oice V Partying with ‘Bat Bruce’

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volume 5 edition 44
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Morden
Thursday,
October 30, 2014
Locally owned & operated - Dedicated to serving our communities
Partying with
‘Bat Bruce’
The Canadian Fossil Discovery
Centre hosted its annual Halloween Party last Saturday,
with over 50 kids and parents
coming out to enjoy pumpkin painting, a dance party
with Lulu and the TomCat,
and crafts and other themed
activities. The afternoon also
included a costume contest
in front of Bruce the mosasaur, who was dressed as Batman this year. Coming in first
place was Logan Froese (Batman) and Summer Davison
(the monster in the centre).
Search for missing
Winkler man comes
to a tragic end
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The search for 19-year-old Travis Sukkau came to a
tragic end on Monday when a body was found in the
Pembina Valley Provincial Park.
RCMP confirmed Tuesday morning that a body
had been found in the park the day before but that
it had not yet been identified as Sukkau. Police said
they continue to investigate Sukkau’s disappearance
and that further updates would be provided when
possible.
Word that the search had come to an end broke
Monday afternoon as Sukkau’s family and friends
posted the news online, including on the Find Travis
Continued on page 2
news > sports > opinion > community > people > entertainment > events > classifieds > careers > everything you need to know
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The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
> sukkau, from pg. 1
Facebook page, which was created that day to coordinate the community’s volunteer search efforts
after RCMP called off the official search.
Sukkau left home early on Oct. 23 to reportedly
photograph the fall colours in the park. His family contacted RCMP that evening when he failed to
return home. Search efforts began later that same
night.
Sukkau’s car was found in a wooded area at the
park and had been observed parked there since before noon on the day he went missing.
Search and rescue teams made up of personnel
from several departments spent the weekend looking for Sukkau, making use of helicopters, search
dogs, thermal imaging, and drones to hunt for any
signs of the young man in the nearly 700 acres of
woodland in the valley.
For the first time on Monday, the search opened
up to community volunteers, whose efforts halted
midday when a body was found.
No further information on the investigation was
available at press time.
Volunteers thank community
for outpouring of support
Over the weekend, while emergency personnel
handled the search for Travis Sukkau in the Pembina Valley Provincial Park, local charitable group
Donate Love and the Hillside Community Church
in Morden began collecting food donations to provide rescuers with meals and snacks.
Donate Love’s Kim Klassen said they were overwhelmed by the support they received from the
Morden-Winkler communities in those efforts.
“The outpouring of generosity from people was
amazing,” she said, noting they were able to provide drinks, snacks, and meals to the searchers
PHONE
822-4437
throughout the operation, including the volunteers
who took over the search from RCMP on Monday.
The leftover food will now be distributed to families in need in the two communities, she said.
Donate Love and Hillside issued a thank-you to
the many individual donors and businesses who
helped out, including: Morden Chicken Chef, Coop Foods, Morden Coffee Culture, Morden Tim
Hortons, Winkler Subway, The Outpost Grill, Triangle Oasis, Del Rios, Kopper Kettle, Morden McDonalds, Pembina Valley Online, and Radio 88.9.
MORDEN
Christmas
Store Hours
(Until the New Year)
OPEN SUNDAY
12 noon to 5 p.m.
OPEN LATE
For the Rest of the week
Open November 11
12 noon to 6 p.m.
facebook.com/find travissukkau
Searchers spent the weekend combing
the Pembina Valley Provincial Park for
signs of 19-year-old Travis Sukkau, who
never returned home from a hike there
last Thursday. RCMP confirmed on Tuesday
that a body had been found in the park on
Monday, but it had not yet been identified
as Sukkau as of press time.
Martin Harder back for
third term as mayor
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The new City of Winkler council
will be split between the old and
the new, as Winkler voters gave
all the incumbent candidates back
their seats in last week’s election, in
addition to voting in three newcomers.
Voter turnout for the Oct. 22 election was 38.1 per cent (up a full 10
per cent from the 2010 election),
with 2,481 of the 6,505 eligible voters filling out their ballots this year.
Incumbent Martin Harder defeated challenger Wolfgang Schaefer
in the mayor’s race, earning 1,675
votes to Schaefer’s 737.
Also elected to city council for another four years were incumbents
Don Friesen (1,741 votes), Marvin
Plett (1,688 votes), and Henry Siemens (1,677 votes). Newly elected to
council were Don Fehr (1,234 votes),
Andrew Froese (1,475 votes), and
Michael Grenier (1,186 votes).
Losing their election bids were
David Guenther (645 votes), Teresa
Penner (1,040 votes), Neil Reimer
(567 votes), and Zahid Zehri (736
votes).
Mayor Harder said the day after
the election that he’s thrilled to
have the confidence of Winkler voters as he begins his third straight
term in office.
“It’s certainly a pleasure to see the
number of people that came out to
vote, just over 38 per cent,” he said,
adding he hopes the increasing voter turn-out trend will continue in
future election years. “It’s gratifying
to see that I got 70 per cent of the
support.”
“I think the issues were pretty
clear and our leadership style, my
leadership style and council’s leadership style, was very clear and I
think the community supported it,
as all the incumbents were re-elected,” Harder added. “We also have a
nice slate of newcomers . . . I think
Continued on page 3
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Incumbents all re-elected in City of Morden
By Cori Bezan
The Morden city council looks almost exactly the same as it did prior
to the elections held on Oct. 22.
With Mayor Ken Wiebe re-elected
by acclamation and the five incumbent councillors also retaining their
seats, only one new face will appear
at the table for the next term.
Alex Fedorchuk (who previously
served two terms on council from
2002-2010) was voted back to council
with 959 votes, taking the vacant seat
left by the retiring Maurice Butler.
Fedorchuk joins incumbents Hank
Hildebrand (952 votes), Doug Frost
(897 votes), Heather Francis (884
votes), Brian Minaker (854 votes), and
Irvin Wiebe (786 votes).
Candidates Harvey Kinsman (759
votes), Bill Potter (569 votes), Marilyn
Skubovius (624 votes), Lorne Stelmach (457 votes), and Brian Thiessen
(647 votes) all lost their bids for a seat.
Morden saw a 33 per cent voter turnout at the elections this year.
Seeing council come back mostly intact from the last term is a vote of confidence from Morden residents, says
Mayor Ken Wiebe.
“It’s rewarding, but it’s also a little
bit intimidating and it’s also a little bit
humbling to realize that people have
that much confidence in you and nobody even wants to run against you,”
he said on his acclamation. “It’s a lot
of things, but I’m appreciative of the
fact that the community has the faith
in myself and the council. I think this
shows that our council is heading in
the right direction.”
With all of the returning experience
at the table, Wiebe said that they can
quickly turn their eyes to the times
and projects ahead, including moving
ahead with the 2014 Corporate Plan
and finding a solution to the day care
problem.
“Four years ago I wanted to see
more day care, and that is something
that we haven’t been able to bring to
the fore,” Wiebe said. “It’s still something we’re working on—we haven’t
given up on it. This city has committed money to it and we’re now waiting for the province to come on board.
Once they come on board then we
can carry on.”
“We have the money set aside for
a day care, but the way the funding
from the province works is if we start
anything before we are given a grant
by the province they will match what
we have, but if we do anything ahead
of time, whatever we’ve done in ad-
our plan right now, and it gives us a
more solid base come spring for putting in a street.”
Looking ahead, Wiebe also hopes to
continue working on city infrastructure, installing new sidewalks, and
working towards water and wastewater solutions such as a new wastewater treatment facility.
“If you have good clean water and
somewhere for it to flow when it’s not
clean anymore, you’re a progressing
community, I believe,” he said.
Council gathered on Tuesday for a
day of orientation before their inaugural meeting on Nov. 3.
• more election coverage on pg. 7
An important message from Agassiz
Medical Centre and C.W. Wiebe Medical Centre
While there has not yet been a case of Ebola virus disease in
Canada and the risk of the disease appearing in Manitoba is
extremely low, coordinated efforts continue to prevent
its spread from countries that currently have severe outbreaks.
If you have travelled to Liberia, Guinea or Sierra
Leone, and have any of the following symptoms:
> winkler election, from pg. 2
all of them have a lot to contribute
and I look forward to working with
them.”
Harder said that many of the issues raised during the election campaign are well-known to council,
and he is eager to get back to work
on solving them.
“Really, it’s nothing different than
what we’ve been focusing on in the
last term: we have always had recreation on our agenda . . . and it will
happen within the next term,” he
said of the expansion to the Winkler
Recreation Complex, which was
brought up as a major concern by
many voters at the Candidates Fo-
vance will not be matched, so that’s
one of the reasons we haven’t started
yet,” he added. “We’re trying to take
advantage of the whole grant.”
Wiebe also added that they will be
proceeding very shortly with some
more of the new Tabor Home infrastructure.
“We’re now in the process of the infrastructure, [which is] pretty much
all in the ground,” he said. “I think everything that has to go in the ground
is pretty much done, and now we’re
going to get the base prepared for
streets for spring installation. Let it
settle over the winter, I believe that’s
rum the week before the election.
The city will also continue to move
forward on its ongoing plans for a
new regional wastewater treatment
plant, Harder said.
“We have had a meeting with the
federal minister, we know what we
need to do with the applications
and we’re prepared to do that,” he
said. “We will put that project forward in a very short period of time
. . . likely within the next year, the
next six months.”
“We will continue to make the citizens of Winkler proud of their city,”
Harder promised for the next four
years.
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Diarrhea
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Please remain at home and contact us by telephone.
Contact us at any of the following numbers:
Agassiz Medical Centre
CW Wiebe Medical
204-822-4474 (main line)
204-325-4312 (main line)
204-822-2605 (nursing dept)
204-822-2601 (clinic manager)
204-822-2608 (further admin)
(24 hours)
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The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Imagination Library signs-up 257 kids to start
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The Dolly Parton Imagination Library kicked off in the Winkler area
on Saturday with a huge bang, as 257
children signed up for the literacy
program in just three hours.
“We just blew Dollywood’s projections out of the water,” committee
chair Joyce Sawatzky said at day’s
end, noting they had been told to expect closer to 60 kids on opening day.
Instead, hundreds of parents filled
Winkler’s Central Station community centre Saturday morning and
afternoon to register their pre-school
children for the program, which
mails out a free book every month to
children from birth until they start
kindergarten.
Sawatzky, a local school librarian,
said the program is going to have a
big impact on the literacy levels of
students in the Garden Valley School
Division catchment area.
“We have a lot of illiteracy in the
area, and with these books, children
having exposure to books, when they
come to school having had experience with books, we just think it’s
going to make a huge difference,” she
submitted photo by Cyndie Toews
Imagination Library volunteer Judy Unrau signs up the library’s very
first child at the kick-off on Saturday. Seven-month-old Charlotte and
her mom Destiny Klassen were among the hundreds who came out
to register for the free literacy program at the launch party.
said. “This program has made a difference wherever it has been in both
literacy rates when the children start
school as well as in graduation rates,
that’s what it translates over to.”
It’s been a long road to get the program up and running in the area, and
it wouldn’t have been possible without the volunteers who have committed to the program and the community, which has supported the
Imagination Library to the tune of
$85,000 so far.
“It’s incredibly exciting. It’s hum-
bling. It’s honouring that people have
caught the vision, and caught the vision for what this project can do,”
Sawatzky said.
“We are not just sending a book to a
child once a month. This can be a life
changing event. It can be something
that affects a child’s life. It essentially
can change their future.”
In order to keep the program running, ongoing donations will be
needed. Sawatzky is optimistic the
community will continue to come
through for them.
“With the response we’ve had, we
are going to continue collecting funds
and hopefully people will continue to
catch the vision for the future of Winkler,” she said, noting they recently
received word of a substantial grant
as well as a commitment of ongoing support from the Garden Valley
School Division. “With that continued
support we see only success for this
project.”
There are 1,800 kids eligible for
the program in the GVSD area, and
Sawatzky hopes to reach as many of
them as possible.
Continued on page 7
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Photo by Cori
bezan/Voice
Amazing Race Canada winner
Tim Hauge Sr. was the guest
speaker at this year’s BTHC Foundation gala, which was held in
Morden last Friday.
BTHC Fdn.
gala raises
$45,000
By Cori Bezan
An evening of good food, fellowship, prizes, and inspirational
speeches raised thousands of dollars
at the ninth annual Boundary Trails
Health Centre Foundation gala in
Morden last Friday.
“I’m always totally amazed at the
support that we get from our community,” said foundation chair Debra
Enns. “I think it went awesome. From
the feedback that we got after the
dinner, everybody was so pleased
with the speaker and the dinner,
the meal itself, and, from my point
of view, it went exactly the way we
planned it.”
This gala is one of the foundation’s
biggest fundraisers. While the numbers haven’t all been tallied yet, Enns
said on Monday that they expect to
have raised around $45,000 from the
sold-old evening.
“We sold 372 tickets for it, so that
was over and above what we expected,” Enns said.
Continued on page 8
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5
6
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Voice
Winkler
The
Morden
getheard
editorial
>
viewpoints
>
l e tt e r s
Honouring the real single parents
publisher
Rick Reimer
ADMINISTRATION
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Editor
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reporter
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Sales
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Agriculture reporter
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production
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production
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The Winkler Morden Voice is published
Thursdays and distributed as a free publication through Canada Post to 14,600 homes
by BigandColourful Printing and Publishing.
The newspaper is supported solely by advertising dollars. If you enjoy the paper and
would like to see it grow and prosper, visit
any of the advertisers and businesses in our
rural communities. Keep your dollars working at home and shop local.
Notices, classifieds, and advertisements
can be purchased by calling 204-325-6888 or
e-mailing [email protected]
Our editorial staff is available in Winkler at
204-332-3456, in Morden at 204-823-2655, or
via e-mail at [email protected]
Our commitment to you: we want to help
build stronger communities through articles that both inform and entertain you
about what’s going on throughout the
Pembina Valley. This is your community
newspaper—let us know what you want to
see in it.
Printed in Canada by Prolific Printing. Republishing without permission is strictly
prohibited.
> Get in touch with us
General inquiries: 325-6888
News tips: 332-3456, 823-2655
Winkler Morden Voice
Box 185, Winkler, MB
R6W 4A5
I
am not a single parent.
My mum was a single
parent . . . I am not.
I am saying this because more
and more I am hearing people
say and/or intimate that they are now
single parents since their divorce/
separation/conscious
uncoupling
and I find it annoying because usually they are completely wrong.
My own relationship with my
children’s mother
ended more than
four years ago and
we now share joint
custody of our chilBy Peter
dren. I have the
kids one week, she Cantelon
has them another,
and this arrangement has worked
very well for us to do the best we both
can to not make a bad situation worse
for the kids. It also works because we
are in a small community.
This means that every other week
I do not have kids and the following
week I am the sole parent in the house
. . . this does not make me a single
parent on the weeks when I have the
children and a childless bachelor on
weeks when I do not. On the contrary,
I am in regular communication with
my children’s mum on weeks when
I have them. We text and talk about
gymnastics arrangements, school
work, discipline, health care and the
general well-being of the offspring. I
am VERY thankful for this and for her
role as my children’s mother.
I am not, however, a single parent,
because there is someone else out
there sharing the load.
Let me introduce you to a real single
parent. My mum was divorced from
my father when I was five. Prior to
that he was rarely around, and generally he was a cheating, drunken,
non-working, drug-using and violently abusive person. The blessing
of women’s shelters was part of my
childhood experience.
After the divorce, dad was just gone.
Oh, we knew where he was. He never left the community, he just never
came around anymore. He also never
paid child support or alimony. He
was invisible. He was not a father. He
was not a parent.
My mum raised myself and three
sisters alone. On welfare. In provincial housing. With no parenting assistance and with all kinds of issues and
struggles she was never helped with.
She never drowned her sorrows in
alcohol or drugs despite being surrounded by an environment saturated with such abuse. She often went
without so that we would not have to.
She is my biggest hero.
That is a single parent. There was no
one there sharing the load. Not financially. Not emotionally. Not spiritually. No one but her.
Continued on page 7
letters
A big thank-you from a grateful family
To the unknown mountain biker
who found our chocolate Lab, Hazel, on the Lake Minnewasta trail on
Tuesday, Oct. 21: Thank you so much
for taking care of her and bringing
her to the Morden Vet Clinic so that
our family could be reunited with
her.
We are sure that she enjoyed the
bike ride with you, but we are very
happy to have her back home with
us.
Thank you for your kindness.
The Nadler family, Morden
MCC should re-think where it sends its aid
Why doesn’t the MCC send Israel
ambulances or hospital supplies for
the terror victims from rocket attacks?
Maybe send some of their highfalutin psychiatrists to Israel to help
people suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome because they
can’t sleep at night because of rocket
sirens. Their military needs blankets
and jackets and so forth. And I’m
sure there are poor people that could
use these things in Israel as well.
For sending a non-stop stream of
over 12,000 rockets, the Gazan people who voted in the terrorist organization Hamas as their leaders by
around 76 per cent got what they deserved during Operation Protective
Shield.
Building their terror tunnels with
supplies they get from other people
should only serve to make you want
to help them less.
If they had the weapons Israel
has they would nuke Israel the first
chance they got.
Joeseph Sparrow,
Winkler
> Got something you want to get off your chest? How about an act of kindness to share?
Send your letters to the editor or acts of kindness to [email protected] Please include your name, address, and phone number for confirmation purposes.
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
7
New faces on RM of Stanley council this term
By Cori Bezan
The RM of Stanley council will see
several new faces join the table, as
the voters elected a new reeve and
only two incumbents last week.
Morris Olafson will be taking Art
Petkau’s place as reeve, beating out
Peter Klassen with a total of 493 votes
to Klassen’s 392.
“It’s a bit of a surprise,” Olafson
said. “I had a very worthy opponent,
Peter Klassen. He’s done a lot of great
work for the RM of Stanley in the last
eight or ten years.”
“I look forward to working with the
new council,” he added. “There’s a
bunch of really good people on here.”
Ward one will see the return of two
familiar faces, as Peter Harold Froese (334 votes) and Bob Giesbrecht
(281 votes) were re-elected, alongside newcomers Bitz (Alfred) Loewen
(319 votes) and Don Henry Falk (288
votes). Richard Warkentin was the
only Ward 1 candidate who did not
see election.
Ward two saw five people gunning
for two councillor positions, with
Wayne Penner (243 votes) and incumbent Dick Fehr (217 votes) getting the
public’s nod. Candidates Ike Klassen,
Edward Reimer, and Leslie Titchkosky did not win their election bids.
A total of 19 per cent of the eligible
voters in the RM of Stanley hit the
polls to cast their ballots last week.
In Ward 1, only 12 per cent of eligible voters did so, while 39 per cent of
Ward 2’s voters cast a ballot.
The blend of new and old faces on
council means that the council won’t
be initiating any new projects right
off the hop, instead giving the newcomers time to learn the ropes, Olafson said.
“I don’t see any major changes in
how the operation is,” he said. “Being
four new people on here, basically
you’ve got to play it slow for the first
little while so everybody gets up to
speed.”
“It’ll be a little bit of a learning curve
here but I think the board itself has
some really smart people on here and
I don’t see it as a big, long learning
curve,” he added.
After that, Olafson said he would
like to start working on road maintenance, which had been a common
concern throughout the RM.
“We want to make sure we have a
real good consistency in our road
maintenance area so everybody is
doing the same thing,” he explained.
“All the operators are on the same
keel, and our staff to keep it all the
right way.”
Olafson wished to extend his thanks
to everyone who supported him in
the election, and also sent a message
out to his fellow council members:
“We’re here to be caretakers of the
RM of Stanley and to make life better
for everybody in the RM,” he said. “I
think that’s our goal. We want better
roads and we want lower taxes and
all this kind of thing. Let’s strive to
make that all happen.”
> imagination library, from pg. 4
“That’s what we’re going to continue to works towards,” she said. “We
have people strategically targeting
children that we really want to reach.”
If you’d like to sign your child up for
the program, stop by Central Station
(545 Industrial Dr.) Tuesday to Friday
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
To make a donation to the program,
cheques can be made out to the Winkler Family Resource Centre with
“Winkler Imagination Library” written on the memo line. Donations can
be mailed to: Winkler Family Resource Centre, Box 997, Winkler, MB,
R6W 4B1.
Regional election round-up
There are more than a few new
faces coming to the table at councils across the region after last
week’s civic election.
In the RM of Thompson, Brian
Callum beat out Richard LeRoux in
the reeve’s race (324 votes to 123).
Joining Callum on council is incumbent Walter McTavish (acclaimed) in Ward 1, incumbent
Wayne Gall in Ward 2 (84 votes),
Robert Penner in Ward 3 (89 votes),
incumbent Huntley Knox in Ward
4 (acclaimed), and Royce Burnett
in Ward 5 (acclaimed).
In the RM of Pembina, which this
election includes the former Town
of Manitou, incumbent Glenn
Shiskowski retains his seat after
defeating challenger Murray Seymour 549 votes to 465.
Rounding out council are Chad
Collins (634 votes), Mike Dymond
(489 votes), Frank Frisch (608
votes), incumbent Bill Howatt (559
votes), incumbent Cynthia Hunter
(375 votes), and Don McLean (534
votes).
Representing the Darlingford
LUD on council are Calvin Funk,
Thomas Hamilton, and Robert
Luger, all acclaimed.
Representing La Riviere on council is Evelyn Janzen, Warren Lea,
and Albert Wymer, all acclaimed.
In the RM of Roland, John Hughes
defeated Bud W. Stuart 156 votes to
112 to take the reeve position. Also
winning seats on council were Ken
D’hoore (158 votes), Carrie Hennan (169 votes), incumbent Bob
Horsman (236 votes), and Gary
Wieler (217 votes).
In the RM of Morris, Ralph Groening was acclaimed as reeve while
Mervin Dueck (311 votes), Barry
Fraese (228), Rick Giesbrecht (290),
Margaret Gluck (251), Denis Robert (243) and Stan Siemens (293)
were elected as councillors.
Representing the Rosenort LUD
on council is Shane Kroeker (87
votes) and Lorne Siemens (74
votes).
> cantelon, from pg. 6
So, you see, I happen to be a parent
who is single, but I am not a single
parent.
The equation is quite simple: if there
is another parent interacting with
and contributing toward the raising
of your kids—no matter where they
are—you are not a single parent. Stop
calling yourself one. It belittles the experiences of others who have been or
are truly alone in the daunting task of
rearing up human beings.
14105gg02
8
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Winkler Cheerboard
kicks off 2014 campaign
bright one for every family in Winkler, Banman says.
Winkler Mayor Martin Harder put
“We hear many stories of where repen to paper a few weeks ago to offi- ceiving this food hamper, along with
cially declare the month of November gifts for the children, has been a huge
as Cheerboard Days.
source of encouragement during
Harder signed the proclamation at a difficult financial time,” she says,
the Cheerboard’s October meeting, noting that they also hear plenty of
giving them the green light to begin stories of former hamper recipients
this year’s awareness and collection giving back in turn when times are
campaign in earnest.
better for their families. “It’s really
With food hampers set to go out to heartwarming to hear all the stories
families in need throughout the Win- of people who have been blessed by
kler area in December, November is it in the past and now that they don’t
the Cheerboard’s busiest time of year, need it, they want to come back and
says board chair Sandra Banman.
help, to pass it on by donating or vol“This is our collection month: the unteering.”
collection of all the food, all the doEach year, the Cheerboard relies
nation we need to make it happen,” on community support to make the
she says, noting they distributed 305 hamper campaign a success, and the
hampers last year and fully expect community certainly hasn’t let them
to need upwards of 315 hampers this down yet.
year.
“We are very thankful for the generEach hamper is packed full of food, osity of our community. We certainly
toiletry items, and children’s gifts to
Continued on page 10
make sure the holiday season is a
By Ashleigh Viveiros
Photo by Ashleigh viveiros/Voice
Surrounded by members of the Winkler and District Christmas Cheerboard, Mayor Martin Harder (seated, centre) signed a proclamation to
officially declare the month of November as Cheerboard Days in the
city. The Cheerboard is looking for food and financial donations to
make this year’s hamper campaign success.
> bthc fdn. gala, from pg. 5
The money raised from the gala
will be going towards the hospital’s
palliative care program, Enns said.
“The Boundary Trails Health Centre Foundation, one of their main
mandates is to cover the budget for
the palliative care,” Enns said. “Without this dinner, we would be needing to rely on individual donations,
so one dinner alone goes a long way
to cover our budget for the year for
palliative care.”
Enns extended a huge thank-you
to the residents and businesses of
Morden and the surrounding area
for their continued support of the
foundation.
“We are so blessed and so fortunate to live in a community with
such generous people,” she said.
“The Boundary Trails Health Centre
Foundation is grateful that our business community and individuals get
behind us and just support us no
matter what cause we have.”
“The MRI machine, the portable
ultrasound machine, spiritual care,
and palliative care would probably
not be at the hospital were it not for
the generosity of the people in our
community,” she added. “We are just
grateful for the community that we
have.”
After supper, keynote speaker Tim
Hague Sr. took the stage to tell his
tale of perseverance. Hague, who
has Parkinson’s disease, won The
Amazing Race: Canada last year with
his son.
After explaining what Parkinson’s
disease is, Hague was able to demonstrate it, lifting his hand to show
the guests the hallmark tremors of
the neuro-degenerative disorder.
“My entire left side just rattles
around. It shakes. That’s Parkinson’s,” he said.
Hague, who is a registered nurse,
noticed a shaking in his left big toe
in August of 2010. By February of
2011 he was officially diagnosed with
young onset Parkinson’s disease.
“To say that I was angry would
be the understatement of the day,”
Hague recalled. “To say that I was
scared would be the understatement
of the year. I was not happy.”
After battling with depression,
Hague chose to embrace the diagnosis as a blessing and worked towards
slowing its effects on his life.
Despite his Parkinson’s, Hague auditioned for the first season of The
Amazing Race: Canada with his son
Tim Hague Jr., and was accepted to
participate as the show raced across
the nation.
Hague spoke of the memorable leg
three, where he struggled with a line
dance in order to continue with the
race.
“You ever have one of those days
where you know you’re not performing to your best? You know you can
do better than this?” he asked.“I simply wanted to give up and go home,
because we were not having fun.
This wasn’t enjoyable. It was rather
painful to tell you the truth.”
Hague and his son were saved by a
non-elimination round and realized
that they needed to make a change
on how they ran the race. They refocused their energies on having fun
and doing their best.
“The race taught me a very important lesson: the strength to simply do
my best and the courage to be content with what my best produced,”
he stressed. “As we learned in that
old adage long ago, the most important things that are learned are
learned in kindergarten. We took
that to heart that day, to simply have
fun and do your best.”
Hague and his son still struggled
through the race, but they managed
to beat out the other teams to secure
the victory because of one word: per-
severance.
“You Google the word perseverance, you get this definition: to continue on in a course of action even in
the face of difficulty with little or no
evidence of success,” he said.
Hague revealed that the way he
ran the race was how he decided to
run his life. He may have Parkinson’s
disease, but it will not stop him from
doing the things he wanted.
“It’s debilitating one day,” he said.
“But not today. It may one day take
my life, but today I am alive and
well.”
“Until we find a cure for it, it may
very well one day win my personal
battle with it. But not today. Today’s
battle is mine.”
Hague ended his speech with motivating words that anyone can use for
their own personal battles.
“I encourage you to persevere,” he
said. “To continue on in your struggle. Even in the face of difficulty,
even when there is little evidence of
success, persevere.”
“I pray that each of you will have
the strength to do your best, the
courage to be content with what
your best produces. I pray that you
have strength for the task at hand
and courage for the road ahead.”
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
MP Candice Bergen recalls Ottawa shooting
By Ashleigh Viveiros
When the shots rang out in the halls of the Parliament
Buildings in Ottawa on Oct. 22, Portage-Lisgar MP Candice Bergen’s first thought was that it was just more construction noise, akin to what MPs have been hearing for
weeks in our nation’s capital.
She and her fellow Conservative caucus members, who
were taking part in their weekly Wednesday morning
caucus meeting with Prime Minister Stephen Harper,
quickly realized, though, that the situation unfolding
right outside the room’s doors was much more dire.
“We meet right in the Centre Block . . . our room where
we meet is right next to the hall where everything happened,” Bergen recalled the next day by phone from Ottawa. “We heard what I thought initially was just some
construction banging because there’s construction going on in Parliament. And then we all just realized very
quickly it was a lot of bangs and somebody said, ‘That’s
gunfire.’”
The politicians quickly moved away from the door nearest the hall, Bergen said, first barricading it with chairs in
the hopes of preventing a gunman from entering. Across
the hall, the Opposition NDP caucus members were doing the same.
“The next 15-20 minutes, it was getting the Prime Minister in a safe, secure place . . . a guard came in very quickly and told us to stay in the room, kind of calmed us all
down, but definitely those first 15-20 minutes when we
knew there’d been a whole bunch of gunfire, we didn’t
know who was doing the shooting, and so then you do
think, ‘Wow, there could be people coming in this room
any minute.’”
“It was pretty frightening,” Bergen said. “You’re thinking about what might happen next, you’re thinking
about what could happen. [I was] praying, praying and
thinking about my children and my family.”
Meanwhile, just outside the room’s wooden doors, gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was shot and killed by House
of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers.
Zehaf-Bibeau had previously fatally wounded Cpl. Nathan Cirillo at the nearby National War Memorial before
charging into the Parliament Buildings, exchanging gunfire with security and injuring one officer before running
down the Hall of Honour towards the doors to the Parliamentary Library, where he was stopped by Vickers.
Parliament Hill was locked down for several hours following the attack, while police ensured there were no
other shooters.
“We were briefed fairly quickly on what had happened
so we knew the perpetrator was dead, but we didn’t
know if there was someone else,” Bergen said, noting
they spent the next 10 hours waiting for word that it was
safe to leave the meeting room.
In the House the next morning, Vickers was given an
extended standing ovation for his bravery.
“All the parties, politics aside, we were all very happy
to be there, to be in our seats . . . and grateful to be leading the country [and] that we have Canadian people who
have resolve and resilience and will not bow to an attack
like this, a terrorist attack,” Bergen said.
“The job that we have is first and foremost is to make
sure that Canadians are protected,” she added, echoing
comments made by the Prime Minister to the nation after the attack.“After something like this, we’re even more
resolved to make sure that . . . Canadians are safe by ensuring there are laws in place, that police have the tools
that they need to stop attacks like this and to stop people
like this who are radicalized and are a threat.
And then our resolve in helping our allies in
fighting ISIS and the threat that they pose to
other countries.”
A review of security at Parliament Hill is ongoing, but Bergen hopes the heart of Canada’s
government will remain an accessible place for
law-abiding citizens.
“Definitely there will be some changes,” she
said. “I’m sure they’ll strike the right balance
between making sure that security is improved
9
where it needs to be improved . . . but at the
same time, keeping it as a place of the people. It
belongs to the people of Canada.”
Earlier this week, RCMP announced that they
have evidence indicating the attack was “driven
by ideological and political motives.”
Zehaf-Bibeau reportedly made a video of himself prior to the attack, which police are currently analyzing for evidence.
The video had not yet been released to the
public as of press time.
14103GG05
14105gg03
10
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Prairie Barnwood raising funds
for Philippine orphanage
By Cori Bezan
A local business is set to raise money to support a growing orphanage in
the Philippines with a gift card program in time for the holidays.
Prairie Barnwood, located on the
south side of Morden, got its beginnings five years ago dismantling old
barns and processing the wood to
create unique, hand-crafted pieces of
furniture.
Now, owner Blayne Wyton and wife
Tara want to put the demand for their
furniture to good use half a world
away.
This holiday season, the company is
offering to donate 100 per cent of the
proceeds of all gift cards they sell to
the Gentle Hands orphanages in the
Philippines and India.
The Wytons first travelled to Gentle
Hands in Manila three years ago after
a family connection brought the facility to their attention.
“My cousin married into the family that was running the orphanage,”
Blayne said, noting the couple have
gone to visit it twice so far and have
fallen in love with the cause.
When the Wytons first attended the
orphanage, there were only 45 children, but the need has grown rapidly
and Gentle Hands today provides aid
and shelter for 89 children.
“The need is just huge,” Blayne said.
The orphanage got its beginnings as
a birthing clinic, but as other clinics
popped up in the area they shifted
their focus to caring for abused, abandoned, or neglected children.
“Kids that come out of poor situations or situations where the parents
just can’t afford the health care or
health for the children, so they bring
them to Gentle Hands to even get
nursed back to health in some cases,
and then they get sent home,” Blayne
explained. In other cases, the orphanage removes abused children from
their homes and works hard to find
them new, loving families.
On his last trip to Gentle Hands,
Blayne encountered a dark situation
that really stuck with him.
“This family of five kids came in a
week or two before my wife and I got
there, and the kids had all been sexually abused and physically abused
by the father, and their mother was
found murdered in the house at
Christmas-time, and we were there
in February,” he recalled.
“The one girl was about nine years
old . . . and she was out in the courtyard playing with a ball and she got
hit in the head. She started to cry,
not like a nine-year-old should: she
was looking for attention or help. So
I went and picked her up and I held
her on my lap and she kind of snuggled into my chest, and she sat there
for probably two hours. It really impacted me that this could be the first
time that a man has actually touched
her in a proper way.”
Gentle Hands also provides severely abused or ill children and young
adults with comfort and care in their
final days.
“Some kids have come there and
they’ve been beaten or abused or neglected so badly that they’ve actually
come [to the orphanage] more to die,”
Blayne said. “They bring them into
the place and it’s just a place where
they can rest in their last year or few
weeks or days in dignity and safety.”
Tara, who traveled alone to the orphanage last March, shared a story
with her husband about a young
boy who had been brought in off the
streets, very ill and beyond help.
“When
Tara
was there, there
was a little boy
Hillside Community Church
Sunday, November 2, 2014 at 11:00 am
SPEAKER: Pastor Kevin Jamieson
TOPIC: The Solid Rock
BAND: Brian et al
We welcome everyone
to worship with us at the
Access Event Centre
[email protected] • www.hillsidechurch.ca • Ph: 822-1166
Photo by Cori bezan/Voice
Prairie Barnwood’s Blayne and Tara Wyton are hoping a gift card promotion will raise upwards of $7,000 for the Gentle Hands orphanage
in Manila, Philippines this holiday season.
there they found that was 18 years
old, and he had tuberculosis,” Blayne
said. “He was neglected and abused,
so they brought him back to Gentle Hands, and this little guy was
44 pounds. An 18-year-old boy, 44
pounds. She showed me pictures; I
can’t even look at them.”
“They brought him back to die. Just
a safe, comfortable place where he
couldn’t be abused anymore, where
he could just rest and go home.”
Tara has done a lot of hands-on
work helping with some of the nursing aspects of the orphanage during
her time there.
“Every child comes with a different
story,” she said. “Some are beautiful
stories, and some are terrible stories
of just hard life and scars and things
that no child should have to deal
with.”
In addition to spending time wit the
kids, Blayne also helped local carpenters put a second level on the orphanage on his last trip.
“They have a very primitive way of
building, so they were kind of teaching me how to build their way,” he
said.
Their time spent at the orphanage
has had a major impact on their lives,
the Wytons say.
“They’re not there just to be an institution, they’re actually there to help
launch people into their life,” Blayne
said. “That really intrigues me.”
Some children who grow up in the
orphanage without ever being adopted are still given a helping hand
as Gentle Hands helps them get into
colleges and universities and trains
them on how to live a successful adult
life when they leave the facility.
“I think what strikes me is it’s not
just a facility for children to kind of
go through their childhood years,”
Blayne said. “A lot of orphanages
almost remove the children after
they’re 13 or 14 years old and then
they’re kind of left to fend for themselves.”
Continued on page 11
> cheerboard, from pg. 8
feel like we’re never doing this alone,” Banman says, adding that countless individuals
and businesses make food and monetary donations, in addition to the thousands of nonperishable food items local schools collect
every year. “We live in an amazing community that is so willing to help those in need.”
If you’d like to donate, keep an eye out
for Cheerboard reps at various community
events in November, including at the City of
Winkler Tree Lighting in Bethel Heritage Park
on Nov. 27. The Winkler Co-op will also be a
hosting a food collection drive this month.
The Cheerboard hampers will be put to-
gether Dec. 8-10 and distributed by volunteer
drivers the evening of Dec. 10.
If you’d like to get involved in any way, call
the Cheerboard at 204-362-3946.
“Together with many giving hearts and
helping hands we hope that we can encourage and help to lighten the load for those in
need during the upcoming Christmas season,” Banman says.
Application forms for hampers will be distributed to school liaisons, churches, and
community organizations and charities such
as Central Station and Donate Love. Applications are due back by Nov. 28.
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
11
Winkler chamber highlights small business
Hildebrand noted that small businesses make up a large part of the
The Winkler and District Cham- chamber’s membership base and
ber of Commerce shone a spotlight form the bedrock of Winkler’s busion the importance of small business ness community.
in our community during its annual
“They are the backbone of the CaSmall Business Week Luncheon Oct. nadian economy and the backbone of
23.
our community here,” he stressed.
“There’s a lot of successful small
Speaking first at this year’s packed
businesses in our community and luncheon at the Quality Inn was Katethere’s a lot of businesses that we lin Letkeman of Charley B’s Classic
don’t necessarily know much about,” Grill and Ice Cream Parlour.
said Chamber president Ryan HilLetkeman, who owns the Main St.
debrand, “so that’s why we put on eatery with business partner Charlthis event, that’s why we pick as many lotte Guenther, spoke about how
speakers as we do and try to give their goal as small business ownthem a little bit of time to educate us ers has been to support buying local
on their business.”
wherever they can.
By Ashleigh Viveiros
Photo by Ashleigh viveiros/Voice
Charley B’s co-owner Katelin Letkeman talked about the importance
local suppliers have had in the restaurant’s success at the Winkler
chamber’s Small Business Week Luncheon last Thursday.
“Char and I had fashioned our
menu using the local culture and it
just did not sit right with us to use big
food suppliers for the ingredients,”
she said. “I mean, we live in an agricultural community so we might as
well utilize it . . . we realized that most
of our menu could be created using
local ingredients. Thus, Charley B’s
slogan was born: local, farm-fresh.”
Buying local has proven a huge
benefit for the restaurant, providing
the freshest ingredients possible for
better tasting food and also allowing
them to thank the community that
has welcomed them with open arms
by ensuring the company’s dollars
are spent close to home.
“As a local small business, we believe if we want the community to
support us, we must support the
community in return,” Letkeman said.
Up next, Eden Health Care Services
CEO James Friesen took the stage to
talk about the work the organization
is doing across southern Manitoba.
The chamber invites one local nonprofit organization to speak at the
luncheon every year.
Eden has come a long way since being founded in Winkler in 1967, Friesen said, today offering far more than
the acute care centre it began with.
“I think when you think of Eden,
most of you probably think of the
mental health centre, again because
it’s been a presence this community
for so long,” he said.
“Our vision and mission states simply that people on the mental health
journey experience hope, healing,
and community,” Friesen said. “Our
mission is to respond to the community by providing a range of services
that will empower persons with mental health needs.”
To that end, in addition to the acute
care centre in Winker, Eden also offers its community health services,
the Recovery of Hope counselling
program, Segue Career Options, and
its various housing and support services programs. All these services
seek to help people struggling with
mental health issues address those
challenges, find safe housing, and
work towards securing meaningful
employment.
Friesen noted that the organization
relies on the community’s support to
do all these things, and he thanked
the business leaders for continuing to
provide that support.
Wrapping up the luncheon was
Henry Siemens of Serious Marketing,
who talked about starting up his company with partner Myron Cornelson
two years ago.
The company strives to help companies navigate the increasingly complicated marketing waters before
them, he said, ensuring a consistent
message and brand goes out across
all mediums.
“As we dealt with clients time and
time again, they would tell us that the
market in our area was different. It’s
different than it was 10 years ago, 15
years ago,” Siemens said, pointing to
increasing number of ways companies can market themselves and their
products.
Since starting, the company has
quickly grown and expanded, changing even as the local market needs
continue to change, Siemens said.
“Two years later our business is almost completely different than it
was when we start because we find
that doors open and doors close and
there’s opportunities everywhere if
you’re prepared to listen to them.”
> gentle hands, from pg. 10
Blayne and Tara are planning to
make another trip to the Philippines
to visit Gentle Hands next spring,
and this time, they hope to bring other people with them who also want
to lend a hand.
“We’d like to go back but this time
we’d like to take a group of people
with us that can come and experience it, and kind of put their expertise to it as well,” Blayne said. “People
that are just interested in helping.”
In order to help raise funds for
Gentle Hands, Blayne decided to
kick off a new gift card fundraiser
this Christmas.
“It’s always exciting to give financially to these different causes, but
what I really want to do is make a
stand for what Prairie Barnwood
stands for,” Blayne said. “The other
thing is inviting other people to be
a part of it. Not just taking proceeds
from the company and giving them
away, but actually inviting other people.”
With 100 per cent of the gift card
proceeds going to Gentle Hands,
Blayne says they hope to raise $7,000
to aid in the day-to-day operational
expenses and outreach projects in
the Philippines, and also help with
the renovation of a building to start a
new Gentle Hands location in India.
Gift cards can be purchased instore at 29026 Willcocks Road in
Morden or online at www.prairiebarnwood.com. Every $100 spent on
gift cards will also give the buyer an
entry into a draw for a dining room
set valued at $6,000.
“It’s a hand-crafted dining room set
to the size and dimensions and colour and style of your choice,” Blayne
said.
“I think it creates an awareness,”
Tara said of the gift card program.
“I think in the way that our societ-
ies are, in the way that our world is,
sometimes we get focused internally
and really kind of get busy doing life
and get busy just kind of in our own
things. I think sometimes we forget that there are in the Philippines
alone there are millions of children
that have no parents, no home, no
food, no shelter, and they’re being
able to be cared for at a place like
Gentle Hands.”
For more information, you can visit
the Prairie Barnwood website, or
reach Blayne Wyton at 204-822-5476
or at [email protected]
12
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Northland Childcare Centre celebrates one year
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The Northland Childcare Centre
in Winkler marked its one-year anniversary last week in the perfect
way: lots of candles (each child got a
muffin with one on top for morning
snack), cake (both an edible one and
a colourful wall display cake courtesy
of the kids), balloons, and thank-yous
to everyone who helped the day care
become a reality.
Located at Northlands Parkway
Collegiate, the community day care
has seen a lot of growth since it first
opened its doors last fall, says executive director Kim Giesbrecht.
“When we started we had 38 enrolled and now we have 78 enrolled
and we’re at 70 per cent of our occupancy,” she says, noting those 78
kids include both part- and full-time
spaces.
The centre has grown its staff, as
well, over the last year to accommodate the increasing number of kids—
they’re at 20 employees right now,
which is nearly double what they
started with—and they’ll continue to
do so as they aim to reach 86 per cent
occupancy by next year.
“We are growing the way we want to
grow,” Giesbrecht says. “We’re want-
Photo by Ashleigh viveiros/Voice
Northland Childcare Centre executive direcotr Kim Giebrecht with
three-year-old Milliom and Brady as they enjoy some cake in celebration of the day care’s first anniversary.
ing to not grow too fast because we
want to know our space, know how to
use our space . . . and we can’t do that
properly if we’re completely full.”
Since opening, NCC has made a few
tweaks to its facility to better accom-
modate the needs of its staff and children, including developing a proper
greenspace area for kids to enjoy just
outside the front door, and building
additional storage space inside as
well as a storage shed outside.
“It’s a beautiful space,” Giesbrecht
says, noting they also love the location, which allows the centre to welcome students from NPC’s community health and child care and Life
Skills programs into the centre as
volunteers and interns.
As a charitable organization, NCC
accepts financial donations towards
its ongoing operations, as well as donations of toys, books, and other new
or gently-used items.
“We have people regularly coming
by with those types of things, which
we really appreciate that,” Giesbrecht says, noting you can contact
the centre at 204-325-5667 if you’d
like to make a donation.
“We are always trying to get out
into the community, make sure people know about us,” she adds, noting
they’ve held a few fundraisers over
the last year and plan to hold more
in the months ahead.
Learn more about NCC online at
www.northland-cc.com.
MCDC changes to aid in city’s growth
By Cori Bezan
The City of Morden is teaming up
with the Morden Community Development Corporation to restructure
the organization and its processes,
making way for increased efficiency
and progress when it comes to handling the city’s economic development.
Council agreed to enter an option
agreement with the MCDC on Oct.
14, providing MCDC with certainty
that they can pursue “economic development opportunities” on the
commercial and industrial land parcels that they have available to them.
In addition, the current MCDC
board will be dissolved as of Nov. 30
with the exception of chairman John
Wiens, who will submit suggestions
to council for consideration as new
board members.
Both of these changes will streamline some processes for the organization, said Mayor Ken Wiebe.
“[Before] if our MCDC had a proposal from a corporation that wanted
to come here, they would have to
bring it to council,” Wiebe explained.
“If council had just met that Monday,
they would have to wait another two
weeks to get in front of council, and
then if there were any questions we
would have to get back to them, and
then they would get back to us, so it
could be four to six weeks before a
decision is made.”
“By allowing [MCDC] to take care
of some of these details and to look
after it, them and the city manager,
it removes a lot of hurdles,” he said.
“If there’s a great opportunity, we can
move on it very quickly as opposed to
a month or two months’ delay.”
These changes come in combination
with some changes made in the city’s
Corporate Plan for 2014, expressing
the city’s vision to grow the population to 15,000 residents by the year
2020.
“The City of Morden is committed
to its vision for 2020 and in becoming
a flourishing community,” stressed
Wiebe. “To do this we must remove
the hurdles that delay moving forward.”
MCDC also has a strong vision for
the growth of the city and maintaining a balance between economic and
environmental sustainability.
“These changes are the most progressive I have seen in all my years of
being involved with the council and
MCDC,” said Wiens in a statement.
“Streamlining the processes as they
have been done, will mean deals for
the benefit of Morden will happen expeditiously. This is a positive move for
the future of Morden.”
Koats for Kids kicks off this week
By Cori Bezan
The Morden and District United
Way and the Morden fire department
are looking for donations of new or
gently used winter clothing items for
the annual Koats for Kids campaign,
which launched this week
“What is does for the community,
number one . . . if it’s in reasonably
good shape, it gives them a good place
to take that and it can probably have
another life,” said the United Way’s
Terry Gibson of the donated items.
“The other good thing is we have
all sorts of people in town who have
larger families and it gives a place
where they can come in and get fitted
out with very nice clothing actually.”
The iconic big red box is already in
place behind the Morden Fire Hall for
citizens to drop off their gently-used
and in good condition winter clothing. Many people in the area also knit
brand-new articles such as mittens
and scarves for donation.
While that’s all more than welcome,
“what we’re after is coats,” Gibson
Continued on page 13
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
13
Rett Syndrome Association restarting in Manitoba
of crying and spells of laughing, and
it’s very difficult to understand what
A former Miami resident is re-ener- they want or what they need or how
gizing an old organization and shed- to take care of them because there’s
ding some light on a rare, often un- not a lot of communication at that
heard-of disease for Rett Syndrome young age.”
Awareness Month, which wraps up
McFadden said that Ema began to
this week.
develop as any other child does before
“Rett Syndrome is a neurological they noticed a delay in her speech.
disorder, a disease,” explained Trish
“Because we have five kids, we knew
McFadden. “It happens almost only that just something wasn’t right,” she
in girls, because it’s an X chromo- recalled.
some [disorder].”
Ema was initially diagnosed with
The disease is diagnosed through autism, which can be a common misgenetic testing, and McFadden said take due to the variety of symptoms
that most children who have the that Rett Syndrome can display.
disorder often begin developing at
The family waited a year to complete
a normal rate before the signs and genetic testing before they found out
symptoms begin to show.
Ema had atypical Rett Syndrome: she
Most begin to start walking and talk- can’t speak, but is more mobile than
ing before the disease causes them to most others with the disease.
regress and they lose the ability to do
“It was only a year ago that we aceither.
tually finally got a final diagnosis,”
Seizures are also a common symp- McFadden said. “So the process to
tom, but McFadden said that the finding, to helping these kids is awdisease can affect each person in ful long, and there’s not a lot in the
vastly different additional ways— province that know about it, so it’s a
from strange hand movements, slow long journey.”
growth, and small hands and feet to
“Once you get living in—we call it
gait abnormalities.
Rettland—once you get in it and you
“The list is huge,” she said.
start to see the girls and the smiles in
McFadden has had first-hand expe- their eyes, it’s a life-changing experirience in dealing with Rett Syndrome, ence for you because you see life and
as it was only a year ago that she everything in a different light,” she
was informed her now five-year-old added.
daughter, Ema, has the disease.
The lack of support for Manitoba
“It is a life-changing disease. It’s families coping with the disorder is
very devastating for most families,” challenging, and McFadden has takMcFadden said. “The home life, it’s en up the banner to change that.
very difficult because the girls don’t
“We are just re-establishing the
sleep and they don’t talk so you never Manitoba Rett Syndrome Association
know what’s wrong. They have spells now,” she said, adding that she will be
By Cori Bezan
> koats for kids, from pg. 12
said. “For little kids, we really want
legging material like ski pants.”
Last year Koats for Kids handed
out over 300 articles of winter clothing to children and families in Morden and area.
While they focus on being able to
help outfit children, Gibson said
that they do get a number of coats
for adults, too.
After a couple of weeks of collection, the first free distribution night
will take place on Nov. 13, followed
by two more on Nov. 20 and Nov.
27. The evenings will run from 4 to
6 p.m.
“We’ll collect coats right up until
the 20th,” Gibson said. “If people
come in and they can’t get what
they’re looking for on one night,
they should come back the next
week later because we will have
more clothes in there, different
clothes.”
After the event is over, United Way
teams up with the Morden Police
Service and the RCMP to send the
leftover clothing to people in northern communities.
“It’s not very hard to do, and it’s
recycling some good articles that
some people really need,” Gibson
said. “It is a good feeling, but more
than that, it just makes sense that
we take something that people are
done with.”
“It’s just an easy thing to do that
works real well,” he added. “If people will drop [winter clothing] off
in the red box, gently used or good
condition clothing, we’ll make sure
it gets to somebody that needs it
badly.”
Five-year-old Ema McFadden lives with Rett’s
Syndrome, a neurological disorder that slows
development.
submitted Photo
president of the organization.
The non-profit association was started many years ago, but grew quiet until recently when McFadden became
more aware of a growing number of
families looking for help.
“We’re starting to get it going again,
and that helps a little bit, to help deal
with it,” she said. “With more families
we can communicate and network
and it’s relatively unknown to most
people.”
McFadden hopes to spread awareness for the rare disease in the province, provide support for children and
families dealing with Rett Syndrome,
and help fund a registry that will help
determine how many people actually
have Rett Syndrome in Canada.
Because of privacy laws in Manitoba,
it is very difficult to reach out to local
families dealing with Rett Syndrome,
but McFadden said that doctors have
diagnosed at least 40 patients provincially.
That said, the association has only
been able to reach out to eight families so far, including one in the Pembina Valley area, which is why they hope
to aid the funding for the registry.
“We’re pretty sure there’s so many
more girls out there that have it that
aren’t diagnosed with it, just because
people don’t know about it,” McFadden said. “These girls sort of fall
through the cracks.”
“The association is originally in
place and it still is in place as a support for families,” McFadden said.“It’s
sort of an alone place when you first
learn about Rett Syndrome, because
when you first learn your child has
Rett Syndrome, with the privacy act,
there’s not a lot of places you can go
besides the internet to find parents
that have girls with Rett Syndrome.”
“We as a group stay connected for
families,” she continued. “Why? For
support and also for help, outreaches,
things like that, because the system
doesn’t always tell you where you’re
supposed to get help or where you
can get help, so you have to search
that on your own. We’re trying to
work as a networking group so we
can help each other with programs
that we know of or things like that.”
McFadden added that they hope to
build the association so that they can
host conferences and seminars for
families, caregivers, and health care
providers on the syndrome, further
getting the word out about the disorder.
“We really want to start getting
through to the doctors and the therapists what Rett Syndrome is and how
they can diagnose it or how they can
find it or spot it,” she said. “As the
word gets out, as our Rett Syndrome
association starts going again, hopefully we’ll find more families that way,
too.
In addition to McFadden, the association’s new board of directors will
have some local ties, as Morden nurse
Janice Lukowski, who has worked
with Ema for two years, will take over
responsibilities as secretary, and Roland residents Kathy and George
Edgar, with their daughter Jody, will
serve as members at large.
More information can be found online at www.rettsyndrome.mb.ca, but
McFadden said that they are in the
process of designing a new website at
www.manitobarett.com, and the two
sites will eventually be linked.
McFadden’s blog following Ema and
their journey through “Rettland” can
be found at www.emasrettworldblog.
wordpress.com.
14
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Warm hearts, warm hands
left Photo by Ashleigh viveiros/Voice; right photo submitted
Southwood School kindergartners donated nearly 40 pairs of mittens to those in need
last week. Left: Tavin, Julena, and Johnny learn from guest Mabel Hildebrand how knitted mittens are made.
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The kindergarten classes at Southwood
School in Schanzenfeld joined forces last week
for Mitten Day, collecting nearly 40 sets of mittens for those in need this winter.
Afternoon kindergarten teacher Michelle
Shepherd said the project is part of the students’ education in community involvement.
“We like to do a service learning project every year,” she said,“and knowing that there are
so many kids and so many adults that don’t
have mittens, people that come new to the
area not realizing how cold it gets, it’s nice to
have those extra supplies for winter.”
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The students each brought in a pair of new
or gently used mittens to be donated to Shine
and Share at Winkler’s Central Station.
“This is an easy way for the kids to give, to
show they care,” Shepherd said. “We want everyone to have warm hands this winter.”
In addition to rounding up the mitten donations, the day also included a few guests who
showed the kids how knitted mittens were
made, including Mabel Hildebrand and Denise Pauls. The students spent the rest of the
day engaging in various educational and fun
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The trio join six acclaimed members on the board, including incumbents Sam Berg, Laurie Dyck, Leah Klassen, Tash Olfert, Brenda Willey and newcomer Garry
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The acclaimed trustees received six candidates for the
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• What skill set or attributes do you bring that will benefit the board and the division?
The trustees then voted in Klassen, Letkeman, and Wallace as the new board members.
A series of board orientation meetings will now take
place before the Nov. 10 board meeting, at which time
the board’s standing committees will be formed and the
group will appoint a chair and vice-chair.
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
15
Annual trail ride raises $6,000 for STARS
By Cori Bezan
Over 100 riders took part in the 2014 Pembina Valley
Fall Trail Ride, an event that raises funds for local organizations while providing a weekend of scenic riding
on the trails.
“The trail ride itself, the Pembina Valley Fall Ride, has
been going on for over 30 years,” said organizer Fred
Carruthers last week. “It’s been kind of done under different people in charge. I took it over eight years ago,
and when I took it over, I made it a fundraiser as well
as a trail ride.”
“I made it a fundraiser because I thought we might as
well be doing it for a good cause,” he added. “I wanted
to be able to donate the money, after expenses, whatever we made, to a good cause.”
Carruthers said that they have raised funds for a few
different organizations over the years, but have raised
money for the STARS air ambulance for the past two
years.
“I believe STARS provides a life-saving service to especially rural people and rural communities,” he said.
“Most of us we live quite a distance from hospitals.”
Carruthers also recalled an incident three years ago
where a rider was bucked off his horse on a trail ride
and STARS flew in to attend to them.
“When you’re doing an activity like trail-riding, you
submitted photos
The annual Pembina Valley Fall Trail Ride raised $6,000 for
the STARS air ambulance last month.
can be quite a distance off a main road where any
ambulance can get to you,” he said. “STARS can
land their helicopter nearly anywhere and provide life-saving service to you if it’s needed.”
This year, around 115 riders saddled up to
blaze the valley trails in the two-day ride in late
September, bringing in $6,000 for the air ambulance—over $1,000 more than last year.
“Everything went quite well,” Carruthers said.
“The weather was great on Saturday, Sunday was
rainy.”
The dance and the
meals also went well, he
added, and the silent and
live auctions were as popular as ever. Diamond
Doug, a cowboy poet, also returned this year for
poetry and story-telling.
Carruthers said they also saw a lot of personal
and business donations come in this year, not
just locally but also from places around the province like Brandon and Winnipeg to support the
cause.
“We thank everyone so much for their donation
of prizes and cash donations. They make the ride
possible beside the people who do the ride. We
wouldn’t be able to raise this much money without all the donations that we get.”
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16
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Symposium gives students
ideas for the future
By Cori Bezan
Photos by Cori bezan/Voice
Gr. 9 student Mitchell Klassen tried to walk as far as he could in full,
heavy firefighting gear at the Garden Valley School Division’s annual
career symposium held at NPC (below) last week.
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Winkler-Morden area high school
students got the chance to see what
their futures could hold last week
as Northlands Parkway Collegiate
played host to the annual Garden Valley School Division Career Symposium.
“This is not to function as a job fair,
it’s more to showcase careers,” said
co-organizer and NPC guidance
counselor Kim Apperley at the Oct.
22 event. “We do have local business
and industry things here, but they
were asked specifically to let students
know what kind of positions do you
have at your business, what kind of
education is required, because then
there’s also a tie-in—we have all the
major players, universities, colleges,
bible schools—so they can also direct
them to some of those institutions
where they might offer training for
different jobs and careers offered at
those places.”
Around 1,400 GVC, NPC, and Morden Collegiate students perused the
booths and displays from around 43
exhibitors at the event.
Of those exhibitors, around 20 of
them held additional break-out sessions for more in-depth information
and presentations.
“Hopefully it plants a seed,” Apperley said.“Hopefully they can get some
ideas, just get them thinking about
[the future], because four years goes
so quickly that if they can be a little
bit more deliberate in choices, even
just talk to some institutions and see
what kind of feel they get from them,
it might help them make a decision
earlier on, which makes choosing
“A lot of students
don’t realize what
options they have
after high school.”
their courses in high school easier.”
This is the first time that NPC has
hosted the career symposium. Apperley noted that the event will likely
alternate between the two Winkler
high schools in future years.
“It is nice to showcase our new
building,” she said. “I know a lot of
the exhibitors asked to have a tour at
the end of the day, so it’s a privilege to
be able to host and to be able to offer
to students in our building. They have
access to really any post-secondary
information that they want.”
“It was nice to have our own culinary students be able to prepare stuff
for our exhibitors, and our exhibitors
see the kind of skills they’re learning
here in the culinary program and in
the bake shop and patisserie,” Apperley added. “I think that’s been nice, to
have it all really in-house . . . and just
to showcase our students and what a
great job they’ve done in learning.”
Rebecca Hamilton, a pharmacist at
Pfahl’s Drugs, was among the exhibitors at the event.
“I think it’s actually pretty good,”
she said of the day’s activities, commenting on the additional space in
Continued on page 17
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
> symposium, from pg. 16
the new school’s gymnasium and the
talent of the culinary arts students.
Pfahl’s Drugs has attended the fair
for the past three or four years, after
Hamilton expressed interest to her
boss that she wanted to help showcase a career as a pharmacist.
“It was because of a career fair like
this that I actually talked to a pharmacist and got interested in the field,”
she explained.
Hamilton added that career symposiums like this one are extremely
beneficial to students, who still might
be looking for their options after
graduation.
“It’s good because they can see all
the different universities, they can
ask the questions of what kind of
courses do I need to take,” she said.
“It’s just great to see all these facilities coming out.”
“I think it just gives them a better
idea of what’s available to them.”
That’s a sentiment echoed by Salon Professional Academy director
of admissions and student services
Stephanie Dzikowicz, who was onhand with a few of the institution’s
students, demonstrating hair-styling,
make-up, and mini manicures.
“I think it’s really important for students, because a lot of students don’t
realize what options they have after
high school,” she said. “I think the
majority of them are being pushed
towards university and that’s not always the best fit for students. I feel
like things like this give them a real
eye-opener about the options out
there and the different things that
might suit them better.”
GVC Gr. 10 students Damaris Heinrichs and Angela Heinrichs both enjoyed this year’s event, browsing the
exhibits for ideas on what they might
like to work towards in the coming
years.
“It’s really nice,” said Damaris, who
attended the symposium last year.
“We have lots of opportunities to
look at stuff and they give us lots of
information, so it’s really nice.”
“I think it was really awesome,”
added Angela, who was attending
the event for the first time.
Both students are still making up
their minds about their futures and
say they enjoyed the easy access to
information that the symposium provided.
“Now you can have an idea of what
you could do, and then you have the
examples and the information they
give you, so you can think about it,”
Damaris said. “You can have lots of
time to think about it, and maybe every year there might be something
new, and you can just get even more
information. You can keep coming
back and learn more.”
17
Things getting hairy at The Bunker
By Cori Bezan
Men around the world are putting down the razor and letting
their beards and moustaches go wild next month to raise awareness about men’s health issues.
“Movember is an attempt to spread awareness for men’s health,”
explained The Bunker team captain Jeff Boschmann. “It started
out as a way to fight against prostate cancer and over the years
it’s kind of evolved into this much larger scheme.”
Last year, the Movember campaign was focused largely on
mental health, Boschmann said, but this year they are focused on
men’s health issues in general.
“I think it’s starting to catch on and people are realizing there
are a bunch of different things that need to be focused on rather
than just one thing at a time,” he said.“I think you can never really
stop talking about those kinds of issues.”
The local Movember team at the youth ministry, which has been
participating for about four years now, currently consists of nine
people, but Boschmann said that their numbers will grow as they
head into the infamous month of facial hair.
“We’re just having fun with it,” he said. “When we joined the
organization three years ago . . . we thought it was really just like
a fun thing to do. We saw these guys, we found them online, and
we thought, yeah, moustaches are cool, and cancer sucks, and
these guys are having a really good time with it in Australia, and
then we started talking to more people.”
Boschmann said that a lot of people thought that the event was
simply a “No Shave November” without realizing that it stood for
something important.
“We realized Movember is actually a thing, it’s actually an organization, it’s a group of guys who are actually trying to do someContinued on page 20
Photo by Cori bezan/Voice
The Bunker’s Jeff Boschmann is ready for
Movember next month.
18
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
li v e
R
E
L
K
N
I
W
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PW ENNS CONCERT HALL
SKAGGS FAMILY CHRISTMAS
LIGHT UP THE SEASON
WINKLER HOCKEY
CITY ADMIN
7 TO KNOW
P1
P1
P1
P2
P2
P2
UPCOMING EVENTS
NOVEMBER 6 - 8
7:30pm FLATLANDS THEATRE COMPANY
THE SECRET GARDEN
NOVEMBER 9
3:00pm FLATLANDS THEATRE COMPANY
THE SECRET GARDEN
NOVEMBER 10
7:30pm DAVID JAMES AND BIG RIVER
NOVEMBER 20 - 22
7:30pm GVC MUSICAL
THE MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR
NOVEMBER 22
2:30pm GVC MUSICAL
THE MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR
NOVEMBER 27
7:00pm AN EVENING WITH FRANK MILLS
MR. “MUSIC BOX DANCER”
A Skaggs Family Christmas
LIVE at PW Enns Centennial Concert Hall
Bluegrass legend Ricky Skaggs brings his family
to the PW Enns Centennial Concert Hall
December 5 for shows at 6pm and 9pm
Ricky has long been known for strong
family values and now three generations of his
family are touring with a very special Christmas
show.
Performers include Ricky’s wife
Sharon, sister-in-law and father-in-law, who
are also known as The Whites, in addition to
Ricky and Sharon’s son and daughter, Luke
and Molly.
Ricky has released two Christmas
albums which feature many traditional
Christmas carols including What Child Is This,
Do You Hear What I Hear, and Joy To The
World. He has also recorded original songs
like New Star Shining and Love Came Gently.
These shows will prove to be a
wonderful way to begin the Christmas
season.
Tickets are available at www.
winklerconcerthall.ca or at City Hall, 185 Main
Street.
DECEMBER 5
6:00pm A SKAGGS FAMILY CHRISTMAS
9:00pm A SKAGGS FAMILY CHRISTMAS
DECEMBER 13
7:30pm ‘TIS THE SEASON
PARKINSON’S FUNDRAISER
P1
up the
FOLLOW US
ONLINE
www.facebook.com/cityofwinkler
@yeswinkler
November 27, 6:30 p.m.
at Bethel Heritage Park
• Visit from Santa
• Story time in the Library
• Music from the NPC Jazz
Choirs - VOX and Dynamix
• Hot Chocolate and Cookies
For information visit the events page at www.winkler.ca
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
19
WINKLER HOCKEY
all GAME TIMES 7:30pm
unless otherwise indicated
NOVEMBER 2
WAYWAYSEECAPPO
GAME TIME 2:30pm
NOVEMBER 4
PORTAGE TERRIERS
NOVEMBER 9
SELKIRK STEELERS
NOVEMBER 22
SWAN VALLEY
NOVEMBER 30
VIRDEN OIL CAPS
GAME TIME 2:30pm
DECEMBER 7
WINNIPEG BLUES
DECEMBER 9
PORTAGE TERRIERS
DECEMBER 12
DAUPHIN KINGS
DECEMBER 19
NEEPAWA NATIVES
DECEMBER 31
STEINBACH PISTONS
GAME TIME 4:30pm
NOVEMBER 2
CARMAN BEAVERS
NOVEMBER 7
CARMAN COUGARS
NOVEMBER 8
STONEWALL FLYERS
NOVEMBER 11
GVC ZODIACS
NOVEMBER 23
WARREN MERCS
NOVEMBER 29
ALTONA MAROONS
DECEMBER 5
ALTONA MAROONS
GAME TIME 8:00pm
NOVEMBER 1
MOUNTAIN MUSTANGS
GAME TIME 2:30pm
NOVEMBER 15
PORTAGE TROJANS
NOVEMBER 18
PORTAGE TROJANS
NOVEMBER 21
NPC NIGHTHAWKS
NOVEMBER 28
GVC ZODIACS
DECEMBER 19
MORDEN REDSKINS
NOVEMBER 29
MOUNTAIN MUSTANGS
DECEMBER 2
CARMAN COUGARS
DECEMBER 23
CARMAN BEAVERS
DECEMBER 6
PEMBINA TIGERS
DECEMBER 13
MORRIS MAVERICKS
DECEMBER 16
CARMAN COUGARS
JANUARY 8
PEMBINA TIGERS
GAME TIME 8:00pm
JANUARY 11
NOTRE DAME HAWKS
DECEMBER 19
MORDEN THUNDER
GAME TIME 12:15pm
CITY ADMIN
PUBLIC NOTICE
WINKLER.CA
NEW GARBAGE/RECYCLING POLICY
In order to encourage more recycling, effective January 1. 2015, there will
be a two-bag limit for trash pickup.
7 THINGS TO KNOW
ANIMAL
CONTROL
P2
For further information on Permits, Garbage and Compost Pickup contact
City Hall at 204 325-9524 or e-mail [email protected]
For concerns
regarding wild or
domestic animals,
dead or alive, call
204-362-0480.
Please do not call
for rabbits.
STREETLIGHT
PROBLEMS
USED OIL
DEPOT
If you streetlights
are flickering or
just not running at
all, call Manitoba
Hydro at
204-822-6131 or
visit
www.hydro.mb.ca
The Used Oil
Depot/Eco-Centre
is located at 3451st St. and is open
on designated
Saturdays from
9-12. They accept
all types of oil,
filters & containers
including cooking
oils.
TEMPORARY
STRUCTURES
HOME
OCCUPATION
WATER MAIN
BREAKS
SNOW ROUTE
PARKING
Not allowed in
residential areas:
Tent Garages,
Snow Fencing,
Sea Containers
or Derelict
Vehicles. Permits
are required.
Not applying for
permits could be
costly. When in
doubt, inquire.
All Home
Occupations
require a Business
License which are
available at City
Hall. Section
43.0 of the Office
Consolidation
of Zoning ByLaw 1938-08
has information
regarding Home
Occupations.
To report a Water
Main Break, you
can call the Utility
Foreman Cell at
204-362-3296 or
the Utility On-Call
Cell at 204-3626505.
There is a 2-day max.
for uninterrupted
parking on city
streets. This is to
be respectful to your
neighbours and snow
removal staff. Please
refrain from parking
on city streets
completely after a
significant snowfall
until the streets are
cleared.
20
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
13th Battery holds training exercise in Morden
By Cori Bezan
The Royal Canadian Legion hall
in Morden played host to a unique
event last Thursday, as seven members of the 13th Battery of the 26th
Field Regiment took part in a special
command post training exercise.
“We’re training to get ready to go
and fire live with artillery shells,” explained Winkler’s Capt. Mark Wilson.
“There’s a lot of pieces to this. You
Photo by Cori bezan/Voice
During an artillery training exercise last week, Bdr. Jules Hebert (left)
entered data while Capt. Mark Wilson (centre) poured over a map
board, and Sgt. Cody McMullen and Mbdr. Denis Houle kept track of
the radio conversations.
have guys talking on the radios, we
have guys working on the computers.
It’s all technical drills. So how we’re
using our radios, how we’re talking
on the radios, how we’re computing
all of these different drills, we want to
make sure we get things right.”
The session was part of regular
training as the troops prepared for a
larger exercise in Shilo over the weekend. While Wilson is a high school
teacher at Garden Valley Collegiate,
most of the others in the 13th Field
Battery hail from Portage la Prairie or
Winnipeg.
“Normally we parade in Portage,
but we know that there’s some interest in the area of military things,
and we have a good relationship here
with Royal Canadian Legion Branch
11, who was nice enough to let us use
their facility,” Wilson explained. “We
thought we’d give it a try down here
and see how it works.”
Wilson served in Afghanistan in
2007 and the Legion invited him to
speak about his experiences when he
returned. Through his involvement
with the Winkler Remembrance Day
Service, Wilson has maintained his
relationship with the Legion over the
last few years.
“This seemed like a natural extension,” Wilson said. “Why not have a
troop down here that could do some
training?”
During the course of the evening,
the men practiced firing artillery in
on-paper simulations.
While the concept sounds fairly straightforward, the process is
lengthy and must be followed to the
letter. Communications between the
observation post and the command
post must be concise, fully documented, mapped on paper, and calculated
on computers before any shots can be
fired.
If everything is going smoothly, the
entire process should take around
two minutes from receiving their directions to firing.
“It’s a bit of a complicated process
to make happen, and that’s why we
practice this so much,” Wilson said.
“It’s not simple stuff.”
Sgt. Cody McMullen was acting as
the technical supervisor in the command post for the evenings’ exercise,
a position usually held by someone
one rank higher than himself.
“It’s very common in the Canadian
Army . . . where we train above what
we are,” he said.“I’m practicing something that I’m not slated to do at any
point in time in the near future anyway, but it’s good to at least prepare
and practice just to keep my skills
fresh.”
McMullen added that the majority of their troop doesn’t work in the
command post, so the session proved
Continued on page 21
> movember, from pg. 17
Meet & Greet
with Steve at
Jonny’s Java
from 6-6:45
A Concert in Support of the Pembina Valley Pregnancy Care Centre
thing with it, not just be all gross
and shaggy,” he explained. “So we
figured, why not actually do something with this fun month while
we’re doing it anyway?”
But while they are hoping to have
fun with the event, Boschmann added that it will be a “reserved excitement” this year. The local Movember
team is looking to help financially
support a past volunteer and current friend of The Bunker who was
recently diagnosed with cancer.
“It hits a little bit more close to
home this year,” Boschmann said.
“We had a volunteer who wanted to
work here this fall, and then he got
diagnosed with cancer, so the whole
chemo thing is kind of keeping him
away from everything.”
“We hung out with him last week
and we sat down, kind of came up
with a plan to make Movember a
little bit more personal for all of us,”
he said. “So instead of putting on
big different random weird events
around town, we’re being a little bit
more thoughtful with it and a little
less crazy.”
The team has already raised $100
through online pledges. Funds will
go to help their friend make end’s
meet during this difficult time.
“Whatever physical cash we make,
we’re hoping to help him out with
some medical bills,” Boschmann
said. “It was kind of just natural for
us. We’re raising money for cancer
this month. He’s telling us ‘I have
cancer, and because of it, I’m lacking
funds.’ Why don’t we just combine
the two things?”
Overall, Boschmann said that they
hope to raise $1,000 through online
donations and physical donations at
drop boxes in the community and at
The Bunker.
“We hit $100 and the month hasn’t
even started yet, so I think we can
do $1,000,” he said.
Donations can be made at the
Bunker weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. or online to The Bunker team at
ca.movember.com.
Step with FTC into
The Secret Garden
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The Flatlands Theatre Company
is bringing another much-loved
story to the stage next week with
its performance of France Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden.
“I think it’s really a beautiful story of changing your life around,”
says director Jeanette Hoeppner.
“You have a certain trajectory, and
things are dark and not looking
so great, and it’s nature that starts
[turning it around] for young Mary
Lennox. Nature’s what started her
to look beyond her own wall of
grief, wall of angst and thinking
no one cares about me, so why
should I care about anything? And
she starts to care about a garden,
and it makes all the difference.”
If you’re not familiar with the
classic story, The Secret Garden begins when Mary Lennox, a sullen
and spoiled young orphan, is sent
to live with her brooding uncle.
Several unexpected discoveries, including that of a neglected
secret garden, start Lennox and
those around her on the path of
transformation.
The cast is filled with several
young actors in the lead roles.
Finding the right kids proved less
challenging than might be expected, Hoeppner said, and the entire
cast has really stepped up to tell
the story.
“All of them knew the story and
that’s why the came,” she said. “So
the excitement that they have in
getting to bring the story alive has
been great.”
Taking on the role of Mary is
15-year-old Kennedy Daneault.
Daneault has taken part in FTC’s
theatre classes and been involved
in several other theatrical productions as an actor and stage manager, but this will be her biggest
leading role.
“I grew up watching the movie,”
she said, noting it’s been a bit surreal to be involved in bringing that
same story to the stage. “When I
was little I used to always want to
be Mary Lennox.”
Daneault believes the play continues to resonate across the generations because “you can really
> exercise, from pg. 20
to be good practice for them.
“It’s good to practice stuff that I am qualified to do and
get a refresher on it,” he said. “As opposed to losing this
information and these skills, it’s good to keep it refreshed,
on the top of my mind.”
“This is all about teamwork,” Wilson added. “Army is all
teamwork. Yes, we have ranks and stuff, but we’re a team.”
Other than artillery, Wilson said that they can work on
a number of different things during a parade, including
infantry, marching, survival skills, weapons, and land surveying.
“I do think this is worthwhile training,”Wilson said.“It is
a valuable way to serve your country.”
“I think being in the Canadian Forces is a very prestigious job,” said Master Bombardier Dave Lamirande.
“There’s tons of opportunities that you can do. It’s one
of the most professional organizations in the country,
there’s so many job opportunities, it’s endless. You can do
whatever you want.”
While Wilson is the only Winkler man in his battery,
there are other part-time civilian soldiers like himself
who travel great distances for their parades. Wilson said
that there is an opportunity to start a troop locally, and
last week’s exercise was evidence that it could work.
“I think there’s a bit of an untapped potential here,” he
said.“I think it would be a great thing to start a troop here.
The nearest one would be Portage or Winnipeg, and there
are guys driving from Plum Coulee or Winkler or Morden
all the way into Winnipeg for like a Tuesday night parade
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
21
From left: Angela Klassen, Kennedy Daneault, and
David Schaeffer run through a scene for Flatlands
Theatre Company’s upcoming performance of The
Secret Garden.
connect to most of the characters. And
there’s just so many different layers to
the characters.”
Making up the younger portion of the
cast are 11-year-olds John Trinke, who
plays Colin, and Kate Heide, who uses
her flute-playing skills to represent the
robin in the garden.
“I just jumped at the chance” to be a
part of the show, Heide said, noting she
read a junior edition of the book prior
to getting involved in this, her first play
with Flatlands.
“This is my first time doing anything
with Flatlands,” Trinke added, noting
he’s enjoyed being involved with various school productions in the past. “I
from 7 o’clock to 10.”
“I think it would be good if we had people who
are interested,” said Lamirande. “I’d be more
than willing to come here and do whatever.”
“I’d be willing to come down here a bit more
and see what [Morden] is all about,” he added.
“Let’s do it in Morden,”Wilson concluded.“We
like working with a whole bunch of different people.”
Trinke and Heide think audience
members will enjoy the surprises the
script includes, but are mum on providing many hints so as not to spoil it for
audience members new to the story.
“You just feel like you’re at home in the
garden,” Heide said, urging people to
come check it out.
The Secret Garden runs nightly at the
P.W. Enns Centennial Concert Hall at
7:30 p.m. Nov. 6-8, with a 3 p.m. matinee
on Nov. 9. Tickets ($15 for adults and $10
for children) are available at winklerconcerthall.ca or at the Centennial Box
Office at Winkler’s City Hall.
have the facility, we have the necessary equipment. We can make it happen.”
For more information or to express interest
in a local troop, you can phone the Portage Armory at 204-857-5831 or contact Wilson at 204362-1900.
Tickets available at Morden’s Heartland, 338 Stephen Street, Morden and at EHCS, 309 Main Street, Winkler or call 1-204-325-5355 to reserve
your ticket. No reserved seating. Coffee and Dessert will be served. Free admission, opportunity given to support Eden’s recovery programs.
22
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
30 days, 50,000 words: time to get writing
By Cori Bezan
Writers, get ready to put your pen to
the paper as National Novel Writing
Month kicks off again this November.
NaNoWriMo encourages writers to
throw off their inner editor and endeavour to write 50,000 words in a
crazy 30-day frenzy, hopefully ending
the month with a rough draft to work
with later.
“Every year, we’re reminded that
there are still stories that have yet
to be told, still voices yet to be heard
from all corners of the world,” said
executive director Grant Faulkner in
a press release. “NaNoWriMo helps
people make creativity a priority in
life and realize the vital ways our stories connect us. We are our stories.”
This year, 400,000 people are expected to participate across the globe,
and the Pembina Hills Arts Council
will be opening their doors to the local writers taking part each week.
“As an arts council, people often
think of us as the gift shop and gallery, but that’s only one small portion
of what we’re involved in and what
we’re trying to promote,” explained
PHAC executive director Amanda
Nicholls. “As an arts council, working
out of the arts centre on Stephen St.,
our goal is to promote arts and culture from all the different sectors—be
it visual arts, performing arts, literary
arts, theatre, these sorts of things—to
promote all of those and create more
engagement and more awareness for
the creativity that exists here, and
then build on that.”
Literature is an area that has not often been focused on in the past, but
the gallery is changing that by hosting write-ins every Thursday evening
from 7 to 9 p.m. in November, providing a creative environment for writers
to socialize, get help, and simply not
have to work alone.
“When this opportunity came along
and Alex [Klages, municipal liaison]
began talks with us, we just thought
it was an excellent opportunity,”
Nicholls explained. “It’s such a great
program for the community to get involved in. It’s free, there’s a whole ton
of benefits for the participants. It’s a
really great program.”
The gallery will also play host to
the NaNoWriMo wrap-up party in
conjunction with their holiday open
house on Dec. 4 from 6-8 p.m.
“We’re going to have an open
mike and all the participants from
NaNoWriMo write-ins can present a
little piece about what they worked
on for the past month,” Nicholls said.
“Then we’re also opening it up to the
public as well, if there are other authors from the area who have written
pieces that they want to test publicly,
this would be a great forum for that.”
Nicholls added that they are taking
the writing month one step further as
they host their own youth short story
contest.
“We wanted something that would
engage a younger audience, and it’s a
bit less daunting than 50,000 words.”
The contest has been divided up into
ages 10 to 14 and 15 to 18 categories.
The short stories (one per person)
should be between 500 to 750 words
in length.
The first place winners will each
be awarded a $50 gift certificate for
PHAC and gallery programs, as well
as story publication on their website
and a feature on their social media
platforms. Second place will also be
recognized online.
The contest deadline is 5 p.m. on
Nov. 25. Entries can be submitted by
mail, email, or in person at the gallery. Entries must be submitted with a
signed contest entry form, which can
be found online at pembinahillsarts.
weebly.com.
You can learn more about NaNoWriMo online at nanowrimo.org.
> an artist’s life
Book review: The Practice Revolution
In every aspect of the arts, an overwhelming theme emerges: practice.
Some arts students love practicing,
and some hate the very thought of sitting down to refine their craft.
The notion of practice and practice
time tends to evoke images of dreaded hours alone in a practice room or
studio doing the same things over
and over again.
In his recent book entitled The Practice Revolution, Philip Johnston addresses the problem of practice time
and proposes creative solutions.
Rather than discussing how much
students should practice, The Practice
Revolution seeks to revolutionize how
students practice, enabling them to
get the best results from that practice.
Several chapters focus on the teacher’s role in practice time, while other
areas of the book discuss parental
roles and give students themselves
tips on utilizing their time.
The book’s strengths lie in its focus
on tailoring practice time to the individual. Johnston has gathered many
different ideas for aiding the effectiveness of practice time. These ideas
range from tried and true concepts
(setting a timer, working in small sections) to the wacky and weird (practice Hangman? Treating practice time
as a video game?). The Practice Revolu-
tion is full of many different ideas to
deal with every possible problem that
could arise during practice time and
novel ways to make practicing fun.
In addition to solving practice problems and creating a more enjoyable
practice experience, Johnston has
broken down the process of learning and memorization and provided
strategies for successful completion
of each stage of practice.
The end result of applying
his principles
will be a well
prepared, well
rehearsed student.
If The Practice
Revolution has a
weakness it lies By Candace
Hamm
in the fact that
several of Johnston’s ideas would be difficult and/or
time consuming to implement.
In addition, some of the games
he uses are too complicated for the
younger children to understand. The
games would work well for older students, but since the young children
tend to be those who need the most
‘fun’ during their practice time, some
chapters may prove ineffective for
dealing with these students.
These weaknesses do not detract
from the overall quality of the book,
however. In general, Johnston’s ideas
are a much needed breath of fresh air
for both teacher and student.
Have an arts story to share? Contact
Hamm at [email protected]
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
23
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sports&recreation
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
inside
>
outside
>
25
ups ide down
Flyers down
Terriers, Kings
to maintain
firm hold 2nd
Tristan Keck is
league’s top scorer
with 17 in 17 games
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The Winkler Flyers made good on
their home ice advantage in their last
two games, downing both the visiting Portage Terriers and the Dauphin
Kings this past week.
Last week Wednesday, Morris native and leading league scorer Tristan
Keck got his 15th goal of the season
late in the opening period to get
Winkler on the board first. Patrice
Wren took advantage of a powerplay
to make it 2-0 for Winkler just a few
minutes later.
The Terriers, who were undefeated
in the league, pushed back hard in
the second. Despite that, Winkler increased their lead to 3-0 five minutes
in thanks to a goal from Scott Gall.
Portage finally got on the board with
a goal with just 3:11 left in the period.
They went on to close the gap with a
second goal at the top of the third.
But that was as close as the Terriers
got as the Flyers’ defensive line, including 24 saves by goalie Dasan Sydora, handed Portage their first loss
of the season 3-2.
Winkler went on to notch their 11th
win of the season a few nights later
against the Dauphin Kings.
The Kings managed two goals that
game, both in the second, while the
Flyers got goal after goal past Dauphin netminder Troy Matrynuik in all
three periods.
Brett Klassen lit up the board first
in period one; Lawson McDonald,
Scott Gall, and Keck made it 4-2 in
period two; and Keck (who is still the
top scorer in the league, now with 17
goals in 17 games) and Shawn Pachet
Photo by rick hiebert
The Dauphin Kings had no answer for the talent of Tristan Keck, who scored twice and assisted on two
more as the Flyers cruised to their 11th win of the season last Saturday. Keck is the Manitoba Junior
Hockey League’s top scorer this season, having notched 17 goals in 17 games.
made it a 6-2 win in the third.
In net for Winkler was Sydora once
again. He made 30 saves as a the Flyers outshot the Kings 40-32.
The wins bolster the Flyers’ record
to 11-2-4, giving them 26 points and
a firm hold on second-place in the
Manitoba Junior Hockey League behind the first-place Terriers.
Coming up, the Flyers play an away
game against the Winnipeg Blues this
Thursday, host the Waywayseecappo
Wolverines on Friday and Sunday,
and host the Terriers next Tuesday.
SEMHL season begins Saturday
The puck drops on the Southeastern Manitoba Hockey League’s
2014-15 season this weekend as the
Altona Maroons take on the Stonewall Flyers on Saturday and the Winkler Royals host the Carman Beavers
Sunday.
This season marks the Royals’ second year back in the league. Last
year they claimed second place with
a 14-4-2 record and then got knocked
out of the playoffs in the semi-finals
against the Morden Redskins.
Morden went on to clinch the title
last spring and look to defend it with
their first game of the season Nov. 6
on the road against the Warren Mercs.
Morden’s first home game isn’t until Nov. 22 against Carman.
26
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
NPC Nighthawks capture home tourney title
By Ashleigh Viveiros
Photo by rick hiebert
In round robin play in the Northlands Parkway Collegiate varsity boys volleyball tournament last weekend, the Morden Thunder tried to break through NPC defenders Nigel
Klassen (left) and Brett Friesen. NPC won the game in two sets, 25-15 and 25-22.
The Northlands Parkway Collegiate Nighthawks varsity boys volleyball team captured the title of their home
tournament last Saturday.
The Nighthawks were flawless in their round robin
pool, while fellow local teams the Garden Valley Collegiate Zodiacs took third and the Morden Thunder took
fifth in their respective round robins.
From there, both GVC and NPC beat their opponents in
the semi-finals (NPC downing Westwood in two sets and
the Zodiacs besting Niverville) to come up against each
other in the final match.
NPC emerged from that victorious, beating GVC 25-21
and 25-22.
Morden, meanwhile, fell to the Leo-Remillard Renards
in two sets in the fifth-place versus fifth-place match.
Earlier in the week, the GVC girls varsity team fell to
the Morden Thunder in three sets and then downed the
Sabres in three, while the boys swept both the Thunder
and the Sabres; the NPC girls team fell to the Olympiens 1-3 while the boys fell 0-3; and the Thunder girls also
beat the Aces 3-1, while the boys fell to Altona 1-3.
In other high school sports news, the Morden Thunder
and the NPC Nighthawks faced-off in Zone 4 boys hockey last Friday night in Winkler.
Morden skated away with a 4-2 win, with Thunder goals
coming from Brendan Turnbull (with two), Keane Boucher, and Steven Baker, and NPC points scored by Cody
Friesen and Sam Voth.
Also last Friday, the GVC Zodiacs fell to the Altona Aces
9-0.
Female Hawks split Blazers, Chiefs games
By Ashleigh Viveiros
The Pembina Valley Hawks had
a split go of it last weekend, falling to the visiting Balmoral Hall
Blazers Friday but then downing
Yellowhead on Sunday.
Friday’s game started off with
a scoreless first period as the
Hawks struggled to make good
on their handful of scoring
chances.
The Blazers ended up drawing
first blood in the second, getting one past netminder Corinne
Schroeder. They did it twice more
in the third, all the while keeping
the Hawks from returning the favour.
Despite Schroeder making 20
saves in all in net, the Blazers
took the game 3-0.
The ladies shook off that loss—
only their second of the regular season—as they hosted the
Chiefs in Pilot Mound on Sunday.
Donning pink jerseys in support of
Cancer Awareness Month, the Hawks
pressed hard but still found themselves scoreless after the first 20 minutes. On the upside, so did the Chiefs,
who failed to break through Taylor
Reimer’s defenses in net.
After a lot of back and forth in the
second period, the Hawks finally
managed to pull ahead with a power-
play goal from Kate Friesen.
In the third, the Hawks kept a firm
hand on control of the puck. The few
times the Chiefs managed to make it
to the Hawks’ zone, Reimer shut down
their chances at scoring, leading to a
1-0 shutout win for Pembina Valley.
The win brings the team’s record
to 4-2, putting them in third place in
the Manitoba Female Midget AAA
Hockey League behind the first-place
Chiefs and the second-place Westman Wildcats.
Coming up, the Hawks hit the road
this weekend to play Central Plains
on Friday, Yellowhead on Saturday,
and the Winnipeg Avros on Sunday.
Next Tuesday the ladies host Central
Plains at home in Pilot Mound. Game
starts at 7:30 p.m.
Hawks make short work of Cougars
By Cori Bezan
The Pembina Valley Hawks bounced
back from a couple of hard losses with
a victory last Friday night against the
Southwest Cougars.
The two AAA Manitoba Midget
Hockey League teams came together
strong as the first period saw a couple
of minor penalties on both sides, but
despite multiple scoring chances, neither team gave ground and the game
headed into period two scoreless.
Pembina Valley’s Ty Enns got his
team on the board in the second, with
a goal from Michael Wirth making it
2-0 heading into the final period.
That was another 20 scoreless minutes, giving the Hawks the shut-out
victory.
Travis Klassen defended Pembina
Valley’s net, facing 33 shots while his
teammates sent 45 the Cougars’ way.
Top-ranked team Winnipeg Wild
hosted the Hawks on Wednesday. Results of the game were not available.
The Hawks will remain on home ice
this weekend to face off against Eastman on Friday and the Yellowhead
Chiefs on Saturday and Sunday.
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
PHOTOS BY RICK HIEBERT
The Pembina Valley AAA Bantam Female Hawks team hosted the AAA Showcase last
weekend, welcoming teams from across the province. Above, left: In Friday’s opening
game against the Westman Wildcats, Mordenite Maiya Ashberg winds up for a shot on
net. Above, right: In the same game, Winkler’s Quinn Hamilton manned the net. The
Hawks took the win 4-2 that night, and then went on to fall to the Eastman Selects 6-3
on Saturday and beat the Norman Wild 2-1 and the Winnipeg Victorias 2-0 on Sunday.
Twisters down Vics, Twins
By Cori Bezan
The Pembina Valley Twisters emerged victorious from their two away games last week in
the MMJHL.
The Twisters took on the St. Vital Victorias
last Thursday, dominating the first period to
take control of the game early.
Pembina Valley’s Joey Delaquis scored the
opening goal just over a minute into the
game, followed by another goal from Carter
Zalluski not too long after. Matthew Hadley
scored a short-handed goal for the Twisters
after a boarding minor penalty to make it 3-0.
The Victorias seized an early chance in period two, but Paul Remillard returned the
favour for the Twisters, followed by a powerplay goal from Mitch Chanel to make it a 5-1
game.
The third period became a battle as the Victorias scored their second goal. Matt Mazinke found the back of the net for the Twisters,
but the Victorias managed to sneak past the
Twisters once more as they took advantage
of a powerplay. Chanel added another goal
Voice
The
Winkler
Morden
to the Twisters list, as did Matt Mazinke on a
power play before the game came to a close.
The Victorias took a total of 21 shots on Pembina Valley goaltender Luke Sirant, but the
Twisters outshot the Winnipeg team, making
32 attempts against them and securing the
8-3 win.
The Twisters then faced the Ft. Garry/Ft.
Rouge Twins on Sunday. After a quiet start,
the Twisters took the lead in the first period
after a goal from Chanel.
The Twins returned in the second period
with two goals of their own, but Zalluski tied
the game up quickly for the Pembina Valley
boys.
Brody Chabbert bested the Twins goaltender to tip the scales back, and despite strong
efforts on both sides, the remainder of the
game went scoreless.
The Twisters outshot the Twins with 39-35
with Alcide Grenier and took the win 3-2.
This weekend the team hosts the St. James
Canucks on Friday and the River East Royal
Knights on Saturday.
Get in touch with us via e-mail:
Send news to: [email protected]
Advertising to: [email protected]
27
Manitoba Hockey Standings
MANITOBA JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE
Addison Division
GP
Portage Terriers
17
Winkler Flyers
17
Winnipeg Blues
14
Steinbach Pistons
13
Dauphin Kings
18
Virden Oil Capitals
15
Swan Valley Stampeders
16
Selkirk Steelers
13
Neepawa Natives
15
OCN Blizzard
16
Waywayseecappo Wolverines
16
W
16
11
8
9
7
6
6
6
6
6
4
L
1
2
2
4
9
7
8
6
8
9
11
OTL
0
4
4
0
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
PTS
32
26
20
18
16
14
14
13
13
13
9
GF
92
61
59
48
54
44
45
45
47
43
29
GA
31
44
45
42
70
54
64
38
67
49
63
MANITOBA MAJOR JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE
GP W
Pembina Valley Twisters
12
8
Raiders Jr. Hockey Club
12
7
St. Vital Victorias
12
7
Charleswood Hawks
11
7
St. Boniface Riels
12
6
St. James Canucks
12
6
River East Royal Knights
12
6
Transcona Railer Express
12
5
Stonewall Jets
11
5
Ft.Garry/Ft.Rouge Twins
12
2
L
3
2
3
3
3
5
6
6
6
10
OTL
1
3
2
1
3
1
0
1
0
0
PTS
17
17
16
15
15
13
12
11
10
4
GF
49
45
51
34
38
41
39
42
34
29
GA
36
28
39
32
34
47
36
39
43
68
AAA MIDGET HOCKEY LEAGUE
Wild
Brandon
Eastman
Thrashers
Parkland
Interlake
Yellowhead
Southwest
Pembina Valley
Kenora
Norman
Central Plains
GP
7
10
10
7
10
8
8
9
6
8
12
9
W
7
7
7
6
6
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
L
0
3
3
1
4
2
3
5
3
6
10
8
OTL
0
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
PTS
14
14
14
12
12
10
9
7
6
4
4
2
GF
48
43
35
22
33
34
22
20
13
22
25
12
GA
8
21
22
14
33
18
22
33
17
28
74
39
AAA WOMENS HOCKEY LEAGUE
Yellowhead Chiefs
Westman Wildcats
PV Hawks
Winnipeg Avros
Norman Wild
Central Plains
Eastman Selects
GP
7
6
6
7
8
6
6
W
5
5
5
3
3
3
0
L
2
1
1
4
5
3
6
OTL
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
PTS
16
14
13
9
9
8
0
GF
18
22
16
16
15
11
4
GA
12
11
11
18
20
8
22
AAA BANTAM HOCKEY LEAGUE
Yellowhead Chiefs - B1
Brandon Wheat Kings - B1
Central Plains Capitals - B1
Pembina Valley PV Hawks - B1
South West Cougars - B1
Parkland Rangers - B1
GP
5
5
4
6
3
3
W
3
2
2
1
1
1
L
0
1
1
4
2
2
OTL
0
0
0
0
0
0
PTS
8
6
5
3
2
2
GF
19
21
19
20
13
8
GA
10
21
24
27
15
10
HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY
GP
W.C. Miller Aces (Altona)
2
Prairie Mountain Mustangs
1
Carman Cougars
1
Morris Mavericks
1
Morden Thunder
1
Cartwright/Nellie McClung/Pilot Mound Tigers 1
Portage Collegiate Institute Trojans
1
Northlands Parkway Collegiate Nighthawks (Winkler) 2
Garden Valley Collegiate (Winkler)
2
STATS AS OF MONDAY, OCTOBER 27
W
2
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
L
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
2
OTL
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PTS
4
2
2
2
2
0
0
0
0
GF
20
6
5
3
4
2
2
5
1
GA
1
3
2
2
2
5
3
10
20
28
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Agriculture
A fiery end to the harvest for La Salle farmer
By Harry Siemens
Farm fires—whether on or off farm
equipment, in and around grain bins
or farm buildings, dust mixed with
oil, straw, chaff, faulty wires or fuel
lines—can happen really quickly.
Case in point: it took only two minutes from fully combining soybeans
until flames engulfed the combine
Dustin Wiens was driving on Oct. 11,
with only one hour left to finish up
the 2014 harvest.
“It was exciting realizing nearing
the finish line of the 2014 harvest,
about an hour to go, when suddenly some error codes showed up on
my monitor in the cab,” says Wiens,
who farms 3,700 acres with his father
near La Salle. “[I was] looking at it
and thinking that doesn’t make any
sense, as different error messages
kept appearing . . . finally I looked in
the side mirror. I saw about five foot
flames shooting out of my engine bay
and quickly radioed my dad, Richard,
waiting with the grain cart about half
mile away.”
Next, he turned the New Holland,
CR 9090 self-propelled combine into
the wind, grabbed the fire extinguisher, and hopped off the combine
to see if there was anything he could
do to extinguish the fire.
By the time he did that and his father arrived seconds later, fire was
already raining down around them
and all they could do was watch it
burn.
A neighbour who saw the smoke
showed up with a 1,000 gallon water
trailer and a pump to help to keep
the fire down until the fire brigade
arrived to douse the remaining burning tires.
Wiens believes he saved the header
and the cab by turning the combine
into the wind, keeping the fire at the
back of the vehicle.
Going back the next day to douse
the smouldering soybeans still in the
combine hopper—about 200 bushels or so—he checked for any cause,
and determined it could be many
different things: wiring, dust, chaff,
a strong dry south wind, or even a
burst fuel line.
A neighbour finished up the nine
acres of soybeans left after their fire.
Once they know what the insur-
ance pays out for their loss, the Wiens
have all winter to decide and browse
whether to buy a used one or a new
one.
“We really liked this combine,”
Wiens laments, “the first newer combine we bought in some time.”
Looking back at the season overall, though, Wiens says their 2014 total crop turned out average to a little
above average, but a little bit lower
quality in the cereals.
Except for marketing a good chunk
of their section of yellow peas— which
they took off first—they have sold very
little of the other crops, he says.
“Most is sitting in the bin and prices
are not looking too good to be sell- submitted photo
ing just yet,” Wiens says. “Bins are full Watching his combine burn certainly wasn’t the end to harvest
with the locks on them and I think season La Salle farmer Dustin Wiens anticipated.
we’re not the only ones in this situation.”
had to use a grain bag on the last of at 18 per cent moisture content and it
They sold enough yellow peas to their wheat.
will come out at 18 and won’t get any
have enough storage, they thought,
“It was really tough wheat, too, and worse, either,” Wiens says.
but it still wasn’t enough and they the guys we talked to have put it in
Do what’s right, right now
T
harry siemens
he M-COOL debate
continues, even
after 12 year, to go
along the lines of
protectionism by
some groups in the United States and fair trade
for the rest of us.
>
Chuck Connor, National Council
of Farmer Cooperatives CEO and
former deputy secretary of agriculture in the U.S., comments on the
so-called “consumer’s right to know”
aspect of the debate.
But first, let me explain what that
is. Some who favour M-COOL in the
U.S. claim consumers want and have
the right to know where their food
comes from. Therefore, country of
origin labelling.
However, when people do surveys of consumers in the U.S., many
show that most shoppers still shop
based on price, not the origin of that
product. Many also shop at the same
place time and again, and therefore
trust the establishment they buy
from to make sure the product is
good and wholesome.
There are some who absolutely
have no problem buying good product at an good price, no matter where
that product comes from. Others
have preferences of where they buy,
what they buy, and who and where
they make that product.
That is all fair game.
Mr. Connor has, as I have, followed
this issue since the early 2000s.
“It didn’t start out as a consumer `right to know’ movement. It
was started by groups who didn’t
want competition from Mexico and
Canada, plain and simple,” he says.
“There are lots of COOL rules by
many countries that are legal and
compliant. The segregation and other requirements in this rule are not.”
Wow. That makes it clear, and in no
uncertain terms.
John Bode, Corn Refiners Association CEO, says livestock groups
that are a part of the COOL Reform
Coalition, like National Cattlemen’s
Beef Association and the National
Pork Producers Council, want the
U.S. to repeal the law.
Other members just want to see
the U.S. honour its trade obligations
by Congress, setting aside whatever
portions of the regulations or law
make it noncompliant. It is a disaster to wait for retaliation and export
damage, he said.
Meaning the retaliation that Canadian Ag Minister Ritz and Trade
Minister Fast are working on to help
convince the Americans making MCOOL right is in everyone’s best inContinued on page 29
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
29
New dairy quota exchange ready for December
By Harry Siemens
milk production on the farm.”
the same price for the milk, and the
In the past, some dairy farmers who value of the milk remains the same.”
Dairy producers in Manitoba will hit their maximum production would
He says the producer pays for the
soon be able to exchange unused literally pour milk down the drain in- cost of buying the production credit
production credits instead of moving stead of paying the penand that can
cows from farm to farm, if they meet alty for over-production.
range, looking
the right criteria says Rosser dairy The new program would
at other provfarmer Henry Holtmann.
help stop that waste from
inces anywhere,
For many years, to keep the milk happening.
from $2 and all
“The
producers
supply close to the demand, the proIt will now be much
the way up to
vincial milk marketing board would easier for a dairy farmer
gets the same
$15 per kiloimplement significant penalties for to look at his producprice for the milk, gram.
producers going over or under their tion in the middle of the
“What
that
purchased production quotas.
and the value of
month and see where it’s
says is a pro“The quota credit exchange pro- going.
ducer needs to
the milk remains
gram allows producers to trade their
“Maybe your butterfat
know his variunderproduction and overproduc- is off, or your milk proable costs so
the
same.”
tion credits with other dairy farmers,” duction is off, and I don’t
that the varisays Holtmann, vice chairman of the have enough room to
able cost and
Dairy Farmers of Manitoba. “In Man- make it to the end of the
the price of the
itoba, producers can a have a range month so should I buy some under credit doesn’t exceed the price he gets
of 20 days of flexibility to fall behind production credits and cover that off,” for the milk,” says Holtmann. “People
on his quota. A producer’s quota is says Holtmann. “The producer gets have to be sharp with their pencils on
based at day zero. He can fall below
his quota by an equivalent of 20 full
production days without losing the
right to refill those underproduction terest.
nadian pigs for finishing.
days.”
Karl Kynoch, chair of Manitoba Pork,
“A number of producers in the U.S.
He says when a producer has a says pork producers on both sides of who were buying their weanling supbump in production they can go right the border and U.S. pork processing ply from Manitoba, some of them lost
back to zero and it gives them lots of plants continue to suffer from the ef- that supply due to the fact that some
flexibility in the different seasons.
fects of M-COOL.
of the processors in the U.S. stopped
“On some farms now what they can
As the result of requirements for buying any pigs that were raised in
do is actually trade with production U.S. pork processing plants to seg- Canada and in turn they weren’t able
credits on a public exchange,” says regate domestic origin pigs from for- to find other stock down there to fill
Holtmann. “Then farms who have eign origin pigs to meet M-COOL their barns,” Kynoch says. “We know
already filled their production quota requirements, most U.S. processors some of the producers actually went
and come to the end of their produc- stopped buying Canadian origin pigs. out of business or they’re sitting there
tion days and still have a flush of cows
Kynoch says the restrictions have currently with empty barns so that
coming, they can then buy those pro- hurt both Canadian producers and really did hurt the producers there.
duction credits and cover that rise of U.S. producers who had relied on Ca- The packers also had to restructure
that one.”
“I really look forward to using it on
my farm,” he adds. “It is a great tool
and way safer to move credits on paper to the farm than to move cows
back and forth because of the greater
emphasis on biosecurity.”
The new quota exchange system will
have some restrictions on who can
sell credits and how many they can
put up for sale.
Producers with quality infractions
will be able to sell credits, but they
won’t be able to buy them.
The DFM will limit producers to
trading no more that 10 per cent of
their total daily quota if they are goldlevel producers. Producers below the
gold level can trade up to seven per
cent, while standard producers with
no infractions can trade up to five per
cent.
> siemens says, from pg. 28
because they had to fill up that space
that was missing from the Canadian
pigs going down.”
Jurgen Preugschas, former chair of
Canadian Pork Council, agrees we
need to stop the need for segregation.
“That’s the whole problem; so how
ever they solve the problem works for
us,” says Preugschas. “They need to
remove the necessity of segregation
in the packing facilities. That is number one and we feel the U.S. must do
it through legislation.”
Rock Lake Camp building
project underway
Work on the new washroom/shower building at
the Rock Lake United Church Camp is well underway. Though there’s still a ways to go before the
project’s completion, the camp expects to have
it finished well before camping begins next June.
The project was made possible thank to the support of the community by way of the Quilt Art and
Craft auctions, Country Blend concert, monetary
and in-kind donations, and volunteer labour. Over
260 campers attended Rock Lake Camp last season,
with another 362 people stopping by for other
group events throughout the summer. For more
information on the camp, contact Neita Avery at
Box 395, Crystal City, Manitoba, R0K 0N0.
submitted Photo by Nancy Macaulay
30
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Christmas Craft Sale in
Morden this Saturday
Vendors and local artisans will be filling the Access
Event Centre for the annual Morden Christmas
Craft Sale this Saturday. Anyone looking for an
early start to their holiday shopping, home decor,
or just a day out of the house will find a little bit
of everything at the show. A total of 80 vendors
will showcase their work, including knitting and
crochet, baking, jewelry, silk painted scarves and
cushions, body care items such as soaps, lotions,
scrubs, butters and bath bombs, pottery, Christmas crafts and decorations, jams and jellies, clothing, and eco-friendly products. The free event will
run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with door prizes, a 50/50
draw, and a silent auction all to help raise funds for
the Pembina Hills Arts Council.
take a break
> GAMES
Sudoku Answer
Crossword Answer
VOICE FILE PHOTO
CLUES
PUZZLEACROSS
NO. 524
54. Yonder
27. Overpowering
1. Smooth music
respect
57. Exact
7. Fails to explode
28. "____ of the
59. Grabbed a bite
10. Voluted
Spider Woman"
61. Having two feet
30. Influence
12. Tear down
63. Work for nine
31. Northern
64. Rose spike
13. Propose for office
32. Weasel
65. Percentage
14. Yiddish expert
33. Barbers' trim
66. Not right
34. Newsreel maker
15. Great ape of Borneo
70. Cathedral part
35. "Eyes of Laura
71. "____ Sematary"
16. Arab outer garments
____"
72. Makeshift bed
17. Hundredweight
37. Soft fabric
73. Loiter
18. The Muse of history
39. Pin-up girl
74. Run into
40. Blame
19. Neutralizes alkalis
76. Bee chaser
43. College vine
78. Use a bench
21. Mortar trough
44. Adult scrod
80. Head
22. Lapsed into bad habits
45. Whetstone
81. Prompter's
47. Sheer curtain
27. Potato State
offering
fabric
28. DeGeneres’ partner
49. Mechanic's milieu
33. Egyptian sun god
52. Body
34. Makes more precise
Copyright © 2010, Penny Press
36.
Deafening noise
85. Farr's feature
48. Dizziness
ACROSS
1. Steeple
part pleasure
50. Mexican
37.
Expresses
86. Lease
food item 5. Vietnamese
6. Pouchlike part
87. Attack offensive
29. Popular Canadian word
38.
__
Nui,
Easter
Island
51. Reason
9. Venetian ruler
6.
A
lyric
poem
30. Resort
39.
Founder
of
Babism
53. Buzzing insect
13. Anglers' boots
DOWN
55.
Roll
15. Purplish
7. Philippine
31. Members of U.S. Navy
40.
Speed shade
competition
1. Gulp seaport & gulf
17. Poet Pound
56. Gauzy fabric8. Utilizes
2. Tropical rodent
32. Smokes
41.
Artist’s
tripod
18. Glacial cover
57. Moonlike
3. Roman date
9.
Lair
35. Smiling so big (texting)
44.
Records
19. Embarrass
58. Untrue
ANSWER TO PUZZLE NO. 524
4. Family room
20. Sow's
matereply 60. Circle around
10. Covering
snowe.g.
36. Capital of Bangladesh
45.
A witty
5. Gay of
Nineties,
21. Fuel for KITT
62. Aquatic mammal
11. Covered
38. Tore down
6. Browalkway
or sis
48.
The
content
of
cognition
22. Hat
64. Rapid ____
7.
Cry
of
dismay
12.
Overzealous
40. Travel in a car
49.
Mohs scale
24. Mulligan
____ measure
67. Skirt panel
8. Large dwellings
26. Zip
68. Bad actor 14. Stench
41. American bridge
50.
__ student, learns
9. Society gal
27. Allied by nature
69. Straightforward
17.
Compartment
engineer James B.
healing
10. Atmosphere
29. Theft
71. "The ____ is
layer
42. “Rule Britannia”
51.
Put in advance mightier . . 18.
." 2nd largest Costa Rican
31. Enchant
11. Wheat, for one
34. Iron, e.g.
72. Poorly lit
island
composer
12. Ahead of
35. Manners
75. Of the ear
20.
Danish
Krone
(abbr.)
43.
Let it stand
CLUES
DOWN
schedule
36. Desert retreat
77. Cleanse
14.
Tear
apart
44. Not bright
1. Dress
Peru’s
38.
for capital
Caesar
79. Convert to 23. Long narrow bands
15. Tyke
a cryptogram
41.
Militarize Isle
24. Woody
tropical vine
45. Rated horsepower
2. Emerald
16. Bamboozle
82. Go up
42. Ape
25.
Farm
state
46. Pinna
3. Group
criminals
23. Revenue
83. Dinghy support
44.
Place of of
worship
26. Tooth
47. Prefix for before
4. Flat
sweetleash
pea petals
84. Muss
25. caregiver
Ire
46.
Equestrian's
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
AUTOS
STEEL BUILDINGS
2011 GMC Sierra All
Terrain 4x4 ext. cab,
sunroof, leather seats,
power
convenience
group, remote start,
fiberglass cap, 32,700
kms. Like new. $33,900
obo. Ph 204-697-9398.
––––––––––––––––––
Guaranteed approval drive
away today! We lend money
to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over
500 vehicles sale priced for
immediate delivery OAC.
1-877-796-0514.
www.
yourapprovedonline.com
Steel buildings/metal
buildings 60% off!
20x28, 30x40, 40x62,
45x90,
50x120,
60x150, 80x100 sell
for balance owed! Call
1-800-457-2206 www.
crownsteelbuildings.ca
WORK WANTED
Available to do renos, repairs, maintenance, painting, siding, roofs, fix-ups.
Residential or commercial.
Call Bill at 204-362-2645
or leave a message at
204-822-3582.
PUBLIC NOTICE
SEASONAL
STORE
GRAND OPENING
Sat., Nov. 15th, 9:30 a.m.
Classifieds
Book Your Classified Ad Today - Call 325-6888 or Email [email protected]
LAND FOR RENT
WORK WANTED
Agricultural Crown Lands are presently available
for rent for hay or grazing. These lands are situated
in the rural municipalities of: Alonsa, Armstrong,
Cameron, Clanwilliam, Coldwell, Daly, Dauphin,
Eriksdale, Ethelbert, Glenella, Grahamdale, Lac
du Bonnet, Lakeview, Langford, Lansdowne, Lawrence, McCreary, Miniota, Mossey River, Mountain
South, North Norfolk, Northern Manitoba, Ochre
River, Pembina, Piney, Pipestone, Rosedale,
Rossburn, Shellmouth-Boulton, South Cypress,
Ste. Rose, Stuartburn, Swan River, Wallace, Westbourne, Woodlands. Closing date for applications
for hay and/or grazing is November 14, 2014.
Please contact your nearest Crown Lands District
Office for more information or call 1-866-210-9589.
A listing of Crown Lands District Offices can be
found online at: www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/land/
crown-land/agricultural-crown-lands-district-offices.
html. A complete listing of Agricultural Crown Lands
available for rent can be found online at: www.
clp.gov.mb.ca/leases_and_permits/properties.
html#agLeasePermit or at any Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development office, RM office
or First Nation Band office.
NOTICES
NOTICES
Do-it-yourself project
gone bad? Need help
to start or finish? I can
help. Call 204-3622645 or lve. message at
204-822-3582.
ARCHERY CLUB
at the
Winkler Arena
OPENING NIGHT
.OVs-ONDAY
Location: Southland Mall, Winkler
n
Store Ope
(former Hallmark Store)
until
!
Support artisans in developing
Dec. 24th
countries while shopping for Christmas!
COMING EVENTS
WINKLER HERITAGE SOCIETY
12th ANNUAL BANQUET
THURSDAY, NOV. 6TH, 6:30 P.M.
WINKLER MENNONITE CHURCH
Theme: International Story Telling
Stories, Music, Displays, International menu
t%PPSQSJ[FT
t%PPSTPQFOBU
GPSZPVUPWJFXUIFEJTQMBZT
5JDLFUT
For reservations phone 204-325-8968
Cut-off date for reservations,
Monday. Nov. 3rd, 12 noon.
CAREERS
Invites applications for the positions of:
School Administrative
Assistant #2014EMMS068
EAL Teacher #2014MIN073
Refer to our website
www.westernsd.mb.ca
for more information
31
Starts: 7 pm
Ends: 9 pm
Come try it out!
For info. contact: Abe Penner
204-822-3886
Registration on
December 1st , 2014
Adults $65
(ages 18 and over)
Children and Youth $45
(ages 7-17)
**Instructions available
,OCATION5PSTAIRSINTHE
7INKLER!RENA
#LUBENDSIN!PRIL
Have you found
the Gospel
Echoes Thrift
Store yet?
You can see us
from Superstore!
We’re located in Winkler at
310b Cargill Road, South
of Rona, behind the
Medi-Chair building.
Supporting the Gospel
Echoes Prison Ministry
Teams of Western Canada.
TENDER
FARM LAND FOR SALE BY TENDER
in the RM of Pembina
Sealed tenders in writing will be received for the
purchase of the following property:
NW ¼ 16-02-07WPM & SW 16-02-07WPM
(Total 244.51 acres - approx. 235 cultivated acres)
NW ¼ 16-02-07WPM –
EXC FIRSTLY: THE NLY 900 FEET PERP OF
THE WLY 600 FEET PREP
SW 16-02-07WPM – 98.48 Cultivated Acres
Terms and Conditions of Tender and Sale:
1. Interested parties must reply on their own
inspection of the property.
2. Each tender must be accompanied by a $10,000
deposit cheque payable to Shirley McElroy.
Deposit cheques accompanying unaccepted bids
will be returned.
3. Possession date December 1, 2014.
4. If the balance of the purchase price is not paid by
December 1, 2014, or other satisfactory
arrangements are not in place, the deposit shall be
forfeited to the vendor as liquidated damages and
not as a penalty.
5. Highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
6. The successful bidder will be responsible for all
reality taxes following December 31, 2014.
7. The purchaser shall be responsible for the GST or
shall self-assess for GST.
8. The bidder(s) whose tender is accepted will
be required to complete an agreement
covering terms and conditions of sale.
Please submit tenders to “McElroy Tender”, Box
277, Manitou, MB R0G 1G0 before 4:00pm on
NOVEMBER 4, 2014.
For further information contact: Bev Furniss (204)
242-4258 or (204) 242-2318, email: [email protected]
HELP WANTED
Concrete Pump Operator
wanted immediately. Experience in machinery operations required. Health
benefits, full time year
round work. Mechanical
skills an asset. $25-$35
hour. Inquire [email protected]
NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Rural Municipality of Stanley’s
Audited Financial Statements for
2013 are available for review in the
office of the Rural Municipality of
Stanley and may be viewed by any
persons during regular business
hours.
Dale Toews, C.M.M.A.
Chief Administrative Officer
R.M. of Stanley
NOTICES
RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF STANLEY
PUBLIC NOTICE - BOARD OF REVISION
Public Notice is hereby given that the 2015 Assessment Roll for the
Rural Municipality of Stanley has been delivered to the Municipal
Office at 23111 PTH 14W and is open for public inspection during
regular business hours. Applications for revision may be made in
accordance with Sections 42 & 43 of The Assessment Act:
APPLICATION FOR REVISION
42(1) A person in whose name property has been assessed, a
mortgagee in possession of property under Subsection
114(1) of The Real Property Act, an occupier of premises
who is required under the terms of a lease to pay the
taxes on the property, or the assessor may make
application for the revision of an assessment roll
with respect to:
a) liability to taxation;
b) amount of an assessed value;
c) classification of property; or
d) a refusal by an assessor to amend the
assessment roll under Subsection 13(2).
APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS
43(1) An application for revision must
a) be made in writing;
b) set out the roll number and legal description of the
assessable property for which a revision is sought;
c) set out which of the matters referred to in subsection
42(1) are at issue, and the grounds for each of those
matters; and
d) be filed by
(i) delivering it or causing it to be delivered to the
office indicated in the public notice given under
Subsection 41(2), or
(ii) serving it upon the secretary,
at least 15 days before the scheduled sitting date
of the board as indicated in the public notice.
The Board of Revision will sit on Thursday, December 4, 2014 at
10:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers of the Rural Municipality of
Stanley to hear applications.
The final date on which applications must be received by the Secretary of the Board is Tuesday, November 18, 2014.
Dated at Winkler, in Manitoba, this 30th day of October, 2014.
Dale Toews - Secretary
Board of Revision
Rural Municipality of Stanley
23111 PTH 14W
Box 1600, Winkler, MB.
R6W 4B5
NOTICES
FOR RENT
Garden Park Estates
in Winkler
has 2 suites available. 1-1
bedroom with spacious den,
patio, small garden plot,
laundry hook ups in your
suite, and a smaller 1 bdrm
with the same amenities,
rent includes: heating, a/c,
water. Common rooms free
for gatherings, 2 lunches
per week available, weekly
activities. Everything is on
one level. Heated garage
parking available.
Rent depends on the size
of suite you choose.
No more worry about
repairs, maintenance, yard
work or snow removal
anymore.
For more information call
Cindy at 362-7151 or
1-866-449-0254,
or Dave at 362-7124.
KITCHEN
TOWELS
( formerly in 1027)
I will be selling these
towels out of my
home, from Nov. 3rd
to Dec. 20th
$3.50 or 3/$10
By appointment
204-325-7662
Joyce Wilson
Bring a Friend.
The Disability Tax
Credit Allows for:
$1,500 Yearly Tax
Credit
$15,000 Refund
(On Avg)
Covers: -Hip/Knee
Replacements,
- Arthritic knees, hips,
hands, or shoulders,
- COPD, other Disabling
Conditions
For Help Applying
1-844-453-5372
NOTICES
UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF
THE PLANNING ACT NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARING
On the date and at the time and location shown below, a
PUBLIC HEARING will be held to receive representations
from any person(s) who wish to make them in respect to
the following matter:
THE CITY OF MORDEN BY-LAW 17-2014
Being an AMENDMENT to the CITY OF MORDEN
ZONING BY-LAW 22-2008, AS AMENDED
HEARING
Morden Civic Centre
LOCATION:
195 Stephen St., Morden, MB
DATE & TIME: Monday, November 17, 2014 @ 7:00pm
AREA:
Proposed Lot 1, of Subdivision for File
No. 4433-14-7216 with deposit No.
1113-2014, Of S 9-3-5WPM
From:
“CR” Community Reserve
To:
“RM” Residential Multi-Family
FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:
Dave Haines, P. Eng.; Planning & Engineering
133 7th Street, Morden, MB. R6M 1V3
Phone: (204) 822-4434
A copy of the above proposal and supporting material may be
inspected at the location noted above during office hours, Monday to Friday. Copies may be made and extracts taken therefrom, upon request.
32
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
BEAUTY PRODUCTS
RENEW LIFE ULTIMATE
FLORA CRITICAL CARE
Classifieds
Book Your Classified Ad Today - Call 325-6888 or Email [email protected]
#JMMJPO$VMUVSFTQFSDBQTVMFtDBQTVMFTt3FH
HELP WANTED
Sale $29.99
CAREERS
Border Land
School Division
Proud Suppliers of
Gluten Free Products
Since 2006
4UFQIFO4USFFUt.PSEFOt1IPOF
AUCTIONS
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
VINTAGE SERVICE STATION COCA COLA AUCTION
SAT Nov 8 @ 10:00 am
Stonewall, MB - #12 Patterson Dr!
OVER 200 SIGNS * Red Indian * BA * White Rose * North Star *
Ford V8 * Chev * JD * Coca Cola *Orange Crush * Salada * Gas
Pumps * Battery; Oil Racks * Oil Cans * Cash Register * Coke Cooler
* GOTO Web PICS & Listing
Anticipates an opening for a
Term Educational Assistant
for the Regional Alternative
Education Centre,
located in Altona, MB.
For details visit http://blsd.ca
or www.jobsineducation.com
COMING EVENTS
Stuart McSherry (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027
www.mcsherryauction.com
CAREERS
PART-TIME SALES ASSOCIATE NEEDED
We’re adding one casual/part-time SALES
ASSOCIATE to our ranks in the next few weeks.
Medical Transcription
is an in-demand career
in Canada! Employers have work-at-home
positions available. Get
the online training you
need from an employertrusted program. Visit:
CareerStep.ca/MT or
1-888-528-0809 to start
training for your workat-home career today!
––––––––––––––––––
Medical Transcriptionists needed! Employers
seeking over 200 additional CanScribe graduates. Student loans
available.
Income-tax
receipts issued. Start
training today. Work from
home! www.canscribe.
com. [email protected]
com. 1-800-466-1535.
––––––––––––––––––
Short on staff? Looking
to hire quality individuals? Join us for an allinclusive Career Expo
in Jamaica. To get more
information go to: www.
abpros.ca/cex.
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
Get free vending machines.
Can
earn
$100,000 + per year.
All cash - retire in just
3 years. Protected territories. Full details
CALL NOW 1-866-6686629 Website WWW.
TCVEND.COM
GUITAR
LESSONS
Now accepting students for fall of 2014.
Learn to play your favourite songs quickly
and easily. Focusing on
Christian music old and
new. Space is limited
so please register early
to reserve your lesson
time. Ask for Joe at Creative Chording Guitar
Studio 204-325-0824.
HEALTH
Are you suffering from
joint or arthritic pain? If
so, you owe it to yourself to try elk velvet antler capsules. Hundreds
have found relief. Benefits humans and pets.
EVA is composed of
proteins, amino acids,
minerals, lipids and water. Key compounds that
work to stimulate red
blood cell production
& cartilage cell regeneration & development.
Stonewall Elk Products
Ltd., 204-467-8428 or
e-mail [email protected]
hotmail.com
MISCELLANEOUS
Regal Catalogue Fundraiser for Crohn’s
and Colitis Foundation
this October: many affordable
household
gadgets, and unique
gift items. To get a
catalogue call 204-8225086 or go to www.
ccfm.shopregal.ca
CAREERS
Are you dependable and resourceful?
Do you have lots of energy, intuition and initiative?
Do you love jewellery? We’d love to hear from you.
APPLY TODAY. PLEASE SEND YOUR RESUME TO
[email protected]
55+ ACTIVITY CENTRE
.ORTH2AILWAY3Ts-ORDEN
9:30A.M.
to
3:30P.M.
FREE ADMISSION
RAINBOW AUCTION
SPONSORED BY MORDEN LIONS CLUB IN SUPPORT OF COMMUNITY PROJECTS
CAREERS
REAL ESTATE
Looking for extra income through the
winter? Or wanting to make a career change?
We have driving opportunities that allow you to
achieve a balance of home time & financial security.
Opportunities for Class 1 Drivers:
·
·
·
Seasonal and Year round
Part-time and Full-time
Company Drivers and Owner Operators
Don’t have your license yet?
We also sponsor and train
full-time company drivers.
Call 1-855-SLT-JOBS or
Email: [email protected]
HIDDEN
Hunter’s Gem
on the Agassiz escarpment
located 10 miles south of Morden.
40 acres (15 airable, 25 bushland).
Includes 16’ x 20’ cabin, diesel
Case tractor with loader, power
generator and 8’ x 8’ storage shed.
$125,000.00
Call Ron Wiebe Agencies
at 204-822-5433
for more details.
As a leader in the Modular Construction Industry and an equal
opportunity employer, we invite you to join our family and experience the value, integrity, and corporate commitment of Grandeur
Housing in a rewarding career as a:
CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER
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The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Classifieds
33
CAREERS
Book Your Classified Ad Today - Call 325-6888 or Email [email protected]
MISCELLANEOUS
MISCELLANEOUS
MISCELLANEOUS
COMING EVENTS
Batteries for everything.
Automotive, farm, construction, ATV, marine,
cycle, golf carts, solar,
phones, tools, radios,
computers etc. Reconditioned, obsolete &
hard-to-find batteries.
SOLAR equipment. The
Battery Man, Winnipeg.
1-877-775-8271 www.
batteryman.ca
Sawmills from only
$4,397 - make money
& save money with
your own bandmill - cut
lumber any dimension.
In stock ready to ship.
Free info & DVD: www.
NorwoodSawmills.
com/400OT 1-800-5666899 Ext: 400OT.
Province-wide
classifieds. Reach over
400,000
readers
weekly. Call us NOW
at 1-204-467-5836 or
email
[email protected]
mcna.com for details.
DEKALB
SuperSpiel
7th Anniversary. November 20 - 24, 2014 at
the Morris Curling Club
and Rosenort Arena.
Teams from Japan,
USA and Canada competing. Including 2014
Olympic Gold Medalists
- Team Jennifer Jones.
For more information
please visit www.morriscurlingclub.org
FINANCIAL SERVICES
Let’s get you moving
forward. Input Capital
infuses your farm with
the capital you need to
start calling your own
shots. 844-715-7355
www.inputcapital.com
Invites applications for a
0.5 FTE Kindergarten
Term Teacher at Rosenfeld
Elementary School,
located in Rosenfeld, MB.
For details visit http://blsd.ca
or www.jobsineducation.com
SAINTS &
SINNERS
COSTUME
RENTALS
At Manitou
Phone 204-242-2941
For appointment visit
www.saintsandsinners.ca
• aluminum
• brass
• zinc
• steel
• e-waste
• lead
• catalytic converters
• stainless steel
• batteries
• copper
www.urbanmine.ca
204.774.0192
72 Rothwell Road
Winnipeg, MB
(1 block south of IKEA)
The trusted name in
metal recycling
AGRICULTURAL
CAREERS
Border Land
School Division
HALLOWEEN
COSTUMES
WE’RE HERE TO SERVE YOU!
Please book your bale grinding dates inn
advance so we can set up our schedule.
e.
We now have 2 Mighty Giant bale grinders by Jones Manufacturing to
cover all of Manitoba on a regular basis. We grind your poor quality
hay, straw, high moisture corn, slough hay, corn straw, and dry grain
for improved feed value. We also grind straw for dairy bedding.
Our grinders do the job quickly & efficiently. If your bale shredder
does not do the job, give us a try.
MIAMI WELDING LTD.
0Hs-ORDEN-"sWWWMIAMIWELDINGCOM
Estate of John Tiessen
As solicitors for the executors for the above estate, we invite TENDERS for the purchase of approximately 79.59 acres of farmland in the RM of
Rhineland described as follows:
If you share our passion for success and high performance, then Viterra is the place for you.
Parcel 2: Approximately 39.59 acres on the
THE N ½ OF THE SE ¼ OF SECTION 30-2-3
WPM (Title No. 2735317/4)
Grain Buyer
Tenders shall be accepted for one or both parcels.
A cheque for $10,000.00 must accompany the tender as a deposit. Written tenders must be received
by 2:00 p.m. on November 7, 2014. Deposit will be
returned if tender not accepted.
We are looking for a self-motivated, results-focused, customer service driven sales professional to join our
team. As the Grain Buyer, you will be responsible for maximizing the sales of grain delivery through direct
contact with clients.
Closing date for the sale shall be 30 days after the
close of tenders, by cash or approved loan proceeds. Any loan advances paid after closing date
are subject to payment of interest at loan rate during reasonable delay for registration of security.
Purchaser shall be responsible for payment of GST
or shall self-assess for GST.
The highest or any tender may not necessarily be
accepted.
ADDRESS: WIENS DOELL LAW OFFICE
P.O. Box 1150
564 Mountain Ave.
Winkler, MB R6W 4B2
Ph. (204) 325-8807
Fx. (204) 325-8352
To the attention of Scott C. Doell
Full time Company and Owner
Operator positions available
The Qualifications for this job are:
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Only selected applicants
will be contacted.
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RTM Transport Ltd.
Box 245 Strathclair, MB R0J 2C0
Fax: 204-365-4753
Attn: Ken Wozney
Email: [email protected]
CAREERS
Greenhouse Assistant
Under the supervision of the Sr. Greenhouse Technician, the successful candidate will be responsible
for assisting in the canola breeding greenhouse
programs. Responsibilities include, but are not
limited to, the following:
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canola plants
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greenhouse plants
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INVITATION TO TENDER
Parcel 1: Approximately 40 acres located on the
N ½ OF N ½ OF SE ¼ 28-1-3 WPM (Title No.
2735318/4)
and
TRUCK DRIVERS
(Full-time, Permanent)
Canola Breeding Program
TENDER
Re:
REQUIRED
Winkler, MB
14105cc01
Ideal candidates have a post-secondary education in agriculture or agri-business and proven experience in
agriculture, customer service and sales. Applicants must also have excellent relationship-building skills and
a Class 5 driver’s licence.
Tracking number 3400.
Viterra offers a competitive salary and benefits plan.
For more information and to apply, please visit Viterra.com.
To be considered for this position, you should:
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organizational skills
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part of a team
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environment would be an asset
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The closing date for applications is November 4, 2014.
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Viterra is Canada’s grain industry leader, supported by the expertise of its people, a superior network of assets, and
unrivalled connections to world markets. Headquartered in Regina, Saskatchewan, our commitment to agriculture goes
back over 100 years, partnering with farmers to market and move their crops to areas of need around the world.
Closing Date: November 14, 2014
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those selected for an interview will be contacted.
Guided by our values of integrity, trust and respect, our goal is to achieve a workforce as diverse as the people we serve.
We encourage aboriginal people, persons with disabilities, women, visible minorities and others to join our team.
Visit Viterra.com
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that breeds new canola varieties for the North
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Check out our website at www.dlseeds.ca
Email resumes to:
[email protected]
34
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Classifieds
Book Your Classified Ad Today
- Call 325-6888 or Email
[email protected]
ANNIVERSARY
ENGAGEMENT
Happy 50th Anniversary Mom and Dad!
-Love, Steve, Bev, Meghan and Taylor,
Marva, Ronald, Victoria and Bauer
Kelly McElroy and Karen Haynes along with
their parents Dale and Evelyn McElroy o
Darlingford, MB and Roger and Marie Haynes
of Franklin, MB; are pleased to announce
their engagement. A November wedding In
Minnedosa, MB is planned.
AUCTION
MORNING HOUSEHOLD
YARD AND TOOL AUCTION AT
144-12TH ST., MORDEN MB.
3!452$!9./6s!-
FOR GEORGE AND HELEN FROESE
WEDDING
WHO ARE DOWNSIZING
14105gg10
Household furniture. Antique Mennonite Shlop Bank,
wooden pull out sleeping bench. Box Telephone, older
radios etc. Allis walk behind snow blower
Very good Yardman Walk behind self-propelled lawn
mower with bagger. Air compressor, some other tools,
aluminum step ladders etc. Propane barbecue
Plastic rain barrels, and oh so much more!
See www.billklassen.com for full listing
Ph: (204) 325-4433
Cell: (204) 325-6230
Fax: (204) 325-4484
Congratulations to Alex and Cam Dueck
on their wedding which was held
on October 11, 2014
God’s blessings as you begin married life!
-With love from,
the Krahn and Dueck families
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The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
Announcements
35
Book Your Classified Ad Today - Call 325-6888 or Email [email protected]
IN MEMORIAM
IN MEMORIAM
OBITUARY
Aganetha “Nettie” Wiens
(nee Peters)
1923 – 2014
On Saturday, October 18, 2014 at the Boundary Trails Health
Centre, Nettie Wiens, aged 90 years, of Winkler, MB formerly of
Reinfeld went to her eternal rest.
She leaves to mourn her passing one daughter, Mary Wiens of
Winkler; two brothers and their families.
She was predeceased by her husband, John C Wiens in 2005,
three sisters and one brother.
Funeral service was held on Saturday, October 25, 2014 at 2:00
pm at the Chortitz Old Colony Mennonite Church with interment at
Reinfeld Cemetery.
Wiebe Funeral Home, Winkler
In care of arrangements
www.wiebefuneralhomes.com
Marcia Snider
November 9, 1976 – October 28, 2103
What we would give for just
one more time to say,
We love you, one more hug,
one last kiss good-bye.
We thought there would be more time,
That somehow you would always be there,
That you could never die.
We know you are in Heaven,
But we love and miss you,
And our hearts still deeply grieve.
We would give anything to have you,
If but for a moment,
Once again here with us.
-All our love,
Dad and Mum,
Dave and Charity,
Mike, Joleen and Jericho
Angela Renee Knelsen
December 15, 1974 - November 2, 2013
Remembering you is easy,
We do it every day;
It’s the pain of losing you,
That will never go away.
Forever Remembered...Forever Loved
-The Goertzen family
Remember Your Loved Ones
with an Announcement in the
Call 204-325-6888 or
[email protected]
OBITUARY
Andrew Loewen
December 9, 1927 – October 21, 2014
Andrew Loewen of Winkler, MB, previously from Elm Creek and Altona, passed away peacefully at Boundary Trails Health Centre on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at the age of 86 years and
10 months.
He was predeceased by his wife Roselyn in May of 1990, as well as by his parents, sisters
Elizabeth and Helen, and brother Jake.
He is survived by four daughters and two sons; daughters Sharon, Shirley, Vera, and Vivian; and
sons Ronald and Mark and their families. He is also survived by his brother Bill; and one sister
Marie, and their families.
Andrew was born on December 9, 1927 in the RM of Montcalm to Wilhelm and Maria Loewen.
He was raised on the family farm and attended school till Grade 8. Hard work and Christian values were taught by his parents and at the age of 14, dad accepted Jesus Christ as his personal
Lord and Saviour. He was baptized upon the confession of his faith and accepted as a member
of the Sommerfeld Mennonite Church in Sommerfeld, at the age of 17.
Dad worked on the family farm until the age of 23, when he married a lovely lady called Roselyn
Heinrichs. They moved to Winnipeg to begin their life together; then returned to the Altona area
in 1956 when his dad became ill and passed away. They purchased the family farm and lived
there for 10 years, then moved to a larger farm at Elm Creek with their family of five children,
where their sixth child was born.
Dad upgraded his education and worked off the farm for many years to support his family. In
1990, after a two year struggle with cancer, mom passed away and dad moved to Winkler. He
continued to work for several years until retirement.
Dad enjoyed spending his time gardening, keeping his yard, and having daily visits and coffee time with his friends at the Winkler Senior Centre. He became ill over the last year, and was
brought to the hospital may times until he was admitted in August of 2014. Dad went to his eternal reward on October 21, 2014 at 7:15 pm.
The family wishes to thank the medical staff at BTHC for their care and compassion for dad in
his brief stay there.
A private family service with burial at the Altona Cemetery has taken place.
Memorial donations may be made to Boundary Trails Health Centre Palliative Care.
Wiebe Funeral Home Altona
in care of arrangements
204-324-5404
OBITUARY
Sarah Hildebrand (nee Krahn)
1925 – 2014
Suddenly on Thursday, October 16th at Boundary Trails Health
Centre, Sarah Hildebrand, aged 89 years, went home to be with
her Lord and Saviour.
She was born January 31, 1925, in Schoeneberg, Ekaterinoslava, Russia and immigrated to Canada with her parents, Jacob D
and Maria Krahn and family in December of the same year. They
first settled in Plum Coulee for a few months and then moved to a
farm south of Winkler (Osterwick), where her childhood years were
spent. Here she grew up with two sisters and two brothers. Mother
received Christ as her personal Saviour in July of 1940 and was
baptized in May of 1945, by Bishop David Schultz and accepted
into the Winkler Bergthaler Church. On August 7th, 1949, she was
united in marriage to Jake Hildebrand of Winkler, where they resided for their first few years together. In the spring of 1954, Sarah and Jake moved to a farm at Manitou, where they lived for 35
years. Here they were members of the Manitou Mennonite Brethren Church. In October of 1988,
Sarah and Jake moved to Morden and in March of 1989, transferred their membership to the
Morden Bergthaler Church. In 1999, Sarah and Jake celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary
with their immediate family. Mom was married to Dad for 56 years and she really missed him
after he was gone. She often told us how she missed him more and more as time went on. One
of Mom’s most important attributes was her faith and her commitment to pray for all her children,
grandchildren and great-grandchildren continuously. Her desire was to see each and every one
of them live in a personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ. Everyone knew that Grandma
loved them and cared for them deeply. She always kept in contact with all of her grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. Whenever she called on the phone, she was always ready to talk to
them. Her selfless love was felt by all of us.
Left to cherish her love and memory are her sons Ray (Nettie) Hildebrand, Rick (Esther) Hildebrand; a special niece Darlene (Vern) Bergen; grandchildren Charlene (Lee) Redpath, Candace
(Steve) Bryce, Joanna (Justin) Roszmann, Ryan (Jessika) Hildebrand; great-grandchildren Sarah,
Emily and Aaron Bryce. Sarah was predeceased by her husband, Jake in 2005; brother, David
Krahn; sister, Mary Baerg; parents, Jacob D and Maria Krahn; sister, Annie Pauls and brother,
Jake Krahn.
We, the family, mourn at the passing of one who was greatly loved and will be sorely missed,
but we sorrow not as those who have no hope. Our hope is in God, our Heavenly Father. Until we
meet again. Love you, Mom.
Funeral service was held on Thursday, October 23rd, 2014 at 2:00 PM at the Morden Mennonite
Church with Rev. Rick Neufeld and Rev. Michael Pahl officiating. Interment followed at Chapel
Cemetery.
We would like to express our heartfelt thanks to all those people who have helped Mom so
much in getting around these last few years. Thank you for taking her to medical appointments,
shopping and even going out for coffee/meals. Thank you for all the kindness extended to our
family during the loss of our Mother, Grandmother and Great Grandmother, Sarah Hildebrand.
Special thanks to pastors Rick Neufeld and Michael Pahl for officiating, the ushers, pianist, special music and Joey Grenier and staff of Wiebe Funeral Home. We would also like to thank the
ladies at Vista Terrace for their quick response calling 911, the ambulance attendants as well
as all the phone calls, visits, food, flowers, cards and donations. Your thoughts and prayers are
greatly appreciated.
-Ray and Nettie Hildebrand and family
Rick and Esther Hildebrand and family
Wiebe Funeral Chapel, Morden
In care of arrangements
www.wiebefuneralhomes.com
36
The Winkler Morden Voice Thursday, October 30, 2014
2009 Acadia SLT
2009 GMC Yukon
SLT 4X4
5.3L V8, Auto,
A/C, Tilt, Cruise,
Power Windows &
Power Door Locks,
Power Driver Seat,
Leather Interior,
Bluetooth, etc.
Stk# 4560A
*Just In*
Inquire
for Price
2009 Chevrolet Silverado
W/T Reg 2WD
2005 F150 FX4 SUPERCAB
FLARESIDE
IF YOU’RE LOOKING
FOR A TOUGH,
NO-NONSENSE
TRUCK AT AN
AFFORDABLE
PRICE, THIS BLACK
FX4 FLARESIDE FITS THE BILL.
5.4L V8, BUCKETS & CONSOLE SHIFT,
POWER DRIVER SEAT, TRAILER TOW AND
18” CHROME WHEELS, ONLY 153,000 KMS
14U125
$13,900
2014 ESCAPE SE AWD
• 2.0L ECOBOOST 4 CYL.
• HEATED SEATS
• PANORAMA ROOF
• NAVIGATION
• REVERSE SENSING
• REVERSE CAMERA
• 18” ALUMINUM
WHEELS
• ONLY 13,000 KMS
$31,900
2011 TAURUS
SEL AWD
• GOLD LEAF
METALLIC
• POWER
MOON ROOF
• SYNC
BLUETOOTH
• HEATED LEATHER
• REVERSE SENSING
• 100,000 KMS
14U133
14U088
$19,500
Permit No. 1162
Since 1955
Alvin Derksen
Bob Peters
Bob Derksen Brian Derksen David Kroeker
690 MEMORIAL DRIVE • 325-4777
WWW.HOMETOWNFORD.CA
Leather
interior,
mag wheels,
chrome
accents, V6
power, 4x4
and more!
090920
$21,900 or $236 biweekly OAC
2011 Escape XLT
Local trade
with
95,000 km,
4x4 and
much more!
4.3L V6, Auto,
A/C, Tilt,
Cruise, Bench
& Cloth Seats,
Steel Wheels,
etc. Stk#
3704A
Inquire
for Price
*Just In*
$16,900 or $158 biweekly OAC
2012 Ford F150 King
Ranch Crew 4X4
Ecoboost V6,
Auto, A/C,
Tilt, Cruise,
Power Windows
& Power Door
Locks, Leather
Interior, Sunroof.
Stk# 4535B
Inquire
for Price
2007 Odyssey Touring
*Loaded*
Inquire
for Price
GPS, leather,
sunroof,
power
sliding
doors and
more!
071183
$19,900 or $215 biweekly OAC
2010 Chevrolet Colorado
Crew LT 4X4
3.7L 5 Cylinder,
4-Speed Auto,
A/C, Tilt, Cruise,
Power Windows &
Power Door Locks,
Cloth & Bucket
Seats, etc.
Stk# 4536C
113523
2008 Pilot SE
*4x4*
VTM 4x4,
alum. wheels,
8 passenger
ready for
winter!
084223
$19,900 or $215 biweekly OAC
HONDA
KURT MILLER
[email protected]
HENRY BLATZ
[email protected]
DON KLIPPENSTEIN
[email protected]
TODD KRASSMAN
[email protected]
KEVIN TALBOT
[email protected]
1-888-305-8917 • 204-325-9511
W W W . J A N Z E N C H E V R O L E T. C A
SCOTT
CHUCK
JODY
HONDA.CA
RANDY
GARTH
WWW.SOUTHLANDHONDA.COM
1-888-246-9153 • 325-7899