Document 407543

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Nxxx,2014-10-30,A,001,Bs-BK,E2_+
Late Edition
Today, partly sunny skies, cooler
than the past few days, high 58. Tonight, clear to partly cloudy, low 45.
Tomorrow, sun, then clouds, high
56. Weather map is on Page B17.
VOL. CLXIV . . . No. 56,670 +
© 2014 The New York Times
$2.50
NEW YORK, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2014
REPEAT OFFENSES
ARE SUSPECTED
ON WALL STREET
FROM DEMOCRATS,
ELECTION FOCUS
ON RACIAL SCARS
CASES BEING REOPENED
COURTING BLACK VOTERS
Banks That Struck Deals
in Past May Be Forced
to Plead Guilty
Attempt to Hold Senate
Is Seen by the G.O.P.
as Race-Baiting
By JEREMY W. PETERS
By BEN PROTESS
and JESSICA SILVER-GREENBERG
It would be the Wall Street
equivalent of a parole violation:
Just two years after avoiding
prosecution for a variety of
crimes, some of the world’s biggest banks are suspected of having broken their promises to behave.
A mixture of new issues and
lingering problems could violate
earlier settlements that imposed
new practices and fines on the
banks but stopped short of criminal charges, according to lawyers
briefed on the cases. Prosecutors
are
exploring
whether
to
strengthen the earlier deals, the
lawyers said, or scrap them altogether and force the banks to
plead guilty to a crime.
That effort, unfolding separately from a number of well-known
investigations into Wall Street,
has ensnared several giant banks
and consulting firms that until
now were thought to be in the
clear.
Prosecutors in Washington
and Manhattan have reopened an
investigation into Standard Chartered, the big British bank that
reached a settlement in 2012 over
accusations that it transferred
billions of dollars for Iran and
other nations blacklisted by the
United States, according to the
lawyers briefed on the cases. The
prosecutors are questioning
whether Standard Chartered,
which has a large operation in
New York, failed to disclose the
extent of its wrongdoing to the
government,
imperiling
the
bank’s earlier settlement.
New York State’s banking regulator is also taking a fresh look
at old cases, reopening a 2013 settlement with the Bank of TokyoMitsubishi UFJ over accusations
that the bank’s New York branch
did business with Iran, according
to the lawyers who were not authorized to speak publicly.
The regulator, Benjamin M.
Lawsky, the lawyers said, is negotiating a new settlement deal
with the bank that, if it goes
through, would involve a penalty
larger than the $250 million it
paid last year. Mr. Lawsky suspects that the bank initially
played down the scope of its
wrongdoing.
PricewaterhouseCoopers, the
influential consulting firm that
advised the Japanese bank on
Continued on Page B7
JOHN G. MABANGLO/EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
Madison Bumgarner’s masterly pitching in Game 7 in Kansas City helped the Giants beat the Royals, 3-2, to win the World Series.
A Pitcher Rises Colorful Rogues Make Way for National Issues
embodied Louisiana politics from
To the Moment,
the 1960s to the 1990s, charming
one half of the state and mortifyAnd Jaws Drop NEW ROADS, La. — A poli- Louisiana
ing the other, might as well be a
By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON
and JONATHAN MARTIN
KANSAS CITY, Mo.
Now he belongs to history,
alongside Christy Mathewson
and Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson
and Randy Johnson. The pantheon of World Series pitching
greats must welcome
a new member. Madison Bumgarner burst
into the club with a
performance for the
ON
BASEBALL ages in Game 7 of the
World Series on
Wednesday.
Bumgarner, a longhaired,
bearded left-hander from Hickory, N.C., squeezed the life from
the plucky Kansas City Royals
with fastballs, cutters and curveballs slung sideways from an arm
that had only two days’ rest.
Bumgarner, 25, shut out the
Royals on two hits for the final
five innings, preserving a 3-2 victory for the San Francisco Giants
and clinching the team’s third
championship in five seasons.
Bumgarner, who beat the
Royals in Game 1 and fired a
shutout in Game 5, was named
the World Series most valuable
player. Late Tuesday, he had dismissed any concerns about pitchContinued on Page B21
TYLER
KEPNER
tician at a street fair is usually an
inconvenience, an ordeal to be
endured as he thrusts a flier at
your chest and a smile at your
face. But the silver-haired candidate pushing his 1-year-old in a
stroller through the funnel-cake
stands and craft booths at the
harvest festival here did not have
to try so hard. The glad-handers
rushed up to him.
“I’d vote for you! I voted for
you plenty of times!” shouted
STAT E S I N P L AY
Mark Wells, 58, a retired state
employee.
Edwin W. Edwards, 87, a fourterm former governor and eightyear former federal inmate, is
back on the trail, this time as a
long-shot Democratic contender
for a House seat and salvation for
magazine feature writers in a
dreary election year.
For all his color, though, Mr.
Edwards, the populist rogue who
ghost.
The main political event this
year, the Senate race, could not
be further removed from the Edwards era. No one here at the
harvest festival was particularly
excited about Senator Mary L.
Landrieu, a three-term Democrat, or Representative Bill Cassidy, the Republican challenger
who will most likely face Ms.
Landrieu in a runoff. A few said
Continued on Page A18
Cuomo Role in Storm Inquiry
Foretold an Ethics Panel’s Fate
In the final days before the
election, Democrats in the closest
Senate races across the South are
turning to racially charged messages — invoking Trayvon Martin’s death, the unrest in Ferguson, Mo., and Jim Crow-era segregation — to jolt African-Americans into voting and stop a Republican takeover in Washington.
The images and words they are
using are striking for how overtly
they play on fears of intimidation
and repression. And their source
is surprising. The effort is being
led by national Democrats and
their state party organizations —
not, in most instances, by the
shadowy and often untraceable
political action committees that
typically employ such provocative messages.
In North Carolina, the “super
PAC” started by Senator Harry
Reid of Nevada, the majority
leader, ran an ad on black radio
that accused the Republican candidate, Thom Tillis, of leading an
effort to pass the kind of gun law
that “caused the shooting death
of Trayvon Martin.”
In Georgia, Democrats are circulating a flier warning that voting is the only way “to prevent
another Ferguson.” It shows two
black children holding cardboard
signs that say “Don’t shoot.”
The messages are coursing
through the campaigns like a riptide, powerful and under the surface, largely avoiding television
and out of view of white voters.
That has led Republicans to accuse Democrats of turning to
race-baiting in a desperate bid to
win at the polls next Tuesday.
“They have been playing on
this nerve in the black community that if you even so much as
look at a Republican, churches
will start to burn, your civil rights
will be taken away and young
black men like Trayvon Martin
will die,” said Michael Steele, a
former chairman of the Republican Party. “The reality of it is,
the Democrats realize that their
most loyal constituency is not as
loyal as they once were.”
Democrats say Republicans
need to own their record of passing laws hostile to African-American interests on issues like voting
rights. The decision to use such
overt appeals reflects just how
much they are relying on black
voters in the states in the old
Confederacy, where key Senate
races could decide which party
controls the chamber.
Democrats are defending vulnerable incumbents in Arkansas,
Louisiana and North Carolina.
And if they lose more than one of
Continued on Page A19
A Small Latino Shift
BOB ADELMAN/CORBIS
By SUSANNE CRAIG
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has
faced intense scrutiny in recent
months, including an investigation by federal prosecutors, over
his management of a commission
that he created to root out corruption in New York politics, but
prevented from examining his
administration’s conduct and
then prematurely shut down.
An analysis of Mr. Cuomo’s
handling of an earlier investigative commission, which highlighted the failures of electric companies in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, reveals some of the
same hallmarks: interference, efforts to shield his administration’s role and a sense that the
governor had a clear idea at the
outset of what the commission
should conclude.
His first use of the Moreland
Act, which empowers governors
to investigate problems and recommend solutions, focused heavily on the post-hurricane failures
of the Long Island Power Authority. A state-run utility, it had a
hapless history and a fed-up customer base from the Rockaways
to the Hamptons.
The storm, which devastated
much of the metropolitan area on
Oct. 29, 2012, left nearly one million customers without power on
Long Island alone.
The Moreland Commission, appointed 15 days later, quickly rendered a harsh verdict: The auContinued on Page A26
A Composer of Plain-Spoken Verses
The poet Galway Kinnell, above in 1984, who won a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award in
1983, died Tuesday at his home in Sheffield, Vt. He was 87. Obituary, Page A29.
Obama Could Replace Aides Bruised by a Cascade of Crises
By MARK LANDLER
WASHINGTON — One day
this month, as the nation shuddered with fears of an Ebola outbreak and American warplanes
pounded Sunni militants in Syria,
President Obama’s national security adviser, Susan E. Rice, invited a group of foreign policy experts to the White House to hear
their views of how the administration was performing.
She was peppered with critiques of the president’s Syria
and China policies, as well as the
White House’s delays in releasing a national security strategy, a
congressionally mandated document that sets out foreign policy
goals. On that last point, Ms. Rice
had a sardonic reply.
“If we had put it out in Febru-
ary or April or July,” she said, according to two people who were
in the room, “it would have been
overtaken by events two weeks
later, in any one of those months.”
At a time when the Obama administration is lurching from crisis to crisis — a looming Cold
War in Europe, a brutal Islamic
caliphate in the Middle East and
a deadly epidemic in West Africa
— it is not surprising that long-
INTERNATIONAL A6-12
NATIONAL
Chemical Exposure Checks
Scrutiny of a State’s Lawyer
The Pentagon will offer medical exams
and health monitoring to service members and veterans exposed to chemical
PAGE A7
warfare agents in Iraq.
Missouri plans to investigate whether
donations influenced decisions by its attorney general.
PAGE A14
BUSINESS DAY B1-13
Egypt Razes Homes on Border
Fed Wraps Up Bond-Buying
The Egyptian Army began demolishing
hundreds of houses on the Gaza border
to create a security buffer zone. PAGE A8
The central bank, led by Janet L. Yellen,
cut back on a stimulus but said interest
rates would remain near zero. PAGE B1
With immigration reform stalled, support for Democrats among
Latinos has declined slightly,
a poll shows. Page A19.
NEW YORK A24-28
NATIONAL A13-22
Nurse May Fight Quarantine
A nurse who cared for Ebola patients
was preparing to challenge whether
Maine can quarantine her.
PAGE A20
Bank Error: Collect $1.5 Million
Mayor’s Focus on Albany Races
Remaking Ferguson Police
Credit Suisse said it paid a hedge fund
manager by mistake. Now it can’t find
the money or the manager.
PAGE B1
Bill de Blasio and his team have taken a
lead in trying to secure a Democratic
majority in the State Senate. PAGE A24
A Missouri town’s police force needs
“wholesale change,” Attorney General
Eric H. Holder Jr. said.
PAGE A13
SPORTSTHURSDAY B14-21
Continued on Page A12
ARTS C1-8
When Football Ends Early
High school football seasons and games
are being canceled for lack of players.
At some schools, fewer students want to
play than used to. Among those who do,
PAGE B14
injuries are on the rise.
EDITORIAL, OP-ED A30-31
Gail Collins
term strategy would take a back
seat. But it raises inevitable questions about the ability of the president and his hard-pressed national security team to manage
and somehow get ahead of the
daily onslaught of events.
Early stumbles in the government’s handling of the Ebola crisis as well as its belated response
PAGE A29
New Visions for the Hirshhorn
Melissa Chiu, the new director of the
Hirshhorn Museum in Washington,
plans to make it a showcase for experimental and international works. PAGE C1
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