Living OLDER Grandparents as Parents Part II

OLDER
Vol 30 Issue 11
A United Way Agency
Serving Clay, Parke, Putnam,
Sullivan, Vermillion and
Vigo Counties
November, 2014
NONPROFIT ORG.
AUTOCR
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
CLINTON, IN
PERMIT NO. 6
Living
A publication of
the Area 7 Agency
on Aging and
Disabled
Area 7 Agency on Aging
and Disabled
1718 Wabash Ave.
Terre Haute, IN 47807
OPTIMISM • LOVE • DIGNITY • ENTHUSIASM • RESPECT
Grandparents as Parents
Part II
Lynn Stanton
“Makes a Difference”
in Sullivan County
The WTHI TV “Make a Difference” Award honors
someone in the community who makes a difference in
the lives of others. According to client family member, Kim Hurteau, Lynn Stanton is the perfect someone in this regard.
Kim’s sister, Lorrie Racey, became a client of Lynn
Stanton in 2010. Since then, all of Lorrie’s family
members have seen the help Lynn has provided Lor- Lynn Stanton with the
rie shared that Lynn is a nice person. Lynn helps her “Make a Difference”
out when she needs it. She is kind. She listens when Award she received from
you are having trouble with something and helps you being nominated by Lorrie
Racey and her family.
with it.
Kim said, “If there is something I could do to show
people how good she is, I would do it,” and she did. After learning about the “Make
a Difference” Award while watching WTHI, Kim went online and filled out the
form.
When she nominated Lynn, Kim had to tell her that she had done so. She did not
have to tell her in advance that she had won the honor of receiving the award. Kim
had been informed when WTHI was coming and she had made arrangement for the
van to park next door to Lorrie’s house to help keep the secret.
Lynn didn’t know they were coming. She was wanting to get there that day
because she was running late which she never does. When she arrived at Lorrie’s
house, she knew there were two guys there who were out of the ordinary.
All of the client’s family was there, but Lynn didn’t think anything about that
because Lorrie was due for her annual assessment and they might have been there
to help answer questions. When WTHI presented her with the award, Lynn said, “I
was so got that I don’t remember what I told the man who interviewed me.” Kim
said that the look on her face was priceless. Her family took her out to dinner and
gave her roses to celebrate. (The taping of the award presentation aired on WTHI
on September 29, 2014.
Kim shared that Lynn does a lot that most people do not realize. She had helped
clients get wheelchair accessible ramps to help maintain their independence and
she has help a client acquire a chairlift. She is always helping someone.
When Lynn says she will do something, she does it. She always says she will
“try.”, but she always comes through. She always calls clients and their family
members back when they have questions or need assistance with something.
Jean Ray, another of Lorrie’s sisters said: This is who she is. For Lynn, it is not
just a job, it comes natural to her. Kim added: Lynn has a family of her own, but
she has her client family. She is a very good case manager. She is very special. She
is caring and compassionate towards her clients and that is what they need
Lynn Stanton has been a case manager with Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled/WCIEDD, Inc. for almost 5 years. She enjoys her work. She says it keeps
her moving. While she is very pleased to have received the “Make a Difference”
Award, her reward is the ability to help her clients get what they need.
Raising grandchildren tip 4: Focus on creating a stable environment
While it will take your grandkids time to adjust to their new living arrangement, there are things you can do to make the transition easier. Above all,
your grandchildren need to feel secure. Children thrive in an environment
that is stable and predictable.
• Establish a routine. Routines and schedules help make a child’s world feel
safe. Set a schedule for mealtimes and bedtimes. Create special rituals that
you and your grandchildren can share on weekends or when getting ready
for bed.
• Encourage their input in their new home. Let your grandkids help pack
and move in their things to the extent that they’re able for their age. Encourage them to decorate their new room and arrange things as they’d like.
Having some control will make the adjustment easier.
• Set up clear, age-appropriate house rules and enforce them consistently. Children feel more secure when they know what to expect. Loving
boundaries tell the child he or she is safe and protected.
• Make sure that each grandchild has a private space. If grandchildren are
sharing a bedroom, get creative: use a divider to partition off a private area
in a bigger room, erect a playhouse in the backyard, or set up a tent in the
family room.
• Offer your time and attention. You can be a consistent, reassuring presence for your grandkids. Try to make time to interact with them at the
beginning of the day, when they come home from school, and before bed
Raising grandchildren tip 5: Encourage open and honest
communication
Communicating openly and honestly with your grandchildren is one of
the best things you can do to help them cope with their new situation. It’s
especially important to take the time to really listen to your grandkids. In
this difficult time, they need an adult they can go to with their questions,
concerns, and feelings.
• Plan regular times when you sit and talk to each other, free from TV,
games, or other distractions.
• Encourage your grandchildren to talk about their feelings, both good
and bad. Try to listen without judging or dismissing their feelings.
• Help your grandkids learn to identify their emotions. For example, if
your grandchild seems upset, you might say, “You look sad. Is something
bothering you?”
• Young children communicate through play. Young children may not be
able to verbalize how they feel, but will express themselves through their
play.
• It’s okay to say, “I don’t know.” You don’t have to have an answer for everything. If you don’t know when mommy’s coming home, for example, be
Client Lorrie Racey and honest about it. Don’t evade the question or lie.
her sister, Kim Hurteau,
talk about why they nominated Area 7 Case Manager Lynn Stanton for the
WTHI “Make a Difference” Award.
Raising grandchildren tip 6: Encourage contact with parents
It is not always possible for children to remain in contact with their parents,
and at times, it may not be in a child’s best interest. But in general, it is good
for your grandchildren to maintain relationships with their parents, especially if they may live with them again. If meeting in person isn’t possible,
you can encourage contact in other ways, including phone calls, cards and
letters, and email.
Continued on Page 9
Older Living
Page 2
Social Security
QUESTION: What is Medicare Open Enrollment? Do You Need to Evaluate
Your Plan?
ANSWERS:
1. What is it? Throughout the year, Medicare has different enrollment periods.
The Open Enrollment Period, or OEP, is the timeframe during which Medicare
beneficiaries (people with Medicare) can make changes to their Medicare plans.
November 2014
Agency Contacts & Staff
1718 Wabash Ave
Terre Haute, IN 47807
(812) 238-1561 or 1-800-489-1561
http://www.westcentralin.com
Ron Hinsenkamp, Executive Director
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561
Connie Conner, Executive Secretary
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561
In-Home Services
Jenni Bigham, Case Management Team Leader
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 241
Debbie Hardas, Case Management Team Leader
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 245
Jordan Pirsch, Pre-Admission Screening Coordinator
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3146
Dixie Ringham, Pre-Admission Screening Clerk/
Records Keeper
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 230
2. When is it? OEP comes in the fall. This year’s OEP will take place October 15 through December 7, 2014. Any changes you make to your Medicare plan
during this period go into effect on January 1, 2015.
Dana McLain, Business Manager
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 235-5503
3. What changes can you make? During OEP, you can…
• Switch from Original Medicare (Medicare Parts A and B) to a Medicare Advantage (Medicare Part C) plan.
• Switch from a Medicare Advantage plan back to Original Medicare.
• Switch from one Medicare Advantage plan to another. This might involve
switching from a plan without Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage to one
that has it, or vice-versa.
• Make changes to your Medicare Part D prescription drug plan:
• Join a Part D plan.
• Switch from one Part D plan to another one.
• Drop your Part D plan altogether.
Note: Medicare Supplement Insurance plans are an exception. You can join one
at any time during the year, not just during OEP.
Aging and Disabled Services Division
Linda Chesher, Services Clerk/Records Keeper
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 229
Administration
Gloria Wetnight, Director
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3140
Nutrition Services
Chris Mangia, Nutrition Program Specialist
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3139
Patty Cannoy, Health, Wellness & Outreach
Coordinator/OLDER Living Editor
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3142
Jennifer Torpy, Nutrition Program Meal Site
Coordinator
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3144
4. Why is OEP so important? Once the Medicare Open Enrollment Period
closes on December 7, you can’t make any changes to your Medicare plan until
the following year. There are some exceptions, such as if you move out of the area
served by your plan, are eligible for Extra Help/Low Income Subsidy programs, or
are dual eligible (on both Medicare and Medicaid). But for most people on Medicare, the OEP is the only time when you can make a change.
Want to receive a free subscription
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Fill out the form below and mail it to: OLDER Living,
1718 Wabash Avenue; Terre Haute, IN 47807. You
can also sign up by sending a message by email to:
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Name
Address
City, State, Zip
Phone
_____ Check here if you want to be taken off the OLDER
Living mailing list
John Turner, Ombudsman
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 235-2289
Kathy Adams, Administrative Assistant
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 237
Aging and Disability Resource Center
Michelle Graham, ADRC Coordinator
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3143
Glenda Parks, Information & Assistance Specialist
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 917-3141
Robin Walsh, Options Counselor
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 238-1561, Ext 254
Transportation Services
Dale Nightingale, Transportation Coordinator
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (812) 232-2675
McMillan Adult Day Service – (812) 232-4627
Patty Butterfield, Director
Email: [email protected]
Simone Gehrke, Assistant Director
Email: [email protected]
Teri Lankston, Activities Aide
Email: [email protected]
Bonnie Washington, Activity Aide
Email: [email protected]
Tracey Whited, Activity Aide
Email: [email protected]
5. Do you have to make a change during OEP? No, you do not have to make
any changes. If the Medicare coverage you have now is working for you, and your
plan(s) is offered for 2014, then you can keep your coverage as it is. However,
because this time comes but once a year, it’s a good idea to evaluate your coverage
during Open Enrollment Period every year. That way, you’ll know if you already
have the best coverage options for you, or if you need to make some changes.
If you would like to schedule an appointment or have any questions regarding the Part D options information or about services through Area 7 Agency
on Aging and Disabled, contact our Aging and Disability Resource Center at (812)
238-1561 or toll free at 1-800-489-1561. Medicare Part D options information is
provided by appointment only.
ADVERTISING IN OLDER LIVING
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same — size and copy — and fee is paid for all three months.
12-Month Discount: Pay for a year, get 2 months free. No size
change. Can change the ad copy up to four times during the
year.
Older Living
November 2014
Page 3
Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled Nutrition Program
2014
NOVEMBER
2014
The Nutrition Program of Area 7
Agency on Aging and Disabled serves
persons who are aged 60+ and persons
who are disabled. For persons who are
60+, the meals are on a donation basis, and a $2 donation per meal is recommended. Area 7 serves Clay, Parke,
3
Chicken & Noodles
w/Mashed Potatoes
Broccoli
Bread w/Jelly
Mandarin Oranges
Milk/Coffee/Tea
467 calories
4
TUESDAY
BBQ Pork w/Bun
Vegetable Soup
Hot Fruit Salad
Milk/Coffee/Tea
628 calories
5
WEDNESDAY
Salisbury Steak
Hominy
Vegetable Blend
Bread w/Margarine
Mixed Fruit
Milk/Coffee/Tea
547 calories
Chicken Patty w/Bread
Broccoli w/Margarine
Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Pudding
Milk/Coffee/Tea
567 calories
11
HOLIDAY
SITES CLOSED
12
17
Hotdog w/Bun
Baked Beans
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
Milk/Coffee/Tea
777 calories
18
Pork Roast w/Gravy
Over Noodles
Broccoli
Carrots
Applesauce
Milk/Coffee/Tea
495 calories
19
25
Turkey
w/Dressing & Gravy
Glazed Carrots
Creamed Peas
Roll w/Margarine
Pumpkin Pie
Milk/Coffee/Tea
984 calories
26
24
Stuffed Baked Potato
w/Meat & Broccoli
w/Shredded Cheese
Pears
Graham Crackers
Milk/Coffee/Tea
547 calories
Anyone aged 60+ who would like to
try a meal at an Area 7 Congregate Dining Site should call the Area 7 Nutrition
Department at (812) 238-1561 or tollfree 1-800-489-1561. Reservations must
be made in advance. Those who are aged
60+ and/or disabled who would like to
REGULAR MENUS
10
Chopped Steak
w/Gravy
Brussel Sprouts
Mashed Potatoes
Bread w/Margarine
Apple Juice
Milk/Coffee/Tea
505 calories
see if they qualify for home delivered
meals should call the Information and
Assistance Department at (812) 2381561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561.
All contributions for meals served in
Area 7 Nutrition Sites are considered
donations and are non-refundable.
“DONATIONS ARE APPRECIATED”
THURSDAY
6
Onion Sage Chicken
Peas
Cauliflower
Bread w/Margarine
Strawberry Oatmeal Bar
Milk/Coffee/Tea
556 calories
3
17
24
MONDAY
Chicken & Noodles
w/Mashed Potatoes
Broccoli
Mandarin Oranges
Milk/Coffee/Tea
50 carbs
Chicken Patty w/Bread
Broccoli w/Margarine
Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Pudding
Milk/Coffee/Tea
66 carbs
Hotdog w/Bun
Pickled Beets
Mixed Vegetables
Pineapple
Milk/Coffee/Tea
66 carbs
Stuffed Baked Potato
w/Meat & Broccoli
w/Shredded Cheese
Pears
Milk/Coffee/Tea
67 carbs
4
11
18
25
BBQ Pork w/Bread
Vegetable Soup
Hot Fruit Salad
Milk/Coffee/Tea
71 carbs
HOLIDAY
SITES CLOSED
Pork Loin w/Gravy
Over Noodles
Broccoli
Carrots
Applesauce
Milk/Coffee/Tea
67 carbs
Turkey w/Gravy
Glazed Carrots
Peas
Bread w/Margarine
Mixed Berry Applesauce
Milk/Coffee/Tea
61 carbs
5
14
Chili w/2 pkgs crackers
Baked Potato
Applesauce
Milk/Coffee/Tea
664 calories
Creamed Ham
w/Biscuit
Potatoes O’Brien
Stewed Tomatoes
Orange Juice
Milk/Coffee/Tea
654 calories
20
Ham Steak w/Onions
Corn
Spiced Peaches
Bread w/Margarine
Cinnamon Bears
Milk/Coffee/Tea
780 calories
21
Parmesan Chicken
Seasoned Cabbage
Bread w/Margarine
Berry Pear Crisp
Tomato Juice
Milk/Coffee/Tea
509 calories
Beef & Peppers
Over Rice
Beets – ½ cup
Peas & Carrots
Peaches
Milk/Coffee/Tea
469 calories
27
HOLIDAY
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
SITES CLOSED
28
HOLIDAY
SITES CLOSED
WEDNESDAY
12
19
26
7
Burrito
w/Cheese Sauce
Peas & Carrots
Seasoned Cabbage
Pears
Milk/Coffee/Tea
481 calories
DIABETIC MENUS
TUESDAY
FRIDAY
Swiss Steak
Sweet Potato
Hot Applesauce
Bread w/Margarine
Milk/Coffee/Tea
538 calories
13
These menus are served
in the Area7 Agency on
Aging and Disabled Nutrition
Sites in Clay, Parke, Putnam,
Sullivan, Vermillion and
Vigo Counties only
10
NOVEMBER
MONDAY
Putnam, Sullivan, Vermillion and Vigo
Counties in Indiana. The locations for
the Area 7 Congregate Dining Sites listed below help determine if a site is within driving or walking distance for interested participants; however, advance
reservations are required.
Salisbury Steak w/gravy
Hominy
Vegetable Blend
Bread w/Margarine
Mixed Fruit
Milk/Coffee/Tea
65 carbs
Chopped Steak w/Gravy
Brussel Sprouts
Mashed Potatoes
Bread w/Margarine
Apple Juice
Milk/Coffee/Tea
59 carbs
Creamed Ham
w/Biscuit
Potatoes O’Brien
Stewed Tomatoes
Orange Juice
Milk/Coffee/Tea
67 carbs
Beef & Peppers
Over Rice
Beets
Peas & Carrots
Peaches
Milk/Coffee/Tea
59 carbs
Onion Sage Chicken
Peas
Cauliflower
Bread w/Margarine
Strawberry Oatmeal Bar
Milk/Coffee/Tea
69 carbs
13
20
27
Note: We do not
discriminate as to race,
sex, or national origin ...
These menus are provided by Mid-Land Meals, Inc. It
will only meet state guidelines if recommended recipes
and products are used.
THURSDAY
6
Menus are subject to
change due to the
availability of food product.
Burrito
w/Cheese Sauce
Peas & Carrots
Seasoned Cabbage
Bread w/Margarine
Pears
Milk/Coffee/Tea
78 carbs
Ham Steak w/Onions
Corn
Spiced Peaches
Bread w/Margarine
Graham Cracker
Milk/Coffee/Tea
67 carbs
HOLIDAY
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
SITES CLOSED
These menus are served
in the Area7 Agency on
Aging and Disabled Nutrition
Sites in Clay, Parke, Putnam,
Sullivan, Vermillion and
Vigo Counties only
FRIDAY
7
Swiss Steak
Sweet Potato
Hot Applesauce
Cookie
Milk/Coffee/Tea
63 carbs
14
21
28
Chili w/Crackers
Baked Potato
Cauliflower
Applesauce
Milk/Coffee/Tea
66 carbs
Parmesan Chicken
Seasoned Cabbage
Peas
Bread w/Margarine
Pears
Milk/Coffee/Tea
60 carbs
HOLIDAY
SITES CLOSED
Menus are subject to
change due to the
availability of food product.
Note: We do not
discriminate as to race,
sex, or national origin ...
Want more information about aging and disability services? Call Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
at (812) 238-1561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561
Older Living
Page 4
Ombudsman: Listening & Talking to All Sides
by John Turner – Area 7 Ombudsman
Celebrating Nursing Facility
Residents’ Rights
A History of Celebrating Residents’ Rights
One way to honor residents receiving long-term care is by celebrating Residents’
Rights Month 2014. This is an opportunity to show tribute to residents and support
long-term care ombudsmen, citizen advocates, facility staff and family members
who work to promote and support residents’ rights. Setting aside a month to focus
on rights is an effective way to ensure this important topic is recognized in your
community, facility or state.
Residents’ Rights Month is celebrated each October and is designated by the
National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care* (the “Consumer Voice”),
to highlight residents living in all long-term care settings. It is a time to reflect on
the importance of the Nursing Home Reform Law of 1987 that promises quality of
life, quality of care and rights for each resident.
During this month, the Consumer Voice also gives special recognition to the
work of thousands of individuals who collaborate daily to help assure ignity, privacy and other basic human rights - often taken for granted in the community - are
maintained as an integral part of the lives of residents living in long-term care
settings.
Residents’ Rights Month originated as Residents’ Rights Week in 1981 at a
Consumer Voice annual meeting. Several nursing home residents in attendance
from across the United States decided it would be special for all residents if time
were set aside to celebrate residents and their rights, separate from annual National
Nursing Home Week events always held in May. The Consumer Voice organized
a successful petition drive to persuade Congress to designate a “Residents’ Rights
Day.” Senator Claude Pepper (D-FL) and Senator David Pryor (D-AR) responded
by introducing a Congressional Resolution for that purpose.
The Consumer Voice was also successful in making arrangements to take five
nursing home residents to the White House to meet with President Jimmy Carter’s
Special Counselor on Aging, Dr. Harold Sheppard. The residents who attended
were Janet Tulloch, Rae Spanover, Joan Knowlton, Ethel Gross and Virginia Caming (all now deceased).
Since 1981, the Consumer Voice has preserved the tradition of celebrating Residents’ Rights, and, in 2011, Residents’ Rights Week was expanded to Residents’
Rights Month. This expansion provides additional time for residents/facility staff,
family members, community advocates and ombudsmen to conduct educational
programs and festive events to call attention to this important topic.
What are Residents’ Rights?
Residents’ Rights:
Guarantee Quality of Life
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law requires each nursing home to care for
its residents in a manner that promotes and enhances the quality of life of each resident, ensuring dignity, choice, and self-determination.
All nursing homes are required “to provide services and activities to attain or
maintain the highest practicable physical, mental, and psychosocial well-being of
each resident in accordance with a written plan of care that… is initially prepared,
with participation, to the extent practicable, of the resident, the resident’s family, or
legal representative.” This means a resident should not decline in health or well-being as a result of the way a nursing facility provides care.
The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law protects the following rights of nursing
home residents:
The Right to Be Fully Informed of
• Available services and the charges for each service
• Facility rules and regulations, including a written copy of resident rights
• Address and telephone number of the State Ombudsman and state survey
agency
• State survey reports and the nursing home’s plan of correction
• Advance plans of a change in rooms or roommates
• Assistance if a sensory impairment exists
• Residents have a right to receive information in a language they understand
(Spanish, Braille, etc.)
Right to Complain
• Present grievances to staff or any other person, without fear of reprisal and with
prompt efforts by the facility to resolve those grievances
• To complain to the ombudsman program
November 2014
• To file a complaint with the state survey and certification agency
Right to Participate in One’s Own Care
• Receive adequate and appropriate care
• Be informed of all changes in medical condition
• Participate in their own assessment, care-planning, treatment, and discharge
• Refuse medication and treatment
• Refuse chemical and physical restraints
• Review one’s medical record
• Be free from charge for services covered by Medicaid or Medicare
Right to Privacy and Confidentiality
• Private and unrestricted communication with any person of their choice
• During treatment and care of one’s personal needs
• Regarding medical, personal, or financial affairs
Rights During Transfers and Discharges
Remain in the nursing facility unless a transfer or discharge:
• is necessary to meet the resident’s welfare;
• is appropriate because the resident’s health has improved and s/he no longer
requires nursing home care;
• is needed to protect the health and safety of other residents or staff;
• is required because the resident has failed, after reasonable notice, to pay the
facility charge for an item or service provided at the resident’s request
• Receive thirty-day notice of transfer or discharge which includes the reason,
effective date, location to which the resident is transferred or discharged, the right
to appeal, and the name, address, and telephone number of the state long-term care
ombudsman
• Safe transfer or discharge through sufficient preparation by the nursing home
Right to Dignity, Respect, and Freedom
• To be treated with consideration, respect, and dignity
• To be free from mental and physical abuse, corporal punishment, involuntary
seclusion, and physical and chemical restraints
• To self-determination
• Security of possessions
Right to Visits
• By a resident’s personal physician and representatives from the state survey
agency and ombudsman programs
• By relatives, friends, and others of the residents’ choosing
• By organizations or individuals providing health, social, legal, or other services
• Residents have the right to refuse visitors
Right to Make Independent Choices
• Make personal decisions, such as what to wear and how to spend free time
• Reasonable accommodation of one’s needs and preferences
• Choose a physician
• Participate in community activities, both inside and outside the nursing home
• Organize and participate in a Resident Council
• Manage one’s own financial affairs
Source: www.theconsumervoice.org
Social Security Announces 1.7 Percent
Benefit Increase for 2015
Monthly Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits
for nearly 64 million Americans will increase 1.7 percent in 2015, the Social
Security Administration announced today.
The 1.7 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) will begin with benefits
that more than 58 million Social Security beneficiaries receive in January
2015. Increased payments to more than 8 million SSI beneficiaries will
begin on December 31, 2014. The Social Security Act ties the annual COLA
to the increase in the Consumer Price Index as determined by the Department
of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Some other changes that take effect in January of each year are based on
the increase in average wages. Based on that increase, the maximum amount
of earnings subject to the Social Security tax (taxable maximum) will
increase to $118,500 from $117,000. Of the estimated 168 million workers
who will pay Social Security taxes in 2015, about 10 million will pay higher
taxes because of the increase in the taxable maximum.
Information about Medicare changes for 2015 is available
at www.Medicare.gov. The Social Security Act provides for how the COLA
is calculated. To read more, please visit www.socialsecurity.gov/cola.
Source: www.ssa.gov
Older Living
November 2014
Page 5
A service of Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
McMillan
Adult Day Service
Wish Lists
486 1st Avenue; Terre Haute, IN 47807
(812) 232-4627 or toll-free 1-800-489-1561 ext. 333
Pull-Up Depends
Medication Cups
Small Dixie Cups
Band-Aides (All Sizes)
Cough Drops (Sugar Free)
Activity Wish List
Bingo Prizes
Construction Paper
Glue & Glue Sticks
General Wish List
Dryer Sheets
Febreze Fabric Spray
Laundry Detergent
Wet Wipes
Kleenex
D Batteries
AA Batteries
AAA Batteries
Hand Soap
Paper Shredder
Prayer List
Leroy Smith
Pauline Lemmons
Karen Richards
Jeanette Graham
Family of Donna Miller
Kitchen Wish List
Healthy Snacks
Dixie Cups
Nurse Wish List
Gloves
Alieve
Ibuprofen
November Birthdays
Barbara Gresham - Nov. 6
Bill Houtz - Nov. 11
Hallie Franklyn - Nov. 24
McMillan Activity Calendar – November 2014
3
MONDAY
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am States Bingo
1:30 pm The Wizard of
Oz Premiered: Watch The
Wizard of Oz
10
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Horse Shoes
4
TUESDAY
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Ladder Ball
1:30 pm Table Ball Finish
Lines
WEDNESDAY
5
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Bible Study with
the Hoovers, Harbours, and
Cathy
17
1:30 pm Where in the
World?
24
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Washers
1:30 pm EZ Does it
Random Trivia
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am World Categories
1:30 pm Bulletin Board
Craft
FRIDAY
am Coffee
7 8-9:00
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Bingo
1:30 pm Nutrition Hour
1:00 pm Live Country
Music
11
CLOSED for
Veterans Day
12 9:30 am Exercise
8-9:00 am Coffee
10:00 am Bible Study with
Dennis Manual
1:30 pm Celebrate
Veterans
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Dead Man’s
Hand Card Game
6
THURSDAY
13 9:30 am Exercise
8-9:00 am Coffee
10:00 am Bingo
18
1:30 pm Reminisce with
Teri
19
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Bible Study with
the Hoovers, Harbours,
and Cathy
8-9:00 am Coffee
1:30 pm Piglet Dice
20 9:30 am Exercise
8-9:00 am Coffee
10:00 am Cornhole
10:00 am Bible Study with
Pastor Henderson
12:00 pm Thanksgiving
Dinner
am Coffee
21 8-9:00
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Bingo
1:30 pm A Thanksgiving
Family Story and
Discussion
1:00 pm Live Country
Music
8-9:00 am Coffee
am Exercise
25 9:30
26
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Apple Wreath
10:00 am Thanksgiving
Price is Right
1:30 pm Fold & Fly It:
Paper Airplanes
1:30 pm Heating Pad
Sock Craft
8-9:00 am Coffee
9:30 am Exercise
10:00 am Bowling
am Coffee
14 8-9:00
9:30 am Exercise
27
CLOSED for
Thanksgiving
1:30 pm Piano Music with
Barbara Hamilton
28
CLOSED for
Thanksgiving
1:30 pm Odds or Evens
Card Game
Activities are
Subject to Change
Without Prior
Notice
Want more information about aging and disability services? Call Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
at (812) 238-1561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561
Page 6
Older Living
Websites Consumers Can Access for Information on Long-Term Care
Consumer Websites
State and Federal Government Websites
http://www.nursinghomeaction.org
The National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home
Reform (NCCNHR) provides information on quality
care, residents' rights, and quality of life issues for
nursing home residents. An easy to use map connects
you to the key long-term care agencies in each state
including citizen advocacy groups and their websites.
http://www.medicare.gov/NHCompare/Home.asp
Nursing Home Compare is a federal government
website run by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare
Services. Consumers can search nursing homes by
state and research information on facility inspections
(surveys) and quality measures.
http://www.ltcombudsman.org
You can find links to your local and state ombudsman
offices through on the National Ombudsman Resource
Center (NORC) website. Ombudsmen are resident
advocates who work at both the regional and statelevel. Many ombudsman programs sponsor websites
with consumer information.
http://www.aarp.org
AARP is a nonprofit membership organization of
persons 50 and older dedicated to addressing their
needs and interests. A five-item preliminary check list
about what consumers should look for when choosing
a nursing home is available on this site.
http://www.pioneernetwork.org
The Pioneer Network is a group of elders, family
members, healthcare professionals, researchers,
advocates, and others working to transform traditional
institutions and practices for the elderly into
communities in which each person's capacities and
individuality are affirmed and developed.
http://www.ahfsa.org
The Association of Health Facility Survey Agencies
sponsors this site. Consumers can find links to state
government offices responsible for licensing and
certifying nursing homes. Many state sites include
inspection (survey) data, nursing home deficiency
information, characteristics of nursing homes, staffing
ratios and much more.
http://www.eldercare.gov
This website is sponsored by the U.S. Administration
On Aging. It provides links to information and referral
(I&R) services for state and area agencies on aging.
These I&R programs can help consumers identify
appropriate services in the area where family members
reside.
Disease - Specific Sites
Many websites are sponsored by organizations with a
mission to educate consumers on diseases commonly
associated with long-term care residents.
Alzheimer's Disease: http://www. alz.org
Diabetes: http://www.diabetes.org
Heart Disease: http://www.americanheart.org
http://www.memberofthefamily.net
memberofthefamily.net is an independent website that Incontinence: http://www.incontinence.org
provides information on nursing homes throughout the Parkinson's Disease: http://www.pdf.org
U.S. including reports and information based on recent
More fact sheets and publications on how to get good
government surveys.
http://www.myziva.net
This is an independent website that combines limited
consumer information with extensive information for
industry professionals. Information is available about
licensed nursing homes from government data as well
as information about specific facilities provided by
facilities.
care in nursing homes are available by calling
NCCNHR at 202.332.2275 or visiting our website at
www.nursinghomeaction.org
Nursing Homes: Getting Good Care There,$11.95
A Consumer Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home:
Fact Sheet #1
Resident Rights: Fact Sheet #2
NC CNH R i s a na t io na l, no n- p r o f it me mb e rs h i p o r g a ni z a t io n f o u nd e d in 1 9 7 5 by E l ma H o ld e r t o p r o t e c t t he
rig ht s , sa f et y , a n d dig n it y o f A me ri ca ' s lo ng - t er m ca r e re s id ent s.
©2004. National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform, 1424 16th Street, NW Suite 202, Washington, DC
20036. Tel. 202.332.2275, Fax 202.332.2949, email [email protected], website: http://nursinghomeaction.org.
November 2014
Why Seniors Should
Get a Flu Shot
Because your immune system weakens as you age, adults age 65 years and
older are more susceptible to the flu. It
is important all seniors get the flu vaccine.
You have two options for vaccination: the regular dose flu shot and the
high-dose shot that results in a stronger
immune response. Talk to your health
care provider to decide which one is
right for you.
If you have flu-like symptoms, contact your health care provider immediately.
Since you are at high risk for flu-related complications, your doctor may
prescribe antiviral medications if you
get the flu.
Why does being older than 65 put
me at higher risk for getting the flu?
As you age, your immune system weakens. This weakening makes
seniors—adults 65 years and older— more susceptible to the flu. For
seniors, the seasonal flu can be very
serious, even deadly. Ninety percent of
flu-related deaths and more than half
of flu-related hospitalizations occur in
people age 65 and older.
How can I protect myself from the
flu?
Get the flu vaccine as soon as it is
available in your area. Getting the flu
vaccine protects you and prevents you
from spreading the flu to your spouse,
children, or grandchildren.
You have two options for vaccination—the regular dose flu shot and the
higher-dose flu shot designed specifically for people 65 and older. Both
vaccines protect against the same three
flu viruses. The higher-dose vaccine
should result in a stronger immune
response. Talk to your health care provider about which vaccine is right for
you.
In addition to getting the flu vaccine,
you should follow our everyday steps
to keep yourself healthy this flu season.
Because you are at an increased risk
of getting pneumonia, a complication
of the flu, talk to your health care provider about the pneumococcal vaccine.
The pneumococcal vaccine will protect
you against pneumonia.
Will Medicare cover my flu vaccine?
Yes, Medicare will cover the flu
vaccine once every flu season.
I have the flu, what should I do?
If you develop flu-like symptoms,
contact your health care provider immediately. Since you are at high risk
for flu-related complications, your
health care provider may prescribe antiviral medications to help make your
symptoms less severe and make you
feel better faster.
Source: www.flu.gov
Happy
Thanksgiving
Older Living
November 2014
Forgetfulness:
Knowing When to Ask for Help
Maria has been a teacher for 35 years. Teaching fills her life and gives her a
sense of accomplishment, but recently she has begun to forget details and
has become more and more disorganized. At first, she laughed it off, but
her memory problems have worsened. Her family and friends have been
sympathetic but are not sure what to do. Parents and school administrators
are worried about Maria’s performance in the classroom. The principal has
suggested she see a doctor. Maria is angry with herself and frustrated, and
she wonders whether these problems are signs of Alzheimer’s disease or just
forgetfulness that comes with getting older.
Many people worry about becoming forgetful. They think forgetfulness is
the first sign of Alzheimer’s disease. Over the past few years, scientists have
learned a lot about memory and why some kinds of memory problems are
serious but others are not.
Age-Related Changes In Memory
Forgetfulness can be a normal part of aging. As people get older, changes
occur in all parts of the body, including the brain. As a result, some people
may notice that it takes longer to learn new things, they don’t remember
information as well as they did, or they lose things like their glasses. These
usually are signs of mild forgetfulness, not serious memory problems.
Some older adults also find that they don’t do as well as younger people on
complex memory or learning tests. Scientists have found, though, that given
enough time, healthy older people can do as well as younger people do on
these tests. In fact, as they age, healthy adults usually improve in areas of
mental ability such as vocabulary.
Other Causes Of Memory Loss
Some memory problems are related to health issues that may be treatable.
For example, medication side effects, vitamin B12 deficiency, chronic alcoholism, tumors or infections in the brain, or blood clots in the brain can
cause memory loss or possibly dementia (see more on dementia, below).
Some thyroid, kidney, or liver disorders also can lead to memory loss. A
doctor should treat serious medical conditions like these as soon as possible.
Emotional problems, such as stress, anxiety, or depression, can make a person more forgetful and can be mistaken for dementia. For instance, someone who has recently retired or who is coping with the death of a spouse,
relative, or friend may feel sad, lonely, worried, or bored. Trying to deal
with these life changes leaves some people confused or forgetful.
The confusion and forgetfulness caused by emotions usually are temporary
and go away when the feelings fade. The emotional problems can be eased
by supportive friends and family, but if these feelings last for a long time, it
is important to get help from a doctor or counselor. Treatment may include
counseling, medication, or both.
More Serious Memory Problems
For some older people, memory problems are a sign of a serious problem,
such as mild cognitive impairment or dementia. People who are worried
Page 7
about memory problems should see a doctor. The doctor might conduct or
order a thorough physical and mental health evaluation to reach a diagnosis. Often, these evaluations are conducted by a neurologist, a physician
who specializes in problems related to the brain and central nervous system.
A complete medical exam for memory loss should review the person’s medical history, including the use of prescription and over-the-counter medicines, diet, past medical problems, and general health. A correct diagnosis
depends on accurate details, so in addition to talking with the patient, the
doctor might ask a family member, caregiver, or close friend for information.
Blood and urine tests can help the doctor find the cause of the memory
problems or dementia. The doctor also might do tests for memory loss and
test the person’s problem-solving and language abilities. A computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan may help
rule out some causes of the memory problems.
Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Some people with memory
problems have a condition called amnestic mild cognitive impairment, or
amnestic MCI. People with this condition have more memory problems
than normal for people their age, but their symptoms are not as severe as
those of
Alzheimer’s disease, and they are able to carry out their normal daily
activities.
Signs of MCI include misplacing things often, forgetting to go to important events and appointments, and having trouble coming up with desired
words. Family and friends may notice memory lapses, and the person
with MCI may worry about losing his or her memory. These worries may
prompt the person to see a doctor for diagnosis.
Researchers have found that more people with MCI than those without it go on to develop Alzheimer’s within a certain timeframe. However,
not everyone who has MCI develops AD. Studies are underway to learn
why some people with MCI progress to AD and others do not.
There currently is no standard treatment for MCI. Typically, the doctor
will regularly monitor and test a person diagnosed with MCI to detect any
changes in memory and thinking skills over time. There are no medications
approved for use for MCI.
Dementia. Dementia is the loss of thinking, memory, and reasoning skills
to such an extent that it seriously affects a person’s ability to carry out daily
activities. Dementia is not a disease itself but a group of symptoms caused
by certain diseases or conditions such as Alzheimer’s. People with dementia
lose their mental abilities at different rates.
Symptoms may include:
•
Being unable to remember things
•
Asking the same question or repeating the same story over and over
•
Becoming lost in familiar places
•
Being unable to follow directions
•
Getting disoriented about time, people, and places
•
Neglecting personal safety, hygiene, and nutrition
Member FDIC
Want more information about aging and disability services? Call Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
at (812) 238-1561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561
Older Living
Page 8
Recipes to begin and end a
Thanksgiving Dinner for Two
Roast Turkey for Two:
Doable and Delicious
November 2014
3. Bake 18 to 20 minutes or until the crust is golden brown and the
apples slices are tender. Drizzle two teaspoons of caramel topping
over each crostata. If desired, serve warm with ice cream.
This recipe is courtesy of Pillsbury.
By Kevin D. Weeks.
Even a small turkey breast is a lot of turkey for two people. My approach is
to buy a whole small breast, thaw it, then cut it in half and refreeze half for
later. Half a breast is not only enough for dinner for two, but enough for a
few turkey sandwiches later. I also like to brine the breast, which produces a
moister and more flavorful result - especially if you flavor the brine as I do in
the recipe below. Serves 2 with leftovers.
Cook Time: 60 minutes
Total Time: 420 minutes
INGREDIENTS
*** Brine ***
1 gal. apple cider
1 cup Kosher salt
4 sprigs fresh sage or 1 Tbsp. rubbed sage
1 sm. onion; chopped
5 peppercorns
*** Turkey ***
1/2 bone-in turkey breast*
1/2 stick unsalted butter
1/4 tsp. rubbed sage
1/4 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. ground pepper
Prep Time: 360 minutes
PREPARATION
Brine:
1. Combine all brine ingredients in a stock pot and bring to a boil, stirring to
dissolve salt.
2. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temperature, then chill in the
refrigerator for 3 hours.
3. Six hours before cooking, submerge the turkey in the brine refrigerate for
6 hours. Alternatively, you can brine the breast a day or two in advance, then
remove from the brine, rinse, pat dry, and store in a sealed container until
ready to cook.
Cooking the Turkey Breast:
4. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Melt butter with sage.
5. Brush breast with butter and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
6. Cook breast for about 45 minutes until an instant-read thermometer**
inserted in the center of the breast reads 160 degrees.
7. Remove from oven and tent with foil. Rest for 15 minutes before slicing.
*Note 1: You may be able to get your butcher to cut the breast in half. Don't
use a breast that is self-basting or Kosher as they have already been brined.
**Note 2: I can't emphasize enough the value of an instant-read
thermometer when roasting any kind of meat. Oven sensors are notoriously
inaccurate and variable, so relying on time to determine doneness is
completely undependable - and those pop-up thermometers
will always overcook the bird.
Answer Key is on Page 12
Answers on Page 10
Source: cookingfortwo.about.com
Mini Apple Crostatas
Ingredients:
Do you really want dessert for two or are you looking
for a bit more? Either way, try these delightful desserts
for two (well….there will be enough for seconds)!
Totally easy to make (just five ingredients) and serves
four -- just in case! Serves 4 people
1 refrigerated pie crust from a 15-ounce box, softened as directed on box
1 large baking apple, peeled, cored and thinly sliced (about 2 cups)
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
8 teaspoons caramel flavored topping
Directions:
1. Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Unroll crust on work surface. Roll crust
out slightly and cut it into four, 5-inch rounds. Place rounds on a
parchment lined cookie sheet.
2. In a medium bowl, mix the sugar and cinnamon and toss the apple
slices into the sugar mixture. Divide the apple slices evenly onto the
center of each pie crust round. Fold 1/2-inch of crust over filling,
pinching slightly so that crust lays flat on apples.
IN-HOME COMPANIONSHIP AND CARE SERVICES
Serving Vigo, Vermillion, Parke, Putnam,
Clay, and Sullivan Counties
www.comfortkeepers.com
Conversation and companionship
Light housekeeping
Grocery shopping
Medication reminders
Grooming and dressing guidance
Recreational activities and crafts
Meal preparation
Errand services
Respite or relief for family
Incidental transportation
Laundry and linen washing
Mail assistance and organization
Periodic review and communication with family
812-232-9766
1273 Lafayette Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47804
November 2014
Older Living
Page 9
Grandparents as Parents Forgetfulness
Continued From Page 7
Continued From Page 1
Making visits with parents as smooth as possible
• Don’t put your grandchild in the middle. Try to set aside any feelings of
anger or disappointment you have toward your grandchild’s parent. Avoid
venting issues or saying critical things about the parent in front of your
grandchild. And don’t make your grandchild feel guilty about spending
time with their parent. This can be confusing and distressing for the child.
• Communicate and cooperate with your grandchild’s parent. Do what
you can to smooth the relationship and make the parent feel a part of the
child’s life. Share information about the child’s school, hobbies, and friends.
Make sure the parent has the child’s schedule and contact information.
• Make visits part of your grandchild’s routine. Contact with parents will
be less stressful for children if they know what to expect. If possible, plan
visits well in advance and put them on a regular schedule. Talk with the
parent ahead of time, so everyone’s expectations for the visit are clear. It’s
best if both parents and grandparents enforce the same rules.
• Be sensitive to your grandchild’s feelings. It’s important to talk with your
grandchild about he or she feels about parental contact. Even when kids are
looking forward to a visit or call, it can bring up many feelings, including
uncertainty and nervousness. Kids may worry that their parent doesn’t love
them anymore, or that they won’t have anything to talk about. Be there to
reassure them.
• Help your grandchild deal with disappointment. Sometimes, visits don’t
go well or the parent doesn’t show up. Vent to a friend if you need to, but
avoid the temptation to say angry or hurtful things
about the parent in front of your grandchild, as this won’t make him or her
feel better. Instead, talk with your grandchild about what happened and
how they feel about it.
Source: Reprinted with permission from: www.helpguide.org.
How much should you tell young grandchildren?
When deciding what to tell your grandchildren about the situation, it’s
important to consider their age and developmental skills. The following
tips may help:
Avoid telling the child too much. Many children are simply too young
to understand the whole story. When grandparents tell a young child all
of the details of the situation, they may be doing more harm than good.
Too much information can be confusing, scary, and overwhelming for
the child.
Avoid telling the child too little or nothing at all. Kids are smart.
They will pick up tidbits about their situation, even if the details are not
discussed directly. If children learn about what’s going on from someone else, they could feel hurt, deceived, and confused. They may avoid
asking you questions or talking to you about other important concerns
because they think certain topics are “off limits.”
Never twist the facts or lie to the child. Even very young children
know the difference between the truth and a lie. They often piece
together information, but then are afraid to talk about the truth. Some
people may twist the facts in an effort to protect the child. But that
approach often backfires. When children are told untruths about the
situation, they may become very confused, angry, and hurt. The best
strategy is to be honest with your grandchildren, at their level of understanding. Your grandchildren will learn the importance of trust and
honesty in relationships.
Source: Grandparents Raising Grandchildren, University of Wisconsin-Extension
Two of the most common forms of dementia in older people are Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. These types of dementia cannot be
cured at present.
In Alzheimer’s disease, changes to nerve cells in certain parts of the brain
result in the death of a large number of cells. Symptoms of Alzheimer’s
begin slowly and worsen steadily as damage to nerve cells spreads throughout the brain. As time goes by, forgetfulness gives way to serious problems
with thinking, judgment, recognizing family and friends, and the ability to
perform daily activities like driving a car or handling money. Eventually, the
person needs total care.
In vascular dementia, a series of strokes or changes in the brain’s blood
supply leads to the death of brain tissue. Symptoms of vascular dementia
can vary but usually begin suddenly, depending on where in the brain the
strokes occurred and how severe they were. The person’s memory, language,
reasoning, and coordination may be affected. Mood and personality changes are common as well.
It’s not possible to reverse damage already caused by a stroke, so it’s very
important to get medical care right away if someone has signs of a stroke.
It’s also important to take steps to prevent further strokes, which worsen
vascular dementia symptoms. Some people have both Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia.
Keeping Your Memory Sharp
People with some forgetfulness can use a variety of techniques that may
help them stay healthy and maintain their memory and mental skills. Here
are some tips that can help:
• Plan tasks, make “to do” lists, and use memory aids like notes and calendars. Some people find they remember things better if they mentally connect them to other meaningful things, such as a familiar name, song, book,
or TV show.
• Develop interests or hobbies and stay involved in activities that can help
both the mind and body.
• Engage in physical activity and exercise. Several studies have associated
exercise (such as walking) with better brain function, although more research is needed to say for sure whether exercise can help to maintain brain
function or prevent or delay symptoms of Alzheimer’s.
• Limit alcohol use. Although some studies suggest that moderate alcohol
use has health benefits, heavy or binge drinking over time can cause memory loss and permanent brain damage.
• Find activities, such as exercise or a hobby, to relieve feelings of stress,
anxiety, or depression. If these feelings last for a long time, talk with your
doctor.
We are there when you need us!
Meadows Home
Health Care, Inc.
1009 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47807
Meadows Home Health Care offers a variety of services
designed for those who need some assistance
but want to maintain their independence at home.
Services Available
Registered Nurses
Licensed Practical Nurses
Emergency Response System
Certified Home Health Aides
Personal Care Attendants
Homemakers
(812) 232-6442
www.meadowshomehealth.com
Want more information about aging and disability services? Call Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
at (812) 238-1561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561
Older Living
Page 10
November 2014
Meetings and Reminders
Vigo County
Alzheimer’s Family
Caregiver Support
Group
The next meeting will be November
5th at 10:00 a.m.; Vigo County Public
Library in Terre Haute. For more information, contact Teresa McKenzie at
(812) 232-2223.
Vigo County Sight
Loss Support Group
The Vigo County Sight Loss
Support Group will meet on
November 19th from 10:00
– 11:30 a.m. at Westminster
Village at 1120 Davis Drive
in Terre Haute. Call Danny
Wayne Beemer at The Wabash
Independent Living & Learning Center, Inc. at (812) 2989455 ext. 205 for more information. All meetings are open
to the public.
Union Hospital
Stroke Support
Group
Union Hospital Stroke Support
Group will meet November 20th at 6:00
p.m. at Union Hospital, Lower Level
Atrium B. The Stroke Support Group
is for stroke survivors and their family
members.
The group is designed to allow people who have had a stroke to share their
experience and lend support to each
other and family members and/or caregivers throughout the recovery process.
Call Laurel Weber at (812) 478-4103 for
more information.
Clay County Sight
Loss Support Group
The Clay Sight Loss Support
Group will meet on November
12th at 10:30 a.m. at the United
Methodist Church at 201 Meridian in Brazil. Danny Wayne
Beemer of the Wabash Independent Living and Learning
Center is the facilitator. Participants have the opportunity
to share personal experiences
as well as ask questions to other participants, facilitators and
guest speakers. Call Danny
Wayne Beemer at The Wabash
Independent Living & Learning
Center, Inc. at (812) 298-9455
ext. 205 for more information.
Cloverdale
Caregiver
Support Group
Caregivers’ Support Group meeting
monthly on the first Thursday of each
month at 4:00 p,m, in The Knoy Center at Cloverdale High School. Contact
Cindy Little at 765-653-3076 or [email protected] for more information. Next meeting: November 6th
Putnam County
Alzheimer’s Disease
Support Group
A support group for those dealing
with the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease or other dementia will be held on
November 6th at 4:00 p.m. at Putnam
County Hospital. Cindy Little is the facilitator for this meeting. Contact Cindy Little at 765-653-3076 or [email protected]
cinergymetro.net for more information.
Greencastle
Caregiver
Support Group
Caregivers’ Support Group meets
each Thursday at Putnam County Public
Library in Greencastle from 6:00 p.m.
-8:00 p.m. All caregivers welcome.
Contact Cindy Little at 765-653-3076
or [email protected] for more
information.
Bereavement
Support Group
Hospice of the Wabash Valley is
currently offering two Bereavement
Support Groups
You are welcome
to attend no matter where you are in
your own grief journey. These support
groups are free and open to the public.
For registration or information, call
Neva McFarland, Bereavement Coordinator, at (812) 234-2515 or toll-free at
1-800-216-5692.
1. Once a month on the 1st Monday Group: 10:00–11:30 a.m.; Grace
Chapel, 2107 W. Highway 40, Brazil.
Next meeting: November 3rd
2. Once a month on the 1st Tuesday Group: 7:00 p.m.; Hospice of the
Wabash Valley in the Annex; 400 8th
Ave, Terre Haute: November 4th
3. Once a month on 1st Wednesday Group: 10:00–11:30 a.m.; Vigo
County Public Library; 7th & Poplar
Streets, Terre Haute. Next meeting: November 5th
AARP
Chapter 567
The AARP Chapter 567 will meet on
November 4th at 1:00 p.m. at the Eighth
Avenue Baptist Church at 2128 8th Ave
in Terre Haute. All seniors are welcome
to attend.
INDIANA
Dine with a Doc® -Brunch in BRAZIL – 11/05/14 –Speakers: Dr. Zachary
Worley, DO Steven Walden, PTA/CCE/CWH Carrie Malone, RN – Topic:
Falls Prevention – Lunch: Bethesda Gardens; 120 S. Franklin Street; Brazil
(812) 448-8848.
Dine with a Doc® —WEST TERRE HAUTE on 11/11/14 – Speaker: Dr.
Marcia Miller, PhD, RN – Lunch: Terre Haute Nursing and Rehabilitation
219 N. Providence Place; West Terre Haute; (812) 533-6807
Dine with a Doc®–Clinton – 11/19/14 – Speaker: Doctor pending – Lunch:
The Gardens of Clinton; Location: 133 S. Washington Street, Clinton;
(765) 832-1974.
Dine with a Doc®-GREENCASTLE on 10/27/2014 – Speaker: Bob Haan,
PT – Topic: Physical Therapy – Lunch: Putnam County Hospital; 915 S.
Zinc Mill Rd., Greencastle (765) 653-7410.
Dine with a Doc® TERRE HAUTE on 11/19/14 – Speaker: Regional Hospital Health Care Partner – Topic: Behavioral Health – Lunch: Cobblestone
Crossings Health Campus; 300 S 5th St. in Terre Haute; (812)-232-3245.
ILLINOIS
Dine with a Doc® MARSHALL, IL on 11/14/14 – Speaker: Regional Hospital Health Care Partner – Lunch: Terre Haute Regional Hospital; Trinity
United Methodist Church; 503 S. Michigan Avenue; Marshall, IL.
Dine with a Doc®-PARIS, Illinois on 11/12/14 – Physician: Dr. Steven
McDonald, MD – Lunch: Gowin Parc; 256 W. Court Street, Paris, IL
(217) 465-8143.
Coffee with a Cop
Terre Haute
Lunch with a Lawyer will take place
on November 17th from 11:30 a.m. –
1:00 p.m. at Wabash Activity Center located at 300 S. 5th Street in Terre Haute.
Speaker: Attorney Rick Brewster. Topic: Estate Planning.
Lunch provider: Cloverleaf Healthcare of Knightsville. Reservations are
required. Call the Center at (812) 2323245 to reserve your seat today. Note:
You do NOT have to be a member of
the Wabash Activity Center to come and
participate in this program. Just bring a
questioning mind, an appetite and perhaps a friend. Lunch with a Lawyer
Indiana
Legal Service
This is a free service for low income
people and seniors 60 years and older.
If you have a legal problem or have
questions about public benefits, eviction or foreclosure, income tax or other
collection disputes, or need a Power of
Attorney or living will, you can make
an appointment to see the lawyer. You
MUST have an appointment to speak
to the lawyer. To schedule an appointment, call toll-free 1-800-822-4774
during regular business hours.
You can also contact Indiana Legal
Services at (812) 339-7668.
The next opportunity to sit down
with a member of Vigo County Law
Enforcement will be on November 12th
from 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. at The Meeting
Grounds Coffee House located at 6th and
Washington Streets in Terre Haute. Free
coffee and donuts will provided courtesy of The Meeting Grounds Coffee
House. This month’s meeting is sponsored by United Way of the Wabash Valley. This program aims to advance the
practice of community policing through
improving relationships between police
offices and community members one
cup of coffee at a time. Everyone from
the community—regardless of age—is
invited to attend. For more information
about Coffee with a Cop, contact Lori
Aplin (812) 917-4970 or via email at
[email protected]
Coffee with a Cop
West Terre Haute
The next opportunity to sit down
with a member of Vigo County Law
Enforcement will be on November 20th
from 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. at Excalibur Catering and Banquet Hall located at 212
W. National Avenue s in West Terre
Haute. Free coffee will be provided
courtesy of Excalibur. This month’s
meeting is sponsored by United Way of
the Wabash Valley. This program aims
to advance the practice of community
policing through improving relationships between police offices and community members one cup of coffee at a
time. Everyone from the community—
regardless of age—is invited to attend.
For more information about Coffee with
a Cop, contact Lori Aplin (812) 9174970 or via email at [email protected]
Older Living
November 2014
Page 11
Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
SENIOR, DISABLED AND RURAL TRANSPORTATION
The Transportation Service of
Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled/WCIEDD, Inc. is provided in
Vigo, Parke and Vermillion Counties
only. Transportation for medical and
nutrition needs is available on a donation basis.
Disabled persons under age 60
may qualify for programs that assist
with transportation in these counties.
To find out if you are eligible, call
the Information and Assistance Department at (812) 238-1561 or tollfree at 1-800-489-1561.
Transportation for person reasons
such as shopping, beauty or barber
shop, work, education, banking, etc.
are available on a fee basis.
In Vigo County, transportation is
available Monday through Friday
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. except
on Federal holidays. Rural public
transportation is available in Vigo
County on a fee basis. This service
is available to anyone regardless of
age or income; however, car seats
are not provided. One-way trips are
$2 each.
In Parke County, transportation is
available on Tuesdays and Fridays.
On Tuesdays we alternate between
staying in Parke County one week
and taking Parke County people to
Vermillion County the next week.
On Fridays we take individuals from
Parke County to Vigo County for
medical needs only.
In Vermillion County, transportation is available on Wednesdays
and Thursdays. On Wednesdays we
take individuals to Vigo County for
medical needs only. On Thursdays
we stay in Vermilion County to take
individuals to any location they need
to go within the county.
To schedule a ride in Vigo, Parke
or Vermillion Counties, call (812)
232-2675 or toll-free at -1800-4891561 ext. 248.
Closed
November 11
Veterans
Day
Closed
November
27-28
Thanksgiving
AREA 7 AGENCY ON AGING AND DISABLED
SENIOR, DISABLED AND RURAL TRANSPORTATION CALENDAR
NOVEMBER 2014 for VIGO COUNTY
MONDAY
3
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
5
4
10:00 a.m.
Peddle Park
to Baeslers
HC Mall/Walmart South
9:30 a.m. PICK-UP
12:30 p.m. RETURN
10
11
12
CLOSED
VETERANS
DAY
17
18
19
25
6
26
7
9:00 a.m.
South and West Area
to Kroger South
14
20
21
9:00 a.m.
North and South-East
Area to Kroger
on Wabash Ave.
9:00 a.m.
North and South-East
Area to Kroger
on Wabash Ave.
10:00 a.m.
Peddle Park
to Baeslers
Walmart East
9:00 a.m. PICK-UP
12:00 p.m. RETURN
9:00 a.m.
North and South-East
Area to Kroger
on Wabash Ave.
FRIDAY
13
10:00 a.m.
Peddle Park
to Baeslers
Walmart South
9:00 a.m. PICK-UP
12:00 p.m. RETURN
24
THURSDAY
27
10:00 a.m.
Peddle Park
to Baeslers
CLOSED
THANKSGIVING
9:00 a.m.
South and West Area
to Kroger South
9:00 a.m.
South and West Area
to Kroger South
28
All Clients Note:
Please Call In Your
Appointments As Far In
Advance As Possible.
Calendar is Subject to
Change. Thank You.
CLOSED
THANKSGIVING
The Suggested
Donation for Seniors
and Disabled for
Medical and Nutrition
Trips is $2.00 for
Each One-Way Trip
The fee for all other trips is $2.00 for each one-way trip.
AREA 7 AGENCY ON AGING AND DISABLED
SENIOR, DISABLED AND RURAL TRANSPORTATION CALENDAR
NOVEMBER 2014 for PARKE AND VERMILLION COUNTY
MONDAY
3
10
TUESDAY
4
Parke County
Dial-A-Ride
To Parke County/
Clinton
11
24
18
25
5
Parke County
Dial-A-Ride
To Parke County/
Clinton
Parke County
Dial-A-Ride
To Parke County/
Clinton
THURSDAY
6
Vermillion County
Dial-A-Ride
Parke County
To Clinton
Vermillion County
to
Terre Haute
12
CLOSED
VETERANS
DAY
17
WEDNESDAY
13
Vermillion County
to
Terre Haute
19
20
Vermillion County
to
Terre Haute
26
Vermillion County
to
Terre Haute
Vermillion County
Dial-A-Ride
Parke County
To Clinton
Vermillion County
Dial-A-Ride
Parke County
To Clinton
27
CLOSED
THANKSGIVING
All Clients Note:
Please Call In Your
Appointments As Far In
Advance As Possible.
Calendar is Subject to
Change. Thank You.
FRIDAY
7
Parke County
to
Terre Haute
14
Parke County
to
Terre Haute
21
28
Parke County
to
Terre Haute
CLOSED
THANKSGIVING
The Suggested
Donation for Seniors
and Disabled for
Medical and Nutrition
Trips is $2.00 for
Each One-Way Trip
Want more information about aging and disability services? Call Area 7 Agency on Aging and Disabled
at (812) 238-1561 or toll-free at 1-800-489-1561
Older Living
Page 12
November 2014
*SAVE THE DATE * SAVE THE DATE * SAVE THE DATE *
FREE
Clay County
Sullivan County
9:00 a.m.—2:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.—2:00 p.m.
November 8th
November 11th
First Christian Church
First Christian Church
Brazil, IN
Sullivan, IN
1875 W. U.S. Highway 40
105 N. Broad Street
Fitness & Exercise Demonstrations
Health Recipe Demonstrations
Free Health Screenings
Healthy Lifestyle Booths
Sponsored by
Area 7 ?Agency on Aging and Disabled
WCIEDD, Inc.
For more information, contact:
Patty Cannoy
Health, Wellness & Outreach Coordinator
1-800-489-1561 ext. 242
[email protected]
Thanksgiving Crossword Answers