HANDBOOK Districtwide Elementary

Elementary
Districtwide
HANDBOOK
2014–2015
Revised 11/6/2014
ADOPTED 10.21.13 - UPDATE ADOPTED 5.5.14
2014-2015 SCHOOL CALENDAR
LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1 — CHEYENNE, WYOMING
s m
6
7
July 2014
t w t f
4
s
1
2
3
8
9
10 11 12
August 2014
s m t w t f
5
3
4
5
6
7
s
1
2
8
9
October 2014
s m t w t f s
September 2014
s m t w t f s
7
1
2
3
8
9
10 11 12 13
4
5
6
5
6
7
1
2
3
8
9
10 11
4
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
27 28 29 30 31
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
28 29 30
26 27 28 29 30 31
January 2015
s m t w t f s
February 2015
s m t w t f s
31
November 2014
s m t w t f s
December 2014
s m t w t f s
1
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
8
9
10 11 12 13
CHRISTMAS
3 4
VACATION
6
3
1
2
3
10
8
9
10 11 12 13 14
4
5
6
7
15 16 17
15
2
3
9
10 11 12 13 14 15
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
11 12 13 14
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
21 22 CHRISTMAS
23
24 25 26 27
VACATION
18 19 20 21
22 23 24
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
28
25 26 27 28
29 30 31
23 24 25 THANKSGIVING
26 27 28 29
30
March 2015
s m t w t f
1
8
2
9
3
4
5
6
s
7
April 2015
s m t w t f
10 11 12 13 14
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
5
END OF
QUARTER/
SEMESTER
HOLIDAYS
PLANNING
OR STAFF
DEVELPM.
CONFERENCES
EARLY
RELEASE
6
s m
7
8
6
7
8
9
10 11
3
4
9
May 2015
t w t f
s
1
2
8
9
5
6
7
17 18 19 20 21
s m
7
June 2015
t w t f
4
5
s
1
2
3
8
9
10 11 12 13
6
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
26 27 28 29 30
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
28 29 30
spring
break
AUGUST
FIRST
DAY OF
SCHOOL
s
5
Spring
2 Break
3 4
7
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
CODES
30 31
4
12–13 • Elementary
31
OCTOBER (CONT.)
31 • Jr. & Sr. High
FEBRUARY
16 • Presidents’ Holiday
JUNE
5 • LAST DAY OF
Conferences, 8–11 a.m.
Address Verification
(No classes, ALL SCHOOLS)
7a.m.–4 p.m.;
(No classes, ALL SCHOOLS)
20 • Staff Development
Junior & Senior High
NOVEMBER
Address Verification &
(No classes, ALL SCHOOLS)
11 • Veterans’ Day,
Schedule Pick-Up -TBA
Early Release, (Planning, MARCH
21 • All Teachers — Building
ALL SCHOOLS)
Staff Development
12 • Early Release,
22 • District Staff Development 26–28 •
(Planning, ALL SCHOOLS)
25 • Planning Day
27 • End of third quarter
Thanksgiving Vacation
26 • FIRST DAY OF CLASSES
(Qtr=47 days)
29 • Nellie T. Ross Birthday
SEPTEMBER
1 • Labor Day holiday
17 • US Constitution Day
OCTOBER
13–14 • Staff Development
(No classes, ALL SCHOOLS)
29 • Early Release,
(Planning, ALL SCHOOLS)
30 • Elementary Parent
/Teacher Conferences
(No elementary classes)
30 • Jr. & Sr.High evening
conferences —End of First
Quarter (Qtr=45days)
DECEMBER
7 • Pearl Harbor Day
10 • Wyoming Day
Dec 22–Jan 2 •
Christmas Vacation
March 30– April 3
Spring Break
APRIL
21 • Early Release,
(Planning, ALL SCHOOLS)
CLASSES
(Qtr=43 days, Sem=90
days,) Any extra snow
days will be made up
after June 5. (Total 176
student contact days, 185
teacher contract days)
4 • Triumph Graduation,
4 p.m.
5 • Central Graduation,
4 p.m
6 • East Graduation,
JANUARY
10 a.m.
MAY
5 • Classes resume
6 •South Graduation,
8 • Native American Day
16 • End of first semester
1 p.m.
(Qtr=41 days, Sem=86 days) 22 • Staff Development day,
Instructional Planning Day
(No classes, SECONDARY
ONLY)
19 • MLK/Equality Day
Holiday (No classes, ALL
SCHOOLS)
(No classes, ALL SCHOOLS) EARLY RELEASE TIMES
or snow make-up day.
25 • Memorial Day Holiday
ELEM • 12:15 p.m.
JH • 11:15 a.m.
HS • 11:15 a.m.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Administrators . . . . . . . .
School Names & Addresses
Board of Trustees . . . . . .
Notifications . . . . . . . . .
Attendance . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
4
4
5
5
6
Registration Requirements, Kindergarten Round-Up, Change
of Address or Phone Number, Absences & Excuses, Student
Release Policy, Parent Pick-Up Areas
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6–9
Breakfast & Lunch Programs, Recess Policy, Telephone Calls,
Lost & Found/Article ID, School Visitation, P.E. Participation,
Personal Equipment & Toys, Cell Phones, LCSD1 Video Camera
Use, Gum/Candy, Birthdays, Before & After School Building Use
Student Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Academically Gifted, Extended & Accelerated Learning, Title I,
Music, Language Arts, Library Services, Computers
Enhancement Activities . . . . . . . . . . . 9–10
Music, Athletics, Field Trips, Science Fair, Geography Bee,
School-to-Careers, Student Organizations,
Activity Fees
Accident Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Opportunities for Involvement . . . . . . 10–11
Open Houses, Parent/Teacher Groups, Parent Volunteers,
Parents on Committees, Parent Climate Survey, Community &
Business Partnerships, Communication/Newsletters
Safe & Drug Free Schools. . . . . . . . . 11–12
WeTip Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Behavior Expectations, School Dress, Playground Conduct,
Conduct on Buses, Weapons, Discipline Procedures
Special Services Programs . . . . . . . . 12–13
Services for Children with Disabilities
Health & Medical Information . . . . . . . 13–15
Nursing Services, Health Records, Confidentiality, Special Needs,
School Attendance & Illness, Illness & Accidents, Head Lice,
Bedbugs, Medications at School, Throat Cultures, Immunizations,
Reporting of Child Abuse, Physical Exams & Insurance, Children’s
Health Insurance Program (Kid Care CHIP)
Emergency/Inclement Weather Plans . . 15–17
Emergency Closing/Early Release, Late Start, Inclement
Weather Boundaries, Crisis Management
Internet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17–18
Implied Consent & Use Policy
Student Directory Information . . . . . . . . 18
Implied Consent for Use Policy
Provisional Enrollment Policy . . . . . . . . 18
elementary
Transportation Services Regulations . . . . 19
Inclement Weather Boundaries . . . . . . 19–20
District Activity & Accountability Reports . . 20
Board Policy Summaries . . . . . . . . . 20–21
Students & Parents Rights, Discipline Policy, Alcohol, Tobacco
and Other Drug Prevention, Violence Prevention, Bullying,
Sexual Harassment, Threats, Weapons, False Accusations,
Complaints Concerning District Personnel
Academic Expectations . . . . . . . . . . 21–22
Grade & Progress Reports, Parent Conferences, Homework,
Make-Up Work, Proficiency Testing, Grading, Honor Rolls
State Academic Standards . . . . . . . . 22–23
State Accountability Assessments
Graduation Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . 23
Hathaway Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Individual School Building Bell Schedules
and Facility Overviews
Afflerbach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Alta Vista. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24–25
Arp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Baggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Bain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25–26
Buffalo Ridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Clawson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Cole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26–27
Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Deming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Dildine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Fairview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Freedom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28–29
Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Goins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Hebard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Hobbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Jessup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Lebhart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Pioneer Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
PODER Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Rossman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Saddle Ridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32–33
Sunrise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Willadsen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Frequently Requested Numbers . . . . . . . 34
School Supply Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . 35–36
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3
ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF
Superintendent of Schools
John Lyttle
2810 House Ave.
Room 130
771-2121
Assistant Superintendent of Instruction—
Dr. Tracey Kinney, Room 128 • 771-2188
Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources—
Matt Strannigan, Room 136 • 771-2163
Assistant Superintendent of Support Operations—
Dave Bartlett, Room 122 • 771-2115
Program Directors
Director of Instruction—
Dr. Marc LaHiff, Room 226 • 771-2123
Director of Special Services—
Alice Hunter, Room 254 • 771-2174
Director of Technology—
Gordon Knopp, Room 356 • 771-2222
Assistant Director of Instruction–Consolidated Grants/At Risk—
Brent Young, Room 231 • 771-2187
Assistant Director of Special Services—
J.P. Denning, Room 256A • 771-2174
Program Administrators
Business Services, Brian Harmsen
Room 118 • 771-2117
Community Relations, Mary Quast
Room 354 • 771-2192 (Information Services)
Facilities & Risk Management, Greg Tucker
3320 Maxwell Ave. • 771-2633 (Safety)
Field Services Management, Scott Cavallier
Room 360 • 771-2133
Finance, Mike Wiggam
Room 116A • 771-2110
Human Resources, Jerod Friedlan
Room 113 • 771-2159
Information Systems/Data Base, Kyle McKinney
Room 154A • 771-2153
Information Technology, Debbie Jacobson
Room 314A • 771-2253
Nutrition Services, Shannon Thompson-Emslie &
Elizabeth Hastings (Meal Programs)
3320 Maxwell Ave. • 771-2440
Planning & Construction, Dennis Auker
Room 113 • 771-2124 (Building Committee)
Transportation, (Busing), Merle Smith
316 Lexington Ave. • 771-2628
Curriculum Coordinators
Art, Lynn Newman • 771-2129
Career & Technical Programs, Jeff Stone • 771-2271
Language Arts: Elementary, Mary Beth Emmons • 771-2432
Language Arts: Secondary, Dr. Karen Delbridge • 771-2140
Math, Kristin Cavallier • 771-2454
Music, Sean Ambrose • 771-2104
Physical Education & Health, John Contos • 771-2255
Science, Melanie Fierro • 771-2604
Social Studies, Mark Quinlivan • 771-2170
World Language, Mary Brummond • 771-2175
4
Secondary School Principals
Central High School, Dr. Stephen Newton
5500 Education Drive • 771-2680
East High School, Sam Mirich
2800 E. Pershing Blvd. • 771-2663
South High School, Phil Thompson
1213 W. Allison Road • 771–2410
Triumph High School, Mike Helenbolt
1250 W. College Drive • 771-2500
Carey Junior High School, Derek Nissen
1780 E. Pershing Blvd. • 771-2580
Johnson Junior High School, John Balow
1236 W. Allison Road • 771-2640
McCormick Junior High School, Jeff Conine
6000 Education Drive • 771-2650
Elementary School Principals
Afflerbach Elementary (K–6), Matt Schlagel
400 W. Wallick Road • 771-2300
Alta Vista Elementary (K–6), Brenda Creel
1514 E. 16th St. • 771-2310
Anderson Elementary (K–6), Jim Fraley
2204 Plain View Road • 771-2606
Arp Elementary (K–6), Donald Brantz
1216 Reiner Court • 771-2365
Baggs Elementary (K–6), Brooke Kelly
3705 Cheyenne St. • 771-2385
Bain Elementary (K–6), Todd Burns
903 Adams Ave. • 771-2525
Buffalo Ridge Elementary (K–6), Greg Garman
5331 Pineridge Ave. • 771-2595
Clawson Elementary (K–6), Harry Petty
376 Road 228A, Horse Creek • 771-2291
Cole Elementary (K–6), Margee Robertson
615 W. 9th St. • 771-2480
Davis Elementary, (K–6), Michael Fullmer
6309 Yellowstone Road • 771-2600
Deming Elementary (K–4), Tony Crecelius
715 W. 5th Ave. • 771-2400
Dildine Elementary (K–6), Mike Wortman
4312 Van Buren Ave. • 771-2320
Fairview Elementary (3–6), Cara Pruter
2801 E. 10th St. • 771-2610
Freedom Elementary, (K–6), Chad Delbridge
4500 Happy Jack Road • 771-2305
Gilchrist Elementary (K–6), Harry Petty
1108 Happy Jack Road • 771-2285
Goins Elementary (K–6), Dr. Joyce Chalstrom
224 Dey Ave. • 771-2620
Hebard Elementary (K–6), Carla Gregorio
413 Seymour Ave. • 771-2450
Henderson Elementary (K–6), Karen Brooks-Lyons
2820 Henderson Drive • 771-2550
Hobbs Elementary (K–6), Randy Hurd
5710 Syracuse Road • 771-2560
Jessup Elementary (K–6), Dr. Barbara Leiseth
6113 Evers Blvd. • 771-2570
Lebhart Elementary (K–2), Cara Pruter
807 Coolidge Road • 771-2614
Miller Elementary (5–6), Tony Crecelius
3501 Evans Ave. • 771-2376
Pioneer Park Elementary (K–6), Dr. April Gates
1407 Cosgriff Court • 771-2316
Rossman Elementary (K–6), Maurice Darnell
916 W. College Drive • 771-2544
Saddle Ridge Elementary (K–6), Eric Jackson
6815 Wilderness Trail • 771-2360
Sunrise Elementary (K–6), Larry Sturgeon
5021 E. 13th St. • 771-2280
Willadsen Elementary (K–6), Harry Petty
645 Harriman Road, Granite Canon • 771-2295
www.laramie1.org
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of Laramie County School District 1, in cooperation with students, parents, staff and the community
is to guarantee a high-quality education in a safe and orderly environment for all students, inspiring them to
become life-long learners and responsible, productive citizens.
LCSD1 Core Values
•
•
•
•
2014 BOARD
OF TRUSTEES
LCSD1 Goals
High expectations
Shared responsibility
Human connection
Maximizing learning
opportunities
Students will:
•
achieve academic success
•
graduate from high school
•
be prepared for college & careers
•
be responsible citizens
USDA and the National School Lunch
Program
The U.S. Department of Agriculture prohibits
discrimination against its customers, employees, and
applicants for employment on the bases of race, color,
national origin, age, disability, sex, gender identity,
religion, reprisal, and where applicable, political
beliefs, marital status, familial or parental status,
sexual orientation, or all or part of an individual’s
income is derived from any public assistance program,
or protected genetic information in employment or in
any program or activity conducted or funded by the
Department.(Not all prohibited bases will apply to all
programs and/or employment activities.)
If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint
of discrimination, complete the USDA Program
Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://
www.ascr.usded.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, or
at any USDA office, or call (866)632-9992 to request
the form. You may also write a letter containing all
of the information requested in the form. Send your
completed complaint form or letter to us by mail
at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office
of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442
or email at [email protected]
Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have
speech disabilities may contact USDA through the
Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339; or (800)
845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA)
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA) affords parents and students over 18 years
of age (“eligible students”) certain rights with respect
to the student’s education records. These rights are:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records
within 45 days of the day the school receives a request for
access. Parents or eligible students should submit to the
school principal (or appropriate school official) a written request
that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The school
official will make arrangements for access and notify the parent
or eligible student of the time and place where the records may
be inspected.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education
records that the parent or eligible student believes are
inaccurate or misleading. Parents or eligible students may ask
the school to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate
or misleading. They should write the school principal (or
appropriate official), clearly identify the part of the record they
want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.
If the school decides not to amend the record as requested by
the parent or eligible student, the school will notify the parent
or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right
to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional
information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided
to the parent or eligible student when notified of the right to a
hearing.
3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable
information contained in the student’s education records,
except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without
consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without
consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate
educational interests. A school official is a person employed
by the school as an administrator, supervisor, instructor, or
support staff member (including health or medical staff and
law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the
school board; a person or company with whom the school
has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney,
auditor, medical consultant, or therapist); or a parent or student
serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or
grievance committee, or assisting another school official in
performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate
educational interest if the official needs to review an education
record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of
Education concerning alleged failures by the school to comply
with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the
office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance
Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave.,
S.W., Washington, DC 20202-4605.
Hank Bailey—Chairman
Sandy Shanor—
Vice Chairman
Anne Beckle—Clerk
LCSD1 Notice of Nondiscrimination
Laramie County School District 1 does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender,
religion, national origin, disability or age in admission
or access to, or treatment, or employment in,
its educational programs or activities. Inquiries
concerning Title VI and Title IX may be referred to
the LCSD1 Assistant Superintendent of Human
Resources located in the Administration Building
at 2810 House Ave., or phone 771-2160. Inquiries
concerning Section 504 may be referred to the LCSD1
Assistant Director of Special Services located in the
Administration Building at 2810 House Ave., or phone
771-2174.
Asbestos Notification
In accordance with the Asbestos Hazard Emergency
Response Act/Environmental Protection Agency—
40CFR Part 763, Laramie County School District 1
is hereby notifying the general public and employees
of the presence of asbestos containing materials
within buildings owned and operated by this district.
Asbestos management plans, with a summary of
material locations, friability, response action and
inspection schedules, are available in the main
office of each facility. Questions may be directed
to the district facility manager by calling 7712633.
Nate Breen—
Assist. Clerk
Tim Bolin—Treasurer
Lynn Storey-Huylar—
Assist. Treasurer
Hathaway Notification
The State of Wyoming
provides Hathaway Merit and
Needs-based Scholarships
to Wyoming students attending the University of
Wyoming and Wyoming Community Colleges. Every
student who meets the merit requirements can earn
a Hathaway Merit Scholarship. Contact your school
counselor for more information.
Mark Klaassen—
Trustee
The districtwide Elementary School Parent Handbook is prepared by the LCSD1 Community Relations
Office. However, all content inquiries should be directed to your school principal. ©2014
elementary
5
ATTENDANCE
Registration Requirements
New students must have up-to-date immunizations.
Parents must bring verification of address to their
child’s attendance-area school as well as sign a
form for records release from the school previously
attended.
Returning Students—Electronic registration is
held in the spring. In mid-August, parents must bring
verification of address to their child’s attendance-area
school. Classroom placement is at the discretion of
the principal. It is suggested that parents discuss their
requests for classroom placement before the end of the
current school year and provide specific reasons.
Verification of Home Address—Documentation should
be a current rent receipt, utility bill, phone bill, credit card or
bank statement in the parents’/guardians’ name.
Kindergarten Round-Up—
Each April, the district’s elementary schools hold
kindergarten round-up in conjunction with electronic
registration. This allows parents and students to see
the school and participate in the kindergarten screening
process.
Students entering kindergarten must be 5 years old
by Sept. 15 of the current year. Parents should bring
the following documentation:
 An up-to-date immunization record
 Verification of home address
 A copy of the child’s birth certificate
 The child’s social security card
Change of Address or Phone Number
It is important to let the school office know as soon as
possible if the family has moved or is planning a move.
Please immediately notify the building principal about
a change of address or telephone number whether or
not a change in attendance area is involved. Up-to-date
information is vital in the event of illness or emergency.
Providing notification several days prior to a transfer
allows for the easiest transition for your child. This also
gives the teacher time to prepare grades and other
documentation for the student’s permanent records.
Absences & Excuses
Regular attendance is essential to a student’s
success in school. Most subjects are taught in
sequence, requiring the understanding of each
concept in the order of presentation. A missed school
day cannot be made up by simply doing the written
work that is missed. Absences/tardies create a
genuine hardship for a student. (See Make-up Work in
Academic Expectations on Page 22.)
Excused & Unexcused—According to state law, all
school-age children are to be in attendance except for
the following reasons: illness, medical care, injury or
other emergencies, activities or events beyond parental
control. Final administrative determination of whether
6
an absence/tardy is excused or unexcused is made by
the district attendance officer.
According to board policy, an elementary student
must bring an excuse signed by a parent or guardian
when returning to school after each absence.
Excessive absences or equivalent unexcused
tardies are reported to the district attorney. After
10 consecutive absences, students are placed on
academic probation which may result in the loss of
credit.
Family vacations or hunting trips are not an
excused absence. For special circumstances prior
arrangements must be made with and approved by the
building principal.
Tardies—If a student is going to be late, we ask
that a parent call the office. If a student is frequently
late, the principal will contact the parents by letter.
If tardies persist, a conference will be held with the
parent, student and principal to discuss possible
solutions to the problem. According to board policy,
three unexcused tardies are equal to one unexcused
absence. (See your school’s bell schedule on Pages
24–33.)
ChildSafe Calling Program—All parents are asked
to call the school no later than 9 a.m. on any day their
child will be absent. Please call each day your child is
absent. This program is designed to keep children safe
by making sure that absent students are safe at home
and not lost or otherwise missing.
Student Release During School Hours
Students are not permitted to leave during the school
day without written authorization from a parent. When
the student is picked up, the parent must come into the
school office to sign out the student. Early dismissals
are recorded as tardies.
Student Release to Other than a Parent
Students are not released to the custody of anyone
other than a parent, a court appointed guardian or their
designee—designation must be in writing.
Students of estranged parents shall be released only at
the request of the parent who has primary custody of the
student pursuant to court order and who is designated as
parent or guardian of the student on school records.
If a bus student is to go home a different way, a
permission note must be sent to the teacher.
Parent Pick-Up Areas/Traffic Safety Plan
A map showing student loading zones for private
vehicles is provided at your school. Please park in the
designated area or the parking lot to avoid blocking
crosswalks or bus lanes.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Breakfast & Lunch Programs
Lunch and breakfast service is provided to all
elementary schools except Willadsen and Clawson.
Miller students may take a bus to Deming for breakfast.
www.laramie1.org
Menus and prices are available online through the
district website at http://nutrition.laramie1.org where the
menu can be printed or e-mailed.
Payment—All schools use a computerized payment
and meal accounting system that credits each student
account. Making payments during meal periods
slows service to students. To ensure adequate time
for students to consume meals, payments should be
made in the cafeteria before school. Please include
the student’s full name and student ID number on the
check and make the check out to Nutrition Services.
Checks may be written to cover multiple student
accounts at the same campus as long as all ID
numbers and amounts are written in the memo portion
of the check. Payments can also be made electronically
on the payment website listed at
http://nutrition.laramie1.org for a nominal fee. This
website offers the ability to see a student’s purchases
and set up e-mail reminders when a student’s balance
is low, at no additional cost.
Charges—If students do not have money in their
meal account, Nutrition Services will allow up to two
“loaner” lunches to be charged on their account.
Parents/guardians must pay the negative charge
accounts promptly. Students will be provided a
designated alternative meal when loaner limit is
exceeded. Breakfast and a la carte items may not be
charged. Parents/guardians are responsible to maintain
their child’s account throughout the entire school year.
Loaner notices are sent once a week—please check
your child’s backpack or use the payment website listed
at http://nutrition.laramie1.org to manage your student’s
account. In order to finalize student accounts before
summer break, loaners will not be allowed after the
third Monday in May each school year.
Non-Sufficient Fund Check Policy—Non-sufficient
fund (NSF) checks include any check written to pay for
student meals and returned to Nutrition Services from
the bank stating that the check has not been paid. This
can happen for insufficient funds, closed account, stop
payment, etc. In order to reduce the burden on the
parent or guardian, any NSF check will not be charged
a processing fee by Nutrition Services. The intended
amount of the check will be removed from the student’s
account upon receipt of the returned check from the
bank. If this causes the student’s meal account to
become negative, the student will not be able to charge
a meal and will be offered the appropriate “alternate
meal.” Nutrition Services will attempt to contact the
parent or guardian by phone the same day the check
is removed from the student’s account. The parent will
be notified of the new account balance. In order for
the student to purchase a meal, the parent or guardian
must deposit additional funds to bring the student’s
account to an adequate amount to cover the cost of the
meal. In the case of this causing the student’s account
to become negative, the parent or guardian will have
to pay the debt to the account. After an NSF check is
received from the parent/guardian, Nutrition Services
will not accept checks from this parent or guardian
for the remainder of the school year. The parent or
elementary
guardian must pay in cash at the school or by credit
card or debit card online. The parent/guardian may
write checks the following school year.
Cold Lunches—Student’s names should be on their
lunch bags or boxes. Milk, vegetables, fruit and limited
a la carte may be purchased. Food items from home
cannot be reheated at school.
Free and Reduced Price Meals—If a family would
like to be considered to receive free- or reducedpriced meals for their student, a new application
must be filed every year with the Nutrition Services
office. Households receiving notification of “Direct
Certification” do not need to complete a meal
application. If some students are missing from your
Direct Certification notification, contact the Nutrition
Services office to update household information.
Applications are available at the Nutrition Services
offices and online through the district website and
at www.applyforlunch.com. Online applications are
processed faster and are recommended for emergency
situations. Families are expected to pay for meals until
their application is approved, which can be up to 10
days. Any meals charged before the application was
approved must be paid in full. Families may apply at
any time throughout the school year. If you need help
filling out an application, call 771-2440.
Meal Service—Students will be offered five daily
food groups including protein, whole grains, fruit,
vegetables and milk. They must select three of the five
food groups in order to receive the unit meal price. Of
the three selected, one must be a fruit or vegetable.
Students who do not select the required components
will be charged for items at a la carte pricing. Please
encourage students to select a fruit or vegetable daily
with meals.
Seconds—If available at the end of service, seconds
will be offered as follows: Fruits and vegetables will be
offered at no charge. Entrees, bread, milk and dessert
items will be available at a la carte pricing.
Students Leaving the District—Please take care of
your lunch account prior to your last day. Any student
that leaves LCSD1 may find a delay in receiving
student records at their new location when owing
money on their lunch account. Students that have
money remaining on their lunch account should notify
their school cashier as soon as possible for a refund.
Graduating students may transfer money to a sibling by
calling Nutrition Services at 771-2440. Seniors—avoid
the last minute rush. If you don’t use your lunch
account, see your cafeteria kitchen manager or cashier
for a refund.
Recess Policy
Students will be outside any time the wind chill is
above 0°. Please make sure your child(ren) is dressed
in warm clothing during cold weather. Snow boots or
overshoes, gloves, hats and coats should be worn. All
students are expected to participate in recess unless
excused due to health restrictions. A written request
from your family’s doctor is required if a student is to
stay in for recess.
7
Telephone Calls
Telephones may be used with permission from
the student’s teacher or the principal. This is usually
reserved only for important or emergency calls.
Arrangements for after-school activities should be
made prior to coming to school.
If messages from parents for students are not called
in before 2:30 p.m., the student may not receive the
message before the end of the school day.
If teachers cannot be reached, messages will be
taken by office staff. Teachers make every effort to
return calls as soon as possible. Generally, the best
times for calling are 8–8:35 a.m. or 3:35–4 p.m.
Lost & Found/Article Identification
A lost and found box is located in each building. In
order to ensure lost articles are returned to the owner,
the student’s name should be sewn or marked on all
clothing, backpacks, etc. Smaller items and money will
be kept in the office. Parents should check the lost and
found if they are missing an item. The lost and found is
cleaned out on a regular basis and the items are taken
to a local charity.
School Visitation
School safety is paramount to the Board of Trustees.
All school visitors must check in at the office, sign in
and receive a visitor pass. While parents are always
welcome and encouraged to visit the school, it is
helpful if prior arrangements are made with the teacher
or principal so the visitation can be coordinated with the
class schedule.
Since playground supervisors do not know all
parents, please do not come to the playground to visit
with your child without notifying the front office.
School-age children from another school (including
siblings) or from out of town are not permitted to visit or
attend school with your child.
Physical Education Participation
If illness, injury or a medical problem limits
participation in P.E., please send a note of explanation
from your doctor describing the physical problem, and
the limit and duration of restrictions. Also, send a note
when the child can return to full activity.
Personal Equipment & Toys
Students who ride bicycles to school are not to ride
them on the school grounds at any time during the
school day. It is the student’s responsibility to provide
a chain and lock for the bicycle. The school/district is
not responsible for lost, stolen or damaged personal
items—all should have the student’s name on them.
Toys and soft items such as basketballs, footballs,
soccer, tennis or nerf balls, or jump ropes are
discouraged. The district cannot be held responsible
for damage or loss. Skateboards, rollerblades, hockey
sticks, hard balls and bats, or toys are not allowed at
school at any time.
8
Possession & use of portable electronic
devices, including cellular phones—
 Students shall have no expectation of privacy in the
possession of a portable electronic device which is
used in violation of district policies, regulations and
rules.
 The safe-keeping of portable electronic devices is
the sole responsibility of the student. The district is
not responsible for damage or loss.
 Portable electronic devices may be used in support
of instruction as approved by district staff in
accordance with district policies, regulations and
rules.
 Portable electronic devices may be used by
students during the time in the morning before the
school day starts, after the school day ends, and in
the case of emergency.
 Portable electronic devices may not be used to
interfere with the education environment, cause
disruption to the district, or threaten.
 Students are required to turn portal electronic
devices over to school personnel when requested.
 Certain school-specific rules may apply. Visit with
your school for details.
LCSD1 Video Camera Use
Maintaining the health, welfare and safety of
students, staff and visitors and the protection of
school district properties shall be the prime factors in
placement of video-only cameras and recorders into
school-district-operated facilities, grounds and vehicles.
Additionally, buses are fitted with audio monitoring
equipment. Video monitoring will be used before,
during and after the regular school day. By installing a
video camera monitoring system, it is the district’s plan
to achieve the following:
 A safer teaching and learning environment.
 The ability to target problem areas related to safety
and security.
 Decrease the cost from incidents of graffiti,
vandalism and burglary; and to deal with behavior
issues.
Gum & Candy
Gum and candy are not allowed at school except with
prior permission from the teacher for special occasions.
Birthdays
School birthday celebrations are usually limited
to the child bringing individual treats for the class. A
suggested list of healthy snacks is available on the
Nutrition Services website, http://nutrition.laramie1.org.
Any celebration or party invitation distribution must be
approved by the principal and teacher prior to bringing
them to school. With permission, invitations may be
distributed only if the whole class receives one, or if
all the boys or all the girls in the class receive one.
Names, addresses and phone numbers should not be
requested from the teacher.
www.laramie1.org
Before/After School Building Use
Guidelines
It is very important for students to want to be at
school and to feel comfortable with being in the
building. The district encourages students to take
advantage of after school activities. However, due to
supervision and safety concerns, students not involved
in an approved activity must leave school property
directly after dismissal. Students should not arrive at
school prior to the designated arrival time. Please visit
with your school regarding its specific policies.
STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
Academically Gifted Program
The K–6 Trailblazer program offers a learning
environment of enrichment and acceleration to
academic high-potential students. Focusing on
the each child’s unique characteristics, grade- and
ability-appropriate programs reinforce, practice and
extend these qualities. The content of the Trailblazer
curriculum is compacted and accelerated using a
variety of approaches and strategies. The program is
located at both Pioneer Park and Afflerbach Elementary
schools
Extended & Accelerated Learning
Programs
Many schools in our district have extended-day
programs such as morning learning labs, after-school
tutoring and other programs to develop skills in
specific content areas. In addition, there are classroom
intervention programs to assist students in language
arts and math. At-risk students have access to summer
school and support through the Building Intervention
Team. Please contact the building principal to find out
what is available to help your student at school.
Title I
Title I is the oldest federal program included in the
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. This
program was reauthorized in 1994 under the Improving
America’s Schools Act. Title I is designed to help
disadvantaged children meet the challenging content
and performance standards set by the State and District
in the areas of reading/language arts and math.
The program provides financial assistance to schools
based on the number of children from low-income
families living in that attendance area. Although the
achievement gap between disadvantaged children
and other children has decreased over the past 20
years, many children in our society lack the educational
opportunity and resources to become well educated.
The following schools receive Title I funds: Afflerbach,
Alta Vista, Arp, Baggs, Cole, Fairview, Goins, Hebard,
Lebhart, Pioneer Park, PODER Academy (Charter),
Rossman and Johnson Junior High.
Parents are an integral part of a Title I schoolwide
program. Contact your school to become involved.
elementary
Music
Band instruction is offered in grades 5–6.
Instrumental choices include flute, clarinet, oboe,
saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, baritone
and percussion. Percussion students should have
two years of piano study prior to or concurrent with
instrumental lessons. (See Activity Fees on Page 10.)
Orchestra instruction on string instruments is offered
to students in grades 4–6. They learn many styles
of music ranging from classical to old-time fiddle.
Instrument choices include violin, viola, cello and string
bass. (Also see Music Enrichment on this page.)
Students who participate in band or strings are
expected to complete all class work missed during
lessons or practice sessions. They are out of their
classrooms for two 30-minute lessons a week.
Language Arts
Spelling Bee—Every building has a spelling coach
that works with spellers who would like to compete in
the Laramie County Spelling Bee. A state contest is
held in March.
Library Services
All schools, except Willadsen and Clawson, have a
library available for student and parent use. Parents
are encouraged to visit the library with their child and
check out reading material.
A parent lending library that includes videos, audio
tapes, books and pamphlets on parenting is available
at some schools.
Computers
Students frequently participate in technology-assisted
learning activities. These activities utilize computers
and other technology-based tools. All schools have
computers in classrooms and traditional and/or mobile
computer labs large enough to accommodate an entire
class. These computers are connected to the district
network and the Internet. Technology-based resources
include: reference materials, curricular reinforcement/
enrichment, presentation creation, data collection,
data processing, work processing and various forms of
communication/collaboration.
ENHANCEMENT ACTIVITIES
Music Enrichment
A variety of co-curricular events are available to
students in grades K–6. Solo and ensemble festivals
are provided for band, choir and orchestra. In addition,
select students in grades 5–6 participate in the citywide
band, choir and orchestra clinics held each year as
part of “Music in Our Schools Month” festivities. Some
schools may offer extracurricular choir, handbell, Orff (a
teaching methodology) and percussion ensembles on a
volunteer basis.
9
Athletics
Activity Fees
An after-school sports program is available to boys
and girls in grades 5–6. The sports seasons may
include the following: flag football, girls’ basketball,
boys’ basketball, girls’ volleyball, track and field. Track
and field is also open to fourth-grade boys and girls.
Some elementary schools participate in competitive
sports with other schools in the city. Permission
slips are required before participation is permitted. If
uniforms are worn, they are issued through the school.
Students are to return clean uniforms at the completion
of their activity. Wearing jewelry during contests is
prohibited.
All participants are expected to maintain passing
grades in the classroom. If a student fails to achieve
at his/her ability level, he/she may be dismissed from
practices and/or games. The classroom teacher, coach
and/or principal will make the decision.
If students choose to be involved in activities such
as bowling, swimming or skating, they will be asked to
assist with payment.
Music—Rental and/or damage fees are collected
for any available musical instruments. (The district
provides a limited number of instruments based on
availability and need. Local music stores are the
common providers of instruments for band and string
instruction.)
Field Trips
Field trips that are aligned to district curricular
units are scheduled by various classroom teachers.
Students must return a signed district permission slip
to participate. Written substitutes or phone calls are
unacceptable. It is the student’s responsibility to make
sure permission slips are returned. Parent chaperones
are welcome; however, there are space limitations on
the activity buses.
Science Fair
The best way for students to learn science is to
“do” science. Science fairs provide students with the
opportunity to engage in the process of scientific
inquiry and experimentation. Each year, schools may
choose to conduct a science fair at the building level
for grades 4–6. Projects are judged at the school level
for advancement to the districtwide elementary science
fair. Sixth-grade students compete to advance to the
junior division of the regional science fair.
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
The school district does not carry accident insurance
to cover students injured at school, for physical
education classes, or on school-sponsored activities.
Parents are responsible for insurance coverage for
these activities. The following options are available to
parents for accident insurance:
 Wyoming Covering Kids, 777-7574
 Student Assurance Services, Inc., call 800-328-2739,
or 771-2169. Check with your school’s office personnel
regarding purchasing accident coverage.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
INVOLVEMENT
Open Houses
At the beginning of the school year, every elementary
school holds an open house for families and students.
This is an excellent opportunity to meet all school
staff members and tour the facility. In addition,
some schools also have grade-level, parent open
houses to communicate class and building goals, the
academic program, and classroom organization and
management.
Geography Bee
Parent/Teacher Groups
Each January or February some schools participate
in the geography bee, a nationwide knowledge contest
directed by the National Geographic Society. Designed
to encourage the study of geography, students have
the opportunity to compete at the school, state and
national level.
Most schools have parent/teacher organizations/
associations (PTO/PTA). Others have less formal
groups. Please contact the school office for information
about the parent group specific to your school. The
district strongly encourages parents to be involved in
their child’s educational environment.
School-to-Careers
Parent Volunteers
In grades K–6, students are given an opportunity to
participate in school-to-career programs. For example,
business community speakers visit with students
regarding different careers.
Parents volunteer in a variety of ways. Parent
participation supports student success—ask the
teacher or principal what the needs of your child’s
classroom or school are and become involved!
Student Organizations
Parents on Committees
Some schools have student councils with
representatives from grades 4–6. Council members
participate in activities such as campaigning, managing
and funding special events and school improvement
projects. Contact your school to find out what student
organization is available for your child.
Parents are invited to participate in the following
committees: the district parent advisory council, the
building collaborative decision-making team, the district
and building school improvement teams, curriculum
committees, the district calendar, policy and building
advisory teams, and the AdvancEd school improvement
team.
10
www.laramie1.org
Two parents from each school serve on the
districtwide Parent Advisory Council. Contact your
building representative, whose name is available
from your principal or the council chairperson, if you
are interested in serving on a committee. Contact the
superintendent’s office for information about serving on
a committee or the Parent Advisory Council.
its program in order to offer high-quality, research
based services that meet the needs of schools and the
community. Programs are aimed at preventing high-risk
activities, such as teen drug use, bullying and other
types of violence. Included are services that encourage
parent participation and community involvement as well
as training for school staff.
Parent Climate Survey
CLICK
Participation in the school’s periodic parent survey
ensures that your perceptions of the school learning
climate are considered. Parent and student surveys
also provide the individual building’s collaborative
decision-making and school improvement teams with a
valuable source of information.
High school students mentor younger students to
encourage them to wear seatbelts, avoid distracted
driving and make good choices.
Community Partnerships
Schools have a variety of community partnership
programs such as a grandparent volunteer program,
civic group readers and mentors, evening computer
labs for families and other programs. In addition,
some schools will partner with the Laramie County
Community Partnership to provide afterschool
programs at an affordable cost.
Business Partnerships
If parents are business owners or employees of
businesses that want to support education, they are
encouraged to become an Adopt-A-School partner. The
program promotes community support for education by
developing links among schools, businesses and public
agencies in addition to providing expanded educational
opportunities for students. For a program brochure or
information on how to become a partner contact the
LCSD1 Community Relations Office.
Each August, Operation Back-to-School provides
school supplies for students participating in the freeand reduced-lunch program. Local business support
helps make this program possible.
Community/School Health Fairs
Free prevention materials are provided to members
of the community who attend the local health fair.
Cyber Bullying
A prevention curriculum to teach students about
cyber bullying and skills to treat each other respectfully.
Elementary Prevention Kits
Kits are circulated throughout all elementary schools
to provide alcohol, tobacco, drug use and violence
prevention materials to classrooms.
Faux Paw-Techno Cat
A computer based program that teaches children
Internet safety.
Governor’s Health & Fitness Day
District students attend this event, which is held by
the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.
Boys and girls visit numerous nutrition and education
stations and participate in physical fitness activities.
Gun Safety
LCSD1’s elementary facilitator and a Cheyenne
Police Department representative present gun safety
information to elementary students.
Communication/Newsletters
Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
Every school has a building newsletter that is
e-mailed, posted online or sent home on a regular
basis. The newsletter is a good source of information
about activities/events, schedules or schedule
changes, outstanding student and staff achievements,
the honor roll and news about what is happening in
your child’s school. Parents are encouraged to read
the newsletter with their children. Additional notices
regarding other events are sent home and posted
online.
Districtwide program to reduce bullying behaviors
and improve school climate.
SAFE & DRUG-FREE
SCHOOLS
Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities
(SDFSC) is committed to ensuring all district schools
are safe, disciplined and drug free. Prevention is
the district model for helping youth grow up to be
healthy and successful. SDFSC continually modifies
elementary
Peaceful School Bus
A curriculum that helps drivers deal with bullying on
school buses.
Red Ribbon Week
A community campaign to educate students on the
hazards of alcohol, tobacco, drug use and violence.
Safe Kids Day
A community health fair that teaches safety
awareness.
Second Step
An evidence-based violence prevention curriculum
that teaches students social emotional skills needed for
success.
11
Talking about Touching
An evidence-based curriculum that teaches about
bicycle safety, fire emergencies, safe touch and how to
ask for help in uncomfortable situations.
WETIP HOTLINE
LCSD1 provides a 24-hour hotline that allows
students, parents or concerned citizens to
anonymously report threats against themselves
or someone they know, or of theft or vandalism
of school property. Rewards are offered for
information leading to the arrest and conviction of
individuals committing a crime.
Call (1-800-78-CRIME or 1-800-782-7463,
1-855-86-BULLY or www.wetip.com).
STUDENT CONDUCT
Behavior Expectations
Safety is a primary concern on the playground, in the
halls, gym and lunchroom, as well as in the classroom.
Students are expected to demonstrate respect for
themselves, others and school property. In addition,
appropriate conduct, manners and language are
expected.
Schoolwide expectations for students are generally
to follow directions; to keep hands, feet and objects
to themselves; to stay in their assigned places; to
respect adults and classmates; and to complete all
assignments on time. (See your building’s Student
Expectation Handbook for more specific rules.)
School Dress
Clothing with suggestive language, alcohol, tobacco
or illegal substance logos is not allowed. Revealing
clothing is not allowed. Extremely baggy pants or long
shirts that cause safety concerns are also not allowed.
Any gang-related clothing is strictly forbidden. At the
junior and senior high levels, your student’s planner
has dress guidelines specific to your child’s school.
If you have questions at the elementary level, please
contact your school.
Playground Conduct
Students are expected to respect one another’s
games and activities. No wrestling, tackling,
piggybacking, shoving, pulling or other rough play
is allowed. No throwing of snowballs, sticks, rocks
or other objects that could be dangerous is allowed.
Playground equipment is to be used only for the activity
intended. (See specific site rules in your building’s
Student Expectation Handbook.)
Conduct on Buses
Students who use district-provided transportation
are required to follow the posted regulations and the
12
directions of the bus driver. Students who violate the
bus rules will receive a formal warning notice for the
first offense. Students who continually violate district
bus behavior expectations and/or create a safety issue
will have their bus privileges suspended for a period of
time depending upon the violation. (See Transportation
Regulations on Page 19.)
Weapons
Possession of weapons on District property or
at school functions are grounds for suspension or
expulsion. A weapon is defined as any device that
is used to injure, or is reasonably capable of injuring
another person or a person’s belongings. Please
communicate to your child that it is important that
school campuses are safe and free of all weapons
or instruments that may be considered weapons.
In addition to firearms and explosives, possession
of knives or stabbing tools is grounds for long term
suspension or expulsion. Please review Sections 14
and 25 in Chapter 8 of District Policy and Summaries
on Pages 20–21.
Discipline Procedures
Although all schools follow board policy guidelines,
each has a specific discipline plan dictated by student
population. The building discipline plan and procedures
policy is in your school’s Student Expectations
Handbook, which also includes a letter from your
principal, the school mission statement, the school
improvement goals, the shared responsibility/learning
agreement or compact, site specific rules and the
school staff list.
(Also see Board Policy Summaries on Pages 20–21.)
SPECIAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
Special education services in Laramie County
School District 1 include complete and comprehensive
programs and service options. The district takes great
pride in the professional commitment of staff, variety
of services and quality of programs available to all
students with disabilities in our district.
LCSD1 provides services to educationally disabled
children in full compliance with regulations and
requirements of the Wyoming Department of Education
(WDE) and the federal mandates as outlined in the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
All students with disabilities for whom LCSD1 has
educational responsibility will receive a free and
appropriate public education.
Who is eligible?—Any student is eligible when
identified within one of the categories of disability
as defined under state and federal definition. This
determination is made by qualified professionals.
Eligibility Classifications—The categories of
disability, which must be met in order for students to
qualify for special education include: autism, deaf-
www.laramie1.org
blindness, deafness, emotional disability, hard of
hearing, learning disability, mental disability, multiple
disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health
impairment, speech/language impairment, traumatic
brain injury and visual impairment.
Districtwide Programs
 Child Find locates children with disabilities.
 Adaptive Living Skills Programs provide
individualized educational instruction for students
defined as moderately or severely intellectually
disabled.
 Day Treatment Programs provide special
learning opportunities for students with emotional
or behavioral challenges who cannot function
effectively in the general education classroom.
Related Services
 Psychological Services’ provides diagnostic
evaluations by certified staff and assesses students
for educational disabilities.
 Social Work Services assists students with
school, home or community problems that
influence the student’s adjustment in school.
 Counseling and Guidance Services assists
students in making decisions affecting their
education, personal adjustment and future
vocational plans.
 Audiology provides diagnostic services to
students suspected of having hearing or auditory
processing impairments.
 Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Services provides
instruction for students who are identified as deaf
or hard of hearing and cannot benefit fully from
regular education programs without support.
 Speech and Language Therapy provides
remedial services to students who exhibit speech/
language delays or deficiencies, fluency problems
or voice disorders.
 Visual Impairment Services assists classroom
teachers with support and accommodations and
provides specifically designed individual instruction
to students who are visually impaired.
 Occupational/Physical Therapy provides
screening, evaluation and intervention designed
to service students identified as eligible for special
education services.
 Adaptive Physical Education Program provides
developmental activities, games and sports suited
to the interests, abilities and limitations of students
with disabilities who may not safely or successfully
engage in the general physical education program.
 School Health Services’ provides health services
to district students and promotes good health as
well as disease and injury prevention.
 Transition Services prepares special education
students with skills and services needed to be
successful in their transition from school to work
and/or post-secondary education and training.
elementary
Support Services
 Homebound Instructional Services provides
teachers for students who may be absent from
school for an extended period of time.
 Specialized Transportation Services are
available for students with disabilities who are
unable to access regular transportation options.
HEALTH AND MEDICAL
INFORMATION
Nursing Services
All schools in LCSD1 have a Registered Nurse
(RN) who is assigned to each building. Although
most elementary buildings do not have a full-time
nurse, a nurse can be reached by phone as needed.
Paraprofessionals and secretaries at all schools assist
the school nurses in their absence.
Health Records
Upon entering LCSD1, a health record is established
by the nurses for each student. The health record
contains information regarding the students’ individual
health needs, immunizations and allergies. Records
indicating the need for accommodations for the student
are also maintained. Please make sure the school
nurse is aware of any conditions/situations which may
prohibit your student from participating in normal school
activities.
Also included in the health record are the results
of routine screenings done by the nursing staff. This
includes hearing, vision, height, weight and, in some
cases, blood pressure screenings. Scoliosis screenings
will be done only by staff or parent referral. Any
abnormal screenings are reported to parents/guardians
so that follow-up can be planned with the student’s
health care provider. If you don’t want your student
screened, you must notify the school nurse in writing
each year.
The health record is maintained until the student
graduates, is projected to graduate or leaves the
district. If the student leaves the district, upon request,
health records can be forwarded to the new school.
Only immunization records are kept in state archives
after graduation.
Confidentiality
The information contained in each student’s health
record is considered confidential and is treated as
such. For the safety of your student, the school nurses
share confidential information with identified staff only
on a “need-to-know basis.” For example, teachers and
staff need to know if a child has: asthma, diabetes,
ADHD/ADD or seizures so that they can be prepared
to react if a child needs medical help. In this way, your
student can quickly receive the health services needed
to be successful in school.
13
Students with Special Health Care Needs
The school nurse will work with you and your student
to make necessary accommodations according to
specific medical needs. Every year students come
to school with casts or on crutches, or following
hospitalization/surgery. Notify your school nurse if
this happens and your student needs help with things
like wheelchair use, excuses from physical education
classes, a transportation plan, etc. Parents/guardians
must notify coaches and field trip sponsors of any of
their student’s health care needs.
School Attendance & Illness
When an illness prevents a student from going
to school, notify the school when the student is
absent. Keep in mind your student could cause entire
classrooms and school staff to become sick. Generally,
students with fever, vomiting, nausea, chills, repeated
diarrhea, severe cough, earache, severe sore throat,
skin rash or draining sores need to stay home until 24
hours after the symptoms go away or treatment has
begun. If you have questions, call your school nurse for
guidance.
If these symptoms remain longer than a day, contact
your health-care provider to see if your student needs
to be evaluated. In cases of certain communicable
diseases (example: strep throat, pink eye) students can
be re-admitted to school after the school nurse reviews
a note from the health-care provider and/or sees the
student. It is extremely important that all medicines
prescribed by the health-care provider are completed.
The State Department of Health has identified certain
diseases as “reportable diseases” (example: chicken
pox). As necessary, the head nurse or designee
may notify the State Health Department when these
diseases occur so the outbreak can be tracked.
Illnesses and Accidents at School
Parents will be notified if a student becomes too sick
to remain at school. First-Aid treatment is available
for minor accidents or injuries. Staff or school nurses
will notify parents if they need to follow up on an injury
or illness. If your student is hurt at school, encourage
your student to tell an adult immediately. In the case of
serious injuries or illnesses, parents will be immediately
notified. If parents cannot be reached, the emergency
numbers listed by parents will be contacted. Staff may
call 911 if the nurse or administrator determines that it
is needed for potentially life-threatening conditions.
Please make sure all phone numbers are current and
the school knows your back-up plans if you are out of
town or work out of town.
School Attendance and Head Lice
School nurses evaluate the presence of live lice
or their eggs (nits) on students as the need arises.
Current national recommendations and research has
shown the incidence of the spread of lice at schools
is rare and no longer recommends screening of entire
classrooms and schools. If a student has lice and/or
14
nits, parents will be notified to treat their student and,
if necessary, their siblings and household members.
The school nurse carefully monitors each case and
is available to work with the family and provide any
necessary information or teaching.
School Attendance and Bedbugs
Nationally, the incidence of bedbugs has risen. If a
student comes to school and bedbugs are found on
him/her, parents will be called and asked to eliminate
the source at home. The school nurse is available
to work with the family and provide any necessary
information or teaching. LCSD1 has a protocol for
working with students who bring bedbugs to school.
Medications at School
1. Parents must sign permission before any
medicines are given at school. The nurse will
review each request and will work with parents
if there are any questions about the medicine.
Please work with your school nurse to make sure
all procedures are followed. Safety of medication
administration is extremely important.
2. Medicine must be received in the original
container and have a current expiration date.
3. Prescription medicines must be received in the
original container from the pharmacy with the
physician’s name, the student’s name, name of the
medicine, dosage and the times to be given. For
your student’s safety, medicines received in plastic
bags or other non-pharmacy containers will not be
given to students.
4. Send only the amount of medicine that is to be
taken at school.
5. For the student’s safety and compliance with the
school’s drug and alcohol policy, medications must
be kept in the nurse’s office.
6. Students are responsible for coming to the nurse’s
office at the designated times for medications.
7. If a medication is ordered by the doctor as “three
times a day,” it should be taken before school,
after school, and before bedtime. Talk to the
school nurse if you have questions.
8. If a medication is ordered by the doctor as “four
times a day,” it should be taken before school,
lunch, after school and before bedtime.
9. Administration of glucagon, inhalers and other
emergency medications are an exception and are
given as the symptoms dictate.
10. School nurses and staff of LCSD1 are not
allowed to administer aspirin and aspirincontaining products to students. After a review
of the literature and consultation with the local
pediatric group, aspirin and aspirin-containing
products should not be administered to students
because of the concern relative to Reye’s
syndrome. Children with headaches and/or fever
could be in the incubation stages of an illness
known to cause Reye’s syndrome in association
www.laramie1.org
with aspirin. School nurses have a complete list
of aspirin containing products and will advise
parents if they are brought to the schools.
11. W.S. 21-4-310 requires Wyoming school districts
to permit a student to possess and self-administer
emergency medications within any school of the
district if form NU#1 is submitted to the district
containing:
• Parental/guardian verification that the student is
responsible for and capable of self-administration
and parental authorization for self-administration
of emergency medication;
• Health-care provider identification of the
prescribed or authorized emergency medication
and verification of the appropriateness of the
student’s possession and self-administration of
the emergency medication.
Contact your school nurse for the form (NU#1) that
needs to be completed by the student’s healthcare provider and parent/guardian. Return the
completed form to the school nurse.
Throat Cultures
Throat cultures for “strep throat” will be offered in the
district with the following guidelines:
1. Throat cultures will be offered to staff and current
students only. Family of staff members or students
are not eligible. Other volunteers are not eligible.
2. Throat cultures will not be done on other groups
even if they offer to pay for them.
3. Only nurses or previously trained individuals may
do throat cultures.
4. Throat cultures will be done only on individuals
who have had symptoms and are screened for:
a. current or recent fever
b. sore throat not related to allergies or sinus
problems
c. reddened throat or enlarged tonsils
5. Throat cultures will not be done unless there is a
valid reason. Parents/staff who request a culture
without these symptoms will be referred to their
healthcare provider of choice.
6. Nurses will not be able to travel to another building
to do a throat culture. Parents/staff are welcome to
go to the building where the nurse is that day.
7. Throat cultures must be done before the morning
mail pick up in the building.
Immunizations
Wyoming State Law requires each student to be
immunized against certain diseases prior to school
attendance. Each school nurse communicates with
parents/guardians regarding missing immunizations.
It is very important that parents follow up on letters
and messages from the school. Students must be fully
immunized within 30 calendar days of the first day of
school.
By state law, students who are not fully immunized
elementary
by the deadline may be excluded from school by the
district administrators. Note: Because some vaccines
are given in a series, students will not be initially
excluded if the series has been started. Parents are
required to complete the series as scheduled.
The only exception to this law is for parents who
have received a medical or religious exemption from
the State Department of Health. See your school nurse
for the forms so you can start this process before the
deadline occurs.
Reporting Child Abuse or Neglect
By Wyoming State Law, any school employee who
has reasonable cause to witness the results of or
suspect that a student has been subject to abuse or
neglect, is required to immediately inform the building
administrator. The administrator or designee will make
a report to the Laramie County Department of Family
Services (DFS) or to the appropriate law enforcement
agency, if necessary. Once the report has been made,
these agencies assume the responsibility for the
investigation.
Physical Examinations & Insurance
(Junior and Senior High schools)
Any student who participates in interscholastic sports
must have a physical and insurance for that school
year. Physicals must be dated after May 1 prior to the
new school year. Insurance must be verified or can be
purchased through the school. Forms are available in
the offices. Athletic physicals may be available from
some medical offices at free/reduced rates and may be
locally advertised. (See Accident Insurance on
Page 10)
Children’s Health Insurance Program
Kid Care CHIP is a children’s health care program
that offers complete health care coverage for children
including dental and vision coverage. This incomebased program is available to qualifying children from
birth through the age of 18. Once enrolled, children
have access to the provider networks of Blue Cross
Blue Shield of Wyoming and Delta Dental of Wyoming.
Preventive services are free of charge and average
co-pays for services are $10. If your children are
uninsured, take the first step and make sure your kids
have the medical care they need. For more information
visit www.health.wyo.gov/CHIP or call 1-855-294-2127.
EMERGENCY AND
INCLEMENT WEATHER
PROCEDURES
LCSD1’s rapid-notification system, ShoutPoint
allows the district to quickly send phone, e-mail and
text messages as selected by the parents/guardians.
15
This system will be used in case of emergency and
inclement weather situations. For example, ShoutPoint
will notify parents of late starts, early releases and
emergency closures due to weather or a crisis
situation. School is canceled only during unusual
circumstances such as extreme weather, facilities or
equipment failure, an environmental hazard or a public
crisis that causes a significant safety risk.
Do not call the school! LCSD1’s ShoutPoint
system, along with all local radio and TV stations will
provide the most current information to parents and
the community on weather or emergency situations.
It is imperative that all district lines are open for vital
communications.
Emergency Closure Forms are included as part of
your student’s electronic registration process. Changes
to the information should be submitted promptly to your
child(ren)’s school office(s). Up-to-date information
is vital in the event of an emergency closure. Please
discuss with your child(ren) the process to follow in
case of early dismissal.
Late Start: Two-Hour Delay Opening
If weather conditions prevent making a decision
regarding school closure by 5:30 a.m., a two-hour delay
may be initiated to allow time for a final determination.
Two-hour delays are effective for all schools and all
students. If school will not be held after the two-hour
delay, an announcement will be sent through LCSD1’s
ShoutPoint system and the media.
Emergency Closing/Early Release
Whenever possible, school closure announcements
will be made the evening before via ShoutPoint and on
all 10 p.m. TV and radio broadcasts. If it is not possible,
an announcement will be made by 5:30 a.m.
If school is closed during the day due to a
snowstorm, it is determined that all students have
satisfactory transportation. Parent instructions from
each student’s emergency closure form are followed.
Inclement Weather Boundaries
Sometimes the weather can be worse in various
parts of the city and outlying areas. When this happens,
LCSD1 will run buses in one area but not another.
When this occurs a weather boundary will be called
under the following parameters:
• If it is unsafe to run buses in a rural area. Buses
that normally run in the area would not run beyond the
designated boundary for both morning and afternoon
routes.
• If weather conditions in rural areas warrant a busing
cancellation, ShoutPoint will not be used to inform
the community. At the present time, we do not have
a consistent method of calling only those who ride
the buses. Parents should tune into the local media
or check the district website: www.laramie1.org for
cancellations. The only time ShoutPoint will be used is
in the event there is a district-wide school closure.
• Boundary areas coincide with the high school your
elementary school feeds into.
16
• LCSD1 does not bus outside the described
boundary during bad weather, even when school is in
session. Rural buses do not run. Parents living outside
of the boundary areas who decide to take their children
to school during these conditions, will be responsible
for picking up their children in the afternoon, regardless
of the weather conditions. (See Inclement Weather
Boundaries on Page 19–20)
Crisis Management Procedures
A detailed emergency preparedness plan is available
in the school office.
All schools are prepared for a variety of emergency
situations including violence, weather, medical or
transportation related.
Lockdown—In the event total security within a
building is necessary, all classroom and exterior doors
are locked with no entry or exit from the building until
the crisis is over.
Evacuation—In the event the school must be
evacuated, all students and staff will be transported by
buses to an emergency relocation site. Once everyone
is accounted for, students will be released to a parent
or guardian.
Locked Doors—The school staff have been
instructed to keep the perimeter doors locked at all
times for the safety of the students and staff of the
school. All visitors must check in and obtain a visitor
pass at the main office.
Emergency Information—Parents are encouraged
to listen to local radio stations and check the district
website (www.laramie1.org) for additional information in
the event of an emergency. Parents may also receive
an emergency notification from ShoutPoint.
Should there ever be a threatening situation or an
emergency on a school campus and, for the safety of
your child(ren) and all students:
• Please remain as calm as possible.
• Please do not attempt to go to the school. Access
routes and streets need to be clear for emergency
vehicles. Traffic congestion will make emergency
response much more difficult for first responders,
including law enforcement, fire departments, and
ambulances, to get to the school to deal with the
emergency quickly and efficiently. This is an issue of
safety for all concerned.
• Please remain at home or at work to make it easier
for officials to contact you, if this becomes necessary.
If schools have the need to mass evacuate students
off site, students will be taken by bus to an alternate
location—you will be given information through the
media and through ShoutPoint as to how and when to
pick up your children.
• Please do not call your child on his/her cell phone.
If numerous people are using cell phones at one
location, it will jam the airways, which will overload
the system and could prevent emergency and school
officials from using their emergency communication
devices. This would seriously hinder efforts to assist
students. Schools also hope to limit student use of
www.laramie1.org
cell phones for the same reason. However, school
personnel will work with students on the use of
their personal cell phones and text messaging in
an emergency to keep you informed with the most
accurate and reliable information possible and to
reduce anxieties.
• Please do not call your child’s school building,
as telephone lines will need to remain open to deal
with the emergency. If the phone system becomes
overloaded, it will hinder efforts to help students and to
provide valuable information.
• Stay tuned to local TV and radio stations for ongoing
information and emergency instructions.
• Check for updates at: www.laramie1.org
•Remember, in an emergency, school officials will
need your assistance. Thank You!
STUDENT INTERNET
ACCESS AT LCSD1
Parent implied consent notice
LCSD1 schools will be operating under an “opt out”
policy for students regarding Internet access. This
means that students will be assumed to have parent/
guardian permission to access the Internet at LCSD1
schools unless the school has received a written
statement from the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) that
the student does not have Internet access permission.
Please understand that in accessing the Internet at
LCSD1 schools, students will be expected to adhere
to the LCSD1 Network Administrative Regulation for
Chapter VII, Section 23—Ethics in Use of Technology.
This Administrative Regulation may be referred to as
an “Acceptable Use Policy.”
Acceptable Use—Users of our technology services
are expected to adhere to a high standard of ethical
use in supporting the district mission, vision and
goals. This includes the expectation that student,
staff and trustees’ use of technology (district or nondistrict provided) will not interfere with the education
of students, cause substantial disruption at the
school district, or involve any threat/abuse of student,
staff or trustee. Technology services may not be
used to access, download, store and/or distribute
any material (text, graphic, photo or audio) which is
defamatory, abusive, obscene, profane, threatening
or sexually explicit to the average person. The district
network connection may not be used to access
any inappropriate areas such as other student or
district network information. Unauthorized network
transmissions, any activity that adversely impacts the
education environment, causes disruption at the school
district, or is perceived as a threat to students or staff
are not acceptable uses of technology services. Use of
our technology services for financial gain is also strictly
forbidden. Inappropriate use will result in disciplinary
action by the building principal that may result in
elementary
suspended, revoked or canceled Internet access by
that user.
Liability—The district makes no warranties of any
kind, expressed or implied, for Internet services.
Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at
each user’s risk. The district specifically denies any
responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information
obtained through the Internet.
A parent(s) or guardian(s) who wishes to deny
Internet access to their LCSD1 student(s) must
request a “Does not have permission to access the
Internet at LCSD1” form and return it to the principal
of their school within two weeks of registration of their
child(ren) at that school.
Clarification of Unacceptable
Computer Use
Appropriate use of computers by students is closely
monitored by the classroom teacher and district
personnel. If a student uses a computer inappropriately,
he/she may lose computer privileges for a period
of time and may face disciplinary action. Examples
are as follows, but are not limited to: Inappropriate
messages, non-teacher directed chat rooms,
suggestive messages/sites, sharing passwords,
chain e-mail, threatening messages, pornographic
sites, illegal activities, hacking activities, violence
and hate, trespassing, plagiarism, spamming,
personal financial gain, vandalism, using illegal
copies of copyrighted software.
Letter to Parents
As we begin the new school year, we want to assure
you that your student’s safety is a top priority in LCSD1.
For that reason, we are writing this letter to share some
thoughts and concerns about student safety and the
Internet.
As you probably know, students across the nation
have received threats in Internet chat rooms. Offenders
often locate students through Internet profiles and
make threats or cruel comments to them. Local and
federal law enforcement agents suggest that students
be cautious in how they identify themselves in chat
rooms and what they write in their Internet profiles
being careful not to include any personal information.
Please talk to your child about the seriousness of
Internet threats. It is against both state and federal
law to make threats via the Internet, and state, local
or federal law enforcement will address any potential
threat. However, you also need to be aware that the
First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution protects free
speech, and people who make cruel remarks, which
are not threats, cannot be prosecuted.
If your child is on the Internet and receives a threat,
you and your child should take the following steps:
 Immediately save and print the screen that has the
threat.
 Immediately call your local law enforcement agency.
 If at school, immediately inform the computer lab
supervisor or teacher.
17
 Law enforcement advises it is important to limit
the number of people whom you tell about the
threat. The fewer people who know of the threat,
the easier it is for the investigators to identify the
perpetrator.
 Law enforcement authorities will investigate to
determine if the threat had any validity and will
inform the school district.
 The school district will promptly implement steps
necessary to protect our students and inform
parents.
These suggestions are based on the advice of law
enforcement and experiences of students. It’s important
that your family make the final decisions about your
child’s home use of the Internet. Thank you for your
cooperation in this important effort to protect the safety
of your child(ren) and all of our students in Laramie
County School District 1 schools.
—Respectfully, LCSD1 Administrators
STUDENT DIRECTORY
INFORMATION USE
Parent Implied Consent Notice
LCSD1 will follow the regulations for public release
of student directory information set forth by the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). If the legal
parent or guardian of a student does not wish to have the
information (as defined below) released upon request, the
form (available from your school’s main office) must be
filled out and returned to the school principal.
All LCSD1 schools will be operating under an “opt
out” policy for students regarding the student directory
information. This means that LCSD1 will assume to
have parent/guardian permission to use their child’s
directory information, as listed below, for publications,
including websites, unless the school has received
the completed “Denial of Permission—Directory
Information” form from the student’s parent(s)/
guardian(s) that LCSD1 does not have permission to
use such directory information.
The primary purpose of directory information is
to allow LCSD1 to include this type of information
from your child’s education records in certain school
publications. Examples include but are not limited to:
 A playbill, showing your student’s role in a drama
production
 The annual yearbook
 Honor roll or other recognition lists
 Graduation programs
 Sports activity sheets, such as for wrestling,
showing weight and height of team members
Directory information, which is information that is
generally not considered harmful or an invasion of
privacy if released, can also be disclosed to outside
organizations without a parent’s prior written consent.
18
Outside organizations include, but are not limited
to, companies that manufacture class rings or publish
yearbooks. In addition, two federal laws require local
educational agencies (LEAs) receiving assistance
under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act
of 1965 (ESEA) to provide military recruiters, upon
request, with three directory information categories—
names, addresses, and telephone listings—unless
parents have advised the LEA that they do not want
their student’s information disclosed without their prior
written consent.
Implied Consent to Use the Following Student
Directory Information to LCSD1 Schools for Publication:
 Student’s name(s)
 Parent(s)’ name(s)
 Address
 Telephone number(s)
 Date and place of birth
 Photograph
 Participation in recognized district activities and
sports
 Height and weight of members of athletic teams
 Dates of attendance
 Degrees and awards received
 School where presently in attendance
Parent(s)/guardian(s) who wish to deny LCSD1 the
ability to use directory information (student’s name(s),
parent(s)’ name(s), address, telephone number(s),
date and place of birth, photograph, participation
in recognized district activities and sports, height
and weight of members of athletic teams, dates of
attendance, degrees and awards received, school
where presently in attendance) of their child(ren) must
ANNUALLY return a “Denial of Permission to Use
Child’s Directory Information for Publication” form
to the principal of their child(ren)’s school within 10
calendar days of registration of their child(ren) at the
school. Forms will be available in the principal’s office
at all schools.
PROVISIONAL
ENROLLMENT POLICY
When a minor wishes to attend LCSD1 but his/
her parents live out of the state or community,
district policy requires that the minor’s custodian
obtain legal guardianship within 30 days of
the student’s enrollment to assure LCSD1 that
someone who resides in the district is legally
responsible for the child, is available to give
permission for the child to participate in activities
and receive medical attention, and that the minor is
a resident of Laramie County.
www.laramie1.org
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICES LCSD1
Administrative Regulation Policy
[Chapter V, Section 10]
Riding a school bus is a privilege, not a right.
Students who choose to ride a District bus must comply
with this administrative regulation. Transportation
drivers and transportation assistants will enforce these
rules and this regulation in accordance with Board
policy.
1. Students on the bus are under the supervision
of the bus driver and/or the TA (Transportation
Assistant). Seats may be assigned by the driver or
TA as necessary.
2. Passengers of a school bus will be limited to
assigned students, approved parents, and
sponsors. If a driver does not recognize a student
as a regular rider, the driver may transport the
student or call dispatch for instructions.
3. A misconduct report may be sent to the parent/
guardian upon violation of this regulation. Students
receiving a misconduct report can have riding
privileges suspended for a period of one to ten
days at the discretion of the driver/supervisor.
Suspension of riding privileges for more than ten
days will be determined by the Superintendent
or designee. The violation of these rules and the
number of violations per an individual student will
determine the time of suspension.
4. The driver shall not remove students from the bus
until it reaches that student’s school of attendance
or assigned stop. There may be incidents that
require a school administrator or law enforcement
officer to remove a student. In these cases, the
student will be removed from the bus as necessary
and provided transportation to the school or to
their home.
5. All passengers will remain seated and out of the
aisle while the bus is in motion. A minimal amount
of movement from seat to seat is permitted at
stops to allow the discharge of passengers at their
designated stop.
6. Bullying, profanity, loud noises/conversations and
verbal abuse to anyone on the bus will not be
tolerated. Violators will be removed from the bus
accordingly.
7. The use or possession of tobacco or lookalike
tobacco products including but not limited to
electronic cigarettes, drugs, or alcohol products
is prohibited on the school bus. Weapons or
explosive articles are prohibited on the bus,
including but not limited to chains, bats, knives,
razor blades, flammable materials, guns or other
threatening items. Possession of any of these
elementary
items by a student is cause for immediate removal
from the bus.
8. Articles which obstruct the aisle, exits, or may
cause a safety concern to the students will not
be allowed on the bus. Glass containers or other
glass items will not be allowed on the bus. The
driver will make the determination if an item can be
transported safely.
9. Live animals are prohibited on a school bus with
the exception of canine assistants for the impaired.
10. The student is responsible for security of his/her
personal property. Personal property found on the
bus will normally be placed in a “lost and found”
area at Transportation. The driver and/or TA are
not responsible for items left on the bus.
11. Cellular phones and video games will not be used
on the bus in a manner which causes a distraction
to the driver. The driver and/or the TA have the
option to confiscate these items to ensure safety
of the riders. The item confiscated will be returned
to the student when he/she departs the bus.
12. Eating and/or drinking on the bus will be left to
the discretion of the driver. Students that have a
medical condition that requires him/her to eat at
scheduled times will be allowed to do so, but must
notify the driver of the requirement. Students who
otherwise eat or drink on the bus are responsible
for keeping his/her area clean, and properly
dispose of their wrappers and/or containers.
13. Students will not be allowed to ride the bus if they
wear clothing that causes a distraction to District
employees or other students. Pants will be worn
near the waistline. Shoes will be of the type that
allow for a safe exit from the bus in case of an
emergency. (ie. exiting from the rear door).
These administrative regulations are set forth by
the LCSD1 transportation department and the board
of trustees. Every driver and assistant are required to
enforce these regulations.
INCLEMENT WEATHER
BOUNDARIES
During inclement weather, district buses will not be
provided outside of the following boundaries:
 Area 1: Inclement Weather Boundary
West of I-25 from the Colorado border north to U.S.
Hwy. 85: with the exceptions of Warren Air Force
Base, Western Hills Subdivision, and west of I-25
south of Horse Creek Road within 1/2 mile west of
I-25.
 Area 2: Inclement Weather Boundary
North of Four Mile Road extending to U.S. Hwy.
85, west to I-25 and east to Whitney Road (or an
imaginary line extending Whitney Road) on the
east.
19
 Area 3: Inclement Weather Boundary
East of Whitney Road (or a line extending Whitney
Road) to where it intersects with U.S. Hwy. 85 on
the north and south to the Colorado border, and
then south of Speedway Drive (or a line extending
Speedway Drive) west to I-25 and east to Whitney
Road (or a line extending Whitney Road to the
south), with the exception of: 1) Saddle Ridge
subdivision and 2) Archies Road and all roads
intersecting Archies Road south of Pershing
Boulevard.
PLEASE NOTE: Parents living outside of the
boundary area who decide to take their child(ren) to
school during these conditions will be responsible for
picking up their child(ren) in the afternoon. Regardless
of weather conditions, if a bus does not run in the
morning it will not run in the afternoon.
DISTRICT ACTIVITY &
ACCOUNTABILITY REPORTS
Districtwide Newspaper
Published five times a year and direct mailed
to every home and business in the Cheyenne
area, the Public Schools’ Chronicle (PSC)
provides the community with a window into the
classroom featuring student learning activities and
informational articles for parents and stakeholders.
Current and past issues are available online at
www.laramie1.org.
Annual Accountability Report
Each year the district publishes a comprehensive
annual report—The District Report Card. The
report covers many facets of the district and
provides a brief history of the past school year. It is
available on the district website and included in the
PSC.
State of the District
Annually, the Superintendent of Schools presents
a State of the District address. The public is invited
to attend and learn about how the district is doing
in four key areas: academic success, graduation,
college and career readiness, and responsible
citizenship.
BOARD POLICY SUMMARIES
The following are only summaries of the Board
policies most commonly addressed by students and
parents. Please refer to the Board of Trustees Policy
manual for complete policy language. Confer with your
building administrator for clarification, or to obtain a
copy of any board policy.
20
Student Records/Parent Rights
[Students—Chapter VIII, Section 18]
Student records are official district files that contain
personally identifiable, directly related information
specific to a student. The principal and the Assistant
Superintendent of Instruction, or designated personnel
are responsible for the creation, maintenance,
security and review of student records. Board policy
has established procedures for release of records to
parents, for student transfer, for a court subpoena or to
school personnel with legitimate educational interests.
Student record information, other than authorized
directory information, shall not be released to any
individual, agency or organization without written
permission of the parents or guardians of students
under 18 years of age, or without the written consent of
students 18 years of age or older. In addition, policies
have been established to address the challenge of
student record content, and the maintenance and
disposition of student records.
Student Rights and Responsibilities
[Students—Chapter VIII, Section 10]
Student rights include compliance with the office
of Civil Rights Regulations, student responsibility for
knowing and complying with school rules, respecting
authority and being diligent in studies. Teachers
have the right to obedience and the responsibility
of conducting a well-planned, effective educational
program. Should disciplinary measures become
necessary to maintain a positive educational
environment, the parent should cooperate with school
personnel and support corrective measures. The
parent shall have a right to full cooperation from school
personnel in disciplinary matters, to be informed of
potentially serious problems and to receive help from
district counselors and Student Services. Please confer
with your building administrator for available services.
Disruptive Student Behavior,
Discipline and Detention
[Students—Chapter VIII, Section 11]
Each building has supportive rules and regulations
that stress prevention of disruptive behavior,
appropriate intervention and disciplinary procedures
should preventive measures fail. Effective operation
of schools requires essential rules and regulation
of conduct; discipline shall mean the control of
behavior necessary to maintain a positive learning
environment. Parents will be notified 24 hours in
advance of detention of a student after school hours
for disciplinary reasons, and may be asked to arrange
for transportation. Please confer with your building
administrator for clarification of the building rules.
Alcohol, Tobacco and
Other Drug Prevention
(Students—Chapter VIII, Section 21)
The district shall provide an educationally driven
program that maintains a drug-free environment. The
www.laramie1.org
possession, use, purchase, sale or distribution of
alcohol, tobacco, lookalike tobacco products including
but not limited to electronic cigarettes, or any illicit
drug by any student while on school property, in
school vehicles, at bus stops and school-sponsored
events is prohibited. This includes any dangerous
or inappropriate possession or use of prescription
drugs, nonprescription drugs or inhalants. Student
possession of any alcohol, tobacco or illicit drugrelated paraphernalia is also prohibited. The district
will investigate reports of students engaging in these
activities and will discipline any student who is found to
be in violation. False or malicious accusations will be
dealt with through appropriate discipline procedures.
Violence Prevention
(Students—Chapter VIII, Section 25)
The Board of Trustees acknowledges the importance
of regulating the school environment to provide
the opportunity for students to obtain maximum
achievement. Therefore the violence prevention policy
prohibits any form of violence including bullying,
harassment, sexual harassment, physical fights,
battery and the use/possession of weapons on school
property, in school vehicles at bus stops and at schoolsponsored events. The district will discipline, as
appropriate considering the seriousness of the offense
and will investigate all reports or complaints of violence.
Incidences will be documented in the district’s student
discipline log.
Bullying
Bullying creates a hostile educational environment
through domination and aggression that harms the
victim psychologically, emotionally and socially. Bullying
is when someone repeatedly and on purpose says or
does mean or hurtful things to another person who has
a hard time defending himself or herself. This includes,
but is not limited to the following: physical or emotional
harm, property damage, insulting or demeaning
behavior, intimidation and cyber-bullying.
LCSD1’s Board of Trustees approved the use of
the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP)
districtwide for students in kindergarten through eighth
grade. With more than 35 years of research and
successful implementation around the world, OBPP is
a whole-school program proven to prevent or reduce
bullying throughout a school setting.
In addition, parents who are not comfortable
speaking with their child’s school personnel may utilize
several ombudsman advocacy services including:
 Chris Zimny, violence prevention coordinator/
program evaluator with Safe and Drug Free
Schools, 771-2204.
 UPLIFT, 778-8686, is a third-party organization
not compensated by LCSD1. UPLIFT advocacy
services have been offered in Cheyenne for more
than 20 years.
Sexual Harassment
requests for sexual favors, sexual jokes, sexual graffiti
or other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature
that: (a) interferes with a student’s work performance,
(b) creates a condition such that a student believes
submission to such conduct is required to participate
in a school program or activity, (c) causes a student to
believe that an educational decision will be based on
whether he or she submits to the unwelcome sexual
conduct, or (d) is so severe, persistent, pervasive
or deliberate as to create an intimidating, hostile or
offensive educational environment.
This includes incidents between students and
members of the school district community such as
district employees, contracted personnel and other
persons invited into the school environment by school
district employees.
Threats, Physical Fights and Battery
Threatening conduct places a student, teacher or
other person in fear of impending bodily injury while a
physical fight is a mutual act of aggression between
people. A person is guilty of battery if he or she
intentionally causes bodily injury to another person by
use of physical force.
Weapons
A weapon is a device that is designed or used to
injure another person or person’s belongings. This
includes, but is not limited to a firearm, explosive or
incendiary material, motorized vehicle, instrument,
material or substance that is reasonably capable of
producing bodily injury.
False Accusations
No person shall engage in false and/or malicious
accusations. These types of accusations will be dealt
with through appropriate discipline procedures.
Complaints Concerning District Personnel
[Personnel—Chapter VI, Section 15]
In the event that a dispute arises involving district
personnel and students that can not be resolved,
written formal and informal grievance procedures are
established in Board policy. Please confer with your
building administrator to obtain a complete policy copy
and any necessary forms.
ACADEMIC EXPECTATIONS
Grade & Progress Reports
The school year is divided into four, nine-week
(quarterly) grading periods for permanent grade
reports.
In addition, students receive midterm informal
progress reports during the fifth week of the each
quarter. Grades are available online. Sign up with your
school office to obtain your access password.
Parent Conferences
At the end of the first quarter, each student’s parent
Sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual advances,
elementary
21
or guardian is scheduled for a conference with the
student’s teacher.
Joint Custody Guidelines—At the request of either
parent, separate conferences can be arranged with
the child’s teacher. Both parents can also request a
copy of the report card, midterm reports and school
newsletters.
Conferences are not scheduled for every student at
the end of the other quarters. However, conferences
may be scheduled throughout the year at the request of
the teacher or parents. In addition, parents will receive
a call or be requested to attend a conference when a
student’s performance drops.
We encourage parents to contact the school at any
time. Good communication is essential. Often what
may appear to be a problem can be cleared up by
clarification of facts or misunderstandings.
Homework
Homework is an extension of learning that takes
place in school. If a teacher assigns homework it
is usually part of an assignment that may receive a
grade, is for practice or enrichment, or it may be just a
sampling for parent understanding of a student’s skills.
Classroom teachers notify parents of their individual
homework policies. If your child consistently says he/
she has no homework, visit or call the teacher.
Make–Up Work
Parents and students must arrange with the teacher
for make-up time and/or work missed within three
days following an absence. Students usually have one
attendance day for each day absent to make up missed
work.
Information for students who are suspended or truant
is available from your principal and Board Policy–
Chapter VIII, Section 5.
Testing for Proficiency
Each year in March, students in third through sixth
grade participate in the Proficiency Assessment
for Wyoming Students (PAWS). The assessment
measures student proficiency in math and reading in
grades three through six and science in grade four.
The assessment is part of the state accountability
plan and is used to determine if schools are meeting
Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals set by the
Federal Department of Education. LCSD1 also uses
the data for part of the district accountability plan and
to provide direction for the strategic plan at both the
district and school level. It is important to encourage
students to do their very best in any assessment
setting. The Wyoming Department of Education (WDE)
releases annual PAWS assessment results in mid to
late summer.
art, music and physical education, as well as behaviors
that support learning. In addition, students receive
rubric scores in writing, listening and speaking.
 Rubrics
 4–Advanced
 3–Proficient (meets the standard)
 2–Basic
 1–Below Basic
Grades 4, 5, & 6—Grades 4–6 receive grades in
reading, mathematics, science and health, and social
studies. They receive progress reports in art, music and
physical education, as well as behaviors that support
learning. In addition, students receive rubric scores in
writing, listening and speaking.
 Letter Grades
 A–Superior (90–100%)
 B–Above average (80–89%)
 C–Average (70–79%)
 D–Below Average (60–69%)
 F–Failing (Below 60%)
 Rubrics
 4–Advanced
 3–Proficient (meets the standard)
 2–Basic
 1–Below Basic
The evaluation of each student’s progress and
achievement in each course is the responsibility of the
teacher of that course.
Elementary School Honor Rolls
Honor roll categories are individual to each school.
Most schools recognize outstanding achievement by
the publication of an honor roll in the school newsletter
and posting it on a prominent bulletin board in the
school at the end of each quarter and/or semester.
STATE ACADEMIC
STANDARDS
Grading Systems
The State Board of Education has identified state
level standards in nine content areas which are
provided to districts and schools to guide teaching and
learning. The standards represent the rigor and level
of learning needed for all students to graduate from
high school college and career ready. The other seven
content areas have standards that were developed
by educators and others around the state. Through
the use of college entrance expectations, career and
technical expectations and subject area groups, the
WDE has provided standards in all content areas.
The state standards, which have been adopted by the
district, represent what students should know and be
able to do when they graduate from high school.
Grades 1–3—First-, second- and third-grade
students receive progress reports in reading,
mathematics, understanding the concepts of science
and health, and social studies and on participation in
At the direction of the Wyoming Legislature, the
WDE has developed an assessment plan to guide
district and school accountability. PAWS is the primary
22
State Accountability Assessments
www.laramie1.org
assessment used in grades three through eight. The
assessment is administered in March and carries into
early April. PAWS results are used to measure district
and school-level accountability as called for by the
state accountability plan and Federal Department of
Education’s No Child Left Behind law.
All high schools are required to administer the ACT
to all students in 11th grade. ACT is a measure of
college and career readiness, and it is used as part
of the criteria for the Hathaway Scholarship. The
ACT assessment provided by the state of Wyoming
assesses students in English, mathematics, reading
and science. Results are used as an accountability
measure for high schools and determine if a student is
college and career ready. College-bound students who
score below a targeted score may be required to take
a remediation course at their college. In preparation
for the ACT, LCSD1 ninth-grade students take the
EXPLORE assessment. Tenth-graders take the PLAN
to measure progress.
All of the assessments have scores that can be
reported at the student, school and district level.
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
Students shall be enrolled in school full time for a
minimum of eight semesters in grades nine through 12.
Full time shall be defined as being enrolled in at least
eight classes. Exceptions can be made through petition
to the principal.
High school graduation for current elementary
students will require a minimum of 27 credits (Carnegie
units) for grades nine through 12 and demonstration
of proficiency in the nine content areas: language arts,
mathematics, science, social studies, health, physical
education, world language, career/vocational education
and fine/performing arts.
Students taking high-school equivalent courses at
the junior high level may earn high school credit for the
course. The grade earned in these courses will become
part of the student’s grade point average (GPA) and will
be on his/her high school transcript.
Carnegie unit credit shall be awarded when a
student receives a passing grade of “D” or better for
any particular class. Students may repeat a course
providing space is available and may have the
original grade replaced when calculating the grade
point average. Students will not receive dual credit
for repeating the same course unless it is approved
prior to enrollment by the Assistant Superintendent of
Instruction and it is noted in the registration booklet.
In addition to the above requirements, a student
must earn a high school diploma with at least one of
the following endorsements, which will be stated on the
transcript of each student:
Advanced Endorsement requires a student to
demonstrate advanced proficiency in at least five of the
nine content areas and proficiency in the remaining areas.
elementary
Comprehensive Endorsement requires a student to
demonstrate proficiency in all nine content areas.
General Endorsement requires a student to
demonstrate proficiency in at least five of the nine
content areas.
(If you have a high school student please refer to
the complete academic standards section in the high
school districtwide student/parent handbook.)
Promotion, Retention, Acceleration
Promotion to successive elementary grades,
kindergarten through six, shall be determined based
on the student’s demonstration of proficiency on
district standards in language arts and mathematics
for his/her respective grade level. Physical, social/
emotional implications and other factors which may be
determined relevant to the individual student shall be
considered.
Students failing to demonstrate proficiency on district
language arts or mathematics standards must avail
themselves of all recommended remediation/steps in
the pyramid of interventions and/or extended learning
opportunities in order to be considered for promotion to
the next grade.
Appeals to the decision to retain a student shall be
handled in accordance with procedures established in
administrative regulation.
HATHAWAY SCHOLARSHIP
Hathaway scholarships are designed to provide an
incentive for Wyoming students to prepare for and
pursue post-secondary education within the State of
Wyoming. The program consists of four separate merit
scholarships, each with specific eligibility requirements,
and a need-based scholarship for eligible students,
which supplements the merit awards.
Merit scholarship levels and criteria are as follows:
 Provisional Opportunity: ($840/semester) GPA:
2.5, ACT: 17 or WorkKeys: 12; Must meet course
offering requirements at high school level
 Opportunity: ($840/semester) GPA: 2.5, ACT 19;
Must meet course offering requirements at high
school level
 Performance: ($1,260/semester) GPA: 3.0, ACT:
21; Must meet course offering requirements at high
school level
 Honors: ($1,680/semester) GPA: 3.5, ACT: 25;
Must meet course offering requirements at high
school level
23
FACILITY OVERVIEWS
each and every one of our students. Buckle up, and
join us as we begin our 2014–2015 marathon and
prove that indeed everyone “Can Be a Champion.”
AFFLERBACH
ALTA VISTA
400 W. Wallick Road—771-2300
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Playground duty coverage
8:20 a.m. Free universal breakfast for all students
8:30 a.m. Entry bell
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10:15–10:30 a.m. Recess (K–2)
11:30 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Lunch & recess (1, 2)
Noon–12:40 p.m. Lunch & recess (K, 3, 1/2 TB, 3/4 TB)
12:20–1 p.m. Lunch & recess (4, 5, 6, 5/6 TB)
2–2:15 p.m. Recess (K–2)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
The staff at Afflerbach
Elementary would like to
welcome you to our
learning community. Our
theme for the 2014–2015
school year is “Everyone
Can Be a Champion.”
Over the course of the
year, our dedicated staff
will be working diligently
with our students and parents to become academic
champions ensuring that we meet the individual needs
of each student academically, socially and emotionally.
It is our belief that no substantial learning can take
place without first creating strong, positive relationships
with our entire learning community. The skilled teaching
staff implements a variety of research-based instruction
strategies to create incredible readers, writers and
mathematicians. Outside of implementing all district
programs with quality, fidelity, intensity and consistency,
the students at Afflerbach also have access to a wide
array of focused interventions including: Read
Naturally, Lindamood-Bell, Successful Reader, Lexia
Reading, Leveled Literacy Intervention, CLIP and
Extended Day and Title I support. We believe that to
accomplish our mission of “Continuous Learning For
All” with a vision of “Being Wyoming’s Outstanding
School in Achievement and Character,” it requires the
focused work of all stakeholders. Therefore,
Afflerbach’s staff collaborates weekly using a
Professional Learning Community model, focusing on
each students’ individual needs while using a
differentiated approach to support individual student
growth. Afflerbach encourages and supports parent
and community involvement including PTO, school
family nights, Quarterly Parent Universities, parent
volunteers, and Foster Grandparents. Afflerbach is also
lucky to host the “Trailblazer” program, an academic
high-potential program for qualified children from
around the entire district. The staff at Afflerbach will
work tirelessly to guarantee a high-quality education for
24
1514 E. 16th St.—771-2310
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Staggered grade level lunch
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Welcome to our learning
community! Built in
1987, Alta Vista
Elementary is a two-story
structure housing two
sections of kindergarten
through sixth grade. Alta
Vista is driven by the
Professional Learning
Community process. Our
dedicated staff is committed to helping students meet
their highest learning potential. Our teaching staff
meets weekly to review student performance and
design instruction that will ensure student achievement.
Progress is tracked and interventions provided for all
students at their learning level. Alta Vista encourages
parent and community involvement through PTO,
parent volunteers, school family nights and Adopt-ASchool partnerships. Additionally, we are fortunate to
provide archery and The First Tee Golf programs in our
school. Alta Vista Elementary receives Title I funding.
These additional federal monies provide supplemental
programs and supplies for students who are at-risk of
not achieving standards. The school is one of the
district sites for the Program for Adaptive Living Skills
designed to meet the needs of a unique special
education population. The concept of diversity and how
it contributes to a well-rounded community is very
important to students, staff and parents who created a
display in the lobby to recognize and celebrate the
diversity within Alta Vista.
ANDERSON
2204 Plain View Road—771-2606
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:35 a.m. Entry bell
8:40 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:20 a.m.–noon Recess/lunch (K & 2)
11:50 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Recess/lunch (1,3,4)
12:25–1 p.m. Recess/lunch (5 & 6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
www.laramie1.org
Anderson Elementary
was built in 1985 and
was recently remodeled
to one of the finest
elementary facilities in
the city. It is a threesection school housing
grades K–6 with a
student population of
485. Anderson prides
itself for its parent-teacher organization, which plays an
integral part of the school community holding many
events that seek active engagement and entertainment
for students, parents and staff members. Anderson’s
work in becoming a teaching and learning laboratory
for reading instruction attracts many professionals from
the district to learn from its highly qualified teaching
professionals. Technology is also one of the
components we take great pride in, with teachers and
students using technology every day during instruction.
The mission for Anderson Elementary states that in
cooperation with students, parents, staff and the
community we will: Achieve our highest potential by
always doing our personal best; set high expectations
for students and staff members; engage and maintain a
curiosity for learning; aspire to be valuable community
members and guarantee a high-quality education.
ARP
1216 Reiner Court—771-2365
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8–8:20 a.m. Playground supervision
8:35 a.m. School begins, breakfast in classrooms/tardy bell
11:08 a.m.–11:54 p.m. Lunch & recess (K–2)
11:43 a.m.–12:24 p.m. Lunch & recess (3–4)
12:10–12:50 p.m. Lunch & recess (5–6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Arp Elementary is a
mainly three-section Title
I school serving students
in grades K–6. Title I
funding supplements the
school program with
additional personnel, a
full-time social worker
and technology aimed at
meeting student needs.
All-day kindergarten was implemented in the fall of
2003, serving kindergarten students in an early
language/literacy program, including a certified speech
therapist for a half day in each kindergarten classroom.
Title I, special education and classroom teachers
collaborate to provide reading instruction to students in
an uninterrupted 90-minute literacy block utilizing the
Balanced Literacy Framework. Grade-level teams
collaborate to implement the GVC for reading, writing
and math. Assessment results are utilized to
instructionally group students and plan daily
interventions in which to improve student achievement.
elementary
BAGGS
3705 Cheyenne St.—771-2385
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:30 a.m. School begins
10–10:15 a.m. Recess
11:25 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Lunch & recess (K–3)
11:40 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Lunch & recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
L.M. Baggs Elementary
school opened in 1965
and a new building
opened in the fall of
2008 with approximately
350 students in grades
K–6. Federal Title I
funding supplements the
basic program with
additional staff and
technology aimed at meeting the individual needs of all
students. Programs like Seeing Stars, Visualizing and
Verbalizing and Everyday Math help students with their
academics. Our active Parent Teacher Organization
and other volunteers provide more than 900 volunteer
hours of service to our children each year. Baggs has a
highly qualified staff as defined by federal, state and
district rules. They encourage active parent
involvement and continually focus on each individual’s
maximum achievement.
BAIN
903 Adams Ave.—771-2525
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:15 a.m.–12:40 p.m. Lunch & recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Bain Elementary is
located in the Sun Valley
area of Cheyenne. Bain’s
staff is committed to its
mission of “Everyone,
every day will work
together to achieve his/
her highest learning
potential.” The Bain
community achieves this
and all goals through commitment to Professional
Learning Communities and Positive Behavior Supports.
At Bain, the Bulldog Beliefs are: Be Safe, Be
Respectful and Be Responsible. Bain’s parent/teacher
organization (PTO) actively supports classroom and
instructional goals through the purchase of technology,
25
learning assemblies, and assisting with major school
projects. Bain also enjoys several Adopt-A-School
partnerships that support academic and citizenship
awards as well as provide volunteer time to the school.
BUFFALO RIDGE
5331 Pineridge Ave.—771-2595
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Walkers may arrive
8:30 a.m. School begins
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Buffalo Ridge was built in
1959 for grades K–6. The
school focuses on
traditional values and
developing character by
implementing the six
pillars of good character:
Fairness, Respect,
Citizenship,
Trustworthiness, Caring,
and Responsibility. The Buffalo Ridge staff values
developing the whole learner by offering acceleration,
interventions and extracurricular activities. Math
acceleration is offered to top quintile sixth-grade
students who travel to Carey Junior High for algebra
instruction and to fifth-grade students who receive the
sixth-grade curriculum during extended-day classes. All
students may receive individualized acceleration in all
subjects through the online Compass Learning suite of
instructional lessons. Interventions include LindamoodBell (Seeing Stars & Visualizing and Verbalizing),
Leveled Literacy Intervention, Successful Reader, On
Cloud Nine, and Compass Learning. Extracurricular
activities include drama club, mini-bank, honors choir,
percussion club, hand-bells clubs, archery club,
football, volleyball, basketball and track. Buffalo Ridge
has a state-of-the-art computer lab, four mobile labs,
and computers in each classroom to enhance daily
instruction in all subject areas. Our library contains an
outstanding collection (over 19,000 items) in all genres,
and it serves as the epicenter of reading for our entire
building. Our families play a vital role in education at
Buffalo Ridge and parents are encouraged to stay
actively involved in their child’s educational program.
They can do this by volunteering their time to help tutor,
plan school and family events, and by encouraging
their children to do their very best.
26
CLAWSON
376 Rd. 228A, Horse Creek—771-2291
School Schedule
Office Hours:(Office is at Gilchrist 771-2285) 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Teacher arrives
9 a.m. School begins
10:45 a.m. Recess
12:15 p.m. Lunch
12:45 p.m. Recess
4 p.m. Dismissal
The school schedule is
adjusted each year to
accommodate the buses
that bring Clawson
students to school.
School starts at 9 a.m.
and dismisses at 4 p.m.
Clawson Elementary is a
K–6 rural school located
35 miles northwest of
Cheyenne off Horse Creek Road. Named for Jean
Clawson, who was the teacher at Clawson for 40 years,
the school has one full-time teacher, one full-time
paraeducator, and three part-time teachers who provide
students with a supportive and challenging
environment. Technological enhancements include a
SMART Board, digital projector and computers. Current
school-wide initiatives aimed at increasing student
achievement include implementation of Professional
Learning Communities, implementation of Balanced
Literacy Framework, implementation of Everyday
Mathematics, an Extended Day Learning program,
Olweus Bully Prevention Program and emphasis on
writing.
COLE
615 W. 9th St.—771-2480
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:20 p.m.
7:30–8 a.m. SPARK
7:50 a.m. Playground opens
8 a.m. First bell, Free universal breakfast for all students
8:15 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10:45–11 a.m. Primary recess
11–11:30 a.m. Lunch (K–2)
11:20–11:35 a.m. Intermediate recess
11:35 a.m.–noon Lunch (3–6)
2–2:15 p.m. Recess (3–6) optional
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
www.laramie1.org
The staff at Cole
Elementary would like to
welcome you to our
learning community. At
Cole we firmly believe
that no substantial
learning can take place
without first creating,
maintaining and fostering
a positive caring family
like atmosphere. We are
dedicated to creating top-notch readers, writers and
mathematicians. To help us grow each student while
they are with us, the experienced staff implements a
variety of innovative instructional programs designed to
meet the needs of a diverse student population of
approximately 230 of the finest students in the city. In
the classroom, teachers have been trained and are
implementing all the district curricular programs with
quality, fidelity, intensity and consistency. Additionally
the staff at Cole has extensive training in implementing
the Thinking Strategies and teachers from around the
city come to observe our teachers implement the
reading and writing workshop model. Outside of the
core curriculum, students have access to many
interventions including: Read Naturally, LindamoodBell, Successful Reader, LEXIA Reading, Leveled
Literacy Intervention, Extended Day and CLIP. In
addition, Cole provides world-class opportunities in art,
music and physical education. The holiday and
extracurricular sports programs are traditionally some
of the best in the city. Cole currently offers a free
pre-kindergarten class for students that live within the
school’s boundary area. Along with this early
educational opportunity, Cole also has an extremely
well equipped library as well as state-of-the-art
technology in all classrooms. To support the families
that share their children with us, Cole also houses a
parent resource center, which includes a library and
computer with Internet access as well as educational
activities that parents can check out and use in their
homes. The staff at Cole will work tirelessly to
guarantee a high-quality education for your child every
day in every way. LCSD1 Pre-K Title I half-day program
is housed at Cole as well. We welcome you to our
learning community.
elementary
DAVIS
6309 Yellowstone Road—771-2600
During the 2014–15 school year, students will be
attending Eastridge while Davis Elementary is under
construction.
School Schedule
8:15 a.m. First Bell
8:20 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
9:45 a.m. Recess (K–1)
10 a.m. Recess (2–3)
11:30 a.m.–12:55 p.m. Lunch and recess (K–6)
1:45 p.m. Recess (6)
2 p.m. Recess (K–2)
2:15 p.m. Recess (5)
2:30 p.m. Recess (4)
3:20 p.m. Dismissal
Bus Schedule
Leaves Davis
7:15 a.m.
7:25 a.m.
7:35 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
Arrives Eastridge
7:40 a.m.
7:50 a.m.
8 a.m.
8:10 a.m.
Leaves Eastridge
3:25 p.m.
Arrives Davis
3:50 p.m.
Davis Elementary is a
two-section school
located in north
Cheyenne. Although it is
a two-section school we
house three sections of
first– and second–grade
keeping class size to
16:1. During the 2014–
2015 school year we will
be transitioning into a new building. We will spend the
school year on the east side of town in the old
Eastridge Elementary building that has been renovated.
The Davis staff is committed to providing a solid, basic
foundation through the use of differentiated
instructional strategies. High expectations are held for
students in all areas of behavior, social and academic
performance. The school implements a true RTI system
with multiple levels of support to allow students
opportunities for academic growth. The school will be a
Microsoft pilot school in 2014 with students having
access to touch devices and training for staff and
students on the implementation of the latest Microsoft
technologies.
27
DEMING
715 W. 5th Ave.—771-2400
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Walkers’ arrival
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:40 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Lunch
2–2:15 p.m. Recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
The Deming building,
grades K–3, is part of
Deming/Miller Elementary
School. Miller contains
grades 4–6. Together,
both buildings comprise a
modified two-section
elementary school with
around 200 students. The
Deming building will
house two sections of grades K–3 and the Miller
building will house one section of grades 4–6. The staff
at Deming/Miller School is committed to provide a
quality education in an environment that is safe, friendly
and filled with high expectations for student growth.
One of its strengths is a strong and active PTO that is
very helpful with fundraising, classroom volunteers and
participation in various school improvement
committees. The goal is to have all students improve in
language arts and mathematical problem solving skills.
Students receive incentives and rewards for exemplary
behavior, meeting high academic standards, modeling
excellent citizenship and for regular attendance.
DILDINE
4312 Van Buren Ave.—771-2320
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:20 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program starts, student supervision begins
8:35 a.m. First bell/school begins
10:20 a.m. Recess (K–4)
11:10 a.m.–12:50 p.m. Recess and lunch blocks
2:05–2:15 p.m. Recess (K, 2, 5, 6)
2:20–2:30 p.m. Recess (1, 3, 4)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Dildine Elementary is one
of the largest elementary
schools in Wyoming,
serving nearly 500
students. The school was
named after Frank R.
Dildine, who came to
Cheyenne in 1901. The
students of Dildine
Elementary benefit from
a staff dedicated to improving student achievement and
28
a highly active PTO. Along with implementing district
curricular programs such as Balanced Literacy,
Everyday Math, social studies and science programs,
Dildine has implemented other research-based
programs. These include Accelerated Reader, Lucy
Calkins Writing and Lindamood-Bell reading
intervention. Even with our investment in great
programs, it is the great faculty that is committed to the
success of all students that makes Dildine Elementary
an exemplary learning environment.
FAIRVIEW
2801 E. 10th St.—771-2610
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 Students may arrive on playground/supervision begins
8:30 a.m. First bell
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Fairview and Lebhart are
sister elementary schools
located in east
Cheyenne. Lebhart is a
primary school serving
grades K–2 (two sections
of kindergarten, three of
first grade and two of
second grade with
approximately 125
students). Fairview serves grades 3–6 (two sections of
third grade and fourth grade and one section of fifth
and sixth grades with approximately 125 students).
Both schools have networked computer labs and tutors
to assist students who need additional academic
support. Monthly activities are planned to provide
families an opportunity for recreation and academic
enrichment. The schools’ improvement plan focuses on
improving student achievement in reading, math and
writing skills. Both schools receive Title I funds.
FREEDOM
4500 Happy Jack Road—771-2305
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Students may arrive on the playground/supervision
begins
8:30 a.m. Entrance bell
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10–10:15 a.m. Recess (K–3)
11:50 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Lunch (K–2), Recess 12:10–12:30 p.m.
11:50 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Recess (3–6), Lunch 12:10–12:30 p.m.
2–2:15 p.m. Recess (K–2)
2:15–2:30 p.m. Recess (3–6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
3:35–4 p.m. Supervision provided for bus students
www.laramie1.org
Freedom Elementary
serves as the
neighborhood school for
military children who
reside on F.E. Warren Air
Force Base. The school’s
educational setting offers
three sections of full-day
kindergarten, through
third grade (three
classrooms), and two sections of grades fourth through
sixth. Here at Freedom our goal is to provide the
highest quality education for your children while
creating a challenging learning environment filled with
valuable learning experiences. The highly-dedicated
staff at Freedom Elementary School have created a
safe and orderly learning environment where children
achieve academically while becoming responsible
citizens.
GILCHRIST
1108 Happy Jack Road—771-2285
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8:10–8:30 a.m. Purchase lunch tickets/Breakfast program begins
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10:15–10:30 a.m. Primary recess (K–3)
11:55 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Lunch (K–3), recess (4–6)
12:15–12:40 p.m. Lunch (4–6), recess (K–3)
2:05–2:20 p.m. Recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
3:35–4:45 p.m. After-school tutoring & sports
Gilchrist Elementary
School is a rural school,
which serves as the focal
point for the local
community. Built in 1984,
the aesthetically pleasing
facility is home to 120
students in grades K–6.
Bolstered by an active
PTO, a highly committed
staff focuses instructional efforts on the development of
skills that will enable students to become self-directed
lifelong learners and productive citizens. The computer
lab and library were remodeled providing students with
up-to-date technological enhancements to support
classroom instruction. Current school-wide initiatives
aimed at increasing student achievement include
implementation of Professional Learning Communities,
implementation of Balanced Literacy Framework,
implementation of Everyday Mathematics, an Extended
Day Learning program, Olweus Bully Prevention
Program and emphasis on writing. Gilchrist was a
nationally recognized Blue Ribbon School in 2011 for
persistently high achievement.
elementary
GOINS ELEMENTARY
224 Dey Ave.– 771-2620
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8:05–8:30 a.m. Breakfast program begins in gym
8:15 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:30 a.m. First bell rings
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell rings
10–10:15 a.m. Recess (K–1)
11:35 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Lunch & recess (K)
11:40 a.m.–12:20 p.m. Lunch & recess (1)
11:45 a.m.–12:25 p.m. Lunch & recess (2)
11:50 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Lunch & recess (3)
11:55 a.m.–12:35 p.m. Lunch & recess (4)
Noon–12:40 p.m. Lunch & recess (5)
12:05–12:45 p.m. Lunch & recess (6)
1:55–2:10 p.m. Recess (4–6)
2:15–2:30 p.m. Recess (2–3)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Goins, home of the
Gators, is a
neighborhood school
located directly north of
Johnson Junior High and
South High. In 2013, our
new building was
complete, with large
windows, skylights and
bright colors. The large
new library offers a view of the city and the Capitol
building, providing many spaces for curling up with a
good book. The art and music rooms are designed for
creative endeavors, and the classrooms are equipped
with the most recent technology. The mission of Goins
Elementary is to create a student-centered community
of lifelong, successful learners who will be able to
access, process and apply information through the
appropriate use of written, oral and technological
resources. All students are supported to develop
individual strengths and character taught and
supported as part of our Positive Behavior Support and
Olweus anti-bullying programs. Our dedicated staff
works to support the learning of each child at individual
levels through the acquisition of common core
standards, while building a feeling of true community.
29
HEBARD
413 Seymour Ave.—771-2450
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:20 p.m.
8:10 a.m. Bus students only (supervision)
8:20 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:20 a.m. Free universal breakfast for all students
8:30 a.m. First bell
8:35 a.m. Classes begin, free breakfast in class/tardy bell
11:35 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Recess & lunch (K–2)
11:35 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Recess & lunch (3–6)
2–2:20 p.m. Primary recess (two 10-minute sessions)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Hebard Elementary is
located in the southcentral part of Cheyenne.
For the 2014–2015
school year, we will have
two sections of
kindergarten, first,
second, and third grade,
one section of fourth, fifth
and sixth grade. Hebard
receives school-wide Title I funding and offers
additional assistance to all students in the areas of
language arts and math. An art room, music room,
living skills center, media center, resource room, district
PALS Program, resource room, and district English as
a Second Language (ESL) are housed at Hebard.
HENDERSON
2820 Henderson Drive—771-2550
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.
8–8:25 a.m. Breakfast program
8:15–8:25 a.m. Walkers’/drop-offs’ arrival
8:30 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10–10:15 a.m. Recess (K–2)
11:40 a.m.–noon Lunch (K–1)
Noon–12:15 p.m. Recess (K–1)
11:40–11:55 a.m. Recess (2–3)
11:55 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Lunch (2–3)
12:15–12:35 p.m. Lunch (4–6)
12:35–12:50 p.m. Recess (4–6)
2–2:15 p.m. Recess (K–3)
2:15–2:30 p.m. Recess (4–6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
30
Henderson Elementary,
home to the soaring
Eagle, was built in the
Henderson subdivision of
Cheyenne in 1952. The
building currently houses
two sections of
kindergarten, three
first- and second-grade
classes and two sections
of grades three through six. Building enhancements
include a nice size library, computer lab, art room,
music room, one special education room and a gym
that serves as a multipurpose room. Henderson is
located in the east-central part of the city and one of
our strengths is a strong and active PTA which helps
with fund-raisers and volunteering in the classrooms.
Our Henderson mission works toward high behavioral
and academic standards with the goal of helping
students become lifelong learners and productive
citizens. Some of the activities and programs at
Henderson are CLIP, Lindamood-Bell, LLI, Science
Fair, We the People, school-wide intervention time and
after-school sports. Our school community is committed
to providing a high-quality education for each child and
working with our parents on a daily basis.
HOBBS
5710 Syracuse Road—771-2560
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:15 a.m. Walkers’/drop-offs’ arrival
8:30 a.m. Bell rings
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:05–11:45 a.m. Recess & lunch (K, 3)
11:25 a.m.–12:05 p.m. Recess & lunch (1, 2, 4)
11:45 a.m.–12:25 p.m. Recess & lunch (5, 6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Hobbs Elementary is a
K–6 three-section
professional learning
community in the
northern part of
Cheyenne. Teachers
work in collaborative
teams to ensure students
are learning at high
levels. There are three
full-day kindergarten classes and a 16:1 student/
teacher ratio in first, second and third grade.
Approximately 450 students are enrolled at Hobbs. The
mission of the Hobbs Elementary staff is to ensure
every student masters grade-level content. Hobbs has
a curriculum that is integrated with technology. Along
with a 30-computer lab, there is a five-computer
research center in the library. Each classroom has
www.laramie1.org
additional computers for student use. Strong parental
support is an essential component of our school.
JESSUP
6113 Evers Blvd.—771-2570
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.– 4:20 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:30 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
9:45–10 a.m. Recess (K, 2, 6)
11:55 a.m.–12:40 p.m. Lunch and recess at varied times
1:45–2 p.m. Recess (K, 1, 3)
2:15–2:30 p.m. Recess (4, 5)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Jessup Elementary,
home of the Jaguars, is
located in the Western
Hill’s neighborhood of
Cheyenne. Celebrating
more than 50 years of
excellence, students,
staff, and parents work
together toward the
school-improvement
goals for reading, writing and math. A strong network of
parent and community volunteers support the
instructional program on a daily basis including
providing assistance in the classrooms and purchasing
technology to improve instruction. Activities like Honors
Reading, We the People, Lindamood-Bell, Thinking
Strategies, and Extended Day instruction offer students
additional academic challenges and interventions.
Jessup is a recipient of the prestigious No Child Left
Behind Blue Ribbon School award from the U.S.
Department of Education. Our school community is
committed to providing a high-quality education for
each child.
LEBHART
807 Coolidge St.—771-2614
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:15 a.m. Students may arrive on playground/supervision begins
8:30 a.m. First bell
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
elementary
Fairview and Lebhart are
sister elementary schools
located in east
Cheyenne. Lebhart is a
primary school serving
grades K–2 (two sections
of kindergarten, three of
first grade and two of
second grade with
approximately 125
students). Fairview serves grades 3–6 (two sections of
third grade and fourth grade and one section of fifth
and sixth grades with approximately 125 students).
Both schools have networked computer labs and tutors
to assist students who need additional academic
support. Monthly activities are planned to provide
families an opportunity for recreation and academic
enrichment. The schools’ improvement plan focuses on
improving student achievement in reading, math and
writing skills. Both schools receive Title I funds.
MILLER
3501 Evans Ave.—771-2376
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program available at Deming. Breakfast bus leaves
Miller at 7:50 a.m.
8:15 a.m. Walkers’ arrival
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
11:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Lunch
2–2:15 p.m. Recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
The Deming building,
grades K–3, is part of
Deming/Miller Elementary
School. Miller contains
grades 4–6. Together,
both buildings comprise a
modified two-section
elementary school with
around 200 students. The
Deming building will
house two sections of grades K–3 and the Miller
building will house one section of grades 4–6. The staff
at Deming/Miller School is committed to provide a
quality education in an environment that is safe, friendly
and filled with high expectations for student growth.
One of its strengths is a strong and active PTO that is
very helpful with fundraising, classroom volunteers and
participation in various school improvement
committees. The goal is to have all students improve in
language arts and mathematical problem solving skills.
Students receive incentives and rewards for exemplary
behavior, meeting high academic standards, modeling
excellent citizenship and for regular attendance.
31
PIONEER PARK
1407 Cosgriff Court—771-2316
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.– 4:20 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:20 a.m. Walkers’/drop-offs’ arrival
8:30 a.m. School begins
9:55–10:10 a.m. Recess (3–6)
10:15–10:30 a.m. Recess (K–2)
11:35 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Lunch & recess (K)
11:40 a.m.–12:20 p.m. Lunch & recess (1)
11:45 a.m.–12:25 p.m. Lunch & recess (2)
11:40 a.m.–12:20 p.m. Recess & lunch (3–4)
11:45 a.m.–12:25 p.m. Recess & lunch (5–6)
2–2:15 p.m. Afternoon recess (K–2)
2:20–2:35 p.m. Afternoon recess (3–6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Pioneer Park is located in
west Cheyenne. The
school has a unique
combination of programs
serving a variety of
populations. Students in
this unit participate in
Title I school-wide
projects with additional
funding provided by the
federal government. Pioneer Park School is highly
supported by the parents and enjoys a rich tradition
and reputation for student success and parent
satisfaction. Trailblazers, an academic high-potential
program for qualified children, is available at Pioneer
Park and Afflerbach for students from throughout the
district.
PODER ACADEMY CHARTER
2201 Morrie Ave.—632-2248
The PODER Academy is a free
public charter school with one
mission: To prepare students
for college and beyond,
through rigorous academic and
specially selected athletic
programs. Students at our school will master the core
subjects such as math, reading, and writing, at grade
level or beyond. We believe in direct instruction,
discipline and focus. Our classrooms are structured
and students are required to remain on task the entire
time they are in school. We offer tutoring for those
who need an extra boost, and support for English
language learners. Simply put, we do whatever it
takes to ensure that our students are prepared and
ready to compete. In addition, students will receive
daily lessons in tennis and chess from specially
trained instructors. Research has shown that tennis
and chess have a positive correlation to academic
32
success, and help promote healthy lifestyles well into
adulthood. Our students will participate in a variety of
tournaments in the school and around the city. We fully
intend to produce some of the best tennis and chess
players in the state, and perhaps nationally. Our
second and third graders took first place honors in the
Colorado State Chess tournament last fall. Last but not
least, we demand a commitment from the students and
their parents. We hold parents accountable to monitor
their child’s academic progress, adhere to attendance
policies, and communicate with the school on a regular
basis. The word PODER is a Spanish word of
empowerment but it also serves as an acronym for
what we stand for … Proud, Outstanding, Determined,
Educated, and Responsible.
ROSSMAN
916 W. College Drive—771-2544
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
8 a.m. Playground supervision begins
8:20 a.m. Free universal breakfast for all students
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
Recess varies by grade
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
Rossman Elementary is
located in south
Cheyenne near Orchard
Valley and the Allison
Addition. The facility was
named after John
Rossman, an early
pioneer and
businessman. The
school houses
approximately 340–350 students in grades K–6. The
faculty and staff offers students a variety of innovative
programs designed to meet the needs of a diverse
student body. Although all staff are focused on
improving student learning and academic performance
in reading, writing, and mathematics, attention is also
given to helping students develop responsible
citizenship.
SADDLE RIDGE
6815 Wilderness Trail—771-2360
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4:20 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8–8:30 a.m. Playground supervision/morning recess
8:30 a.m. School begins
11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Lunch and recess (Visit our website,
www.laramie1.org for specific times)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
www.laramie1.org
Saddle Ridge is a
community of learners
who believe in developing
the whole child. We are
committed to providing a
rigorous learning
environment that is
innovative and engages
our children. Through the
use of best practice in the classrooms, collaboration
within our Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)
and the use of technology, our commitment to a
world-class educational environment can be felt
throughout our school community. Saddle Ridge is also
committed to developing positive behaviors and social
skills. We utilize the Positive Behavior Support
framework to establish our school rules and behavioral
expectations. Through vigilant teaching of these
behaviors, consistent expectations and rewards for
good social interactions, we work diligently to ensure
your children understand how to be positive, productive
citizens. We have an open-door policy and encourage
parents to be a part of our school community. Whether
you are able to help out in the classroom, be a part of
the Parent Teacher Organization, participate in school
activities or simply support your children’s education at
home, we look forward to working closely with you.
Through an ongoing commitment to high academic and
social expectations, we will continue our drive to
guarantee a high-quality education in a safe and
orderly environment.
SUNRISE
5021 E. 13th St.—771-2280
School Schedule
Office hours: 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
8 a.m. Breakfast program begins
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
9:45–10 a.m. Recess (K–PALS)
10:05–10:20 a.m. Recess (1, 2)
11:15–11:45 a.m. Lunch (PALS)
11:30–11:55 a.m. (K, 1)
Noon–12:15 p.m. Recess (K, 1)
11:45 a.m.–12:10 p.m. Lunch (2, 3)
12:15–12:30 p.m. Recess (2, 3)
Noon–12:25 p.m. Lunch (4–6)
12:30–12:45 p.m. Recess (4–6)
1:50–2:05 p.m. Recess (3, 4)
2:10–2:25 p.m. Recess (5, 6)
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
elementary
Sunrise is located in the
Sun Valley area. This
school serves
approximately 350
students in grades K–6.
Sunrise classrooms are
equipped with SMART
Boards, wireless
network and FM sound
systems to better serve
students’ needs and provide academic support. Sunrise
uses Love & Logic and has developed positive
behaviors with positive social skills to help meet
behavior expectations. Our Parent Teacher
Organization plans and provides families opportunities
for recreation. Academic enrichment focuses on
improving student achievement in reading, math and
writing.
WILLADSEN
645 Harriman Road,
Granite Canon—771-2295
School Schedule
Office hours: (office is at Gilchrist 771-2285) 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m.
School hours: 8:15 a.m.–4 p.m.
8:35 a.m. School begins/tardy bell
10:05 a.m. Recess
11:50 a.m. Lunch
12:20 p.m. Recess
2 p.m. Recess
3:35 p.m. Dismissal
4 p.m. Teacher leaves
Willadsen Elementary
School is a K–6 rural
school located 20 miles
west of Cheyenne
directly off I-80 at the
Harriman Road exit. The
school has one full-time
teacher, four part-time
teachers and one
paraeducator. Willadsen
places special emphasis on providing students with a
learning environment that is challenging, supportive
and caring. A SMART Board and computers are
available to enhance daily instruction in all subject
areas. Willadsen continues to be the focal point of the
community and parents are actively involved in the
educational process of their children Current school
wide initiatives aimed at increasing student
achievement include implementation of Professional
Learning Communities, implementation of Balanced
Literacy Framework, implementation of Everyday
Mathematics, an Extended Day Learning program,
Olweus Bully Prevention Program and emphasis on
writing.
33
FREQUENTLY REQUESTED NUMBERS
Central Administration ................................................
Superintendent of Schools .........................................
Assistant Superintendent of Instruction ...................
Assistant Superintendent of Human Resources ......
Assistant Superintendent of Support Operations ...
Special Services ..........................................................
Federal Programs ........................................................
Technology ..................................................................
Department of Instruction...........................................
New Teacher Induction/Mentoring .............................
Community Relations .................................................
Business Services ......................................................
Facilities & Risk Management ...................................
Finance ........................................................................
Nutrition Services .......................................................
Planning & Construction ...........................................
Transportation ............................................................
Website ........................................................................
771-2100
771-2121
771-2188
771-2163
771-2115
771-2174
771-2214
771-2222
771-2214
771-2285
771-2192
771-2117
771-2633
771-2110
771-2440
771-2124
771-2628
www.laramie1.org
NOTES
34
www.laramie1.org
LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply

checklist
KINDERGARTEN
2
4
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2











LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply















LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1

checklist
SECOND GRADE
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
Boxes of crayons (Crayola)—24 count
Glue sticks
4 oz. bottles of Elmer’s white school glue—no gel
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
Box of colored pencils
Box ziplock bags—sandwich size
One-inch three ring binder—no zipper
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
elementary
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
Boxes of crayons (Crayola)—24 count, classic colors
Glue sticks
4 oz. bottle of Elmer’s white school glue—no gel
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
One-inch three ring binder—no zipper
Art/Pencil box
Box ziplock bags—quart size
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.















checklist
FIRST GRADE
Boxes of crayons (Crayola)—24 count
Glue sticks
4 oz. bottle of Elmer’s white school glue—no gel
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Box #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Box ziplock bags—gallon size
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
school supply

LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply

checklist
THIRD GRADE


















1
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
Box of crayons (Crayola)—24 count
Glue stick
4 oz. bottle of Elmer’s white school glue—no gel
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
Spiral notebooks
Box of colored pencils (12–16 count)
Packet of wide ruled white notebook paper (loose leaf)
Large pencil pouch (zippered)
Box ziplock bags—quart size
One-inch three ring binder—no zipper
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
35
LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply

checklist
FOURTH GRADE
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
Box of crayons (Crayola)—24 count
Glue sticks
4 oz. bottle of Elmer’s white school glue—no gel
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
Spiral notebooks
Box of colored pencils (12–16 count)
Packet of wide ruled white notebook paper
(loose leaf)
 1 Pencil pouch (zippered)
 1 1½-inch three ring binder—no zipper
 2 Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”














Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply

checklist
FIFTH GRADE












3
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1




1
1
2
2
Glue sticks
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
Spiral notebooks
Box of colored pencils (12–16 count)
Packet of wide ruled white notebook paper
(loose leaf)
Pencil pouch (zippered)
Two-inch three ring binder—no zipper
Highlighters
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
LARAMIE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT 1
school supply

checklist
SIXTH GRADE












3
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1





1
1
1
2
2
Glue sticks
Box washable markers—8 count
Fiskars™ type scissors
Boxes #2 pencils—24 count
Boxes facial tissue (plain)
Pocket folders
Backpack—full size that fits 8 ½”x 11” papers
Erasers—large
Composition notebooks
Spiral notebooks
Box of colored pencils (12–16 count)
Packet of wide ruled white notebook paper
(loose leaf)
Packet of 8 subject dividers
Pencil pouch (zippered)
Two-inch three ring binder—no zipper
Highlighters
Packages of sticky notes 3”x 3”
Laramie County School District 1 schools supply
lists are standardized for each grade level K–6.
The same grade-level list will be used for every
school in the LCSD1 system.
36
www.laramie1.org
INDEX
Absences, excuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accelerated learning programs . . . . . . . . .
Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Activity fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Address change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adopt-A-School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asbestos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
At-risk students (academic) . . . . . . . . . . .
At-risk students (behavior). . . . . . . . . . . .
Bicycles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Birthdays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board policy summaries . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Breakfast program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bullying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bullying prevention program . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Business partnerships . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Carnegie units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cell phones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Child abuse/neglect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ChildSafe calling program . . . . . . . . . . . .
Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communicable diseases . . . . . . . . . . . .
Community partnerships. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Computer use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Content Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crisis intervention (behavior) . . . . . . . . . .
Crisis management (emergencies) . . . . . . .
Disabled students (physical, mental, emotional)
Discipline procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
District annual report . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
District goals (performance/assessment) . . . .
Districtwide newspaper . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency closing (early release/weather) . . .
Emergency procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enrollment policy (out-of-district) . . . . . . . .
Evacuation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Extended learning programs . . . . . . . . . .
Field trips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Free/reduced meals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Geography Bee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gifted students (Trailblazers) . . . . . . . . . .
Grade/progress reports . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grading systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gum & candy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Health information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Homebound students . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Homework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Honor rolls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hotline (WeTip) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Illness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Immunizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kindergarten Round-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Late start (2-hour delay) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Library services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lockdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
elementary
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. . . . .6
. . . . .9
. . 10, 14
. . . . 10
. . . . .6
. . . . 11
. . . . .5
. . . . 10
. . . . .9
. . . 11,12
. . . . .8
. . . . .8
. . 20–21
. . . .6–7
. . 11, 21
. . 11, 21
. . 12, 19
. . . . 11
. . . . 23
. . . . .8
. . . . 15
. . . . .6
. . 10–11
. . 13–15
. . . . 11
. . . . .9
. . 17–18
. . . . 22
11, 20–21
. . 16–17
. . 12–13
12, 20–21
. . . . 20
. . . . 22
. . . . 20
. . 15–17
. . 16–17
. . . . 18
. . . . 16
. . . . .9
. . . . 10
. . . . .7
. . . . 10
. . . . .9
. . . . 21
. . . . 22
. . . . .8
. . 13–15
. . . . 13
. . . . 22
. . . . 22
. . . . 12
. . 13–15
. . . . 15
. . 17–18
. . . . .6
. . . . 16
. . . . .9
. . . . 16
Lost & Found . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lunch program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Make-up work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mastery subjects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medication at school . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Music enrichment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Music fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Music instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Names & addresses (students) . . . . . . . . . .
Names & photos (students) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Names on clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Names on personal equipment . . . . . . . . . .
New students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Newsletters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nondiscrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nurses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open houses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parent implied consents . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parent involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parent surveys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parent volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parents on committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical education participation . . . . . . . . . .
Playground conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading (language arts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recess policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Red Ribbon Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registration requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Returning students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rights (students & parents) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safe & Drug Free Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . .
School dress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
School visitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
School-to-Careers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Science Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sexual Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spelling Bee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standards (state & district) . . . . . . . . . . . .
State of the District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Student behavior expectations . . . . . . . . . .
Student council (organizations) . . . . . . . . . .
Student information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Student/parent rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Student release during school . . . . . . . . . . .
Student release to other than custodial parent(s) .
Surveys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tardies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Telephone calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Throat cultures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Title I schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Toys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verification of home address . . . . . . . . . . .
Video camera use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather (recess) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weather (storms) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing (language arts) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . .6–7
. . . . . . 22
. . . . . . 22
. . . . 14–15
. . . . . . .9
. . . . . . 10
. . . . . . .9
. . . . . 6, 18
. . . . . 6, 18
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . 11
. . . . . . .5
. . . . . . 13
. . . . . . 10
. . . . 17–18
. . . . 10–11
. . . . . . 11
. . . . . . 10
. . . . 10–11
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . 12
. . . . . . .9
. . . . . . .7
. . . . . . 11
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . .6
. . . 5, 20–21
. . . . . . 11
. . . . . . 12
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . 10
. . . . . . 10
. . . . . . 11
. . . . 12–13
. . . . . . .9
. . . . 22–23
. . . . . . 20
. . . . . . 12
. . . . . . 10
. . . . . . 18
. . . . 20–21
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . 11
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . 22
. . . . . . 15
. . . . . . .9
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . 19
. . . . . . .6
. . . . . . .8
. . . . . . .7
15–16, 19–20
. . . . . . .9
37
2810 House Avenue
Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001
307-771-2100
www.laramie1.org
Facebook: www.facebook.com/LaramieCountySD1