347
302
444
532
595
342
287
411
507
492
291
250
441
420
427
283
251
412
389
381
284
274
(0.9)
(1.2)
(6.9)
(5.5)
(4.9)
0.1
(6.4)
(6.2)
(0.6)
2.2
21
22
23
24
25
Washington (Dulles)
Boston
Denver
Detroit
Portland, Oregon
384
475
472
298
282
308
366
317
222
252
351
325
282
214
284
334
282
251
211
221
332
260
252
193
190
268
248
237
219
199
(1.7)
(6.3)
(7.6)
(4.2)
(3.0)
(5.4)
(3.1)
(1.5)
0.9
(2.6)
26
27
28
29
30
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
Orlando (International)
Salt Lake City
San Diego
Charlotte
370
271
257
153
185
300
204
212
138
122
275
198
181
189
148
233
160
161
123
115
212
136
145
115
122
199
173
167
141
127
(5.6)
(6.4)
(5.7)
(2.7)
(5.8)
(3.9)
2.0
1.0
3.4
2.6
Average for airports listed
(0.9)%
2.1%
1.1
2.4
1.7
2.1
0.5%
Notes: Airports shown are the 30 busiest U.S. airports, measured by total cargo tonnage (enplaned plus
deplaned freight and mail) in 2012.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
Source: Airports Council International.
E-54
According to schedules published by OAG Aviation Worldwide, 16,820 average
daily departing seats are scheduled from Love Field for the second quarter of 2014,
97% of them on Southwest Airlines. Service is provided by Southwest (16,270 seats
on 118 flights to 18 airports), United Express (310 seats on 6 flights to Houston
Bush), Delta Connection (220 seats on 5 flights to Atlanta), and SeaPort Airlines
(20 seats on 2 flights to El Dorado, Arkansas). Since 1998, Love Field has also been
served at times by American, American Eagle, and Legend Airlines (now defunct).
Airline service from Love Field using aircraft with more than 56 seats is restricted by
federal legislation. The Wright Amendment (1979) prohibited such nonstop service
from Love Field to airports other than those in the bordering states of Arkansas,
Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The Shelby Amendment (1997)
added airports in Alabama, Kansas, and Mississippi to those permitted to receive
nonstop service. In December 2005, the number of permitted airports was further
expanded to include those in Missouri. These federal statutory limitations (referred
to collectively in this report as the Wright Amendment) have had the intended effect
that most airline service from Love Field meets short-haul regional travel demand
and does not compete directly with medium-haul and long-haul flights from the
Airport. Between the mid-1980s and 2006, Love Field accounted for between 9% and
11% of the combined number of passengers enplaned at Love Field and the Airport.
In November 2004, Southwest began public lobbying to repeal the Wright
Amendment, arguing that it was anticompetitive. After much controversy and
negotiation, in June 2006, the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the Dallas/Fort Worth
International Airport Board, American, and Southwest reached agreement
(documented in the Five Party Agreement) to repeal fully the Wright Amendment
by 2014. As provided by the Five Party Agreement:
y
Through-ticketing (i.e., issuance of a ticket for travel involving a change of
flights at a permitted airport) is allowed for all domestic flights from Love
Field.
y
Nonstop flights from Love Field to international destinations are not
permitted.
y
The number of gates at Love Field is capped at 20, with Southwest having
preferential-use rights to 16 gates and American and United each having
rights to 2 gates; other gate facilities have been decommissioned or
demolished. As discussed in the earlier section, “American-US Airways
Merger,” as part of the settlement with the Department of Justice, American
is required to relinquish its two gates. An agreement whereby American
will sublease the two gates to Virgin America has been approved by the
Department of Justice and is awaiting approval by the City of Dallas.
y
A voluntary curfew on aircraft operations between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m.
applies at Love Field.
E-55
y
The cities of Dallas and Fort Worth agree to oppose passenger service at
airports within an 80-mile radius of Love Field other than the Airport
(including Alliance and Meacham International airports, both operated by
the City of Fort Worth). Southwest and American would be required to
relinquish gates at Love Field should they or their affiliates or codeshare
partners add service at any such airport.
y
Southwest would be required to relinquish gates at Love Field if it or an
affiliate or codeshare partner were to serve the Airport.
These provisions were enacted into law in October 2006 in the Wright Amendment
Reform Act (Reform Act). Pursuant to the Reform Act, all restrictions on domestic
airline service from Love Field will expire in October 2014. Southwest, American,
and United have since executed use and lease agreements for Love Field with the
City of Dallas, all with expiration dates in 2028.
Southwest began through-ticketing on flights from Love Field in October 2006. In
December 2006, Southwest adjusted its schedules to provide direct flights (one stop,
with no change of plane and minimized ground time at the intermediate airport)
and convenient connecting flights in permitted states. As shown in the later
Table 18, Love Field’s share of the combined number of passengers enplaned at Love
Field and the Airport increased from 9.7% in FY 2006, before the Reform Act was
passed, to 12.3% in FY 2008, as Southwest increased service and Love Field captured
a higher share of originating passengers in the Dallas-Fort Worth market.
As required by the Reform Act, the City of Dallas is implementing a terminal
modernization plan for Love Field, which provides for expansion of the landside
terminal building and construction of a 20-gate concourse to replace the existing
concourses. Each gate accommodates standard narrowbody aircraft (such as the
B-737). The terminal and concourse have a nominal design capacity of 8 million
enplaned passengers, approximately twice the number enplaned at Love Field in
2013. The modernization plan is scheduled to be completed before October 2014,
when the Wright Amendment restrictions expire.
In February 2014, Southwest announced that it will begin nonstop service from Love
Field to 15 destinations not now permitted under the Wright Amendment restrictions
effective October and November 2014. All 15 are among the top 25 destinations
listed in the later Table 17. Service will be continued to all 16 destinations now
served nonstop, but some of these will have reduced numbers of flights. Although
Southwest has not yet published flight schedules to the 31 destinations, the airline
has stated that it expects that approximately 140 departures per day will be operated
initially, approximately 20 more than currently operated.
Competition with Fort Worth Alliance Airport
Fort Worth Alliance Airport, located 17 miles north of downtown Fort Worth and
16 miles northwest of the Airport, has two air carrier runways serving general
E-56
aviation, all-cargo, and aircraft maintenance operations. The airport is privately
managed on behalf of the owner, the City of Fort Worth.
Alliance is part of a large mixed-use development and, among other aviation and
aerospace businesses, accommodates FedEx’s southwest regional hub. FedEx
operates approximately 15 flight departures per weekday from its 600,000-squarefoot facility at Alliance. Until December 2012, Alliance also accommodated a major
American Airlines maintenance and engineering center, which was closed as part of
the airline’s bankruptcy restructuring.
Alliance opened in 1989 and began reporting significant amounts of air cargo
tonnage in 1997, when FedEx opened its hub. According to the U.S. Department of
Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, more than five times as much
cargo tonnage was enplaned at the Airport than at Alliance in 2012. Alliance is not
certified by the FAA for scheduled passenger airline service. As noted in the earlier
discussion of the Reform Act, the City of Fort Worth has agreed that it will not
promote passenger airline service at Alliance.
Competition with Fort Worth Meacham International Airport
Fort Worth Meacham International Airport is a general aviation airport, owned and
operated by the City of Fort Worth, located 5 miles north of downtown Fort Worth.
Meacham has not been served by scheduled passenger airlines since 1998 and is not
certified by the FAA to accommodate scheduled passenger airline service (although
it may accommodate unscheduled service). As noted in the earlier discussion of the
Reform Act, the City of Fort Worth has agreed that it will not promote passenger
airline service at Meacham.
HISTORICAL AIRLINE TRAFFIC
Enplaned Passengers
Table 13 presents historical data on numbers of domestic and international enplaned
passengers at the Airport. Between FY 1990 and FY 2000, the number of enplaned
passengers at the Airport increased an average of 2.3% per year compared with an
average increase of 3.8% per year for the United States as a whole.
Between FY 2000 and FY 2002, the number of enplaned passengers at the Airport
decreased 15.5% as a result of the decline in airline travel following the
September 11, 2001, attacks and reduced airline service. With the return of
passenger confidence in the security of airline travel and the widespread availability
of low fares, traffic growth returned. Between FY 2002 and FY 2004, enplaned
passenger numbers at the Airport increased an average of 6.5% per year, compared
with 8.4% per year for the nation as a whole.
E-57
Table 13
HISTORICAL DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL ENPLANED PASSENGERS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
Fiscal
Year
Passengers (thousands)
Domestic International Total
Percent
international
Annual percent increase (decrease)
Domestic International
Total
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
22,957
22,826
24,343
23,738
24,191
1,368
1,306
1,378
1,452
1,541
24,325
24,132
25,721
25,190
25,732
5.6%
5.4
5.4
5.8
6.0
(0.6)%
6.6
(2.5)
1.9
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
25,300
25,754
26,426
26,334
26,245
1,655
1,733
1,892
2,116
1,824
26,955
27,487
28,318
28,450
28,069
6.1
6.3
6.7
7.4
6.5
4.6
1.8
2.6
(0.3)
(0.3)
7.4
4.7
9.2
11.8
(13.8)
4.8
2.0
3.0
0.5
(1.3)
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
28,218
26,447
23,658
24,038
26,790
2,371
2,433
2,182
2,191
2,516
30,589
28,880
25,840
26,230
29,305
7.8
8.4
8.4
8.4
8.6
7.5
(6.3)
(10.5)
1.6
11.4
30.0
2.6
(10.3)
0.4
14.8
9.0
(5.6)
(10.5)
1.5
11.7
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
26,736
27,308
27,092
26,322
25,430
2,777
2,840
2,760
2,716
2,516
29,514
30,149
29,852
29,038
27,946
9.4
9.4
9.2
9.4
9.0
(0.2)
2.1
(0.8)
(2.8)
(3.4)
10.4
2.3
(2.8)
(1.6)
(7.4)
0.7
2.2
(1.0)
(2.7)
(3.8)
2010
2011
2012
2013
25,526
26,097
26,204
26,835
2,662
2,769
2,956
3,292
28,188
28,867
29,160
30,128
9.4
9.6
10.1
10.9
0.4
2.2
0.4
2.4
5.8
4.0
6.8
11.4
0.9
2.4
1.0
3.3
7,305
7,348
10.6%
10.9
0.3%
First 3 months
(October-December)
2013
6,532
772
2014
6,551
798
_____________________________
(4.5)%
5.5
5.4
6.1
3.3%
(0.8)%
6.6
(2.1)
2.2
0.6%
Notes: The international-domestic split for FY 1990 through FY 1998 was estimated using the
U.S. Department of Transportation T100 database.
Prior to FY 2000, enplaned passenger numbers exclude nonrevenue passengers, which, since
FY 2000, have typically accounted for less than 2% of the total.
Rows may not add to totals shown and calculated percentages may not match those shown
because of rounding.
Sources: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records, except as noted.
E-58
Notwithstanding Delta’s closure of its connecting hub at the Airport in January 2005,
enplaned passenger numbers increased an average of 1.4% per year between FY 2004
and FY 2006 (compared with an increase of 3.2% per year for the nation), as American
and other airlines replaced service withdrawn by Delta and load factors increased.
Between FY 2006 and FY 2009, enplaned passenger numbers at the Airport
decreased an average of 2.5% per year as a result of American and other airlines
reducing seat capacity in response to the contraction of demand during the 20082009 recession and increased operating expenses. Between FY 2006 and FY 2009,
enplaned passenger numbers decreased an average of 1.7% per year for the nation as
a whole. With the resumption of economic growth, enplaned passenger numbers at
the Airport increased an average of 1.9% per year between FY 2009 and FY 2013,
compared with an average of 1.2% per year for the nation. The Airport accounted
for an estimated 3.8% of passengers enplaned at all U.S. airports in FY 2013, a
decrease from 4.4% in FY 2000.
Between FY 1990 and FY 2000, the number of passengers enplaning on international
flights increased an average of 5.7% per year as international travel demand to and
from the MSA grew and American and foreign-flag airlines increased service.
During the decade, the number of domestic enplaned passengers at the Airport
increased an average of 2.1% per year.
Between FY 2000 and FY 2009, international enplaned passenger numbers increased
an average of 0.7% per year, while domestic enplaned passenger numbers decreased
an average of 1.1% per year. Between FY 2009 and FY 2013, international enplaned
passenger numbers increased an average of 7.0% per year, largely as a result of
increased international service by American and new international service by Qantas
Airways and Emirates Airlines, while domestic enplaned passenger numbers
increased an average of 1.4% per year. In FY 2013, international passengers accounted
for 10.9% of all passengers enplaned at the Airport, an increase from 5.6% in FY 1990.
Originating and Connecting Passengers
Table 14 presents historical data on originating and connecting passengers at the
Airport. Between FY 1990 and FY 2000, the number of passengers originating their
air journeys at the Airport increased an average of 4.3% per year, higher than the
average increase for connecting passengers (1.2% per year). In FY 2000, originating
passengers accounted for an estimated 40.4% of all enplaned passengers.
Between FY 2004 and FY 2007, originating passenger numbers grew strongly as
American competed with Southwest service from Love Field by lowering fares in
certain markets from the Airport. During this period, originating passenger
numbers increased an average of 4.3% per year while connecting passenger numbers
decreased an average of 1.9% per year. In FY 2007, the peak historical year for
originating passenger numbers at the Airport, originating passengers accounted for
an estimated 43.4% of all enplaned passengers.
E-59
Table 14
HISTORICAL ORIGINATING AND CONNECTING PASSENGERS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
Enplaned passengers
(in thousands)
Fiscal
Year Originating Connecting Total
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
8,100
8,000
8,600
8,400
8,600
16,225
16,132
17,121
16,790
17,132
24,325
24,132
25,721
25,190
25,732
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
9,400
9,900
10,300
10,900
11,000
17,555
17,587
18,018
17,550
17,069
26,955
27,487
28,318
28,450
28,069
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
12,360
11,680
10,410
10,460
11,420
18,229
17,200
15,430
15,770
17,885
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
12,150
12,590
12,950
12,530
11,360
17,364
17,559
16,902
16,508
16,586
Annual percent
increase (decrease)
Originating Connecting Total
Percent
Percent
Originating Connecting
(0.6)%
6.1
(1.9)
2.0
(0.8)%
6.6
(2.1)
2.2
33.3%
33.2
33.4
33.3
33.4
9.3
5.3
4.0
5.8
0.9
2.5
0.2
2.5
(2.6)
(2.7)
4.8
2.0
3.0
0.5
(1.3)
34.9
36.0
36.4
38.3
39.2
65.1
64.0
63.6
61.7
60.8
30,589
28,880
25,840
26,230
29,305
12.4
(5.5)
(10.9)
0.5
9.2
6.8
(5.6)
(10.3)
2.2
13.4
9.0
(5.6)
(10.5)
1.5
11.7
40.4
40.4
40.3
39.9
39.0
59.6
59.6
59.7
60.1
61.0
29,514
30,149
29,852
29,038
27,946
6.4
3.6
2.9
(3.2)
(9.3)
(2.9)
1.1
(3.7)
(2.3)
0.5
0.7
2.2
(1.0)
(2.7)
(3.8)
41.2
41.8
43.4
43.2
40.6
58.8
58.2
56.6
56.8
59.4
2010 11,490
16,698
28,188
2011 12,110
16,757
28,867
2012 12,270
16,890
29,160
2013 12,600
17,528
30,128
_____________________________
1.1
5.4
1.3
2.7
0.7
0.4
0.8
3.8
0.9
2.4
1.0
3.3
40.8
42.0
42.1
41.8
59.2
58.0
57.9
58.2
Note:
(1.2)%
7.5
(2.3)
2.4
66.7%
66.8
66.6
66.7
66.6
Prior to FY 2000, enplaned passenger numbers exclude nonrevenue passengers, which since
FY 2000 have typically accounted for less than 2% of the total.
Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
Sources: Enplaned passengers: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
Originating passengers: LeighFisher estimates based on U.S. Department of Transportation,
Origin-Destination Survey of Airline Passenger Traffic, Domestic and International,
Databank 1B and T100 databases, accessed February 2014.
E-60
Between FY 2007 and FY 2009, originating passenger numbers decreased as a result
of the recession and decreased airline aircraft seat capacity. Over the 2 years,
originating passenger numbers decreased an average of 6.3% per year, while
connecting passenger numbers decreased an average of 0.9% per year. With the
resumption of economic growth, between FY 2009 and FY 2013, originating
passenger numbers increased an average of 2.6% per year, while connecting
passenger numbers increased an average of 1.4% per year. In FY 2013, originating
passengers accounted for an estimated 41.8% of enplaned passengers at the Airport.
Airline Aircraft Departures and Fleet Mix
Between FY 2000 and FY 2006, the average number of daily scheduled departing
flights at the Airport decreased at a faster average annual rate (-3.0%) than the
number of passengers (-0.2%). Over the 6-year period, the average seating capacity
of airline aircraft serving the Airport and passenger load factors both gradually
increased. The average number of passengers per departure increased from 76.0 in
FY 2000 to 90.4 in FY 2006. By FY 2013, the regional aircraft share of departures had
increased to 37.6%, and the average number of passengers per departure was 92.0.
Airline Competition and Market Shares
Table 15 lists the airlines providing service at the Airport as scheduled for July 2014.
All of the mainline U.S. airlines except Southwest serve the Airport. AirTran
stopped service at the Airport in November 2011 following its acquisition by
Southwest. Virgin America began domestic service at the Airport in December 2010;
Spirit began domestic service in May 2011; and JetBlue began domestic service in
May 2012. Recent new international service at the Airport is provided by Qantas, a
Oneworld alliance member, (to Brisbane, May 2011), Emirates (to Dubai, February
2012), and WestJet with which American has code-sharing and other marketing
relationships (to Calgary, April 2013).
Airline Shares of Enplaned Passengers. Table 16 presents historical data on
airline shares of enplaned passengers at the Airport. Figure 8 presents a comparison
of airline shares of enplaned passengers at the Airport in FY 1993, the peak marketshare year for Delta and Delta Connection, and FY 2013. As shown, the combined
share of passengers enplaned on the flights of American, American Eagle,
US Airways, and US Airways Express (domestic and international) increased from
65.0% in FY 1993 to 85.5% in FY 2013. The combined share for Delta, Delta
Connection, and Northwest (which merged with Delta in October 2008) decreased
from 30.9% in FY 1993 to 3.8% in FY 2013
Airline Shares of Originating Passengers. Figure 9 presents a comparison of
airline shares of originating passengers at the Airport in FY 1993 and FY 2013. The
combined share of originating passengers enplaned on the flights of American,
American Eagle, US Airways, and US Airways Express (domestic and international)
increased from 64.7% in FY 1993 to 66.0% in FY 2013. The combined share for Delta,
Delta Connection, and Northwest decreased from 26.5% in FY 1993 to 7.6% in FY 2013.
E-61
Table 15
AIRLINES SERVING THE AIRPORT
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
July 2014
Scheduled passenger airlines (a)
Domestic service
International service
Mainline
Alaska Airlines
American Airlines (c)
Delta Air Lines
Frontier Airlines
JetBlue Airways
Spirit Airlines
Sun Country Airlines
United Airlines
US Airways
Virgin America
Regional
Compass Airlines (g)
Envoy Air (c) (d)
ExpressJet Airlines (d) (g) (h)
Endeavor Air (f)
Mesa Airlines (h)
Shuttle America (g) (h)
SkyWest Airlines (g) (h)
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
U.S.-flag airlines
American Airlines (c)
Envoy Air (c) (d)
Spirit Airlines
Sun Country Airlines
Foreign-flag airlines
Aeromexico Connect (e)
Avianca (formerly TACA)
British Airways (c)
Cayman Airways
Emirates Airlines
KLM-Royal Dutch Airlines
Korean Air
Lufthansa German Airlines
Qantas Airways (c)
Qatar Airways (c) (i)
Sky Regional Airlines (f)
WestJet
All-cargo airlines (b)
Air China Cargo
Airborne Express
Ameriflight
Asiana Cargo
Cargolux
Cathay Pacific Cargo
China Airlines Cargo
EVA Airways
FedEx
Korean Air Cargo
Lufthansa Cargo
Martinaire
Nippon Cargo Airlines (NCA)
Singapore Airlines Cargo
UPS Air Cargo
Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records as of December 2013.
Flights marketed under the Oneworld alliance.
Airline operating as American Eagle affiliate of American Airlines.
Airline operating as affiliate of Aeromexico.
Airline operating as affiliate of Air Canada.
Airline operating as Delta Connection.
Airline operating as United Express.
Qatar begins nonstop service to Doha on July 1, 2014.
E-62
Table 16
HISTORICAL AIRLINE SHARES OF ENPLANED PASSENGERS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
Domestic
American and affiliates
American
American Eagle
US Airways
Subtotal American
57.7%
7.8
1.7
67.2%
55.8%
7.5
2.3
65.6%
57.4%
8.3
0.4
68.1%
64.9%
11.8
2.6
79.4%
66.0%
11.5
2.7
80.2%
66.3%
12.1
2.9
81.2%
65.8%
12.1
3.1
81.1%
64.9%
11.8
3.2
79.9%
64.2%
11.5
3.0
78.6%
63.1%
10.8
2.9
76.8%
Delta
Spirit
United
Virgin America
Frontier
Alaska
JetBlue
Sun Country
AirTran (a)
ATA
National
Vanguard
Other
Subtotal
Total domestic
18.4%
-3.8
-0.5
--0.3
0.6
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.4
25.1
92.2%
19.2%
-3.7
-0.6
--0.1
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.3
0.3
25.9
91.6%
17.3%
-3.2
-0.7
--0.1
1.0
0.7
--0.2
23.3
91.4%
3.8%
-3.8
-0.9
0.3
-0.1
1.5
0.6
--0.2
11.2
90.6%
3.7%
-3.5
-1.0
0.5
-0.2
1.1
0.2
--0.3
10.4
90.6%
3.7%
-3.2
-1.0
0.5
-0.1
1.1
---0.3
9.8
91.0%
3.6%
-3.0
-1.0
0.4
-0.1
1.1
---0.3
9.5
90.6%
3.7%
0.4
3.1
0.5
0.9
0.5
-0.1
1.1
---0.3
10.5
90.4%
3.8%
1.8
3.1
0.8
0.8
0.5
0.2
0.1
0.1
---0.1
11.2
89.9%
3.8%
3.4
2.8
0.7
0.7
0.4
0.4
0.1
----0.0
12.2
89.1%
International
American and affiliates
American
American Eagle
Subtotal American
5.7%
-5.7%
6.6%
0.1
6.7%
6.9%
0.2
7.1%
7.5%
0.4
7.9%
7.3%
0.5
7.8%
7.2%
0.4
7.6%
7.7%
0.4
8.1%
7.8%
0.5
8.3%
7.9%
0.6
8.4%
8.1%
0.6
8.7%
Other U.S.-flag airlines
Foreign-flag airlines
Total international
0.7
1.4
7.8%
0.5
1.2
8.4%
0.6
0.8
8.6%
0.7
0.9
9.4%
0.4
1.1
9.4%
0.2
1.2
9.0%
0.2
1.1
9.4%
0.2
1.1
9.6%
0.2
1.5
10.1%
0.3
1.9
10.9%
Airport total
100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
Notes: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding. Shares include affiliates of airlines shown.
(a) Southwest does not serve the airport.
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
E-63
Domestic Passenger Demand and Airline Service by Destination
Table 17 and Figure 10 present data on the top 25 markets as ranked by domestic
originating passengers at the Airport in FY 2013. Also shown in the table are the
numbers of average daily scheduled seats by airport as scheduled for July 2014 and
the airlines providing nonstop service from the Airport to the 25 markets. The top
five markets – Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and
San Francisco – accounted for 25.5% of originating passengers at the Airport in
FY 2013. In July 2014, American is scheduled to provide nonstop flights to all
25 markets. Other airlines are scheduled to provide competing service to all of the
top 10 markets and 21 of the top 25 markets (all except Charlotte, Nashville,
Pittsburgh, and St. Louis). Spirit is scheduled to provide nonstop flights to the top
13 markets. In addition, Southwest is scheduled to provide nonstop or direct (onestop, no change of plane) service to 21 of the top 25 markets (all except Detroit,
Charlotte, Salt Lake City, and Pittsburgh) from Love Field.
E-64
Figure 11 shows trends in domestic passenger airline yields (revenue per passengermile) for American at the Airport, all other airlines at the Airport, and all airlines
nationwide from FY 2000 through FY 2013. The figure illustrates how the “yield
premium” historically enjoyed by American decreased between FY 2000 and
FY 2005, as a result of fare competition with other airlines at the Airport and with
Southwest at Love Field. In FY 2006, yields increased for American and for all other
airlines serving the Airport after Delta closed its hub. Between FY 2006 and FY 2009,
yields decreased slightly as a result of intensified fare competition, partly with
Southwest at Love Field following the relaxation of some of the Wright Amendment
restrictions. Between FY 2009 and FY 2013, as the economy improved and the
airlines restricted capacity and increased fares, the average domestic passenger yield
at the Airport increased, consistent with the national trend.
E-65
ȬŜŜ
Las Vegas
Phoenix
Salt Lake City
Denver
Source: U.S. Department of TransportaƟon, Origin-DesƟnaƟon Survey of Airline Passenger Traĸc,
DomesƟc, Databank 1B, accessed March 2014.
Houston
s
400 mile Dallas/
Fort Worth
Note: Markets shown accounted for 1% or more of total inbound and outbound passengers on
scheduled airlines at Dallas/Fort Worth InternaƟonal Airport in a 10% sample for the 12 months
ended September 30, 2013. The width of the lines is proporƟonal to the share of domesƟc
originaƟng passengers from the Airport to each market.
Shaded states are those not subject
to the Wright Amendment restricƟons
on Ňights from Dallas Love Field.
San Diego
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Portland
SeaƩleTacoma
MinneapolisSaint Paul
St. Louis
Chicago
Nashville
Detroit
Miami
Orlando
Tampa
Figure 10
DOMESTIC PASSENGER ORIGIN-DESTINATION PATTERN
Dallas/Fort Worth InternaƟonal Airport
Atlanta
CharloƩe
Washington, D.C.
Philadelphia
New York
Boston
DFW765 F-0009
E-67
New York
LaGuardia
Newark
Kennedy
White Plains
MacArthur (Islip)
Subtotal
Chicago
O'Hare
Midway
Subtotal
Washington, D.C.
Reagan National
Baltimore/Washington
Dulles
Subtotal
3
4
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
John Wayne (Orange County)
LA/Ontario
Bob Hope (Burbank)
Long Beach
Subtotal
City/airport
2
1
Originating
passenger
rank
FY 2013
1,180
1,205
1,160
801
797
1,377
1,361
1,379
1,403
1,428
1,247
1,217
1,202
1,244
1,221
Air miles
from
DFW
575
484
315
1,374
1,460
8
1,468
1,201
611
96
25
8
1,942
1,278
473
173
23
14
1,960
1.8%
1.5
1.0
4.4%
4.7%
0.0
4.7%
3.8%
2.0
0.3
0.1
0.0
6.2%
4.1 %
1.5
0.6
0.1
0.0
6.3%
FY 2013
(ended September 30) (a)
Average daily Percent of
originating
originating
passengers
passengers
1,478
860
948
3,286
3,462
-3,462
2,627
1,199
226
--4,052
3,670
1,403
560
--5,633
Average daily
scheduled
seats
Table 17
SCHEDULED DOMESTIC AIRLINE SERVICE BY DESTINATION
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
American (d)
American, Spirit (d)
American, United
American, Spirit, United
(d)
American, Delta, Spirit (d)
American, United (d)
American, Delta
American, Spirit, United, Virgin America (d)
American
American
Airlines offering
nonstop service (c)
July 2014 (b)
E-68
Miami
Fort Lauderdale
Miami
West Palm Beach
Subtotal
Boston
Logan
T.F. Green (Providence)
Manchester-Boston
Subtotal
Orlando
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Sky Harbor
Mesa Gateway
Subtotal
Seattle-Tacoma
Minneapolis-Saint Paul
10
11
12
13
14
15
Denver
Atlanta
Las Vegas
6
7
8
9
San Francisco
San Francisco
Mineta San José
Oakland
Subtotal
City/airport
5
Originating
passenger
rank
FY 2013
1,673
859
882
875
964
1,291
1,551
1,529
1,552
1,099
1,102
1,083
657
716
1,070
1,478
1,451
1,457
Air miles
from
DFW
619
562
533
100
633
751
686
831
37
24
892
490
329
114
933
1,150
1,086
978
916
231
81
1,228
2.0
1.8
1.7%
0.3
2.0%
2.4
2.2
2.7%
0.1
0.1
2.9%
1.6%
1.1
0.4
3.0%
3.7%
3.5
3.1
2.9%
0.7
0.3
3.9%
FY 2013
(ended September 30) (a)
Average daily
Percent of
originating
originating
passengers
passengers
Table 17 (page 2 of 3)
SCHEDULED DOMESTIC AIRLINE SERVICE BY DESTINATION
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
1,774
1,750
2,111
-2,111
1,659
1,694
1,618
--1,618
1,241
1,778
280
3,299
2,686
3,454
1,945
2,296
682
168
3,146
Average daily
scheduled
seats
Alaska, American (d)
American, Delta, Spirit, Sun Country (d)
American, US Airways (d)
Spirit
American, Spirit (d)
American, Spirit, (d)
American, JetBlue, Spirit (d)
American, Spirit (d)
American
American
American, Froniter, Spirit, United (d)
American, Delta, Spirit (d) (e)
American, Spirit (d)
American, United, Virgin America
American (d)
Spirit (d)
Airlines offering
nonstop service (c)
July 2014 (b)
E-69
1,003
620
1,630
1,068
547
330
292
282
274
272
17,662
474
402
376
92,774
43,083
43.5
100.0%
1,338
1,242
984
700
1,084
49,691
1,537
1,070
2,281
1,857
412
2,269
1,554
1.1
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.9
56.5%
1.5
1.3
1.2
1.3%
0.4
1.7%
1.8
Average daily
scheduled
seats
American, Delta
American (d)
Alaska, American, Spirit (d)
American
American (d) (e)
American, Spirit (d)
American, Spirit (d)
American
American, United (e)
American (e)
American, Delta, Spirit
Airlines offering
nonstop service (c)
July 2014 (b)
(a) Source: LeighFisher estimates based on U.S. Department of Transportation, Origin-Destination Survey of Airline Passenger Traffic, Domestic,
Databank 1B and T100 databases, accessed February 2014.
(b) Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser, accessed February 2014.
(c) Including flights operated by regional affiliates.
(d) One-stop direct service (no change of plane required) also offered from Dallas Love Field.
(e) Nonstop service also offered from Dallas Love Field.
Note: Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
31,233
Salt Lake City
Nashville
Portland, OR
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Subtotal airports listed
21
22
23
24
25
1,183
910
922
421
113
534
Airport total
San Diego
Tampa
Charlotte
18
19
20
210
232
550
13,571
Houston
Bush
Hobby
Subtotal
17
981
Air miles
from
DFW
All other U.S. airports
Detroit
City/airport
16
Originating
passenger
rank
FY 2013
FY 2013
(ended September 30) (a)
Average daily
Percent of
originating
originating
passengers
passengers
Table 17 (page 3 of 3)
SCHEDULED DOMESTIC AIRLINE SERVICE BY DESTINATION
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Passenger yields for all airlines at the Airport have historically been higher than
passenger yields for airlines in the nation as a whole, although the margin decreased
from 48% above the U.S. average in FY 2000 to 26% above the U.S. average in
FY 2013 for American, and from 19% above the U.S. average in FY 2000 to 3% below
the U.S. average in FY 2013 for all other airlines. The relatively high average yields
at the Airport are attributable, in part, to the shorter average itinerary length of
airline service at the Airport (an average of 1,070 miles, which is approximately 11%
shorter than the national average) and, in part, to the status of the Airport as a
connecting hub, with American dominating service in many travel markets.
E-70
Distribution of Passengers between the Airport and Love Field
Table 18 shows the distribution of originating and enplaned passengers in the
Dallas-Fort Worth market between the Airport and Love Field.
Distribution of Originating Passengers. In FY 2000, Love Field accounted
for 19.3% of originating passengers in the Dallas-Fort Worth market. In FY 2005,
Love Field’s share of originating passengers had decreased to 15.6%. (Short-haul
traffic was affected disproportionately by the additional security measures following
the September 2001 terrorist attacks.) In FY 2006, after service to Missouri airports
became permitted under the Wright Amendment, Love Field’s share increased to
17.1%.
Since passage of the 2006 Reform Act, Love Field’s share of originating passengers
has increased to 18.9% in FY 2013 as a result of fare competition and new direct
service to airports outside the Wright Amendment states. Over the 6 years FY 2007
to FY 2013, the overall number of originating passengers in the Dallas-Fort Worth
market decreased, from approximately 16.0 million to 15.5 million.
Distribution of Enplaned Passengers. Between FY 2000 and FY 2006, before
the Reform Act was passed, Love Field accounted for between 9% and 11% of
enplaned passengers in the Dallas-Fort Worth market. Since FY 2006, Love Field’s
share of enplaned passengers has been approximately 12%.
Passenger Service by Airline
Table 19 presents data on scheduled passenger airline service from the Airport to
domestic and international destinations in July 2013 and July 2014. Table 20
provides additional information on passenger airline service to international
destinations as scheduled for July in 2000 through 2014.
For July 2014, 944 average daily aircraft departures are scheduled to 197 airports
(143 domestic and 54 international) from the Airport. American and American
Eagle together are scheduled to serve 189 destinations nonstop, 141 of the
143 domestic destinations (all except Myrtle Beach and Oakland) and 48 of the
54 international destinations (all except Amsterdam, Brisbane, Doha, Dubai, Grand
Cayman, and Punta Cana).
E-71
E-72
12,150
12,590
12,950
12,530
11,360
11,490
12,110
12,270
12,600
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2,780
2,790
2,880
2,940
2,250
2,590
3,020
3,050
2,710
2,960
2,980
2,290
2,230
2,220
14,270
14,900
15,150
15,540
14,400
15,180
15,970
15,580
14,070
15,320
14,660
12,700
12,690
13,640
28,188
28,867
29,160
30,128
29,514
30,149
29,852
29,038
27,946
30,589
28,880
25,840
26,230
29,305
3,949
4,017
4,073
4,205
2,976
3,244
3,911
4,068
3,872
3,502
3,541
2,819
2,781
2,905
32,137
32,884
33,234
34,332
32,490
33,393
33,763
33,106
31,818
34,092
32,420
28,659
29,011
32,211
Enplaned passengers
DFW (b)
DAL (c)
Total
80.5
81.3
81.0
81.1
84.4
82.9
81.1
80.4
80.7
80.7%
79.7
82.0
82.4
83.7
19.5
18.7
19.0
18.9
15.6
17.1
18.9
19.6
19.3
19.3%
20.3
18.0
17.6
16.3
87.7
87.8
87.7
87.8
90.8
90.3
88.4
87.7
87.8
89.7%
89.1
90.2
90.4
91.0
(b)
(c)
(a)
12.3
12.2
12.3
12.2
9.2
9.7
11.6
12.3
12.2
10.3%
10.9
9.8
9.6
9.0
LeighFisher analysis of U.S. Department of Transportation, Origin-Destination Survey of Airline Passenger Traffic, Domestic and
International, Databank 1B and T100 databases, accessed February 2014.
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
City of Dallas, Aviation Department records.
Note: Calculated percentages may not match those shown and rows may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
12,360
11,680
10,410
10,460
11,420
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
Originating passengers (a)
DFW
DAL
Total
Shares of
Originating passengers Enplaned passengers
DFW
DAL
DFW
DAL
Table 18
SHARES OF ORIGINATING AND ENPLANED PASSENGERS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) and Dallas Love Field (DAL)
Fiscal Years ended September 30
(passengers in thousands)
Table 19
SCHEDULED SERVICE BY PASSENGER AIRLINE
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Airline
Average daily
aircraft departures
July
July
2013
2014
Average daily
departing seats
July
July
2013
2014
Airports served
nonstop (a)
July
July
2013
2014
American and affiliates
American
American Eagle
US Airways
US Airways Express
Subtotal American
491
295
19
-- (b)
805
499
286
19
-804
73,798
14,239
2,829
19
90,885
73,193
13,748
3,167
-90,108
109
89
3
1
186
114
86
3
-189
Other U.S.-flag airlines
Spirit
Delta (c)
United (c)
Sun Country
Virgin America
Frontier (c)
Alaska
JetBlue
Subtotal other U.S.-flags
30
38
35
5
6
4
3
3
124
28
42
34
5
6
5
4
3
126
4,614
4,014
2,890
758
785
593
500
381
14,534
4,496
4,435
2,744
773
746
694
529
331
14,748
25
8
8
8
2
1
1
1
41
22
8
8
7
2
1
2
1
37
353
301
345
266
-217
198
309
172
136
96
35
2,429
353
301
299
266
259
221
200
198
170
136
98
35
2,537
1
1
1
1
-1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
107,847
107,393
196
197
Foreign-flag airlines
Qantas
Korean Air
British Airways
Emirates
Qatar
Lufthansa
Air Canada (c)
Aeromexico (c)
KLM
WestJet
Avianca (formerly TACA)
Cayman Airways
Subtotal foreign-flags
Total all airlines
1
1
1
1
-1
3
3
1
1
1
-- (b)
14
943
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
-- (b)
14
944
Notes: Data shown are for scheduled domestic and international service from the Airport in July 2013
and July 2014.
Columns may not add to totals shown because of rounding.
(a) Numbers of airports served nonstop are not additive because some airports receive nonstop
service by more than one airline.
(b) Less than one average daily departure.
(c) Includes regional affiliates.
Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
E-73
Table 20
SCHEDULED INTERNATIONAL AIRLINE SERVICE
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Weekly scheduled aircraft departures
Central Europe and
Caribbean America Middle East Mexico
July
Asia and
Pacific
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
24
24
14
14
14
108
105
83
94
94
30
28
30
28
35
21
21
28
30
31
49
63
49
54
60
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
17
24
17
18
18
103
89
89
74
80
35
32
37
33
24
29
27
30
35
30
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
17
21
26
35
49
80
80
81
88
95
27
33
38
38
38
37
37
39
40
45
Canada
South
America
Total
182
183
190
164
196
31
31
28
21
33
445
456
422
404
463
56
49
49
49
60
247
233
279
237
188
40
33
27
29
25
528
488
528
474
424
60
59
74
68
75
237
262
281
345
331
25
29
29
39
39
484
522
567
652
672
1.6%
(3.2)
5.1
1.0%
0.6
6.0
South
America
Total
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
2000-2004
2004-2008
2008-2014
(12.9)%
7.0
18.1
(3.5)%
(5.9)
4.3
3.9%
(1.8)
2.5
10.2%
3.0
4.5
5.3%
(5.1)
7.3
1.9%
4.8
5.7
July
Asia and
Pacific
Canada
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
6,076
6,250
3,539
3,552
3,552
13,808
13,733
11,302
11,741
11,731
5,273
4,928
5,273
5,241
6,255
3,028
3,241
3,948
4,217
5,048
11,235
15,071
11,753
12,927
13,683
22,571
20,723
21,861
20,175
24,956
6,327
6,450
5,509
4,373
6,419
68,319
70,397
63,186
62,226
71,644
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
4,431
5,840
4,188
4,527
4,613
13,161
12,499
11,827
9,860
10,302
5,903
5,222
6,004
5,106
4,105
4,499
4,296
4,742
5,313
4,537
13,097
11,592
11,711
11,889
14,440
31,077
28,213
32,935
26,366
20,844
7,905
6,723
5,821
6,302
5,863
80,074
74,384
77,228
69,363
64,705
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
4,410
6,205
7,424
9,765
13,664
10,641
10,400
10,451
11,494
11,926
4,649
5,619
6,194
6,086
6,002
5,654
5,626
5,713
5,735
6,576
14,933
15,135
18,870
18,131
19,166
26,755
26,932
28,635
37,449
36,115
5,957
6,666
6,624
8,670
8,885
72,997
76,583
83,911
97,330
102,334
0.4%
(0.5)
5.9
1.2%
(0.8)
6.7
Weekly scheduled departing seats
Central Europe and
Caribbean America Middle East Mexico
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
2000-2004
2004-2008
2008-2014
(12.6)%
6.3
20.2
(4.0)%
(4.3)
3.2
4.4%
(4.9)
2.7
13.6%
1.3
3.6
E-74
5.1%
(3.5)
8.3
2.5%
1.4
5.4
Table 20 (page 2 of 2)
SCHEDULED INTERNATIONAL AIRLINE SERVICE
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Destinations served nonstop
Central
Europe and
Caribbean America
Middle East
July
Asia and
Pacific
Canada
South
America
Total
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
3
3
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
2
1
2
1
2
3
3
4
5
4
4
5
4
4
4
8
10
8
8
10
4
4
4
3
5
28
30
28
27
31
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2
3
2
2
2
4
4
4
4
4
2
3
3
4
3
4
5
5
6
6
4
4
4
4
5
15
13
13
13
12
5
4
4
4
4
36
36
35
37
36
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2
3
3
3
5
4
4
4
4
5
4
6
7
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
5
6
6
6
7
12
18
17
18
17
4
5
5
6
7
37
48
48
49
54
Mexico
Note: Rows may not add to totals shown and calculated percentages may not match those shown
because of rounding.
Source: OAG Aviation Worldwide Ltd, OAG Analyser database, accessed February 2014.
Spirit Airlines began serving the Airport in May 2011 with flights to
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood and Las Vegas. Spirit has since begun service to 18
additional domestic destinations and 2 international destinations. Not all service
operates year-round. For July 2014, Spirit is scheduling 28 average daily departures
from the Airport to 22 airports, making the Airport the second busiest in Spirit’s
system after Fort Lauderdale (where it operates 45 average daily departures to
42 airports).
As shown in Table 20, most of the Airport’s international service is to Mexico, which
has increased as American has added service to secondary cities in Mexico using
regional jet aircraft. For July 2014, 35.3% of weekly international departing seats are
scheduled to airports in Mexico, followed by Europe and the Middle East (18.7%),
Asia and the Pacific (13.4%), Canada (11.7%), South America (8.7%), Central
America (6.4%), and the Caribbean (5.9%).
E-75
Air Cargo
Airlines providing all-cargo service at the Airport are listed in Table 15. Table 21
presents historical data on air cargo weight enplaned and deplaned. Cargo tonnage
(carried by all-cargo aircraft and as belly cargo on passenger airline aircraft)
increased each year between FY 1990 and FY 2000, at an average of 5.0% per year.
Between FY 2000 and FY 2003, cargo tonnage decreased 25.1% partly as a result of
post-September 2001 security restrictions on the carriage of freight and mail on
passenger aircraft. Between FY 2003 and FY 2006, cargo tonnage increased 14.8%, as
the local economy improved and all-cargo operators decided to increase service at
the Airport. Between FY 2006 and FY 2013, cargo tonnage decreased 23.3% as a
result of service decisions by the all-cargo airlines and the global economic
recession. In FY 2013, UPS accounted for 25.0% of the air cargo tonnage enplaned
and deplaned at the Airport.
Aircraft Operations
Table 22 presents historical data on aircraft operations (landings and takeoffs) at the
Airport. Aircraft operations increased an average of 1.6% per year between FY 1991
and FY 2000, as passenger and all-cargo airlines increased service at the Airport.
Between FY 2000 and FY 2012, aircraft operations decreased an average of 2.2% per
year. The distribution of aircraft operations in FY 2013 was: air carrier, 66.8%; air
taxi and commuter, 32.3%; and general aviation, 0.9%. Military operations have
historically accounted for a negligible percentage of aircraft operations at the
Airport.
Aircraft Landed Weight
Table 23 presents historical aircraft landed weight at the Airport, which generally
correlates closely with airline aircraft departures. In FY 2013, approximately 99% of
landed weight was accounted for by airlines signatory to the Airline Agreement. In
FY 2013, American, American Eagle, US Airways, and US Airways Express together
accounted for approximately 76% of landed weight, other passenger airlines
accounted for approximately 15%, and the all-cargo airlines accounted for
approximately 9%.
E-76
Table 21
HISTORICAL AIR CARGO
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
Fiscal
Year
Weight of cargo enplaned
and deplaned (tons) (a)
Annual percent
increase (decrease)
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
597,000
606,000
624,000
664,000
772,000
1.5%
3.0
6.4
16.3
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
857,000
872,000
894,000
902,000
931,000
11.0
1.8
2.5
0.9
3.2
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
977,000
900,000
734,000
732,000
803,000
4.9
(7.9)
(18.4)
(0.3)
9.7
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
827,000
840,000
808,000
754,000
628,000
711,000
3.0
1.6
(3.8)
(6.7)
(16.7)
13.2
2011
2012
2013
671,000
660,000
644,000
(5.6)
(1.6)
(2.4)
First 3 months
(October-December)
2013
2014
168,000
175,000
4.2%
Average annual percent
increase (decrease)
1990-2000
5.0%
2000-2013
(3.2)
_____________________________
Note: Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of
rounding.
(a) On all-cargo and passenger aircraft.
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
E-77
Table 22
HISTORICAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
Fiscal
Year
Air carrier
Air taxi/
commuter
General
aviation
Military
Total
1991
1992
1993
1994
547,253
571,384
591,793
611,456
167,346
175,406
182,478
205,244
15,525
15,775
13,793
13,005
727
967
975
723
730,851
763,532
789,039
830,428
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
634,661
612,269
614,664
606,441
594,170
222,626
228,401
224,242
230,686
213,903
13,876
13,841
11,736
10,910
12,566
1,298
1,107
687
446
206
872,461
855,618
851,329
848,483
820,845
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
609,829
585,729
493,826
482,483
518,397
218,971
212,446
243,946
269,943
278,872
16,413
13,106
12,819
6,862
6,530
213
266
222
123
120
845,426
811,547
750,813
759,411
803,919
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
492,428
479,807
475,219
481,600
472,554
233,288
214,548
206,008
181,308
158,512
6,695
6,279
5,903
5,876
4,800
152
95
326
949
582
732,563
700,729
687,456
669,733
636,448
2010
2011
2012
2013
470,969
470,851
445,404
451,992
173,257
173,474
194,982
218,507
5,149
6,087
5,874
6,359
489
216
186
143
649,864
650,628
646,446
677,001
First 3 months
(October-December)
2013
110,018
2014
110,289
51,813
52,481
1,657
1,792
56
40
163,544
164,602
Average annual percent increase (decrease)
1991-2000
2000-2013
1.2%
(2.3)
3.0%
(0.0)
0.6%
(7.0)
(12.8)%
(3.0)
1.6%
(1.7)
Annual percent increase (decrease)
First 3 months
2013-2014
0.2%
1.3%
_____________________________
8.1%
(28.6)%
Note: Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of rounding.
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
E-78
0.6%
Table 23
HISTORICAL AIRCRAFT LANDED WEIGHT
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
Fiscal
Year
Total landed weight
(1,000-pound units) (a)
Annual percent
increase (decrease)
1991
1992
1993
1994
45,455,874
46,759,128
48,401,939
47,348,143
2.9%
3.5
(2.2)
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
48,156,275
45,631,620
45,800,077
45,008,547
45,057,954
1.7
(5.2)
0.4
(1.7)
0.1
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
46,706,347
46,460,534
42,037,204
41,034,795
43,077,521
3.7
(0.5)
(9.5)
(2.4)
5.0
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
40,979,227
39,435,666
39,117,706
37,592,651
36,185,328
(4.9)
(3.8)
(0.8)
(3.9)
(3.7)
2010
2011
2012
2013
36,270,271
36,321,677
36,449,422
38,254,504
0.2
0.1
0.4
5.0
Average annual
percent increase (decrease)
1991-2000
0.3%
2000-2013
(1.5)
_____________________________
Note: Calculated percentages may not match those shown because of
rounding.
(a) Landed weight of corporate and general aviation is excluded.
Source: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
E-79
KEY FACTORS AFFECTING FUTURE AIRLINE TRAFFIC
In addition to the population and economy of the Airport service region, discussed
in the earlier section “Airport Service Region,” key factors that will affect future
airline traffic at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport include:
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
Economic and political conditions
Financial health of the airline industry
Airline service and routes
Airline competition and airfares
Airline consolidation and alliances
Availability and price of aviation fuel
Aviation safety and security concerns
Capacity of the national air traffic control system
Capacity of the Airport
Economic and Political Conditions
Historically, airline passenger traffic nationwide has correlated closely with the state
of the U.S. economy and levels of real disposable income. Recession in the U.S.
economy in 1990-1991, 2001, and 2008-2009 and associated high unemployment
reduced discretionary income and contributed to reduced airline travel demand in
those years.
With the globalization of business and the increased importance of international
trade and tourism, the state of the U.S. economy has become more closely tied to
worldwide economic, political, and social conditions. As a result, international
economics, trade balances, currency exchange rates, political relationships, and
hostilities all influence passenger traffic at major U.S. airports. Sustained future
increases in passenger traffic at the Airport will depend on stable international
conditions as well as national and global economic growth.
Financial Health of the Airline Industry
The number of passengers using the Airport will depend partly on the profitability
of the U.S. airline industry and the associated ability of the industry and individual
airlines, particularly American, to make the necessary investments to provide
service.
The 1990-1991 recession, coupled with increased operating costs and security
concerns during the Gulf War, generated then-record financial losses in the airline
industry. Those losses put particular pressures on financially weak or highly
indebted airlines, forcing many to seek bankruptcy protection, sell productive assets,
lay off workers, reduce service, or discontinue operations. Eastern Air Lines and
Pan American World Airways ceased operations in 1991.
Between 1995 and 2000, the airline industry as a whole was profitable, but as a result
of the 2001 economic recession, the disruption of the airline industry that followed
E-80
the September 2001 attacks, increased fuel and other operating costs, and price
competition, the industry again experienced huge financial losses. In 2001 through
2005, the major U.S. passenger airlines collectively recorded net losses of
approximately $61 billion.
To mitigate those losses, all of the major network airlines restructured their route
networks and flight schedules and reached agreement with their employees, lessors,
vendors, and creditors to cut costs, either under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection
or the possibility of such. US Airways twice filed for bankruptcy protection, in
August 2002 and September 2004, and emerged in September 2005 following its
merger with America West Airlines. United Airlines filed for bankruptcy protection
in December 2002 and emerged in February 2006. American avoided filing for bankruptcy protection in 2003 only after obtaining labor cost concessions from its
employees. Northwest filed for bankruptcy protection in September 2005, emerged
in May 2007, and subsequently merged with Delta.
In 2006 and 2007, the U.S. passenger airline industry as a whole was profitable,
recording net income of approximately $23 billion, but in 2008, as oil and aviation
fuel prices increased to unprecedented levels, the industry experienced a
profitability crisis. In 2008 and 2009, the U.S. passenger airline industry recorded
net losses of approximately $27 billion. The industry responded by grounding
older, less fuel-efficient aircraft, adopting fuel-saving operating practices, hedging
fuel requirements, reducing scheduled seat capacity, eliminating unprofitable routes
and hubs, laying off employees, reducing employee compensation, reducing other
nonfuel expenses, increasing airfares, and imposing ancillary fees and charges.
Between 2007 and 2009, the U.S. passenger airlines collectively reduced domestic
capacity (as measured by available seat-miles) by approximately 10%.
In 2010 through 2013, the U.S. passenger airline industry as a whole recorded net
income of approximately $8 billion, in spite of sustained high fuel prices, by
controlling capacity and nonfuel expenses, increasing airfares, recording high load
factors, and increasing ancillary revenues. Over the four years 2009 to 2013, the
airlines collectively increased domestic seat-mile capacity by an average of just 1.0%
per year. As discussed in the earlier section “AMR Restructuring and Merger with
US Airways,” AMR Corporation and its subsidiaries American and American Eagle
filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in November 2011. American’s future
profitability will depend largely on the contribution from its operations at the
Airport.
Sustained industry profitability will depend on, among other factors, economic
growth to support airline travel demand, continued capacity control to allow
increased airfares, and stable fuel prices. Consolidation of the airline industry has
resulted in four airlines (American, Delta, Southwest, and United) now accounting
for approximately 90% of domestic capacity. Such consolidation is expected by
airline industry analysts to contribute to industry profitability. However, any
resumption of financial losses could cause U.S. airlines to seek bankruptcy
E-81
protection or liquidate. The liquidation of any of the large network airlines would
drastically affect airline service at certain connecting hub airports, present business
opportunities for the remaining airlines, and change airline travel patterns
nationwide.
Airline Service and Routes
The Airport serves as a gateway to the Dallas-Fort Worth MSA and as a connecting
hub. The number of origin and destination passengers at the Airport depends on
the intrinsic attractiveness of the MSA as a business and leisure destination, the
propensity of its residents to travel, and the airline fares and service provided at the
Airport and Love Field. The number of connecting passengers, on the other hand,
depends entirely on the airline service provided.
The large airlines have developed hub-and-spoke systems that allow them to offer
high-frequency service in many city-pair markets. Because most connecting
passengers have a choice of airlines and intermediate airports, connecting traffic at
an airport depends on the route networks and flight schedules of the airlines serving
that airport and competing hub airports. Since 2003, as the U.S. airline industry has
consolidated, airline service has been or is being drastically reduced at many former
connecting hub airports, including those serving St. Louis (American 2003-2005),
Dallas-Fort Worth (Delta 2005), Pittsburgh (US Airways 2006-2008), Las Vegas
(US Airways 2007-2010), Cincinnati (Delta 2009-2011), Memphis (Delta 2011-2013),
and Cleveland (United 2014).
As discussed in the earlier section, “Airport Role,” the Airport is the busiest
connecting hub in American’s system, and most passengers at the Airport are
connecting between flights. As a result, passenger traffic at the Airport largely
results from the route networks and flight schedules of American rather than the
economy of the Airport service region. It is expected that the Airport will continue
to be the busiest connecting hub in the combined American-US Airways system, but
if American were to reduce connecting service at the Airport, such service would not
necessarily be replaced by other airlines. The potential effects on passenger traffic of
a reduction in connecting airline service at the Airport are discussed in the later
section “Stress Test Forecast and Assumptions.”
Airline Competition and Airfares
Airline fares have an important effect on passenger demand, particularly for
relatively short trips for which the automobile and other travel modes are potential
alternatives, and for price-sensitive “discretionary” travel. The price elasticity of
demand for airline travel increases in weak economic conditions when the
disposable income of potential airline travelers is reduced. Airfares are influenced
by airline capacity and yield management; passenger demand; airline market
presence; labor, fuel, and other airline operating costs; taxes, fees, and other charges
assessed by governmental and airport agencies; and competitive factors. Future
E-82
passenger numbers, both nationwide and at the Airport, will depend, in part, on the
level of airfares.
Overcapacity in the industry, the ability of consumers to compare airfares and book
flights easily via the Internet, and other competitive factors combined to reduce
airfares between 2000 and 2005. During that period, the average domestic yield for
U.S. airlines decreased from 16.1 cents to 13.8 cents per passenger-mile. In 2006
through 2008, as airlines reduced capacity and were able to sustain fare increases,
the average domestic yield increased to 15.9 cents per passenger-mile. In 2009,
yields again decreased, but, beginning in 2010, as airline travel demand increased
and seat capacity was restricted, yields increased to 17.5 cents per passenger-mile by
2013. Beginning in 2006, ancillary charges have been introduced by most airlines for
services such as checked baggage, preferred seating, in-flight meals, and
entertainment, thereby increasing the effective price of airline travel more than these
yield figures indicate.
As discussed in the earlier section, “Airport Role,” the Airport competes with Love
Field on airline service and airfares for certain origin and destination passengers. As
a result of the Wright Amendment restrictions, such competition has been limited.
When the remaining Wright Amendment restrictions expire in October 2014,
Southwest and other airlines will be permitted to offer nonstop service from Love
Field to all airports in the United States. The effects of expiration of the Wright
Amendment restrictions will depend on air service and pricing decisions by
Southwest and other airlines serving Love Field, and the competitive response from
American and other airlines serving the Airport. While such competition could
reduce airfares in certain markets and increase overall passenger demand, traffic at
the Airport could be reduced as airlines operating at Love Field capture an increased
share of passengers. The magnitude of any such reduction will be constrained by
the 20-gate capacity limitation at Love Field.
Airline Consolidation and Alliances
In response to competitive pressures, the U.S. airline industry has consolidated. In
April 2001, American completed an acquisition of failing Trans World Airlines. In
September 2005, US Airways and America West Airlines merged. In October 2009,
Republic Airways Holdings completed purchases of Frontier and Midwest airlines.
In December 2009, Delta and Northwest completed their merger. In October 2010,
United and Continental airlines completed their merger and have now integrated
most operations. In May 2011, Southwest completed its acquisition of AirTran, and
expects to integrate operations in 2014.
As discussed in the earlier section “AMR Restructuring and Merger with
US Airways,” in December 2013, American and US Airways completed their merger
to create the world’s largest airline as measured by seat-mile capacity. Management
of the merged airline has stated its intention to maintain all hubs in the combined
E-83
system. How airline service at the Airport might change following the merger is not
yet known.
Alliances, joint ventures, and other business arrangements provide airlines with
many of the advantages of mergers; all of the large U.S. network airlines are
members of such alliances with foreign-flag airlines. Alliances typically involve
marketing, code-sharing, and scheduling arrangements to facilitate the transfer of
passengers between the airlines. Joint ventures involve even closer cooperation and
the sharing of costs and revenues on designated routes. As discussed earlier in the
section “Airport’s Role in American’s System,” American is a member of the
Oneworld alliance and participates in joint ventures, code-sharing, and other
commercial arrangements with several airlines.
Availability and Price of Aviation Fuel
The price of aviation fuel is a critical and uncertain factor affecting airline operating
economics. Fuel prices are particularly sensitive to worldwide political instability
and economic uncertainty. Beginning in 2003, fuel prices increased as a result of the
invasion and occupation of Iraq; political unrest in other oil-producing countries; the
growing economies of China, India, and other developing countries; and other
factors influencing the demand for and supply of oil. By mid-2008, average fuel
prices were three times higher than they were in mid-2004 and represented the
largest airline operating expense, accounting for between 30% and 40% of expenses
for most airlines. Fuel prices fell sharply in the second half of 2008 as demand
declined worldwide, but have since increased as global demand has increased. In
2011 and 2012, political instability and conflicts in North Africa and the Middle East
contributed to volatility in fuel prices. Average fuel prices decreased overall
between 2011 and 2013, partly as a result of increased supply from U.S. domestic
production. At the end of 2013, average aviation fuel prices were approximately
2.5 times the prices prevailing in 2003.
Airline industry analysts hold differing views on how oil and aviation fuel prices
may change in the near term. However, there is widespread agreement that fuel
prices are likely to remain high relative to historical levels and to increase over the
long term as global energy demand increases in the face of finite and increasingly
expensive oil supplies.
Aviation fuel prices will continue to affect airfares, passenger numbers, airline
profitability, and the ability of airlines to provide service. Airline operating
economics will also be affected as regulatory costs are imposed on the airline
industry as part of efforts to reduce aircraft emissions contributing to global climate
change.
Aviation Safety and Security Concerns
Concerns about the safety of airline travel and the effectiveness of security
precautions influence passenger travel behavior and airline travel demand.
E-84
Anxieties about the safety of flying and the inconveniences and delays associated
with security screening procedures lead to both the avoidance of travel and the
switching from air to surface modes of transportation for short trips.
Safety concerns in the aftermath of the September 2001 attacks were largely
responsible for the steep decline in airline travel nationwide in 2002. Since 2001,
government agencies, airlines, and airport operators have upgraded security
measures to guard against changing threats and maintain confidence in the safety of
airline travel. These measures include strengthened aircraft cockpit doors, changed
flight crew procedures, increased presence of armed sky marshals, federalization of
airport security functions under the Transportation Security Administration (TSA),
more effective dissemination of information about threats, more intensive screening
of passengers and baggage, and deployment of new screening technologies.
Public health and safety concerns have also affected airline travel demand from time
to time. In 2003, concerns about the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome
(SARS) led public health agencies to issue advisories against nonessential travel to
certain regions of the world. In 2009, concerns about the spread of influenza caused
by the H1N1 virus reduced certain international travel, particularly to and from
Mexico and Asia. In April 2010, airspace and airports in much of Europe were
closed for several days because of the threat to flight safety related to the ash cloud
from the eruption of a volcano in Iceland. In March 2011, airline travel to and from
Japan decreased following a destructive earthquake and tsunami.
Historically, airline travel demand has recovered after temporary decreases
stemming from terrorist attacks or threats, hijackings, aircraft crashes, public health
and safety concerns, and international hostilities. Provided that precautions by
government agencies, airlines, and airport operators serve to maintain confidence in
the safety of commercial aviation without imposing unacceptable inconveniences for
airline travelers, it can be expected that future demand for airline travel at the
Airport will depend primarily on economic, not safety or security, factors.
Capacity of the National Air Traffic Control System
Demands on the national air traffic control system have, in the past, caused delays
and operational restrictions affecting airline schedules and passenger traffic. The
FAA is gradually implementing its Next Generation Air Transport System
(NextGen) air traffic management programs to modernize and automate the
guidance and communications equipment of the air traffic control system and
enhance the use of airspace and runways through improved air navigation aids and
procedures. Since 2007, airline traffic delays have decreased as a result of reduced
numbers of aircraft operations, but, as airline travel increases in the future, flight
delays and restrictions may be expected.
E-85
Capacity of the Airport
In addition to any future constraints that may be imposed by the capacity of the
national air traffic control and airport systems, future growth in airline traffic at the
Airport will depend on the provision of capacity at the Airport itself.
With seven air carrier runways able to accommodate the simultaneous arrival of
three aircraft in virtually all weather conditions, the Airport’s airfield capacity is
among the highest in the world. As discussed in the earlier section “Airport
Facilities,” certain gates at the Airport are not in use (or are not fully utilized) and
will be available to accommodate aircraft operations during TRIP construction or
increased numbers of aircraft operations. In a report on the capacity needs of the
national airspace system released by the FAA in May 2007, the Airport was
characterized as not needing additional capacity.
AIRLINE TRAFFIC FORECASTS
Forecasts of airline traffic at the Airport through FY 2020 were developed taking into
account analyses of the economic basis for airline traffic at the Airport, trends in
historical airline traffic, and key factors likely to affect future airline traffic, all as
discussed in earlier sections.
In developing the forecasts, it was assumed that airline traffic at the Airport will
increase as a function of the growth in the population and economy of the Airport
service region and the continued operation of the Airport as a connecting hub. It
was assumed that airline service at the Airport will not be constrained by the
availability of aviation fuel, limitations on the capacity of the air traffic control
system or the Airport, charges for the use of aviation facilities, or government
policies or actions that constrain Airport operations. Forecasts developed in
connection with terminal planning studies for Love Field and forecasts developed
by the FAA for the Airport and Love Field were also considered.
Passenger numbers for FY 2014 were estimated on the basis of actual numbers
recorded through December 2013 and scheduled airline seat capacity published by
OAG Aviation Worldwide for January through July 2014. The estimated number of
enplaned passengers at the Airport in FY 2014, 30.6 million, is a 1.6% increase from the
30.1 million enplaned in FY 2013.
Two passenger forecasts were developed, a base forecast and a stress test forecast, as
presented in Table 24. The forecasts are presented graphically on Figure 12.
E-86
E-87
40.8%
Percent originating
42.0%
12,110
16,757
28,867
10.6%
2.4%
26,098
2,769
28,867
42.1%
12,270
16,890
29,160
11.3%
1.0%
26,204
2,956
29,160
Historical
2011
2012
41.8%
12,600
17,528
30,128
12.3%
3.3%
26,836
3,292
30,128
2013
Source: Historical: Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
Forecast: LeighFisher, March 2014.
Percent reduction from base
forecast
Originating
Connecting
Total enplaned
Percent originating
STRESS TEST FORECAST
Enplaned passengers (millions)
Originating
Connecting
Total
11,490
16,698
28,188
10.4%
0.9%
25,526
2,662
28,188
Originating
Connecting
Total
Percent international
Percent annual change
BASE FORECAST
Enplaned passengers (millions)
Domestic
International
Total
2010
0.0%
0.0
0.0
42.2%
12,900
17,700
30,600
42.2%
12,900
17,700
30,600
12.5%
1.6%
27,200
3,400
30,600
2014
(4.8%)
(14.4)
(10.3)
44.6%
12,000
14,900
26,900
42.0%
12,600
17,400
30,000
13.2%
(2.0%)
26,500
3,500
30,000
2015
47.9%
11,400
12,400
23,800
42.0%
12,800
17,700
30,500
13.8%
1.7%
26,800
3,700
30,500
Forecast
2017
47.9%
11,600
12,600
24,200
41.9%
13,000
18,000
31,000
14.0%
1.6%
27,200
3,800
31,000
2018
48.0%
11,800
12,800
24,600
41.9%
13,200
18,300
31,500
14.1%
1.6%
27,600
3,900
31,500
2019
48.0%
12,000
13,000
25,000
41.9%
13,400
18,600
32,000
14.3%
1.6%
28,000
4,000
32,000
2020
(11.1%) (10.9%) (10.8%) (10.6%) (10.4%)
(29.9)
(29.9)
(30.0)
(30.1)
(30.1)
(22.0)
(22.0)
(21.9)
(21.9)
(21.9)
47.9%
11,200
12,200
23,400
42.0%
12,600
17,400
30,000
13.6%
0.0%
26,400
3,600
30,000
2016
The forecasts presented in this table were prepared using the information and assumptions described in the accompanying text.
Inevitably, some of the assumptions will not be realized and unanticipated events and circumstances may occur. Therefore, the
actual results will vary from those forecast, and the variations could be material.
Table 24
AIRLINE TRAFFIC FORECASTS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
Fiscal Years ended September 30
(in thousands)
0.9%
0.9
0.9
0.6%
2.8
0.9
Average
annual
increase
2013-2020
ȬŞŞ
Originating passengers
Connecting passengers
Historical
Forecast
Stress test
Base
Fiscal years ending September 30
Sources: Historical—Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport records.
Forecast—LeighFisher, March 2014.
Figure 12
FORECAST ENPLANED PASSENGERS
Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport
0
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
5
10
15
20
25
30
Total enplaned passengers
(originating plus connecting)
The forecasts presented in this figure were prepared using the information and assumptions described in the
accompanying text. Inevitably, some of the assumptions will not be realized and unanticipated events and circumstances
could occur. Therefore, the actual results will vary from those forecast, and the variations could be material.
Enplaned passengers
(millions)
35
DFW765 F-0012
Base Forecast and Assumptions
For the base forecast, it was assumed that, beginning in FY 2015:
y
The U.S. economy will experience sustained growth averaging
approximately 2.5% per year.
y
The economy of the Airport service region will grow at a similar rate as that
of the United States as a whole.
y
A generally stable international political environment and safety and
security precautions will ensure airline traveler confidence in aviation
without imposing unreasonable inconveniences.
y
There will be no major disruption of airline service or airline travel behavior
as a result of international hostilities or terrorist acts or threats.
y
American will successfully integrate its operations with those of
US Airways, and will add the seat capacity required to accommodate
additional demand.
y
The Airport will continue to be the principal connecting hub in the
combined American-US Airways system, and the percentage of passengers
connecting at the Airport will not change materially.
y
Competition among airlines serving the Airport and Love Field will ensure
competitive airfares for flights from the Airport.
y
The Airport will continue to be the only international passenger gateway to
the Dallas-Fort Worth market, as provided for by the Reform Act.
y
International traffic will grow at a faster rate than domestic traffic as a result
of increased globalization and relaxation of international trade and travel
restrictions.
y
Upon expiration of the Wright Amendment restrictions, Southwest and
other airlines serving Love Field will gradually make full use of the 20 gates
at the new terminal to provide nonstop service in key markets. Airfare
competition in such markets among airlines serving the Airport and Love
Field will result in a stimulation of demand in the Dallas-Fort Worth market
as a whole. Increased numbers of passengers on new nonstop services from
Love Field will result in reduced passenger numbers at the Airport, but
such reductions will be relatively small because of the gate limitation at
Love Field and will be offset by increased passenger numbers associated
with economic growth and airline service and fare competition. The share
of Dallas-Fort Worth domestic passengers served from the Airport will
E-89
decrease from approximately 86.5% in FY 2014 to approximately 81.5% in
FY 2016.
As a result of offsetting influences, the number of domestic enplaned passengers at
the Airport is forecast to be reduced slightly in FY 2015 and FY 2016. An average
increase of 1.5% per year is then forecast between FY 2016 and FY 2020.
The number of international enplaned passengers is forecast to increase steadily at
an average of 2.8% per year between FY 2013 and FY 2020.
Overall, the number of enplaned passengers at the Airport is forecast to increase
from 30.1 million in FY 2013 to 32.0 million in FY 2020, or an average of 0.9%. In its
most recent Terminal Area Forecast (published February 2014), the FAA forecasts an
average annual increase of 2.5% in enplaned passengers at the Airport over the same
period.
Stress Test Forecast and Assumptions
The stress test forecast of enplaned passengers was developed to provide the basis
for a sensitivity test of the Airport’s financial results to a hypothetical reduction in
passenger numbers. The same assumptions underlie the stress test forecast as the
base forecast except that passenger traffic at the Airport was assumed to be
decreased as result of reduced connecting airline service and weak economic
conditions. It was hypothesized for the stress test that, between FY 2014 and
FY 2016, both originating and connecting passenger numbers would be reduced. In
FY 2016 through FY 2020 passenger numbers would then increase at rates similar to
those for the baseline forecast.
In FY 2020, the overall number of enplaned passengers is 25.0 million for the stress
test forecast, compared with 32.0 million for the base forecast. Relative to the base
forecast, in FY 2020, the number of originating passengers is approximately 10%
lower, the number of connecting passengers is approximately 30% lower, and the
total number of enplaned passengers is approximately 22% lower. Originating
passengers account for approximately 48% of the total in the stress test forecast
compared with 42% in the base forecast.
Landed Weight Forecast and Assumptions
Forecasts of Signatory Airline landed weight are shown in Exhibit E-1 at the end of
the report. In the base forecast, landed weight is forecast to increase from
37.4 million pounds in FY 2013 to 40.1 million pounds in FY 2020. The forecast
growth rate for landed weight was assumed to be approximately the same as that
for enplaned passengers. Corresponding assumptions were made for the stress test
forecast.
E-90
FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
FRAMEWORK FOR AIRPORT FINANCIAL OPERATIONS
The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Board established and developed the
Airport under the terms of a 1968 Contract and Agreement between the City of
Dallas and the City of Fort Worth, joint owners of the Airport. Construction began
in 1969 and the Airport opened in 1974. Under the terms of the Contract and
Agreement, the Board is authorized to develop, operate, and maintain the Airport
on behalf of the Cities.
The Board has 11 voting members, 7 from the City of Dallas and 4 from the City of
Fort Worth, who are appointed by the respective City Councils. A twelfth, nonvoting, member representing one of the four cities neighboring the Airport (Irving,
Grapevine, Euless, and Coppell) is appointed on an annual rotating basis. The
Board operates the Airport with approximately 1,850 staff members under the
direction of a Chief Executive Officer.
Bond Ordinances
The financial operations of the Airport are governed, in large part, by the Master
Bond Ordinance adopted by the Cities in September 2010. The Master Bond
Ordinance amended and restated the Regional Airport Concurrent Bond Ordinance
adopted by the Cities in November 1968 (the 1968 Ordinance) under which the
Airport was originally financed with Joint Revenue Bonds, and which was
subsequently amended and supplemented. In particular, the Thirtieth Supplement,
adopted in February 2000, established many key provisions governing Airport
financial operations. The provisions of the Master Bond Ordinance regarding the
Rate Covenant and the calculation and application of Gross Revenues (as shown in
Exhibit I) are the same as those of the 1968 Ordinance as amended and
supplemented. The Master Bond Ordinance and supplemental ordinances are
collectively referred to in this report as the Bond Ordinances.
In the Rate Covenant (Section 6.3(b) of the Master Bond Ordinance), the Cities
covenant that the Board will place into effect Airport rentals, fees, and charges that
are reasonably estimated to produce, in each Fiscal Year, Net Revenues (Gross
Revenues less Operation and Maintenance Expenses) that will meet at least 125% of
the debt service requirements of all Bonds and other parity Obligations plus at least
100% of the requirements of any subordinate obligations.
The Bond Ordinances provide for the issuance of additional Bonds and prescribe the
application of Airport Revenues to the funds and accounts established under the
Bond Ordinances, as described in the later section “Application of Revenues.”
E-91
Airline Agreement
Effective the beginning of FY 2011, the Board executed an Airport Use and Lease
Agreement (the Airline Agreement) with American and other Signatory Airlines
that collectively account for essentially all enplaned passengers and landed weight
at the Airport and extends through FY 2020, the forecast period covered by this
report*. As described in the later sections “Landing Fees” and “Airline Terminal
Rents and Use Fees,” the Airline Agreement provides for the calculation of
Signatory Airline rentals, fees, and charges according to cost-recovery principles to
ensure that the requirements of the Rate Covenant are met or exceeded. Airline
revenues presented in this report were forecast on the assumption that American
and the other Signatory Airlines will pay rentals, fees, and charges in accordance
with the provisions of the Airline Agreement.
CAPITAL PROGRAM
As part of the Airline Agreement, the Board, American, and the other Signatory
Airlines agreed to a scope of work and funding plan for the Terminal Renewal and
Improvement Program (TRIP), scheduled to be completed in September 2018, and
other capital improvements at the Airport being implemented through FY 2020. The
TRIP and other improvements are collectively referred to in this report as the
Capital Program. Estimated project costs and funding sources for the Capital
Program are shown in Exhibit A.
Terminal Renewal and Improvement Program
The TRIP is a phased renewal of Terminals A, B, C, and E as the buildings and their
systems reach the end of their 40-year useful lives. As part of the TRIP, the
terminals are being renovated and their electrical, plumbing, heating, cooling,
security, conveyance, telecommunications, lighting, fire protection, and information
technology systems replaced to extend the useful lives of the terminals for at least
35 years. Various operational improvements benefiting the airlines, other Airport
tenants, and passengers are being incorporated and concession and passenger
services are being upgraded and consolidated into concession “villages” similar to
those at Terminal D.
Also as part of the TRIP, the parking garages at the terminals are being
reconstructed and various improvements are being made to the roadways and
curbsides serving the terminals.
*As of the date of this report, all airlines providing scheduled service at the Airport
are signatory to the Airline Agreement except Aeromexico Connect and Sky
Regional Airlines, which together accounted for less than 0.5% of enplaned
passengers in FY 2013.
E-92
Other Capital Program Elements
Other Airport renewal, replacement, and upgrade needs anticipated during the
forecast period are:
y
Terminal: Renewal and replacement of terminal facilities and systems not
provided for in the TRIP.
y
Airfield: Reconstruction of runway, taxiway, and apron pavements, and
renewal of airfield lighting and other systems.
y
Roads and bridges: Renewal, replacement, extension, and expansion of
Airport access roads and bridges.
y
Skylink: Renewal and replacement of facilities and systems for the Skylink
inter-terminal automated people mover system.
y
Parking: Renewal and upgrade of parking garages and lots and
replacement of shuttle buses and vans serving employee and public
parking.
y
Other: Renovation and upgrades to utility, environmental, information
technology, aircraft rescue and fire fighting (ARFF), safety, security, and
other Airport support facilities and systems.
SOURCES OF FUNDS
Exhibit A summarizes estimated funding sources for the TRIP and other elements of
the Capital Program. The funding sources are as agreed upon with the Signatory
Airlines under the Airline Agreement.
Federal Grants-in-Aid
The Board is eligible to receive grants-in-aid under the FAA’s Airport Improvement
Program (AIP) for up to 75% of the costs of airfield and other approved projects.
Certain of these grants are entitlement grants, the annual amount of which is
calculated on the basis of the number of enplaned passengers and landed weight of
all-cargo aircraft at the Airport. Other, discretionary, grants are awarded on the
basis of the FAA’s determination of the priorities for projects at the Airport and at
other airports in the nation. In FY 2004 through FY 2013, the Board received an
average of $9.0 million per year in entitlement grants and an average of $10.8 million
per year in discretionary grants, for a total of $19.9 million per year.
In the Board’s funding plan for the Capital Program shown in Exhibit A, AIP grants
totaling $172.3 million ($17.2 million per year on average) were assumed to be
received in FY 2011 through FY 2020 for airfield, safety, and security projects.
E-93
Passenger Facility Charge Revenues
The Board has approval from the FAA to impose a PFC per eligible enplaned
passenger at the Airport. The PFC was imposed at $3.00 in May 1994 and increased
to $4.50 in July 2002. Through September 2013, cumulative PFC revenues, including
investment earnings, totaled $1,814.6 million, of which $1,803.7 million had been
expended for approved project costs: $734.1 million funded “pay-as-you-go” and
$1,069.6 million for Bond debt service.
Since FY 2011, the Board has applied to the payment of Bond debt service all PFC
revenues derived from the $4.50 PFC now in effect. The Board intends to continue
such application of PFC revenues. By agreement with the Signatory Airlines,
additional PFC revenues derived from any future increase in the PFC, up to a
maximum of $7.50 per eligible enplaned passenger, are also to be used to pay Bond
debt service to the maximum extent that such PFC revenues are approved by the FAA
for the payment of eligible Bond debt service. Under the FAA Modernization and
Reform Act of 2012, $4.50 is the maximum PFC that may be imposed through FY 2015.
Exhibit F presents historical and forecast sources and uses of PFC revenues by year,
assuming continued imposition of a $4.50 PFC.
Joint Revenue Bonds
Exhibit B presents the estimated sources and uses for the proposed 2014 New
Money Bonds and planned 2016 Bonds. Financing assumptions for the proposed
2014 New Money Bonds, proposed 2014 Refunding Bonds, and planned 2016 Bonds,
as provided by First Southwest Company, the Board’s co-financial advisors, are
shown on the following page.
The estimated sources of Bond funds are proceeds from the sale of the Bonds after
original issue discount. Investment earnings on available amounts in the
Construction Fund and Capitalized Interest Account during construction are also to
be available. However, no such investment earnings were assumed for purposes of
this report.
The estimated uses of Bond funds are (1) deposits to the Construction Fund to pay
project costs; (2) escrow deposits to refund outstanding Bonds; (3) deposits to the
Capitalized Interest Account to pay Bond interest during construction; (4) deposits
to meet the Debt Service Reserve Requirement, if any; and (5) payment of
underwriters’ discount, financing, legal, and other Bond issuance expenses.
The proposed 2014 Refunding Bonds are being issued to refund all outstanding
2004B Bonds and 2007 Bonds to restructure the principal payment schedule and
lower interest costs so as to limit increases in required airline rentals, fees, and
charges.
E-94
Proposed 2014 New Money Bonds
2014C
2014D
2014G
2014B
Bond proceeds
(par amount in thousands)
$182,250
$129,930
$258,645
$54,945
Project costs to be funded
(in thousands)
$147,707
$111,775
$208,313
$50,000
Final maturity
2045
2045
2045
2037
Tax status
AMT
Non-AMT
AMT
Taxable
Interest rate for final maturity
5.50%
5.50%
5.50%
5.89%
Interest to be capitalized in part
through
2017
2016
2018
2015
Principal amounts to be made in
2025-2045
2018-2045
2025-2045
2018-2037
Debt service reserve requirement
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Proposed 2014
Refunding Bonds
2014E
2014F
Planned 2016
New Money Bonds
2016A
2016B
2016BC
Bond proceeds
(par amount in thousands)
$83,710
$104,600
$106,265
$535,625
$108,505
Project costs to be funded or
Bond principal to be redeemed
(in thousands)
$89,099
$97,382
$83,902
$430,958
$101,740
Final maturity
2026
2027
2045
2045
2045
Tax status
AMT
Non-AMT
Non-AMT
AMT
AMT
Interest rate for final maturity
5.25%
5.25%
5.63%
5.63%
6.50%
Interest to be capitalized in part
through
None
None
2019
2018
2016
Principal amounts to be made in
2014-2026
2014-2027
2026-2045
2025-2045
2026-2045
Debt service reserve requirement
Met from
existing
balances
Met from
existing
balances
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
Funded
from Bond
proceeds
E-95
Bond Debt Service Requirements
Exhibit C presents the Bond debt service requirements of outstanding Bonds,
proposed and planned new money Bonds, and changes in debt service requirements
that have resulted or are estimated to result from the refunding of outstanding
Bonds. Debt service requirements are allocated to Airport cost centers in accordance
with the provisions of the Airline Agreement.
Effective FY 2010, the Board changed the annual period for which it accrues debt
service requirements for the purposes of calculating rentals, fees, and charges from
the Bond Year ended November 1 to the Fiscal Year ended September 30.
Consequently, the debt service requirements for outstanding Bonds shown in
Exhibit C for FY 2010 are for the 11 months November 2009 through September
2010. Debt service requirements shown for FY 2011 through FY 2014 are the
amounts accrued for the Fiscal Year ended September 30. Debt service requirements
shown for FY 2015 through FY 2020 are the amounts for the Bond Years ending
November 1.
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE EXPENSES
Exhibit D presents Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Expenses by type and by
Airport cost center. Data for FY 2008 through FY 2010 are from the Board’s annual
Rates, Fees, and Charges Settlement reports; data for FY 2011 through FY 2013 are from
the Board’s Rates, Fees, and Charges Year End Reconciliation reports; and data for
FY 2014 are from the Board’s FY 2014 Forecast report. Beginning in FY 2011,
expenses are allocated to cost centers in accordance with the provisions of the
Airline Agreement.
The line items of Operation and Maintenance Expenses shown in Exhibit D were
forecast, using the FY 2014 forecast as the base, by taking into account increases in
unit costs as a result of inflation, forecast aircraft and passenger activity, and
planned terminal development. In particular, the following assumptions were
made:
1. To account for inflation, the unit costs of salaries, wages, benefits, materials,
services, and supplies will increase an average of approximately 3% per
year.
2. In addition to inflation-related increases, the costs of operating, maintaining, and administering airfield, terminal, and other Airport facilities will
increase as a function of the forecast increases in passenger and aircraft
activity documented in the earlier section, “Airline Traffic Forecasts.”
3. Implementation of the TRIP will result in efficiencies so that facility and
transportation management expenses will be reduced by approximately 2%
in each of FY 2016, FY 2017, and FY 2018.
E-96
Operation and maintenance expenses for Terminals A and C are paid directly by
American and are not shown in Exhibit D. Similarly, operation and maintenance
expenses for the Hotel (which are the responsibility of the Public Facility
Improvement Corporation) and for the shuttle bus system serving the consolidated
rental car center are not shown in Exhibit D. The Board incurs certain operating and
maintenance expenses for the rental car center, but treats such expenses as a “passthrough,” so that they are not shown in Exhibit D.
REVENUES
Exhibit E presents operating revenues. Data for FY 2008 through FY 2010 are from
the Board’s annual Rates, Fees, and Charges Settlement reports; data for FY 2011
through FY 2013 are from the Board’s Rates, Fees, and Charges Year End Reconciliation
reports; and data for FY 2014 are from the FY 2014 Forecast report. The distribution
of operating revenues by major category in FY 2013 was as follows:
Revenues
Share
Airline revenues
Airfield
Terminal
Subtotal
$114,894,000
144,296,000
$259,190,000
21.4%
26.9
48.3%
Nonairline revenues
Terminal concessions
Parking and ground transportation
Commercial development and other
Subtotal
Total
$ 62,340,000
152,460,000
63,040,000
$277,840,000
$537,030,000
11.6%
28.4
11.7
51.7%
100.0%
Individual components of Revenues shown in Exhibit E were forecast, using FY 2014
estimates as the base, taking into account allowances for unit price inflation at 3.0%
per year, planned terminal redevelopment, and the provisions of the Airline
Agreement and other leases and agreements with users and tenants of the Airport.
Forecasts documented in the FY 2014 Financial Plan as prepared by DFW staff were
also taken into account.
Revenues from sources related to passenger numbers, such as concession and
parking revenues, and from sources related to aircraft movements, such as landing
fees, were forecast as a function of the forecast airline activity described in the earlier
section “Airline Traffic Forecasts.” The specific assumptions underlying individual
components of Revenues are described in the following sections.
AIRLINE REVENUES
Capitalized terms in this section are used as defined in the Airline Agreement,
except as otherwise defined. Airline revenues shown in Exhibits E and E-1 are as
calculated under the provisions of prior agreements for FY 2008 through FY 2010
E-97
and as calculated under the provisions of the Airline Agreement for FY 2011 through
FY 2020.
Airport Cost Centers
The Airline Agreement establishes three direct cost centers for the accounting of
Airport revenues and expenses and to provide the basis for calculating rentals, fees,
and charges, as follows.
Airfield: Runways, taxiways, aprons, airfield grounds, air navigation aids,
aircraft fueling facilities, general aviation facilities, and associated airfield land and
facilities. The Signatory Airlines pay Landing Fees, calculated according to a costrecovery methodology to ensure that net Airfield Cost Center requirements are met,
as described in the later section “Landing Fees.”
Terminal: All space and facilities in the terminals, including airline leased
space, common-use space, international arrivals space, and vacant space. The
Signatory Airlines pay Terminal Rents, calculated according to a cost-recovery
methodology to ensure that net Terminal Cost Center requirements are met, as
described in the later section “Airline Terminal Rents.”
DFW: Public and employee parking garages and lots, associated shuttle bus
systems, Skylink, rental car facilities, terminal concession revenues (but not the cost
of terminal concession space), air cargo facilities, aircraft maintenance hangars,
nonterminal hotels, and other commercial land, development, and concessions. The
DFW Cost Center consists of the Passenger Services and Commercial Development
sub-cost centers. After certain transfers and credits to the Airfield and Terminal
costs centers are made, all net revenues from the DFW Cost Center are deposited
into the DFW Capital Account for Airport renewal and replacement needs, other
capital investments, and other Airport purposes at the discretion of the Board.
In addition, the Airline Agreement establishes the following indirect cost centers.
Overhead: Operation, maintenance, and other expenses and liabilities
associated with operation of the Airport that are not directly associated with the
functions of the direct cost centers, such as insurance, pensions, information
technology, general and administrative functions, roadways and bridges, utilities,
and infrastructure.
Department of Public Safety: Operation, maintenance, and other expenses
and liabilities associated with police, ARFF, and safety and security functions and
services.
Allocation of Requirements to Cost Centers
Under the provisions of the Airline Agreement, requirements are to be allocated to
the three direct cost centers, as follows.
E-98
Operation and Maintenance Expenses: Charged directly to the cost centers
generating the expenses.
Operating Reserve Account deposit: Allocated pro rata according to each
cost center’s share of O&M Expenses.
Overhead: Allocated pro rata according to each cost center’s share of O&M
Expenses (including Department of Public Safety expenses).
Department of Public Safety expenses: As budgeted based on actual use of
Department of Public Safety services in the prior Fiscal Year.
Existing debt service: Principal and interest payments on Bonds outstanding
as of September 30, 2010 (and on Bonds issued to refund such Bonds), allocated 60%
to the Airfield, 11% to the Terminal, and 29% to the DFW cost centers.
Future debt service: Principal and interest payments on Bonds issued after
September 30, 2010, allocated in proportion to the project costs funded (net of any
grants or PFC revenues).
Incremental coverage: Allocated pro rata according to each cost center’s
share of the change in debt service.
Landing Fees
Exhibit E-1 shows historical and forecast Landing Fees and Signatory Airline
Landing Fee rates per 1,000 pounds of landed weight. Under the provisions of the
Airline Agreement, the Signatory Airlines pay Landing Fees calculated to allow the
recovery of the net cost of the Airfield Cost Center, calculated as the sum of allocable
requirements less credits for other Airfield revenues. The net Airfield cost is further
adjusted to reflect the credit or charge resulting from the reconciliation of actual
versus budgeted amounts for the prior Fiscal Year and any Capital Threshold
Adjustment Amounts (calculated as described in the next paragraph). Landing Fees
are recalculated each Fiscal Year (or more frequently if required) to reflect the
budgeted net Airfield cost and landed weight.
The Capital Threshold Adjustment Amounts are calculated to ensure minimum
annual deposits to the DFW Capital Account (the Lower Capital Threshold). Of any
amounts above a maximum (the Upper Capital Threshold), 75% is credited to the
Signatory Airlines against the Landing Fee requirement and 25% is deposited to the
DFW Capital Account. For FY 2014, the Lower Capital Threshold is $42.9 million
and the Upper Capital Threshold is $64.3 million. Accumulated unassigned
balances in the DFW Capital Account are also subject to a limit (the Cumulative
Capital Threshold), $107.2 million for FY 2014. All threshold amounts are adjusted
annually by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). For the financial forecasts in this
report, a CPI of 3.0% was assumed. It was also assumed that expenditures from the
E-99
DFW Capital Account will cause the Cumulative Capital Threshold Amounts not to
be exceeded.
Landing Fees decreased in FY 2011 as a result of the rate-making methodology in the
Airline Agreement. Airlines that are not signatory to the Airline Agreement pay a
landing fee rate that is set at the Signatory Airline rate plus 25%. For the financial
forecasts in this report, it was assumed that airlines accounting for substantially all
landed weight at the Airport will pay Landing Fees at the Signatory Airline rate.
Airline Terminal Rents and Use Fees
Airline Terminal Rents. Exhibit E-1 shows historical and forecast Airline
Terminal Rents and the average terminal rental rate per square foot of rented space.
Under the provisions of the Airline Agreement, the Signatory Airlines pay Terminal
Rents calculated to allow for the recovery of the net cost of the Terminal Cost Center,
calculated as the sum of allocable requirements as adjusted for the credit or charge
resulting from the reconciliation of actual versus budgeted amounts for the prior
Fiscal Year and the credit of all other revenues attributable to the Terminal. Such
other revenues include fees for the use of the international arrivals areas at
Terminal D, fees for the use of other common-use terminal facilities, rents paid by
the TSA and other tenants, reimbursements of O&M expenses by concessionaires,
and fees for catering services.
The calculation of the net Terminal requirement includes credits in the amount of
agreed-upon transfers from the Joint Capital Account (the Annual Capital Transfer)
equal to $28.0 million in FY 2011, and reduced by $4.0 million per year until phased
out in FY 2017, as shown in Exhibit I. Also credited in the calculation are a Board
contribution for costs allocable to vacant space, as calculated by formula, and other
agreed-upon fixed amounts. Terminal Rents are recalculated each Fiscal Year (or
more frequently if required) to reflect the budgeted net Terminal cost and leased
space. Airline Terminal Rents increased in FY 2011 as a result of the rate-making
methodology in the Airline Agreement.
Other Terminal Revenues. Also included in Exhibit E-1 are fees for the use
of the Federal Inspection Services (FIS) facilities in Terminal D (FIS Facility Fees),
fees for the use of common-use facilities in Terminals D and E (Common Use Space
revenues), and rentals and O&M expense reimbursements paid by nonairline
tenants. FIS Facility Fees are charged per deplaned international passenger
(excluding passengers arriving from airports with U.S. Customs and Border
Protection preclearance stations) and are set annually to recover the budgeted costs
allocable to the FIS Facility. The FIS Facility Fee rate is shown in Exhibit E-1.
Common Use Space revenues include use fees for gates (“turn fees”) and rentals
paid by the TSA and Airport tenants other than the Signatory Airlines. Different
turn fee rates are charged for the use of domestic common-use gates in Terminal E
and international common-use gates in Terminal D. The turn fee rates are adjusted
annually by the percentage increase in the terminal rental rate.
E-100
Airline Payments per Enplaned Passenger
Exhibit E-1 summarizes all payments from the passenger airlines serving the Airport
and the average of such payments per enplaned passenger. Excluded from
Exhibit E-1 are payments made separately by American for the operation and
maintenance of Terminals A and C. Such payments are estimated to have been
approximately $37.9 million in FY 2013, or $1.26 per enplaned passenger averaged
over all Airport enplaned passengers.
NONAIRLINE REVENUES
Exhibit E presents nonairline revenues grouped by (1) terminal concessions, (2) parking
and ground transportation, and (3) commercial development and other. Assumptions
underlying the forecasts of the major line items of revenues are described in the
following sections. Terminal concession revenues are determined largely by the
numbers of enplaned passengers (originating and connecting). Parking and ground
transportation revenues are determined largely by numbers of originating passengers.
Terminal Concession Revenues
In FY 2013, concessions and other services in the terminals generated approximately
11.6% of Airport operating revenues, as follows:
Food and beverage
Retail
Passenger services
Advertising
Telecommunications
Other
Total
Revenues
Share
$24,004,000
17,859,000
3,642,000
14,144,000
1,944,000
595,000
$62,188,000
38.6%
28.7
5.9
22.7
3.1
1.0
100.0%
The Board estimated that, in FY 2010, it earned approximately 50% more concession
revenues per passenger from outlets in the then-new Terminal D than from outlets
in other terminals as a result of more concession space per passenger and more
attractive outlets. As discussed in the earlier section, “Capital Program,” the TRIP
includes the development of concession “villages” similar to those in Terminal D in
all other terminals. The Board expects that these developments will increase
average passenger concession spend rates in Terminals A, B, C, and E to levels
similar to those in Terminal D.
Food and Beverage. Approximately 120 food and beverage outlets are
operated in the terminals. In FY 2013, gross receipts for food and beverage
concessions totaled approximately $185.7 million, or $6.16 per enplaned passenger.
In FY 2013, the Board received approximately $24.0 million, or 12.9% of gross
receipts, in food and beverage concession fees.
E-101
Retail. Approximately 100 news, gift, and other retail merchandise
concession outlets are operated in the terminals. In FY 2013, gross receipts for retail
merchandise concessions totaled $109.6 million, or $3.64 per enplaned passenger. In
FY 2013, the Board received approximately $17.9 million, or 16.3% of gross receipts,
from retail concessions.
Passenger Services. In FY 2013, gross receipts from passenger convenience
services, such as ATMs, baggage cart rentals, currency exchange, locker rentals,
vending machines, barber and shoeshine shops, and business services, accounted for
approximately $6.4 million, or $0.21 per enplaned passenger. In FY 2013, the Board
received approximately $3.6 million in privilege fees from such concessions.
Advertising. In FY 2013, the Board received approximately $14.1 million, or
$0.47 per enplaned passenger, in advertising and related revenues.
Telecommunications. The Board receives revenues from communications
services provided in the terminals, including long distance telephones, wired and
wireless Internet access, and pay telephones. In FY 2013, the Board received
approximately $1.9 million, or $0.06 per enplaned passenger, from such terminal
telecommunications services.
Other. Other concessions and passenger services from which the Board
derives revenues include storage, office space, recreation sites, and antenna and cell
sites. In FY 2013, revenues from these services were approximately $0.6 million, or
$0.02 per enplaned passenger.
Forecast Assumptions. It was assumed that terminal concession revenues
will increase as a function of inflation and forecast increases in enplaned passengers,
with allowances for increased sales per passenger resulting from the new concession
facilities to be constructed in the terminals through the TRIP.
Parking Revenues
As of October 2013, the Board provided approximately 42,100 public parking spaces,
of which approximately 3,300 were out of service for TRIP construction, as follows:
y
Terminal parking in garages and “infield” lots within walking distance of
each terminal (25,300 spaces net of 3,300 out of service for construction)
y
North and south express parking lots providing covered and uncovered
spaces with “car-to-gate” shuttle bus service (8,600 spaces)
y
Remote north and south parking lots providing economy parking near the
north and south entry and exit control plazas on International Parkway, also
served by shuttle buses (4,900 spaces)
E-102
The Board operates all Airport public parking facilities and a fleet of 59 shuttle buses
and vans to transport passengers between the express and remote parking lots and
the terminals. (The Board also operates a fleet of 29 buses to transport passengers
between the terminals.) In FY 2013, public parking revenues totaled approximately
$116.1 million, or 21.6% of the total operating revenues shown in Exhibit E. The
control plazas on International Parkway are equipped with an automated TollTag©
debit system to collect terminal parking charges. The Board charges a “pass-through
fee” of $2 for vehicles that enter and then exit the Airport within 8 minutes ($1 with
TollTag©). A “drop-off fee” of $1 is charged for vehicles entering the Airport and
leaving between 8 and 30 minutes later.
Terminal parking rates are $2 for up to 2 hours, $5 for 2 to 4 hours, $7 for 4 to
6 hours, and $20 for 6 to 24 hours ($18 with TollTag©). Terminal parking rates were
last changed at the beginning of FY 2013, when the 6-to-24 hour rate was increased
from $19 to $20. Rates for express parking are $13 per day covered (increased at the
beginning of FY 2013 from $12), and $11 per day uncovered (increased at the
beginning of FY 2013 from $10). The rate for remote parking is $9 per day (increased
at the beginning of FY 2014 from $8). The Board also contracts with a third-party
operator to provide valet parking at the terminals at a rate of $25 per day (increased
at the beginning of FY 2013 from $23).
Various private operators provide approximately 7,500 parking spaces off Airport.
Off-Airport parking rates are competitive with those charged for the Board’s express
and remote economy parking lots, ranging from approximately $7 per day for
uncovered parking to $20 per day for covered valet parking, with various corporate
discounts and amenities to attract patrons. The Board collects a privilege fee from
six off-Airport parking operators calculated as 10% of their gross receipts. In
FY 2013, off-Airport privilege fees totaled approximately $2.5 million (included in
the $116.1 million shown for parking in Exhibit E.)
Parking revenues were forecast assuming that:
1. Parking demand will change from estimated FY 2013 levels in proportion to
forecast changes in numbers of originating passengers.
2. Additional parking spaces will be made available as needed to
accommodate demand while maintaining approximately the current
balance between on-Airport and off-Airport facilities. (As part of the
Capital Program, the Board plans to add approximately 4,400 public
parking spaces.)
3. Parking rates will be increased every two years and productivity
enhancements implemented so as to achieve increases in revenues per
originating passenger averaging approximately 3.6% per year, consistent
with the assumptions made by DFW staff documented in the FY 2004
Financial Plan.
E-103
4. All on-Airport parking facilities will continue to be operated by the Board.
Rental Car Privilege Fees
Rental car revenues (shown in Exhibit E) are derived from rental car concession
privilege fees. The Board operates a 155-acre rental car facility located near the
south entrance of the Airport and provides shuttle bus service between the facility
and each terminal with a fleet of 54 buses. The rental car facility and shuttle bus
service consolidate the operations of rental car companies that serve substantially all
of the Airport rental car market.
The rental car companies operate under the terms of concession agreements that
became effective when the consolidated rental car facility opened in 1999 and are
scheduled to expire in 2025. Under these agreements, the companies pay 10% of
their gross receipts, against minimum annual guaranteed amounts, for the privilege
of operating on Airport. The rental car companies also reimburse the Board for
certain O&M expenses. The rental car companies and their shares of gross revenues
in FY 2013 were as follows:
Company
Revenues
Hertz (a)
Avis (b)
Alamo/National (c)
Enterprise (c)
Budget (b)
Dollar (a)
Thrifty (a)
Advantage
E-Z
Silvercar
Total
Share
$ 68,493,000
53,039,000
50,728,000
25,750,000
22,950,000
14,545,000
7,855,000
5,994,000
5,704,000
415,000
26.8%
20.8
19.8
10.1
9.0
5.7
3.1
2.3
2.2
0.2
$255,473,000
100.0%
(a) Operates as a subsidiary of Hertz Global Holdings, Inc.
(b) Operates as a subsidiary of Avis Budget Group.
(c) Operates as a subsidiary of Enterprise Holdings, Inc.
In FY 2013, rental car privilege fees totaled $26.8 million, or $2.12 per originating
passenger. The privilege fees were forecast to increase with inflation and forecast
increases in originating passengers.
On behalf of the Board, each on-Airport rental car company collects a customer
facility charge (CFC) of $4.00 per transaction-day. Rental car revenue bonds were
issued through the Facility Improvement Corporation in 1998 and 1999 to fund
construction of the consolidated rental car facility. As discussed in the letter at the
beginning of this report, the 2011A Bonds were issued to refund the Facility
E-104
Improvement Corporation’s 1998 and 1999 bonds. Effective with the issuance of the
2011A Rental Car Refunding Bonds, the Public Facility Improvement Corporation
(PFIC) assumed the obligations of the Facility Improvement Corporation. Under the
provisions of a June 2011 agreement between the PFIC and the Board, CFC revenues
are to be paid by the PFIC to the Board in amounts sufficient to meet the debt service
requirements of the 2011A Bonds. Such CFC revenues are defined as Successor
Rental Car Facility Charges. Forecasts of CFC revenues and their use to pay the debt
service requirements of the proposed 2011A Rental Car Refunding Bonds are shown
in Exhibit G. Successor Rental Car Facility Charges are included in Gross Revenues,
as shown in Exhibit I.
Effective January 2008, the rental car companies also collect a customer transportation charge (CTC) of $2.20 per transaction-day to cover the operation and
maintenance costs of the shuttle bus fleet. Such CTC revenues are not pledged to
the repayment of Joint Revenue Bonds and are not included in Gross Revenues or
shown in Exhibit E.
Ground Transportation Fees
In FY 2013, ground transportation fee revenues totaled approximately $8.2 million,
or $0.65 per originating passenger and include revenues from commercial ground
transportation operators, such as shared-ride, limousine, bus, taxicab, and hotel and
parking lot courtesy vehicle operators. Commercial ground transportation
operators pay permit, access, vehicle inspection, drivers’ permit, decal, and
TollTag© fees.
Nonterminal Concessions
Nonterminal (outside) concession revenues include revenues from gas stations and
other commercial outlets. In FY 2013, such revenues totaled approximately
$1.4 million, or $0.11 per originating passenger.
Commercial Development Revenues
The Board derives revenues from Airport property located outside the passenger
terminal complex. Such commercial development revenues include rental revenues
from ground leases, building and facility leases, and rental car facility ground leases
(but not concession fee or CFC revenues). Commercial development revenues also
include revenues from foreign trade zone tariffs, a hotel and recreation complex, and
property and surface use fees (but not royalties) from natural gas drilling. In
FY 2013, commercial development revenues from land and building rentals totaled
approximately $41.2 million, or 7.7% of operating revenues. American Airlines and
US Airways together accounted for approximately $8.5 million of FY 2013 land and
building rentals.
Properties with access to the Air Operations Area (Airport Services rentals) are
generally charged the same rental rate. Rental rates for other properties are
separately negotiated, generally using a fair market value approach. Leases
E-105
generally include provisions allowing the rental rates to increase annually with
inflation. Of the Airport’s 17,200 acres, 13,020 acres are developable for aeronautical
and nonaeronautical purposes. Of the developable land area, 8,180 acres have been
developed and 4,840 acres are available for future development.
Facilities outside the passenger terminal complex were mostly constructed by
tenants or third-party developers who pay ground rents under long-term leases.
As the leases expire and the facilities revert to Board ownership, the Board charges
facility rent in addition to ground rent.
A Hyatt Regency hotel, located adjacent to Terminal C on the east side of
International Parkway, provides approximately 800 rooms, restaurants, and meeting
facilities. Revenues paid to the Board are calculated as percentages, varying from
3.7% to 6.8%, of gross receipts.
New commercial development revenues were forecast to account for anticipated
returns on investments in infrastructure and utilities. Beginning in FY 2015,
revenues were forecast to be received from American Airlines in amounts equal to
the debt service requirements (plus incremental coverage) of the proposed 2014G
Bonds to be issued to finance an American flight training facility (see Exhibit C for
debt service amounts).
Employee Transportation Fees
The Board operates four parking lots with approximately 7,500 spaces for airline
flight crew and other employees. Transportation is provided between these lots and
the terminals with a fleet of 32 buses. The Board charges fees, often paid by
employers, to recover transportation costs. In FY 2013, such fees totaled
approximately $12.3 million, or 2.3% of operating revenues. Employee
transportation fees were forecast to increase with inflation.
Utilities Expense Reimbursements
In FY 2013, revenues from utilities expense reimbursements from nonairline tenants
totaled approximately $5.0 million, or 0.9% of operating revenues. In FY 2011,
utilities expense reimbursements decreased as reimbursements for terminal
expenses under the Airline Agreement began to be included in the terminal rental
rate calculation. Utilities expense reimbursements after FY 2013 were generally
forecast to increase with inflation.
Miscellaneous Income
Additional revenue sources include miscellaneous permit, security, and accounting
fees. In FY 2013, those revenues totaled approximately $2.9 million, or 0.5% of
operating revenues. Other revenues were forecast to increase with inflation.
E-106
Investment Income
Investment income shown in Exhibit E represents investment earnings on balances
in the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund, including balances attributable to the
Debt Service Reserve Fund and the Rolling Coverage Account. In FY 2013, such
revenues totaled $1.5 million, or 0.3% of operating revenues, and were forecast to
increase as a result of higher balances and interest rates gradually increasing to an
average of 2.5%.
Natural Gas Revenues
In October 2006, the Board entered into an agreement with Chesapeake Energy
Company to allow natural gas exploration and extraction at the Airport. The
agreement required payment of an upfront fee and a royalty fee, set at 25% of gross
revenues, for the right to drill for and extract natural gas at the Airport. In addition,
Chesapeake pays the Board property and surface use fees for the extraction and
transportation of natural gas on and through the Airport.
The Board paid a portion of the upfront fee, with FAA approval, to the cities of
Dallas and Fort Worth as reimbursement for their original capital contributions. To
date, 112 gas wells have been drilled on the Airport, with 98 wells completed and
producing gas for sale. In May 2009, Chesapeake stopped drilling new gas wells on
the Airport because of the low price of natural gas.
Under the terms of the Bond Ordinances, both the upfront fee and all royalties are to
be treated as proceeds from the sale of Airport property, deposited into the Capital
Improvements Fund, and are not to be included in the calculation of Gross
Revenues. Only property and surface use fee revenues are included as revenues in
Exhibit E.
Hotel Revenues
As part of the Terminal D project, a Grand Hyatt hotel with approximately
300 rooms opened in 2005. The Hotel has a full-service restaurant and
approximately 20,000 square feet of meeting and banquet space and is operated by
Hyatt under a management contract. As discussed in the letter at the beginning of
this report, certain costs of constructing the Hotel were financed with the 2001 PFIC
Hotel Bonds. In 2012, the Board refunded the 2001 PFIC Hotel Bonds through the
issuance of Joint Revenue Bonds (the 2012C Hotel Refunding Bonds). Under the
provisions of an April 2012 agreement between the PFIC and the Board, revenues
derived from operation of the Hotel are, to the extent available after the payment of
certain operating expenses, to be paid by the PFIC to the Board in amounts sufficient
to meet the debt service requirements (including 25% coverage) of the 2012C Hotel
Refunding Bonds. The Board has pledged that, if net Hotel operating income is
insufficient to pay such debt service requirements, it will use amounts in the DFW
Capital Account to ensure that the debt service payments are made.
E-107
Forecasts of Hotel revenues and their use to pay the debt service requirements of the
2012C Hotel Refunding Bonds are shown in Exhibit H. Hotel revenues used to pay
such debt service requirements are considered to be Gross Revenues of the Airport
as shown in Exhibit I.
APPLICATION OF REVENUES
Exhibit I presents the application of Revenues in accordance with the Bond
Ordinances and Airline Agreement.
Under the Bond Ordinances, all Airport operating revenues and PFC revenues
committed as Gross Revenues are to be deposited into the Operating Revenue and
Expense Fund. Revenues are applied or deposited into the funds and accounts
established under the Bond Ordinances as follows:
y
Debt Service Fund. Pay Accrued Aggregate Debt Service.
y
Debt Service Reserve Fund. Maintain the Debt Service Reserve
Requirement.
y
Operation and Maintenance Expenses. Pay all Operation and Maintenance
Expenses in accordance with the annual budget.
y
Operating Reserve Account. Set aside an amount sufficient to pay
Operation and Maintenance Expenses for 90 days.
y
Capital Improvements Fund. Amounts remaining after all other funding
requirements of the Bond Ordinances have been met are deposited into the
Capital Improvements Fund and, under the terms of the Airline Agreement,
allocated by formula to the DFW Capital Account, the Joint Capital
Account, and the Rolling Coverage Account.
Under Section 5.2(d) of the Master Bond Ordinance, the Board may,
provided the requirements of the Rate Covenant are met, retain funds in the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund at the end of each Fiscal Year. Any
such retained funds would be included in Gross Revenues for the following
Fiscal Year. For the forecasts in this report, it was assumed that no such
funds will be retained.
Amounts in the DFW Capital Account may be used at the Board’s
discretion to pay the costs of renewal, replacement, or other capital projects
or for any other Airport purpose. For purposes of this report, all DFW
Capital Account amounts were assumed to be used for projects in the
Capital Program. As shown in Exhibit I, beginning in FY 2015, annual
transfers of $2.4 million are to be made to the Operating Revenue and
Expense Fund as a contribution to the debt service requirements of the
2013G Bonds issued to finance a new Board headquarters building. The
E-108
amount of the annual deposit to the DFW Capital Account is calculated as
described in the earlier section “Landing Fees.”
Amounts in the Joint Capital Account are to be used to (1) pay the costs of
projects in the preapproved Capital Program, (2) pay the costs of any
additional projects approved by a majority-in-interest (MII) of the Signatory
Airlines, and (3) make agreed-upon annual transfers to reduce Terminal
Rents. As shown in Exhibit I and discussed in the earlier section, “Airline
Terminal Rents,” Annual Capital Transfer amounts are to be transferred
annually from the Joint Capital Account to the Operating Revenue and
Expense Fund and credited in the calculation of Terminal Rents.
Amounts in the Rolling Coverage Account are to be used to satisfy
requirements of the Bond Ordinances. For this report, all amounts in the
Rolling Coverage Account were assumed to be transferred annually to the
Operating Revenue and Expense Fund to ensure that the debt service
coverage requirements of the Rate Covenant are met or exceeded.
APPLICATION OF PFC REVENUES
All PFC revenues are deposited into the PFC Fund to be used for approved projects,
either to pay project costs directly (“pay-as-you-go”) or to pay debt service on
Bonds. Under the Bond Ordinances, PFC revenues committed to the payment of
Bond debt service (and authorized by the FAA to pay Bond principal and financing
costs) are included in Gross Revenues. As shown in Exhibit F, beginning in FY 2011,
all PFC revenues were assumed to be used to pay debt service on Bonds.
DEBT SERVICE COVERAGE
Exhibit I also shows the calculation of debt service coverage. As required by the
Rate Covenant (Section 6.3(b) of the Master Bond Ordinance), Gross Revenues are
forecast to be sufficient to pay Operation and Maintenance Expenses plus at least
125% of the Accrued Aggregate Debt Service requirements of all outstanding Bonds
and other parity Obligations plus all other amounts required under the Bond
Ordinances in each Fiscal Year of the forecast period.
As also required by the Rate Covenant (Section 6.3(c) of the Master Bond
Ordinance), Current Gross Revenues are forecast to be sufficient to pay Operation
and Maintenance Expenses plus at least 100% of the Accrued Aggregate Debt
Service requirements of all outstanding Bonds and all other obligations plus all other
amounts required under the Bond Ordinances in each Fiscal Year of the forecast
period. Current Gross Revenues are defined as Gross Revenues less any amounts
transferred to the Operating Revenue and Expense Fund from the Debt Service
Reserve Fund, the Rolling Coverage Account, or other accounts in the Capital
Improvements Fund.
E-109
BASE FORECASTS AND STRESS TEST PROJECTIONS
Exhibit J-1 summarizes the forecast financial results as presented in Exhibits A
through I and discussed in the preceding sections assuming the “base” forecast of
enplaned passengers and aircraft landed weight presented earlier in Table 24.
Exhibit J-2 is an identical presentation of financial results in which the projected
revenues and expenses reflect the “stress test” forecast of enplaned passengers and
aircraft landed weight, as presented in Table 24.
The assumptions underlying the stress test projections are the same as those for the
base passenger forecasts, except:
1. Operating revenues related to passenger numbers, such as terminal
concession revenues, parking, and rental car revenues, are reduced
proportionately.
2. PFC revenues are similarly reduced in proportion to reduced passenger
numbers and would cover a lower share of Bond debt service requirements.
3. Certain operating and maintenance expenses are reduced to reflect the
lower passenger and flight activity (overall O&M Expenses in FY 2020
approximately 10% lower than for the base case).
4. As required by the Airline Agreement, the Signatory Airlines would pay the
increased Bond debt service not paid from PFC revenues through higher
Landing Fees and Terminal Rents.
For the stress test, the entire Capital Program was assumed to be implemented and
Bond-funded to the same schedule as for the base case. Required airline payments
per passenger are projected to increase, as shown on Exhibit J-2. Projected Bond debt
service coverage ratios would still exceed the Rate Covenant requirements.
E-110
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
E-111
ȬŗŗŘ
ExhibitA
$Ͳ
171,315
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
566
422
__________
$193,871
100,874
69,092
31,837
200,590
9,317
112,344
47,699
227,222
__________
$294,055
72,124
109,832
45,185
488,458
236,934
Ͳ
65,919
12,150
__________
$23,517 $1,937,688
Ͳ 30,415
219,494
__________Ͳ __________
$23,517 $2,187,597
$
2,489,806 $
172,303 $
992,846 $
1,324,657
__________
__________
__________
__________
$4,700,920 $172,303 $1,016,363 $3,512,254
$487,926
344,313
178,924
77,022
689,048
246,251
112,344
114,184
239,794
__________
$1,961,205 $Ͳ
30,415 Ͳ
219,494 __________
__________Ͳ
$2,211,114 $Ͳ
FAAgrants
Net
Bond
funded
Source:Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportrecords,January27,2014.
____________________
FAA=FederalAviationAdministration
Note:TheAmericanAirlinestrainingcenter,showninExhibitBasbeingfundedwiththeproposed
2013GBonds,isnotincludedintheCapitalProgramasdefined.
TotalCapitalProgram
SubtotalotherCapitalProgram
OtherCapitalProgram
OtherTerminal
Airfield
Roads,bridges,rail,andSkylink
Utilities
Parking
Commercialdevelopment
Informationtechnology
Safetyandsecurity
Environmentalandother
SubtotalTRIP
TerminalRenewaland
ImprovementProgram
Terminalbuildings
Parkinggarages
Roadway,rail,andother
Project
costs
Capital
ImproveͲ
ments
Fund
PROJECTCOSTSANDFUNDINGSOURCESFORTHECAPITALPROGRAM
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
(inthousands)
May 1, 2014
Ȭŗŗř
$182,250
(2,698)
___________Ͳ
2014BBonds
$129,930
1,121
___________Ͳ
2014CBonds
$258,645
(3,307)
___________Ͳ
$54,945
Ͳ
___________Ͳ
2014DBonds 2014GBonds
Proposed2014NewMoneyBonds
$625,770
(4,884)
___________Ͳ
Subtotal
$750,395
(1,539)
___________Ͳ
Bonds
Planned
2016
$4,196,140
160,665
12,869
___________
Total
50,000
262,082 19,153 11,058 32,886 1,700 64,796 71,401 398,279
23,612 1,657 1,183 2,359 608 5,807 10,598 40,017
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________
$2,999,933 $179,552 $131,051 $255,338 $54,945 $620,886 $748,856 $4,369,675
CapitalizedInterestAccount
Issuanceexpenses
Source:FirstSouthwestCompany,March3,2014.
____________________
(a)SeeExhibitA.
Totaluses
99,613 11,036 7,035 11,779 2,638 32,488 50,258 182,359
DebtServiceReserveFund
Ͳ Ͳ 72,210
Ͳ Ͳ 114,556
72,210
114,556
855,070 80,096 97,999 45,208 223,302 246,286 1,324,657
___________
___________
___________
___________
___________Ͳ ___________
___________
___________
$2,427,860 $147,707 $111,775 $208,313 $50,000 $517,795 $616,600 $3,562,254
50,000 50,000
$1,572,790 $67,611 $13,776 $163,106 $Ͳ $244,493 $370,314 $2,187,597
$2,999,932 $179,552 $131,051 $255,338 $54,945 $620,886 $748,856 $4,369,675
$2,819,975
167,088
12,869
___________
Bonds
Outstanding
2010Ͳ2013
Refundingof2001PFICHotelBonds
Refundingof1998and1999RentalCarCFCBonds
OtherCapitalProgram(a)
AmericanAirlinestrainingcenter
Usesoffunds
Projectcosts
TerminalRenewalandImprovementProgram(a)
Totalsources
Sourcesoffunds
ParamountofBonds
Originalissuepremium(discount)
TransferfromDebtServiceReserveFund
ExhibitB
SOURCESANDUSESOFNEWMONEYBONDFUNDS
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
(inthousands)
May 1, 2014
ȬŗŗŚ
Subtotalincludessavingsfrom
from2011Ͳ2014Arefundings
Subtotal
2000Ͳ2009Bondsasrefunded
2000ABonds
2001ABonds
2002ABonds
2002BBonds
2002CBonds
2003ABonds
2003CͲ1/2Bonds
2004AͲ1/2Bonds
2004BBonds
2006ARefundingBonds
2007RefundingBonds
2009ARefundingBonds
2011CRefundingBonds
2011DRefundingBonds
2011ERefundingBonds
2012BRefundingBonds
2012ERefundingBonds
2012FRefundingBonds
2012GRefundingBonds
2013DRefundingBonds
2013ERefundingBonds
2013FRefundingBonds
2014ARefundingBonds
PreͲ2000Bondsasrefunded
2001ARefundingBonds
ExhibitC
[B]
[A]
2009
2011
Historical
2010
2012
2013
$20,116
34,046
24,079
4,572
3,048
75,567
6,624
5,697
10,820
40,424
6,045
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$18,439
31,208
22,085
4,191
2,794
69,269
6,072
Ͳ
9,918
Ͳ
5,540
33,513
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$17,993
33,225
24,088
4,196
2,894
74,900
14,186
Ͳ
10,819
Ͳ
6,050
30,135
3,046
1,302
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$7,122
15,384
24,092
1,902
1,271
66,688
1,239
Ͳ
10,508
Ͳ
6,049
36,724
9,950
15,611
18,608
24,372
1,214
179
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
503
2,008
Ͳ
Ͳ
68,611
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,589
Ͳ
7,346
39,177
8,476
11,174
14,276
33,774
17,023
16,128
16,080
3,261
1,005
141
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
3,302
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,381
Ͳ
7,305
39,341
7,396
11,690
9,147
21,437
14,340
18,338
17,428
24,013
28,169
16,944
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
2014
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,383
Ͳ
7,290
39,359
7,304
11,733
18,707
20,382
14,072
14,535
17,308
28,065
21,471
15,693
10,378
__________
$Ͳ
2015
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,378
Ͳ
12,797
35,772
7,304
11,693
18,723
20,382
14,072
12,938
14,245
35,379
27,520
12,722
10,377
__________
$Ͳ
2016
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,379
Ͳ
13,302
30,331
7,304
11,653
18,739
20,382
14,072
12,938
15,600
45,241
27,620
13,997
10,377
__________
$Ͳ
2017
Forecast
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
6,378
Ͳ
13,301
7,696
7,304
13,993
18,747
31,577
14,072
22,553
15,466
36,098
33,273
20,374
10,377
__________
$Ͳ
2018
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
11,696
Ͳ
13,296
7,697
12,239
18,184
Ͳ
32,392
21,147
21,079
15,878
36,130
25,434
28,195
10,376
__________
$Ͳ
2019
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
11,766
Ͳ
13,302
7,693
12,227
24,692
Ͳ
32,374
17,174
21,053
15,810
36,167
31,075
22,620
10,380
__________
$Ͳ
2020
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
May 1, 2014
$(2,092) $3,750 $(18,903) $(42,087) $(32,278) $(58,207) $(45,156) $(19,254) $(3,588) $(1,053)
$234,938 $231,038 $203,029 $222,834 $240,913 $245,572 $225,231 $232,680 $240,302 $247,935 $251,209 $253,743 $256,333
$20,116
34,044
24,077
4,395
2,834
75,567
6,698
5,676
10,819
44,642
6,070
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$6,441 $6,448 $5,904 $6,137 $385 $Ͳ
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
BONDDEBTSERVICEREQUIREMENTS
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
(dollarsinthousands)
Ȭŗŗś
[F]
Historical
Forecast
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
4,423
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
4,351
23
117
1,102
447
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$6,090
13,371
40
4,139
3,432
7,839
7
Ͳ
380
89
Ͳ
__________
$9,902
14,273
957
9,019
3,671
11,057
1,211
1,383
856
1,774
2,012
__________
$15,345
14,275
Ͳ
10,079
3,828
21,766
20,420
5,276
15,952
7,968
4,744
__________
$15,345
14,273
Ͳ
10,278
3,975
22,800
23,344
17,826
21,664
11,666
5,488
__________
$15,345
14,277
Ͳ
10,398
4,120
23,441
23,344
18,612
21,664
12,126
5,488
__________
$15,345
14,275
Ͳ
10,629
4,753
23,750
23,344
18,612
21,664
12,126
9,978
__________
$15,345
14,273
Ͳ
10,629
4,921
23,750
23,344
18,612
21,664
12,126
9,978
__________
$15,345
14,276
Ͳ
10,629
5,095
23,750
23,344
18,612
21,664
12,126
9,977
__________
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$1,069
473
8,884
1,457
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$3,454
4,726
13,271
2,914
Ͳ
Ͳ
4,216
__________
$9,559
6,926
13,804
2,914
2,084
3,661
7,019
__________
$9,713
9,221
13,856
4,304
4,875
22,120
7,019
__________
$9,713
9,220
13,860
4,666
4,875
29,879
7,019
__________
$9,713
9,229
13,860
4,666
5,928
29,879
7,019
__________
$785 $(2) $(9) $(7) $2,434 $28 $(7)
Ͳ
(992)
__________
$236,494
(123,755)
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
Ͳ
(125)
__________
$208,808
(112,971)
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
Ͳ
(94)
__________
$233,300
(130,500)
(4,423)
Ͳ
__________
Ͳ
(165)
__________
$247,173
(138,522)
(4,351)
(1,102)
__________
Ͳ
(106)
__________
$280,854
(137,053)
(13,371)
(3,432)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$282,130
(111,495)
(14,273)
(3,671)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$364,212
(125,756)
(14,275)
(3,828)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$415,533
(111,945)
(14,273)
(3,975)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$442,709
(113,811)
(14,277)
(4,120)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$479,224
(115,677)
(14,275)
(4,753)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$487,644
(117,542)
(14,273)
(4,921)
__________
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$491,437
(119,408)
(14,276)
(5,095)
__________
$61,690
11,723
29,785
__________
$65,521
25,895
35,582
__________
$68,751
37,933
46,007
__________
$64,153
92,512
63,688
__________
$77,009
126,959
81,371
__________
$80,470
145,363
84,668
__________
$82,780
168,313
93,427
__________
$81,737
175,885
93,286
__________
$82,151
177,017
93,490
__________
Sources:Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportrecordsandFirstSouthwestCompany,January15,2014.Amountsarenetofcapitalizedinterest.Seetextforassumptions.
May 1, 2014
$98,377 $103,198 $126,998 $152,691 $220,353 $285,339 $310,501 $344,520 $350,908 $352,658
$59,026
10,821
28,530
__________
$116,346 $112,739 $95,837 $98,377 $103,198 $126,998 $152,691 $220,353 $285,339 $310,501 $344,520 $350,908 $352,658
1,438
(2,935)
__________
$239,882
(123,536)
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
[G]
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$11,882 __________
$28,581 __________
$45,967 __________
$71,107 __________
$79,232 __________
$80,294
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
[H=D+E+F+G] $241,379 $237,486 $208,933 $233,394 $247,338 $280,960 $282,130 $364,212 $415,533 $442,709 $479,224 $487,644 $491,437
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$4,423 $6,040 $35,388 $56,114 $119,652 $146,658 $148,814 $154,474 $154,641 $154,817
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$241,379 $237,486 $208,933 $233,394 $247,338 $280,960 $281,345 $352,332 $386,960 $396,749 $405,683 $408,384 $411,150
$Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
__________
Total
____________________
(a) AmountsearnedonbalancesintheDebtServiceFund.
(b) SpecialRevenues.SeeExhibitF.
(c) SuccessorRentalCarFacilityCharges.SeeExhibitG.
(d) SeeExhibitH.
Airfield
Terminal
DFW
Allocationtocostcenters
NetpaidfromotherRevenues
Netdebtservice
Less:PaidfromPFCrevenues(b)
Less:PaidfromCFCrevenues(c)
Less:PaidfromHotelrevenues(d)
TotalallBonds
Plus:Variableratebond
remarketingfees
Less:Investmentincome(a)
Subtotal
ProposedandplannednewmoneyBonds
2014BBonds
2014CBonds
2014DBonds
2014GBonds
2016ABonds
2016BBonds
2016CBonds
Less:Savingsfromplannedrefundings
with2014EFBonds
[C]
[D=A+B+C]
TotalalloutstandingBonds
Subtotal
OtheroutstandingBonds
2010ABonds
2011ARentalCarRefundingBonds
2012ABonds
2012CCapitalProgramBonds
2012CHotelRefundingBonds
2012DBonds
2012HBonds
2013ABonds
2013BBonds
2013CBonds
2013GBonds
ExhibitC(page2of2)
BONDDEBTSERVICEREQUIREMENTS
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
FiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(dollarsinthousands)
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
ȬŗŗŜ
Ȭŗŗŝ
$105,408
55,514
104,285
13,757
33,696
4,321
4,264
__________
2009
$107,666
60,341
104,540
16,605
29,450
4,590
4,840
__________
$109,770
56,292
110,686
17,810
27,657
4,118
5,655
__________
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$114,454
60,676
112,560
16,248
26,916
4,307
6,286
__________
2012
$113,096
56,387
126,229
16,064
25,642
5,177
7,099
__________
2013
$118,428
61,825
126,966
19,666
24,976
5,821
8,832
__________
2014
$121,893
63,447
131,543
19,973
25,259
5,996
7,044
__________
2015
$125,549
65,155
134,206
20,317
25,537
6,176
7,252
__________
2016
$130,029
67,303
138,536
20,929
26,215
6,361
7,478
__________
2017
Forecast
$134,656
69,517
142,990
21,554
26,904
6,552
7,712
__________
2018
$139,436
72,013
148,955
22,470
28,123
6,749
7,958
__________
2019
$144,371
74,598
155,150
23,421
29,391
6,951
8,212
__________
2020
$126,172
49,438
36,748
27,633
10,219
9,099
11,842
7,817
42,279
__________
$125,057
52,083
37,143
28,120
10,546
9,464
12,135
6,116
47,368
__________
$122,602
56,429
38,707
29,793
10,963
9,393
13,365
6,731
44,005
__________
$122,426
60,275
40,882
31,285
11,808
10,349
14,751
7,456
42,215
__________
$121,984
60,499
46,494
34,102
8,086
10,320
16,769
7,729
43,711
__________
$124,329
63,537
46,880
35,979
9,520
11,246
18,571
8,168
48,284
__________
$125,771
65,159
47,368
36,977
12,076
11,433
19,086
8,386
48,899
__________
$127,321
67,115
48,790
38,086
12,437
11,775
19,659
8,637
50,372
__________
$130,835
69,362
50,908
39,297
12,986
12,255
20,289
8,915
52,004
__________
$134,413
71,681
53,106
40,545
13,557
12,756
20,937
9,203
53,687
__________
$140,458
74,074
55,390
41,832
14,151
13,275
21,604
9,501
55,419
__________
$146,745
76,543
57,762
43,160
14,768
13,812
22,293
9,808
57,203
__________
(2.8%)
2.1%
1.2%
2.8%
$65,575 $67,075
131,428 138,281
134,985 __________
136,091
__________
$331,988 $341,447
2.4%
4.8%
$71,165 $72,031
140,495 149,779
138,034 __________
144,704
__________
$349,694 $366,514
2.4%
2.4%
$72,688 $74,768
153,044 156,753
149,423 __________
152,671
__________
$375,155 $384,192
3.3%
3.3%
$77,091 $79,578
161,209 166,120
158,551 __________
164,187
__________
$396,851 $409,885
3.9%
3.9%
$82,303 $85,172
172,183 178,795
171,218 __________
178,127
__________
$425,704 $442,094
(a) Source:Rates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports,Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportBoard.
(b) Depositstomaintainabalanceofatleast90days'budgetedOperationandMaintenanceExpensesfortheensuingFiscalYear.
May 1, 2014
$Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $479 $2,520 $3,197 $2,281 $2,160 $2,259 $3,165 $3,259 $3,955 $4,098
2.6%
$131,288 $129,269 $107,975
87,101 84,127 80,490
112,281 __________
107,850 __________
139,567
__________
$330,670 $321,246 $328,032
$330,670 $321,246 $328,032 $331,988 $341,447 $349,694 $366,514 $375,155 $384,192 $396,851 $409,885 $425,704 $442,094
$132,952
49,941
37,328
26,931
10,541
9,491
12,645
8,832
42,009
__________
$330,670 $321,246 $328,032 $331,988 $341,447 $349,694 $366,514 $375,155 $384,192 $396,851 $409,885 $425,704 $442,094
$103,332
53,549
109,683
16,613
36,901
4,327
6,266
__________
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
______________________________________________
Note:ExpensesareallocatedtocostcentersinaccordancewiththeprovisionsofthepriorairlineagreementthroughFY2010andtheAirlineAgreementbeginninginFY2011.
OperatingReserveAccountdeposit(b)
Annualpercentchange
Total
Airfield
Terminal
DFW
ExpensesbyCostCenter
Total
Expensesbydepartment
Facilityandtransportationmanagement
Publicsafety
Parkingoperations
Informationtechnology
Customerservice
Airportoperations
Commercialmanagement
Planninganddevelopment
Administrationandoverhead
Total
Expensesbytype
Salariesandwages
Benefits
Contractservices
Equipmentandsupplies
Utilities
Insurance
General,administrative,andother
ExhibitD
OPERATIONANDMAINTENANCEEXPENSES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(dollarsinthousands)
ȬŗŗŞ
Revenueperenplanedpassenger
Enplanedpassengers
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Forecast
2018
2019
2020
$19,040
9,938
7,613
5,885
__________
$42,477
0.4%
$5,350
383
2,574
__________
$11,485
10,557
7,243
6,069
__________
$35,354
Ͳ1.0%
$5,260
446
2,337
__________
$65,124
14,979
7,889
12,361
__________
$100,353
Ͳ32.3%
$5,417
262
5,000
__________
$73,431
19,007
9,112
12,640
__________
$114,190
3.3%
$95,297
23,859
11,816
13,323
__________
$144,296
Ͳ4.0%
$5,771
112
4,289
__________
$5,944
116
4,418
__________
$6,122
119
4,550
__________
$6,306
123
4,687
__________
$6,495
127
4,827
__________
$6,690
130
4,972
__________
$123,685
19,736
13,144
13,038
__________
$169,603
2.3%
$190,351
16,406
20,557
13,291
__________
$240,605
10.8%
$222,019
16,971
23,977
13,553
__________
$276,520
15.2%
$242,539
17,510
26,630
13,822
__________
$300,501
Ͳ4.5%
$271,344
18,041
30,281
14,099
__________
$333,765
4.7%
$279,439
18,658
31,687
14,385
__________
$344,169
Ͳ6.2%
$283,900
19,325
32,704
14,679
__________
$350,609
1.1%
$9,922 __________
$10,172 __________
$10,477 __________
$10,792 __________
$11,116 __________
$11,449 __________
$11,792
__________
$117,516 $130,209 $150,051 $143,373 $150,104 $140,769 $142,279
$5,603
109
4,210
__________
$17,761
14,998
2,894
7,807
2,228
496
30
__________
47.5%
0.4%
$19,604
15,136
2,851
8,101
2,360
524
349
__________
46.6%
Ͳ4.1%
$20,647
17,221
2,390
8,391
2,536
490
43
__________
46.4%
4.7%
$21,550
17,207
3,299
9,801
2,595
458
(100)
__________
47.6%
8.2%
$24,004
17,859
3,642
14,144
1,944
595
151
__________
48.3%
10.8%
$25,272
18,471
3,835
14,891
2,047
627
Ͳ
__________
49.8%
10.8%
$26,286
19,212
3,989
15,488
2,129
652
Ͳ
__________
55.1%
29.2%
$27,886
20,382
4,232
16,432
2,259
692
Ͳ
__________
57.4%
15.0%
$30,078
21,983
4,564
17,723
2,436
746
Ͳ
__________
56.4%
4.1%
$31,488
23,014
4,778
18,554
2,550
781
Ͳ
__________
57.5%
9.0%
$32,956
24,087
5,001
19,419
2,669
818
Ͳ
__________
56.2%
0.2%
$34,483
25,203
5,233
20,319
2,793
855
Ͳ
__________
55.8%
1.6%
Ͳ6.5%
5.9%
5.7%
6.0%
13.7%
4.5%
4.0%
6.1%
7.9%
4.7%
4.7%
4.6%
$1.70
$1.65
$1.74
$1.79
$1.88
$2.07
$2.13
$2.26
$2.40
$2.54
$2.62
May 1, 2014
$2.70
$2.78
29,038 27,946 28,188 28,867 29,160 30,128 30,600 30,000 30,000 30,500 31,000 31,500 32,000
8.0%
$49,420 $46,213 $48,925 $51,717 $54,809 $62,340 $65,144 $67,756 $71,882 $77,531 $81,166 $84,949 $88,886
$18,989
16,009
2,922
8,279
2,383
522
317
__________
44.6%
Annualpercentchange
2012
Ͳ3.4%
0.3%
Ͳ16.8%
183.9%
13.8%
26.4%
17.5%
41.9%
14.9%
8.7%
11.1%
3.1%
1.9%
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$214,358 $215,212 $206,395 $216,166 $233,837 $259,190 $287,118 $370,814 $426,572 $443,874 $483,869 $484,938 $492,887
$17,539
10,632
8,019
6,176
__________
$42,366
2.7%
1.5%
Totalterminalconcessions
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$5,417 $5,504
243 280
5,303 4,717
__________
__________
$
7,540
$
8,307
$
8,043
$
10,679
$
10,963
$
10,501
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$171,991 $172,735 $171,041 $115,813 $119,647 $114,894
$5,710
355
1,475
__________
Annualpercentchange
Terminalconcessions
Foodandbeverage
Retail
Passengerservices
Advertising
Telecommunications
Other
Adjustment(c)
2009
$162,657 $162,740 $161,077 $103,509 $106,839 $103,041 $106,259 $118,700 $138,093 $131,043 $137,407 $127,730 $128,860
1,795 __________
1,688 __________
1,921 __________
1,625 __________
1,845 1,352 __________
1,334 __________
1,337 __________
1,481 __________
1,538 __________
1,582 __________
1,591 __________
1,626
__________
__________
$164,452 $164,428 $162,998 $105,134 $108,684 $104,393 $107,593 $120,037 $139,574 $132,582 $138,989 $129,320 $130,486
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
Airlinerevenuesasshareof
operatingrevenues
Totalairlinerevenues
Annualpercentchange
TotalTerminalCostCenter
TerminalCostCenter
AirlineTerminalRents
FISFacilityfees
CommonUseSpacerevenues
Other(b)
Annualpercentchange
TotalAirfieldCostCenter
Subtotal
Other
Fuelfarmrentals
Aircraftparkingfees
Corporateaviationandother
Subtotal
AirfieldCostCenter
LandingFees
SignatoryAirlines
Nonsignatoryairlines
ExhibitE
OPERATINGREVENUES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
Ȭŗŗş
$92,728
21,825
5,827
1,573
__________
2009
$97,329
21,655
7,168
1,557
__________
$107,519
23,519
7,705
1,337
__________
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$110,841
23,472
8,248
1,253
__________
2012
$116,092
26,767
8,156
1,445
__________
2013
$124,093
26,150
8,537
1,626
__________
2014
$126,777
26,840
8,569
1,533
__________
2015
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
(e)
$128,678
27,377
8,741
1,579
__________
2016
$140,642
28,368
9,057
1,652
__________
2017
Forecast
$144,983
29,387
9,382
1,728
__________
2018
$156,046
30,436
9,717
1,807
__________
2019
$158,410
31,515
10,062
1,890
__________
2020
Ͳ10.7%
4.7%
9.7%
2.7%
6.0%
5.2%
2.1%
1.6%
8.0%
3.2%
6.8%
2.0%
$33,335
8,383
16,795
3,042
8,573
__________
$10.74
$33,358
7,747
14,793
3,087
934
__________
$11.11
$40,723
8,119
3,529
2,775
3,159
__________
$11.57
$38,742
10,200
4,903
3,067
2,301
__________
$11.72
$41,211
12,345
5,022
2,917
1,545
__________
$12.10
$41,073
13,492
5,338
2,973
1,206
__________
$12.43
$42,633
12,591
5,499
3,044
6,605
__________
$12.99
$47,088
12,843
5,663
3,117
9,979
__________
$13.20
$49,765
13,100
5,833
3,192
13,431
__________
$14.04
$54,389
13,362
6,008
3,268
13,633
__________
$14.27
$57,685
13,629
6,189
3,346
14,020
__________
$15.00
$61,367
13,902
6,374
3,427
14,120
__________
$15.07
Ͳ10.6%
Ͳ0.7%
5.7%
3.1%
7.8%
4.2%
4.2%
5.0%
8.1%
4.3%
5.7%
3.2%
Ͳ2.6%
Ͳ5.7%
Ͳ2.3%
5.3%
5.4%
9.2%
7.4%
16.6%
Source:Rates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports,Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportBoard.
Rentalsandexpensereimbursementspaidbynonairlinetenants.
AdjustmenttoreconcilehistoricalconcessionrevenuesasreportedindetailedconcessionreportsandRates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports.
Grosspublicparkingrevenuesbeforeoperatingexpenses.
AmountsearnedonOperatingRevenueandExpenseFundbalances,includingbalancesattributabletotheDebtServiceReserveFundandtheRollingCoverageAccount.
10.5%
5.8%
7.0%
May 1, 2014
2.6%
2.3%
55.4%
52.5%
53.4%
53.6%
52.4%
51.7%
50.2%
44.9%
42.6%
43.6%
42.5%
43.8%
44.2%
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$480,889 $453,505 $442,948 $466,268 $491,673 $537,030 $576,750 $672,661 $743,519 $786,445 $841,177 $862,764 $882,841
Ͳ5.7%
Ͳ16.8%
Ͳ12.9%
Ͳ14.6%
Ͳ2.7%
1.6%
6.5%
1.7%
9.8%
11.8%
8.4%
6.3%
4.6%
4.6%
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$266,532 $238,293 $236,553 $250,102 $257,836 $277,840 $289,631 $301,847 $316,947 $342,571 $357,307 $377,826 $389,953
$80,476 $70,127 $59,918 $58,305 $59,213 $63,039 $64,082 $70,372 $78,691 $85,321 $90,661 $94,870 $99,190
$33,845
8,358
18,217
4,422
15,634
__________
$10.90
12,530 11,360 11,490 12,110 12,270 12,600 12,900 12,600 12,600 12,800 13,000 13,200 13,400
Ͳ2.5%
$136,635 $121,953 $127,710 $140,080 $143,814 $152,460 $160,406 $163,719 $166,374 $179,719 $185,480 $198,006 $201,877
$103,875
24,294
6,696
1,770
__________
2008
______________________________________________
Note:AirlinerevenuesarecalculatedinaccordancewiththeprovisionsofthepriorairlineagreementthroughFY2010andtheAirlineAgreementbeginninginFY2011.
Annualpercentchange
Totaloperatingrevenues
Airlinerevenuesasshareof
operatingrevenues
Annualpercentchange
Totalnonairlinerevenues
Annualpercentchange
Totalcommercialdevelopmentandother
Commercialdevelopmentandother
Landandbuildingrentals
Employeetransportation
Utilitiesexpensereimbursements
Miscellaneousincome
Investmentincome(e)
Revenueperoriginatingpassenger
Originatingpassengers
Annualpercentchange
Totalparkingandgroundtransportation
Parkingandgroundtransportation
Parking(d)
Rentalcarprivilegefees
Groundtransportationfees
NonͲterminalconcessions
OPERATINGREVENUES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
ExhibitE(page2of2)
[E=A+C+D]
Totalairfieldcostcenter
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
2014
2015
2016
2017
Forecast
2018
2019
2020
$355
(15,105)
__________
$149,702
$4.37
$383
(13,994)
__________
$150,817
$4.54
$2.90
$262
(8,959)
__________
$96,437
$4.49
$446
(13,715)
__________
$149,729
$2.79
$243 $280
(8,931) __________
(8,381)
__________
$99,995 $96,293
$2.98
$109
(8,873)
__________
$98,830
$2.80
$112
(10,263)
__________
$109,886
$3.19
$116
(11,918)
__________
$127,772
$3.71
$119
(11,349)
__________
$121,351
$3.47
$123
(11,891)
__________
$127,220
$3.57
$127
(11,090)
__________
$118,357
$3.27
$130
(11,194)
__________
$119,422
$3.25
37,593 36,185 36,270 36,279 36,452 37,359 38,384 37,640 37,640 38,260 38,881 39,501 40,122
[O/P]
[P]
[O=L+M+N]
[L=E+K]
[M]
[N]
$15.02
$9.06
$51.36
$57.95
$76.13
$98.78
$152.03
$177.32
$193.71
$216.71
$223.18
$226.74
$5.18
$5.69
$7,243 __________
$7,889
__________
$29,285 __________
$87,992
__________
$179,014 $184,429
12,979 1,493
(2,007) __________
(4,202)
__________
$4.67
$8.64
$
9,112 __________
$11,816
__________
$
101,550 __________
$130,972
__________
$201,545 $227,265
(1,074) 151
(9,676) __________
(10,373)
__________
$7.76
$5.59
$13,144 __________
$20,557
__________
$156,565 __________
$227,314
__________
$255,395 $337,200
1,323 Ͳ
(10,585) __________
(13,873)
__________
$6.92
$5.64
$23,977 __________
$26,630
__________
$262,968 __________
$286,679
__________
$390,739 $408,030
Ͳ
Ͳ
(12,295) __________
(5,758)
__________
$5.62
$5.70
$30,281 __________
$31,687
__________
$319,666 __________
$329,784
__________
$446,886 $448,141
Ͳ
Ͳ
(6,000) __________
(6,000)
__________
$5.66
$455,352
Ͳ
(6,000)
__________
$32,704
__________
$335,929
__________
$5.76
0.7%
Ͳ5.2%
Ͳ4.4%
5.0%
13.8%
13.4%
31.4%
17.0%
6.3%
9.6%
0.3%
1.6%
$6.85
$7.17
$6.74
$6.30
Source:Rates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports,Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportBoard.
EffectiveaverageratepaidbySignatoryAirlinesandnonsignatoryairlinestakingintoaccountyearͲendreconciliationadjustments.
ExcludespassengersarrivingfrominternationalairportswithU.S.CustomsandBorderProtectionpreclearancestations.
IncludesutilitiesexpensereimbursementsthroughFY2010andnetyearͲendreconciliationadjustments.
$6.54
$7.20
$8.04
$10.78
$12.61
$13.19
$14.22
May 1, 2014
$14.04
$14.04
29,038 27,946 28,188 28,867 29,160 30,128 30,600 30,000 30,000 30,500 31,000 31,500 32,000
3.0%
$198,909 $200,375 $189,986 $181,720 $190,795 $217,043 $246,133 $323,326 $378,444 $402,272 $440,886 $442,141 $449,352
$8,019 __________
$7,613
__________
$36,190 __________
$36,592
__________
$185,892 $187,409
13,867 15,697
(850) __________
(2,732)
__________
$5.20
2,045 1,917 2,259 2,633 2,448 2,763 2,853 2,937 3,021 3,105 3,189 3,273 3,357
$10,632 $9,938 $10,557 $14,979 $19,007 $23,859 $19,736 $16,406 $16,971 $17,510 $18,041 $18,658 $19,325
$13.83
______________________________________________
Note:DoesnotincludepaymentsformaintenanceofTerminalsAandC,whicharemadeseparatelybyAmericanAirlines.
Passengerairlinepaymentsper
enplanedpassenger
Enplanedpassengers
Annualpercentchange
Netairlinepayments
Totalairlinepayments
Utilitiesreimbursementsandother(d)
Less:Airserviceincentivecredits
[J]
[K=F+H+J]
TotalTerminalCostCenter
[H/I]
FISFacilityfeerate
(perinternationaldeplanedpassenger)
CommonUseSpacerevenues
[I]
[H]
[F/G]
Internationaldeplanedpassengers(c)
FISFacilityfees
Averageterminalrentalratepersqft
TotalAirlineLeasableSquareFootage
2013
$17,539 $19,040 $11,485 $65,124 $73,431 $95,297 $123,685 $190,351 $222,019 $242,539 $271,344 $279,439 $283,900
[C]
[D]
Aircraftparkingfees
Less:CargoairlineLandingFees
2012
1,268 1,268 1,268 1,268 1,267 1,252 1,252 1,252 1,252 1,252 1,252 1,252 1,252
[A/B]
Averagelandingfeerate(b)
(per1,000lbsoflandedweight)
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$164,452 $164,428 $162,998 $105,134 $108,684 $104,393 $107,593 $120,037 $139,574 $132,582 $138,989 $129,320 $130,486
2009
[F]
[B]
2008
[G]
[A]
Landedweight
TerminalCostCenter
AirlineTerminalRents
ExhibitEͲ1
CALCULATIONOFPASSENGERAIRLINEPAYMENTS
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerrates)
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
AirfieldCostCenter
LandingFees
ȬŗŘŖ
ȬŗŘŗ
27,946
$4.39
84.8%
$104,097
2,374
__________
2009
28,188
$4.39
84.2%
$104,206
933
__________
28,867
$4.39
85.9%
$108,915
363
__________
2011
Historical(a)
2010
29,160
$4.39
85.3%
$109,149
161
__________
2012
30,128
$4.39
87.4%
$115,602
60
__________
2013
30,600
$4.39
85.0%
$114,184
Ͳ
__________
2014
30,000
$4.39
85.0%
$111,945
Ͳ
__________
2015
30,000
$4.39
85.0%
$111,945
Ͳ
__________
2016
30,500
$4.39
85.0%
$113,811
Ͳ
__________
2017
Forecast
31,000
$4.39
85.0%
$115,677
Ͳ
__________
2018
31,500
$4.39
85.0%
$117,542
Ͳ
__________
2019
32,000
$4.39
85.0%
$119,408
Ͳ
__________
2020
$4,923
$123,755
__________
$128,678
__________
$(22,207)
$7,043
$112,971
__________
$120,014
__________
$(14,875)
$Ͳ
$130,500
__________
$130,500
__________
$(21,222)
$Ͳ
$138,522
__________
$138,522
__________
$(29,212)
$Ͳ
$137,053
__________
$137,053
__________
$(21,390)
$Ͳ
$111,495
__________
$111,495
__________
$2,689
$Ͳ
$125,756
__________
$125,756
__________
$(13,811)
$Ͳ
$111,945
__________
$111,945
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$113,811
__________
$113,811
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$115,677
__________
$115,677
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$117,542
__________
$117,542
__________
$Ͳ
$Ͳ
$119,408
__________
$119,408
__________
$Ͳ
May 1, 2014
$120,027 $97,820 $82,945 $61,723 $32,511 $11,121 $13,811 $Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ
$8,022
$123,536
__________
$131,558
__________
$(24,466)
$107,092 $106,471 $105,139 $109,278 $109,310 $115,663 $114,184 $111,945 $111,945 $113,811 $115,677 $117,542 $119,408
29,038
$4.39
79.5%
$101,283
5,809
__________
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
(a)Sources:PFCreportsandRates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports,Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportBoard.
(b)$4.50lessairlinecollectionfeeof$0.11perpassengereffectiveJuly2002.
PFCFundbalance
PFCrevenuesminusexpenditures
TotalPFCexpenditures
UsesofPFCrevenues
PayͲasͲyouͲgoexpenditures
DebtserviceonBonds
TotalPFCrevenues
SourcesofPFCrevenues
Enplanedpassengers
NetPFCperpassenger(b)
PercentpassengerspayingPFC
PFCreceipts
Investmentearnings
ExhibitF
SOURCESANDUSESOFPFCREVENUES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
ȬŗŘŘ
4,941
[E/H]
[EͲH]
11,490
12,110
12,270
2012
12,600
2013
12,900
2014
12,600
2015
12,600
2016
12,800
2017
Forecast
13,000
2018
13,200
2019
13,400
2020
4,128
$4.00
4,227
$3.95
4,747
$4.00
4,889
$4.00
5,043
$4.00
5,163
$4.00
5,043
$4.00
5,043
$4.00
5,123
$4.00
5,204
$4.00
5,284
$4.00
5,364
$4.00
Ͳ3.2%
0.0%
$11,051
1,900
4,423
__________
$17,374
886
__________
$18,260
24.4%
Ͳ0.1%
13.6%
$12,785
1,896
Ͳ
__________
$14,681
Ͳ
__________
$14,681
1.2%
Ͳ75.1%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
4,351
__________
$4,351
201
__________
$4,552
3.0%
243.3%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
13,371
__________
$13,371
2,254
__________
$15,626
3.2%
Ͳ7.2%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,273
__________
$14,273
223
__________
$14,496
2.4%
Ͳ1.5%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,275
__________
$14,275
1
__________
$14,276
Ͳ2.3%
0.0%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,273
__________
$14,273
Ͳ
__________
$14,273
0.0%
0.0%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,277
__________
$14,277
1
__________
$14,278
1.6%
0.0%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,275
__________
$14,275
Ͳ
__________
$14,275
1.6%
0.0%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,273
__________
$14,273
Ͳ
__________
$14,273
1.5%
0.0%
$Ͳ
Ͳ
14,276
__________
$14,276
1
__________
$14,277
1.5%
135%
112%
114%
430%
129%
142%
141%
141%
144%
146%
148%
150%
May 1, 2014
$5,309 $4,552 $15,626 $14,496 $14,276 $14,273 $14,278 $14,275 $14,273 $14,277
104%
$5,078 $1,820 $2,031 $729 $15,004 $4,548 $6,158 $5,898 $5,901 $6,216 $6,539 $6,862 $7,178
0.0%
$12,791
1,898
Ͳ
__________
$14,690
Ͳ
__________
$14,690
Ͳ16.5%
$19,765 $16,510 $16,712 $18,989 $19,556 $20,174 $20,654 $20,174 $20,174 $20,494 $20,814 $21,134 $21,455
$4.00
$12,789
1,898
Ͳ
__________
[F]
$14,686
Ͳ
__________
[H=F+G] $14,686
[E=CxD]
[D]
11,360
2011
Historical(a)
2010
0.39 0.36 0.37 0.39 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40
12,530
2009
______________________________________________
(a) RequiredSupplementalInformation,RentalCarFacilityBonds,Series1998and1999,ContinuingDisclosureStatements, DFWAirportBoard.
(b) BeginningFY2011,transferfromthePublicFacilityImprovementCorporationtotheOperatingRevenueandExpenseFundofanamountequaltothelesserof(1)thesumofdebtservicerequirementsofthe
2011ARentalCarRefundingBondsplusIncrementalCoverageor(2)CFCrevenues.
SuccessorRentalCarFacilityCharges(b)
CoverageofrentalcarCFCdebtservice
requirementsbyCFCrevenues
RemainingCFCrevenues
Annualpercentchange
TotalusesofCFCrevenues
Subtotaldebtservicerequirements
IncrementalCoverage
UsesofrentalcarCFCrevenues
Debtservicerequirementsof
1998RentalCarFacilityChargeBonds
1999RentalCarFacilityChargeBonds
2011ARentalCarRefundingBonds
Annualpercentchange
TotalCFCrevenues
CFCrevenuespertransactionͲday
[B]
[C=AxB]
RentalcartransactionͲdays
[A]
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
RentalcartransactionͲdays
peroriginatingpassenger
SourcesofrentalcarCFCrevenues
Originatingpassengers
ExhibitG
SOURCESANDUSESOFRENTALCARCFCREVENUES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
ȬŗŘř
225%
CoverageofHoteldebtservicerequirements
bynetHoteloperatingincome
[C/D]
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Forecast
2018
2019
2020
$4,445
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$4,445
__________
$4,574
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$4,574
__________
$4,527
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$4,527
__________
Ͳ3.2%
$10,605
6,150
754
1,274
__________
$18,784
__________
$6,697
Ͳ0.8%
$2,809
1,102
275
__________
$4,186
__________
22.0%
$11,649
6,456
781
1,424
__________
$20,310
__________
$8,173
11.8%
$Ͳ
3,432
583
__________
$4,015
__________
10.0%
$12,813
6,808
842
1,550
__________
$22,013
__________
$8,990
8.8%
$Ͳ
3,671
60
__________
$3,731
__________
5.5%
$13,057
7,065
894
1,605
__________
$22,620
__________
$9,485
3.6%
$Ͳ
3,828
39
__________
$3,867
__________
1.2%
$13,448
7,277
921
1,645
__________
$23,290
__________
$9,601
2.4%
$Ͳ
3,975
37
__________
$4,012
__________
3.0%
$13,852
7,495
948
1,694
__________
$23,989
__________
$9,889
3.0%
$Ͳ
4,120
36
__________
$4,157
__________
3.0%
$14,267
7,720
977
1,745
__________
$24,708
__________
$10,185
3.0%
$Ͳ
4,753
158
__________
$4,911
__________
3.0%
$14,695
7,951
1,006
1,797
__________
$25,450
__________
$10,491
3.0%
$Ͳ
4,921
42
__________
$4,963
__________
3.0%
$15,136
8,190
1,036
1,851
__________
$26,213
__________
$10,806
3.0%
$Ͳ
5,095
44
__________
$5,139
__________
3.0%
$15,590
8,435
1,067
1,906
__________
$27,000
__________
$11,130
3.0%
178%
$450
Ͳ
__________
$450
__________
$3,018
151%
$454
Ͳ
__________
$454
__________
$1,890
148%
$457
Ͳ
__________
$457
__________
$1,713
195%
$474
576
__________
$1,049
__________
$2,938
224%
$511
620
__________
$1,131
__________
$3,844
254%
$543
642
__________
$1,185
__________
$4,569
248%
$559
658
__________
$1,217
__________
$4,517
246%
$576
677
__________
$1,253
__________
$4,623
245%
$593
698
__________
$1,291
__________
$4,738
214%
$611
719
__________
$1,330
__________
$4,251
218%
$629
740
__________
$1,370
__________
$4,473
217%
$648
763
__________
$1,411
__________
$4,580
May 1, 2014
TransferfromPFICtoOperatingRevenue
andExpenseFund(f)
$1,377 $4,015 $3,731 $3,867 $4,012 $4,157 $4,911 $4,963 $5,139
______________________________________________
(a) Summaryoperatingstatementsandannualbusinessplans,PublicFacilityImprovementCorporation,DFWAirportBoard.
(b) NotincludedinOperationandMaintenanceExpenses(perExhibitD)pursuanttotheBondOrdinances.Excludesdepreciationandamortization.
(c) Forecastprioritymanagementfeescalculatedas70%ofmanagementfeespayabletoHyatt.
(d) Forecastcontributionstoreserveforrenewalandreplacementoffurnishings,fixtures,andequipment(FF&E)calculatedas5%ofHotelrevenues.
(e) Forecastcontributionstoreserveforreplacementofandadditionstocapitalitemscalculatedas2%ofHotelrevenues.
(f) BeginningFY2011,transferfromthePublicFacilityImprovementCorporationtotheOperatingRevenueandExpenseFundofanamountequaltothelesserof(1)thesumofdebtservicerequirements
ofthe2012CHotelRefundingBondsplusIncrementalCoverageor(2)netHoteloperatingincome.
RemainingHotelrevenues
Subtotalotheruses
2012
$5,579 $3,468 $2,344 $2,170 $3,987 $4,975 $5,754 $5,734 $5,877 $6,029 $5,580 $5,843 $5,991
[EͲF]
[F]
[E=CͲD]
$4,476
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$4,476
__________
Ͳ12.6%
Ͳ21.3%
1.6%
5.4%
Ͳ10.4%
$11,015
5,926
750
1,083
__________
$18,773
__________
$6,918
5.1%
$9,974
5,650
740
1,012
__________
$17,376
__________
$7,913
[D]
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$10,202
6,350
719
908
__________
[B]
$18,179
__________
[C=AͲB] $10,055
[A]
2009
$16,214 $14,023 $13,918 $14,566 $15,582 $16,741 $17,427 $17,760 $18,293 $18,842 $19,407 $19,989 $20,589
11,480
10,635
11,235
10,415
12,262
13,390
13,824
14,205
14,632
15,071
15,523
15,988
16,468
540
632
539
499
639
872
854
925
953
981
1,011
1,041
1,072
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$28,234 $25,290 $25,692 $25,481 $28,484 $31,003 $32,105 $32,891 $33,878 $34,894 $35,941 $37,019 $38,129
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
$437
Ͳ
__________
$437
__________
$5,142
Otheruses
Subordinatemanagementfees
Capitalreplacementreserves(e)
NetHotelincomeafterpaymentof
debtservicerequirements
Subtotaldebtservicerequirements
Debtservicerequirements
2001PFICHotelBonds
2012CHotelRefundingBonds
IncrementalCoverage
Annualpercentchange
NetHoteloperatingincome
Subtotaloperatingexpenses
UsesofHotelrevenues
Directoperatingexpenses(b)
Indirectoperatingexpenses(b)
Prioritymanagementfees(c)
FF&Ereplacementreserves(d)
Annualpercentchange
TotalHotelrevenues
SourcesofHotelrevenues
Rooms
Foodandbeverage
Telecommunicationsandother
ExhibitH
SOURCESANDUSESOFHOTELREVENUES
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptpercentages)
ȬŗŘŚ
Endingbalance
RollingCoverageAccountbalance
Beginningbalance
IncrementalCoverage(l)
Subtotal
ApplicationtoCapitalImprovementsFund
ToDFWCapitalAccount
ToJointCapitalAccount
ToRollingCoverageAccount(k)
Remainingamountavailableto
applytoCapitalImprovementsFund
Subtotal
ApplicationofGrossRevenues
AccruedAggregateDebtService(i)
DebtServiceReserveFunddeposit
OperationandMaintenanceExpenses(j)
OperatingReserveAccountdeposit(j)
GrossRevenues
Subtotal
OperatingRevenueandExpense
Fundtransfers(f)
RollingCoverageAccount
JointCapitalAccount(g)
DFWCapitalAccount(h)
CurrentGrossRevenues
CalculationofGrossRevenues
Operatingrevenues(b)
SpecialRevenues(c)
SuccessorRentalCarFacilityCharges(d)
Hotelrevenues(e)
ExhibitI
[CͲG]
$59,122
$236,494
Ͳ
321,246
Ͳ
__________
$557,741
$Ͳ
39,602
Ͳ
__________
$39,602
__________
$616,863
$453,505
123,755
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$577,260
2009
$233,300
Ͳ
331,988
479
__________
$565,767
$57,093
28,000
Ͳ
__________
$85,093
__________
$687,170
$466,268
130,500
5,309
Ͳ
__________
$602,077
$247,173
Ͳ
341,447
2,520
__________
$591,140
$58,105
24,000
Ͳ
__________
$82,105
__________
$718,229
$491,673
138,522
4,552
1,377
__________
$636,124
2012
$280,854
Ͳ
349,694
3,197
__________
$633,745
$61,793
20,000
Ͳ
__________
$81,793
__________
$775,516
$537,030
137,053
15,626
4,015
__________
$693,723
2013
$282,130
Ͳ
366,514
2,281
__________
$650,925
$70,221
16,000
Ͳ
__________
$86,221
__________
$792,693
$576,750
111,495
14,496
3,731
__________
$706,471
2014
$364,212
Ͳ
375,155
2,160
__________
$741,527
$70,584
12,000
2,400
__________
$84,984
__________
$901,543
$672,661
125,756
14,276
3,867
__________
$816,559
2015
$415,533
Ͳ
384,192
2,259
__________
$801,984
$91,053
8,000
2,400
__________
$101,453
__________
$975,202
$743,519
111,945
14,273
4,012
__________
$873,749
2016
$442,709
Ͳ
396,851
3,165
__________
$842,725
$103,883
4,000
2,400
__________
$110,283
__________
$1,028,974
$786,445
113,811
14,278
4,157
__________
$918,691
2017
Forecast
$479,224
Ͳ
409,885
3,259
__________
$892,368
$110,677
Ͳ
2,400
__________
$113,077
__________
$1,089,116
$841,177
115,677
14,275
4,911
__________
$976,039
2018
$487,644
Ͳ
425,704
3,955
__________
$917,303
$119,806
Ͳ
2,400
__________
$122,206
__________
$1,121,748
$862,764
117,542
14,273
4,963
__________
$999,542
2019
$491,437
Ͳ
442,094
4,098
__________
$937,629
$121,911
Ͳ
2,400
__________
$124,311
__________
$1,145,975
$882,841
119,408
14,277
5,139
__________
$1,021,664
2020
$71,184
Ͳ
70,584
__________
$141,767
$68,963
Ͳ
91,053
__________
$160,016
$69,336
Ͳ
103,883
__________
$173,219
$Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $57,093 $58,105 $61,793 $70,221 $70,584 $91,053
Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ 1,232 3,688 8,421 312 20,469 12,830
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $58,325 $61,793 $70,214 $70,533 $91,053 $103,883
$71,550
Ͳ
70,221
__________
$141,771
$103,883
6,794
__________
$110,677
$75,572
Ͳ
110,677
__________
$186,249
$110,677
9,129
__________
$119,806
$76,942
Ͳ
119,806
__________
$196,748
$121,911
948
__________
$122,859
$85,486
Ͳ
122,859
__________
$208,345
May 1, 2014
$119,806
2,105
__________
$121,911
$82,534
Ͳ
121,911
__________
$204,445
$52,203 $121,403 $127,089 $141,771 $141,768 $160,016 $173,219 $186,249 $196,748 $204,445 $208,346
$208,808
Ͳ
328,032
(3,506)
__________
$533,334
$Ͳ
29,619
Ͳ
__________
$29,619
__________
$585,538
$442,948
112,971
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$555,919
2011
Historical(a)
2010
$Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $63,298 $65,296
Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ
Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ 58,105 61,793
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________
$Ͳ $Ͳ $Ͳ $121,403 $127,089
$59,612
$239,882
Ͳ
[E]
330,670
[F]
3,432
__________
[G=D+E+F] $573,985
[D]
$Ͳ
29,171
Ͳ
__________
[B]
$29,171
__________
[C=A+B] $633,596
[A]
$480,889
123,536
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$604,425
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
APPLICATIONOFREVENUESANDDEBTSERVICECOVERAGE
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(dollarsinthousands)
ȬŗŘś
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Forecast
2018
2019
2020
[H/D]
[D]
125%
125%
125%
125%
152%
125%
151%
125%
150%
125%
150%
125%
144%
125%
142%
125%
142%
125%
141%
125%
142%
125%
142%
125%
113%
100%
108%
100%
111%
100%
116%
100%
118%
100%
121%
100%
120%
100%
121%
100%
117%
100%
117%
100%
117%
100%
May 1, 2014
117%
100%
117%
100%
$239,882 $236,494 $208,808 $233,300 $247,173 $280,854 $282,130 $364,212 $415,533 $442,709 $479,224 $487,644 $491,437
______________________________________________
(a) Source:Rates,Fees,andChargesSettlement(orReconciliation) reports,Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirportBoard.
(b) SeeExhibitE.
(c) PFCrevenuesusedtopaydebtservice.SeeExhibitF.
(d) TransfersfromthePublicFacilityImprovementCorporationtopaydebtserviceonthe2011ARentalCarRefundingBonds.SeeExhibitG.
(e) TransfersfromthePublicFacilityImprovementCorporationtopaydebtserviceonthe2012CHotelRefundingBonds.SeeExhibitH.
(f) TransfersfromtheCapitalImprovementsFundinaccordancewithSection5.2(d)oftheMasterBondOrdinance.
(g) TransferstotheTerminalCostCenterratebaserequirementtoreduceAirlineTerminalRentspursuanttotheAirlineAgreement.
(h) TransferstotheOperatingRevenueandExpenseFundtopaydebtserviceonthe2013GBonds.
(i) SeeExhibitC.AmountisnetofinvestmentincomeonbalancesintheDebtServiceFund.
(j) SeeExhibitD.
(k) IncludesIncrementalCoverage.
(l) Depositstomaintainabalanceof25%ofAccruedAggregateDebtServiceforthethenͲcurrentFiscalYear.
(m) RateCovenantcoveragecalculationpursuanttoSection6.3(b)oftheMasterBondOrdinance.
(n) RateCovenantcoveragecalculationpursuanttoSection6.3(c)oftheMasterBondOrdinance.
[D]
[I/D]
Debtservicecoverage
Requirement
(3,432) Ͳ 3,506 (479) (2,520) (3,197) (2,281) (2,160) (2,259) (3,165) (3,259) (3,955) (4,098)
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
[I=AͲEͲF] $270,323 $256,014 $231,392 $269,610 $292,157 $340,832 $337,676 $439,244 $487,298 $518,675 $562,895 $569,883 $575,472
(330,670) (321,246) (328,032) (331,988) (341,447) (349,694) (366,514) (375,155) (384,192) (396,851) (409,885) (425,704) (442,094)
$604,425 $577,260 $555,919 $602,077 $636,124 $693,723 $706,471 $816,559 $873,749 $918,691 $976,039 $999,542 $1,021,664
125%
125%
$239,882 $236,494 $208,808 $233,300 $247,173 $280,854 $282,130 $364,212 $415,533 $442,709 $479,224 $487,644 $491,437
(3,432) Ͳ 3,506 (479) (2,520) (3,197) (2,281) (2,160) (2,259) (3,165) (3,259) (3,955) (4,098)
__________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
[H=CͲEͲF] $299,494 $295,616 $261,011 $354,703 $374,262 $422,625 $423,898 $524,228 $588,751 $628,958 $675,972 $692,089 $699,783
AccruedAggregateDebtService(i)
NetCurrentGrossRevenues
2012
(330,670) (321,246) (328,032) (331,988) (341,447) (349,694) (366,514) (375,155) (384,192) (396,851) (409,885) (425,704) (442,094)
2011
Historical(a)
2010
[E]
[F]
2009
$633,596 $616,863 $585,538 $687,170 $718,229 $775,516 $792,693 $901,543 $975,202 $1,028,974 $1,089,116 $1,121,748 $1,145,975
2008
[C]
CalculationofCurrentGrossRevenuescoverage(n)
[A]
CurrentGrossRevenues
Less:OperationandMaintenance
Expenses(j)
[E]
Less:OperatingReserveAccount
[F]
deposit(j)
Debtservicecoverage
Requirement
AccruedAggregateDebtService(i)
NetGrossRevenues
CalculationofGrossRevenuescoverage(m)
GrossRevenues
Less:OperationandMaintenance
Expenses(j)
Less:OperatingReserveAccount
deposit(j)
APPLICATIONOFREVENUESANDDEBTSERVICECOVERAGE
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(dollarsinthousands)
ExhibitI(page2of2)
ȬŗŘŜ
[C]
[D]
[B]
[A]
2011
Historical
2010
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Forecast
2018
2019
2020
$Ͳ
330,670
3,432
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
321,246
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
328,032
(3,506)
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
331,988
479
1,232
__________
$Ͳ
341,447
2,520
3,688
__________
$Ͳ
349,694
3,197
8,421
__________
$Ͳ
366,514
2,281
312
__________
$Ͳ
375,155
2,160
20,469
__________
$Ͳ
384,192
2,259
12,830
__________
$201,545
32,291
54,809
143,814
59,213
__________
$227,265
31,925
62,340
152,460
63,039
__________
$255,395
31,724
65,144
160,406
64,082
__________
$337,200
33,615
67,756
163,719
70,372
__________
$390,739
35,833
71,882
166,374
78,691
__________
$408,030
35,844
77,531
179,719
85,321
__________
$446,886
36,983
81,166
185,480
90,661
__________
$448,141
36,797
84,949
198,006
94,870
__________
$455,352
37,536
88,886
201,877
99,190
__________
$447,140
Ͳ
__________
$799,754
$Ͳ
442,094
4,098
948
__________
_______________________________
Sources:Seeprecedingexhibitsandaccompanyingtext.
[I/A]
[K/A]
Debtservicecoverage
GrossRevenuescalculation
[J]
[K=I+J]
NetGrossRevenues
[I]
NetCurrentGrossRevenues
[F/H]
[H]
[I]
[H/I]
$7.17
$6.74
$6.30
$6.54
$7.20
$8.04
$10.78
$12.61
$13.19
$14.22
$14.04
$14.04
125%
108%
125%
113%
111%
125%
116%
152%
118%
151%
121%
150%
120%
150%
121%
144%
117%
142%
117%
142%
117%
141%
May 1, 2014
117%
142%
117%
142%
29,171 __________
39,602 __________
29,619 __________
85,093 __________
82,105 __________
81,793 __________
86,221 __________
84,984 __________
101,453 __________
110,283 __________
113,077 __________
122,206 __________
124,311
__________
$299,494 $295,616 $261,011 $354,703 $374,262 $422,625 $423,898 $524,228 $588,751 $628,958 $675,972 $692,089 $699,783
$270,323 $256,014 $231,392 $269,610 $292,157 $340,832 $337,676 $439,244 $487,298 $518,675 $562,895 $569,883 $575,472
$480,889 $453,505 $442,948 $466,268 $491,673 $537,030 $576,750 $672,661 $743,519 $786,445 $841,177 $862,764 $882,841
123,536 123,755 112,971 135,809 144,451 156,693 129,722 143,899 130,230 132,246 134,863 136,778 138,823
(330,670) (321,246) (328,032) (331,988) (341,447) (349,694) (366,514) (375,155) (384,192) (396,851) (409,885) (425,704) (442,094)
(3,432) __________
Ͳ __________
3,506 __________
(479) __________
(2,520) __________
(3,197) __________
(2,281) __________
(2,160) __________
(2,259) __________
(3,165) __________
(3,259) __________
(3,955) __________
(4,098)
__________
$6.85
29,038 27,946 28,188 28,867 29,160 30,128 30,600 30,000 30,000 30,500 31,000 31,500 32,000
12,530 11,360 11,490 12,110 12,270 12,600 12,900 12,600 12,600 12,800 13,000 13,200 13,400
43.2%
40.6%
40.8%
42.0%
42.1%
41.8%
42.2%
42.0%
42.0%
42.0%
41.9%
41.9%
41.9%
$480,889 $453,505 $442,948 $466,268 $491,673 $537,030 $576,750 $672,661 $743,519 $786,445 $841,177 $862,764 $882,841
$184,429
31,737
51,717
140,080
58,305
__________
$431,764
Ͳ
__________
$782,630
$Ͳ
425,704
3,955
2,105
__________
[G]
$179,014
27,381
48,925
127,710
59,918
__________
$422,273
Ͳ
__________
$766,635
$Ͳ
409,885
3,259
9,129
__________
$185,892
28,466
49,420
136,635
80,476
__________
$187,409
27,803
46,213
121,953
70,127
__________
$406,810
(4,000)
__________
$713,274
$Ͳ
396,851
3,165
6,794
__________
$116,346 $112,739 $95,837 $97,491 $102,722 $124,161 $152,408 $220,314 $285,302 $310,464 $344,362 $350,866 $352,614
[F]
OperatingRevenueandExpense
FundTransfers
CurrentGrossRevenuescalculation
2009
$239,882 $236,494 $208,808 $233,300 $247,173 $280,854 $282,130 $364,212 $415,533 $442,709 $479,224 $487,644 $491,437
(123,536) (123,755) (112,971) (130,500) (138,522) (137,053) (111,495) (125,756) (111,945) (113,811) (115,677) (117,542) (119,408)
Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ (5,309) (4,552) (15,626) (14,496) (14,276) (14,273) (14,278) (14,275) (14,273) (14,277)
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
(1,377) __________
(4,015) __________
(3,731) __________
(3,867) __________
(4,012) __________
(4,157) __________
(4,911) __________
(4,963) __________
(5,139)
__________
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheforecastswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheforecastandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
$334,102 $321,246 $324,527 $333,699 $347,655 $361,312 $369,107 $397,784 $399,281
(29,171) __________
(39,602) __________
(29,619) __________
(28,000) __________
(24,000) __________
(20,000) __________
(16,000) __________
(12,000) __________
(8,000)
__________
[E=B+C+D] $421,278 $394,383 $390,745 $403,190 $426,377 $465,473 $505,515 $606,098 $676,583
NetGrossRevenues
Operatingrevenues
Otherrevenues
Less:OperationandMaintenanceExpenses
Less:OperatingReserveFunddeposits
Airlinepaymentsperenplanedpassenger
Enplanedpassengers
Originatingpassengers
Originatingpercentage
Subtotal
Operatingrevenues
Passengerairlinepayments
Otherairlinecostcenterrevenues
Terminalconcessions
Parkingandgroundtransportation
Commercialdevelopmentandother
Netrequirements
Subtotalotherrequirements
Less:AnnualCapitalTransfer
DebtServiceReserveFunddeposits
OperationandMaintenanceExpenses
OperatingReserveFunddeposits
IncrementalCoverage
Netdebtservice
Requirements
AccruedAggregateDebtService
Less:SpecialRevenues
Less:SuccessorRentalCarFacilityCharges
Less:Hotelrevenues
ExhibitJͲ1
SUMMARYOFFORECASTFINANCIALRESULTS:BASECASEPASSENGERFORECAST
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
ȬŗŘŝ
[C]
[D]
[B]
[A]
2011
Historical
2010
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Projected
2018
2019
2020
$Ͳ
330,670
3,432
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
321,246
Ͳ
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
328,032
(3,506)
Ͳ
__________
$Ͳ
331,988
479
1,232
__________
$Ͳ
341,447
2,520
3,688
__________
$Ͳ
349,694
3,197
8,421
__________
$Ͳ
366,514
2,281
312
__________
$Ͳ
356,801
Ͳ
20,469
__________
$Ͳ
343,650
Ͳ
12,830
__________
$201,545
32,291
54,809
143,814
59,213
__________
$227,265
31,925
62,340
152,460
63,039
__________
$255,714
31,405
65,144
160,406
64,082
__________
$339,934
34,305
60,754
155,923
70,282
__________
$383,562
36,553
56,068
147,888
78,424
__________
$411,502
37,600
60,499
160,062
84,978
__________
$447,271
38,550
63,362
165,505
90,308
__________
$456,904
39,215
66,341
177,006
94,503
__________
$464,419
40,062
69,442
180,785
98,808
__________
$400,169
Ͳ
__________
$778,903
$Ͳ
395,580
3,641
948
__________
_______________________________
Sources:Seeprecedingexhibitsandaccompanyingtext.
[I/A]
[K/A]
Debtservicecoverage
GrossRevenuescalculation
[J]
[K=I+J]
NetGrossRevenues
[I]
NetCurrentGrossRevenues
[F/H]
[H]
[I]
[H/I]
$7.17
$6.74
$6.30
$6.55
$7.20
$8.05
$12.12
$15.87
$17.05
$18.23
$18.33
$18.34
125%
108%
125%
113%
111%
125%
116%
152%
118%
151%
121%
150%
120%
150%
120%
143%
112%
136%
114%
139%
114%
137%
May 1, 2014
115%
140%
115%
141%
29,171 __________
39,602 __________
29,619 __________
85,093 __________
82,105 __________
81,793 __________
86,221 __________
84,984 __________
101,453 __________
110,283 __________
113,077 __________
122,206 __________
124,311
__________
$299,494 $295,616 $261,011 $354,703 $374,262 $422,625 $423,898 $521,710 $565,901 $614,169 $657,643 $682,672 $691,310
$270,323 $256,014 $231,392 $269,610 $292,157 $340,832 $337,676 $436,726 $464,448 $503,886 $544,566 $560,466 $566,999
$480,889 $453,505 $442,948 $466,268 $491,673 $537,030 $576,750 $661,197 $702,496 $754,642 $804,996 $833,969 $853,517
123,536 123,755 112,971 135,809 144,451 156,693 129,722 132,331 105,602 107,245 109,488 111,031 112,703
(330,670) (321,246) (328,032) (331,988) (341,447) (349,694) (366,514) (356,801) (343,650) (355,130) (366,960) (381,018) (395,580)
(3,432) __________
Ͳ __________
3,506 __________
(479) __________
(2,520) __________
(3,197) __________
(2,281) __________
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
(2,870) __________
(2,958) __________
(3,515) __________
(3,641)
__________
$6.85
29,038 27,946 28,188 28,867 29,140 30,128 30,600 26,900 23,400 23,800 24,200 24,600 25,000
12,540 11,360 11,500 12,100 12,230 12,600 12,900 12,000 11,200 11,400 11,600 11,800 12,000
43.2%
40.6%
40.8%
41.9%
42.0%
41.8%
42.2%
44.6%
47.9%
47.9%
47.9%
48.0%
48.0%
$480,889 $453,505 $442,948 $466,268 $491,673 $537,030 $576,750 $661,197 $702,496 $754,642 $804,996 $833,969 $853,517
$184,429
31,737
51,717
140,080
58,305
__________
$386,638
Ͳ
__________
$763,251
$Ͳ
381,018
3,515
2,105
__________
[G]
$179,014
27,381
48,925
127,710
59,918
__________
$379,047
Ͳ
__________
$748,784
$Ͳ
366,960
2,958
9,129
__________
$185,892
28,466
49,420
136,635
80,476
__________
$187,409
27,803
46,213
121,953
70,127
__________
$364,794
(4,000)
__________
$696,259
$Ͳ
355,130
2,870
6,794
__________
$116,346 $112,739 $95,837 $97,491 $102,722 $124,161 $152,408 $231,882 $309,930 $335,465 $369,737 $376,613 $378,734
[F]
OperatingRevenueandExpense
FundTransfers
CurrentGrossRevenuescalculation
2009
$239,882 $236,494 $208,808 $233,300 $247,173 $280,854 $282,130 $364,212 $415,533 $442,709 $479,224 $487,644 $491,437
(123,536) (123,755) (112,971) (130,500) (138,522) (137,053) (111,495) (114,188) (87,317) (88,810) (90,302) (91,795) (93,288)
Ͳ Ͳ Ͳ (5,309) (4,552) (15,626) (14,496) (14,276) (14,273) (14,278) (14,275) (14,273) (14,277)
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
Ͳ __________
(1,377) __________
(4,015) __________
(3,731) __________
(3,867) __________
(4,012) __________
(4,157) __________
(4,911) __________
(4,963) __________
(5,139)
__________
2008
Thisexhibitisbasedoninformationfromthesourcesindicatedandassumptionsprovidedby,orreviewedwithandapprovedby,Airport
management.Inevitably,someassumptionsusedtodeveloptheprojectionswillnotberealizedandunanticipatedeventsandcircumstances
mayoccur.Therefore,therewillbedifferencesbetweentheprojectedandactualresults,andthosedifferencesmaybematerial.
$334,102 $321,246 $324,527 $333,699 $347,655 $361,312 $369,107 $377,270 $356,480
(29,171) __________
(39,602) __________
(29,619) __________
(28,000) __________
(24,000) __________
(20,000) __________
(16,000) __________
(12,000) __________
(8,000)
__________
[E=B+C+D] $421,278 $394,383 $390,745 $403,190 $426,377 $465,473 $505,515 $597,152 $658,410
NetGrossRevenues
Operatingrevenues
Otherrevenues
Less:OperationandMaintenanceExpenses
Less:OperatingReserveFunddeposits
Airlinepaymentsperenplanedpassenger
Enplanedpassengers
Originatingpassengers
Originatingpercentage
Subtotal
Operatingrevenues
Passengerairlinepayments
Otherairlinecostcenterrevenues
Terminalconcessions
Parkingandgroundtransportation
Commercialdevelopmentandother
Netrequirements
Subtotalotherrequirements
Less:AnnualCapitalTransfer
DebtServiceReserveFunddeposits
OperationandMaintenanceExpenses
OperatingReserveFunddeposits
IncrementalCoverage
Netdebtservice
Requirements
AccruedAggregateDebtService
Less:SpecialRevenues
Less:SuccessorRentalCarFacilityCharges
Less:Hotelrevenues
ExhibitJͲ2
SUMMARYOFPROJECTEDFINANCIALRESULTS:STRESSTESTPASSENGERFORECAST
Dallas/FortWorthInternationalAirport
ForFiscalYearsendingSeptember30
(inthousandsexceptperpassengerratesandpercentages)
[THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK]
Financial Advisory Services
Provided By
ESTR ADA HINOJOSA
INVESTMENT BANKERS
`