PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP 2013/2014 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
2013/2014 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
ALBERTA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL (ACH)
Alberta Children’s Hospital (ACH) is
Southern Alberta’s major treatment,
teaching, and research facility for children
with complex medical problems. ACH is a
tertiary care teaching and research hospital
affiliated with the University of Calgary and
is an integral part of the Alberta Health
Services, which includes several other
hospitals and health centers in Calgary,
including
Foothills
Medical
Centre,
Rockyview
General
Hospital,
Peter
Lougheed Centre, and the new South
Health Campus.
The Alberta Children’s Hospital welcomes patients from birth to age 18 from southern Alberta, southeastern
British Columbia, and southwestern Saskatchewan.
CALGARY, ALBERTA
ACH is located in Calgary, a vibrant urban centre located on the Bow River at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.
Consistently ranked among the world’s top cities for quality of life, Calgary is well-known for its hospitality, urban
amenities, year-round sporting opportunities, and festivals. It is a short drive from Banff National Park, Lake Louise,
and other mountain ski resorts. As Canada’s fourth largest urban centre, Calgary is a thriving city that continues to
draw newcomers every year. It also receives more sunny days than any other major city in Canada. Calgary was
recently named as one of the top 5 best cities in the world (Economist Intelligence Unit, August 2011).
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PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
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ABOUT OUR HOSPITAL
In September 2006, we moved to a brand new building. The new
Alberta Children’s Hospital was carefully designed for the people
who will use the building the most – patients, families, physicians,
and staff of the hospital. Children and teens contributed to the
design of the building -- a colorful, kid-friendly structure closely
resembling toy building blocks. This is how the building looks
today as it sits on a hilltop overlooking downtown Calgary, the
Bow River, and the Rocky Mountains. To see our new site, visit
http://www.calgaryhealthregion.ca/ACH/.
The vision for the new Alberta Children’s Hospital was to create a
building that would reduce stress and promote healing. The
interior of the hospital has been designed to enable the delivery of family-centered care. The hospital includes
supports for families such as sleeping facilities for parents in each patient room, an art therapy room, a babysitting
service for siblings of patients, a sacred space for spiritual activities, a pet visitation room, family resource library,
and vast outside space that includes Healing Gardens and several outdoor play structures. There is also an outdoor
staff garden area, staff fitness room, library, and video and teleconferencing facilities.
NEUROPSYCHOLOGY AT ALBERTA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL
Within this multidisciplinary and collaborative healthcare environment, neuropsychologists function as consultants
and provide a wide range of clinical services. In the Neurosciences program, this includes neuropsychological
assessment of children with a variety of neurological conditions such as intractable epilepsy, traumatic brain injury,
brain tumours, hydrocephalus, cerebrovascular conditions, genetic disorders, and infectious diseases such as
encephalitis and meningitis. Children are generally seen as part of comprehensive multidisciplinary investigations
requested by treating neurologists, neurosurgeons, pediatricians, and physiatrists from a variety of clinics and
programs including:
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Refractory Epilepsy
Traumatic Brain Injury
Neurosurgery
Pediatric Stroke
Genetics
Neuropsychiatry
Neuro-oncology
Currently, there are two full-time neuropsychologists (with an additional position not currently filled), with
additional affiliated staff involved in the fellowship (see Appendix A). The Neuropsychology Services has two
postdoctoral fellowship positions, and has three psychological assistants specialized in neuropsychometry.
Neuropsychologists function as members of multidisciplinary teams or as consultants for physicians and treatment
teams serving children and adolescents with complex neurological and medical conditions.
Research is an integral part of our mandate in neuropsychology. Alberta Children’s Hospital is on the University of
Calgary campus (www.ucalgary.ca), and is affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary and
several institutes that promote research in neurosciences and child health. These institutes include the Alberta
Children’s Hospital Research Institute (http://www.ucalgary.ca/research4kids/) and the Hotchkiss Brain Institute
(www.hbi.ucalgary.ca). Neuropsychologists at ACH conduct research in several different areas in addition to their
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clinical work (see Appendix B for a list of recent publications). There is a range of continuing education activities for
staff members and for professionals in the hospital and in the community.
FELLOWSHIP GOALS AND TRAINING
The Pediatric Neuropsychology Fellowship is modeled after the goals set forth by the International
Neuropsychological Society - American Psychological Association Division 40 Task Force on Education,
Accreditation, and Credentialing, and by the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical
Neuropsychology.
The goal of the fellowship is to train fellows to an advanced level of competence in pediatric
neuropsychology consistent with independent practice in a tertiary health care setting, and to provide
fellows with experience in pediatric neuropsychology research.
Training objectives are designed to train fellows who, by the end of the program, will:
1.
Demonstrate an advanced level of competence in pediatric neuropsychology sufficient for
independent practice.
2.
Demonstrate a strong knowledge base in clinical neuropsychology and clinical neurosciences.
STRUCTURE
This is a two-year fellowship designed to follow the program guidelines set forth by the Association of Postdoctoral
Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology (APPCN). We have two fellowship positions (one junior, one senior) with the
following components, which can be tailored to meet the needs and goals of trainees:
•
Clinical training (minimum 70% of time commitment; up to 90% of time commitment)
•
Didactic Experiences (10% of time commitment)
•
Research (0-20% of time commitment, depending on fellow’s goals and demonstrated abilities)
This translates into 3.5 to 4.5 days/week devoted to clinical work and clinical supervision and 0.5 days per week
devoted for education/didactics, with the potential for up to one day per week devoted to research. The exact
proportion of clinical and research time will be determined according to the candidate’s training goals and their
demonstrated abilities. For example, candidates who are interested in a mainly clinical fellowship experience may
increase their clinical time commitment up to 90% (i.e., 90% clinical, and 10% didactic). The exact proportion will
be determined in collaboration with the program director, and may change as the fellow progresses through the
program. Most fellows will spend their first year with a major emphasis on clinical training.
In the second year of the program, fellows may also take part in supervising pre-doctoral residents, practicum
students, and/or psychometrists (as available).
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CLINICAL COMPONENT
The main clinical component of the fellowship consists of two major rotations in the supervised
neuropsychological assessment of children with complex medical and neurological conditions seen within the
Refractory Epilepsy Rotation and the Neurotrauma/General Neurology programs. Minor rotations may be arranged
for fellows who demonstrate an ability to meet or exceed the expectations set forth in the major rotations.
MAJOR ROTATIONS
Candidates will complete two major rotations during their fellowship. For major rotations,
referrals will include a mix of inpatients and outpatients, and assessment methods will
include full neuropsychological assessments, brief screenings, and bedside evaluations. On
average, 3.5 to 4.5 days per week will be devoted to the major rotation(s). Descriptions of
the two major rotations (refractory epilepsy and neurotrauma) are found below.
Refractory Epilepsy Rotation
The Refractory Epilepsy rotation will provide direct training in the neuropsychological evaluation of children with
seizure disorders, including training in pre-operative neuropsychological assessment of children evaluated for
epilepsy surgery as part of multidisciplinary pediatric surgery work-ups. The fellow will participate in Pediatric
Epilepsy rounds at ACH, and in the combined adult-child Calgary Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme Surgical
rounds at Foothills Medical Center. The fellow will gain experience in assessing children from the preschool age to
young adulthood, with most patients in the school-age range. Training in assessing quality of life and psychosocial
adjustment of children with epilepsy comprises an integral part of the rotation, in addition to the assessment of
executive functions, memory, language, visual-spatial skills, and other neuropsychological domains. Training in
specialized techniques such as extra-operative language mapping may also be included, as well as opportunities to
learn techniques offered through the adult epilepsy program.
Neurotrauma/General Neurology Rotation
The Neurotrauma rotation provides intensive and in-depth experience and training in the field of pediatric
acquired brain injuries (i.e., traumatic brain injuries, cerebrovascular, hypoxic-ischemic, neurotoxic, autoimmune,
infectious) and general neurology (i.e., complex and/or rare presenting conditions, such as neuromuscular,
neuropsychiatric, and genetic disorders, as well as cases involving neurosurgical intervention requiring pre-surgical
evaluations and post-surgical follow-up, such as tumor resections or endoscopic third ventriculostomy for
hydrocephalus). Primary clinical activities include: 1) conducting inpatient and outpatient neuropsychological
assessments with provision of reports and feedback to families; 2) providing consultation to the multidisciplinary
Neurorehabilitation Team, Neurologists, and Neurosurgeons during weekly team rounds and also individually; 3)
providing consultation to other referring neurologists and physicians within neurosciences; 4) providing
consultation to the unique Dr. Gordon Townsend School located within ACH; 5) providing consultation to external
parties such as schools and community organizations; and 6) acute/emergency intervention arising from time to
time (e.g., suicidal patients, child protection). Opportunities for involvement in cognitive rehabilitation and
behavior management programming may also be available.
MINOR ROTATIONS
Minor rotations can also be arranged to provide experience with assessment or treatment of other
neuropsychological or general clinical populations of interest to the fellow. Minor rotations are optional, are
available at the discretion of the fellowship director and/or program manager, and are only available to those
fellows who meet or exceed the clinical demands in their major rotations. These minor rotations may also be
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included as part of a major rotation. Minor rotations will not exceed one day per week of clinical time and shall not
interfere with the major rotation duties.
Rapid Cognitive Screening Rotation
Fellows may have an opportunity to become involved in a program that provides rapid cognitive screening of
inpatients and outpatients. This rotation provides a unique experience for fellows because it means providing a
rapid clinical service within the neurology and/or neurosurgery clinics as part of patient management, tracking
cognitive abilities over time, or monitoring cognitive side-effects of treatment.
Intervention Rotation
Fellows may become involved in planning and leading an intervention rotation (e.g., cognitive rehabilitation,
psychotherapy, support group) pending approval from the fellowship director and/or the program manager.
Neuro-Oncology Rotation
Eligible fellows may have the opportunity to choose a minor rotation in Neuro-oncology (part of the Hematology,
Oncology, and Transplant program) pending approval from the fellowship director and/or the program manager.
The aim of this rotation is to complement the fellow’s experience and training with aspects of the
neuropsychological evaluation specific to pediatric oncology settings. The fellow will gain experience in assessment
of children and adolescent survivors of brain tumors or cancers requiring CNS-invasive treatment.
EDUCATIONAL/DIDACTIC COMPONENT
Clinical and Teaching Rounds
Fellows will have access to a number of required and optional educational, research, and clinical rounds as part of
their didactic component. These include active participation in patient-focused rounds (i.e., Epilepsy Surgery
Rounds, Pediatric Epilepsy Rounds, and Neurorehabilitation [Brain Injury] Team Rounds), as well as attendance at a
number of teaching and clinical rounds (i.e., Neurology Teaching Rounds, Neuroradiology Teaching Rounds,
Developmental Neurosciences Grand Rounds, Pediatric Grand Rounds, Clinical Neurosciences Grand Rounds)
offered at the hospital and affiliated sites, including Foothills Medical Centre and the research institutes (e.g.,
Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Hotchkiss Brain Institute). Fellows are required to participate in the
patient-focused rounds applicable to their rotation(s), to attend weekly educational and research rounds, and
present cases at the teaching rounds. Fellows involved in research will be expected to present interim or
completed research results at one of the research forums (e.g., Neurosciences Business Meeting, teaching rounds).
RESEARCH COMPONENT
Fellows interested in a research component may have the opportunity to take an active part in collaborative
research with fellowship supervisors. As noted, fellows may be able to have up to one day per week for research,
which will be negotiated with the fellowship director. Projects will be under the guidance of the supervisor and will
almost always involve multidisciplinary research and clinical data. The supervisor will work closely with the fellow
to ensure that the project moves along smoothly and will provide assistance at all stages of the project. Recent
publications involving trainees can be found in Appendix B.
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RESOURCES AND EQUIPMENT
The Neuropsychology Service has several state-of-the-art pediatric testing suites for conducting
neuropsychological evaluations. Each has digital audio-video equipment for remote observation and recording,
including observation-room video monitors, DVD recorders, and remote camera controls. The Neuropsychology
Service also has an extensive library of neuropsychological equipment and testing materials, clinical
questionnaires, and scoring software for conducting pediatric neuropsychological assessments, as well as a
number of reference texts on clinical neuropsychology.
Fellows will be provided with office space and will have full access to computers, testing materials, library facilities,
electronic journals, statistical and referencing software, and other supplies necessary for conducting their clinical
work and research.
SUPERVISION AND PROGRESS EVALUATIONS
Supervision follows a mastery model:
1.
Observation (fellow of staff).
2.
Joint assessment/treatment (shared responsibility for case management).
3.
Observation (staff of fellow); the observation is direct, requires the staff to be in the room and
prepared to intervene if necessary.
4.
Fellow solo, with staff providing planning and debriefing sessions for each case (may use audio,
video or one-way mirror to review sessions).
5.
Arms-length supervision; fellow carries a case load and cases are discussed at regularly
scheduled supervision sessions.
After an initial screening period, fellows are expected to rapidly move to level 3, and would be expected to be
working at level 4 for the majority of their rotations. Fellows are expected to be working at level 5 by the end of
the fellowship.
Formal supervision to review cases will occur weekly (1 hour), along with informal supervision available on a daily
basis. At the end of each six-month period, an interim progress report will be completed and shared with the
fellow and the Fellowship Director. A final report for each major rotation will be completed at the end of the
rotation. Continuation to the second year of the program is contingent on satisfactory progress during the first
year.
Fellows whose performance is not meeting expected levels will be directly informed of their perceived problem
areas, and a plan for remediating these weaknesses will be formulated in conjunction with the fellowship
supervisor and the fellowship director.
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ELIGIBILITY
In order to be eligible, applicants must have (1) substantial experience in clinical neuropsychological assessment of
children, (2) completed a CPA- or APA-accredited Clinical Psychology or Clinical Neuropsychology doctoral
program, and (3) completed a CPA- or APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship. In addition, all degree
requirements must be completed before the start date.
With respect to issues affecting our ranking process, please note that Alberta Children’s Hospital is an equal
opportunity employer with a strong commitment to diversity of trainees. Canadian immigration regulations
require that preference be given to qualified Canadian citizens or landed immigrants.
SALARY AND BENEFITS
Stipend for fellows is $57,000 (Canadian Funds) for the first year and $59,000 for the second year. The fellow will
be provided with a standard employee benefits package that includes three weeks paid vacation in each of year 1
and year 2 (i.e., 15 working days each year), 11 paid statutory holidays, and basic medical benefits plan.
START DATE
The fellowship training year runs from the first week of September until the final week of August. Fellows are
expected to start their training within the first week of September 2013.
DEADLINE
All application materials must be received no later than January 31, 2013. However, early applications are
strongly encouraged, particularly for those wishing to schedule an in-person interview at a conference (pending
availability of the director or a designate to travel to the conference; please contact Dr. Brooks to inquire about
conference availability). Applications received after this date or applications with missing information after this
date will not be considered.
APPLICATION PACKAGE
Applicants must submit the following 8 items:
1.
Application form and checklist (please download application form and checklist from the website,
http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/3805.asp).
2.
Curriculum vitae
3.
Letter of interest
4.
Official graduate school transcripts (enclosed in original unopened envelopes OR sent directly from
institution)
5.
A statement from your graduate school clinical training director indicating your status in the program
and probability of completing all doctoral requirements prior to the start date of the fellowship (the
latter is waived for those already holding the doctorate)
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6.
Two sample de-identified pediatric neuropsychological reports
7.
Copies of representative publications (if applicable)
8.
Three letters of recommendation (enclosed in original unopened envelopes OR sent directly from
referees)
Application package should be sent to:
Dr. Brian Brooks
Director, Pediatric Neuropsychology Fellowship
Neurosciences Program, Alberta Children’s Hospital
2888 Shaganappi Trail NW
Calgary, AB, CANADA, T3B 6A8
Please send hard copies of all application materials via mail or courier, and please send all application materials
together (except transcripts and letters of reference, which can be mailed directly). Hard copies are preferred to
ensure that the candidate can verify that all documents appear as intended. Electronic versions of your application
materials (i.e., email attachments) and faxes will not be accepted.
INTERVIEWS
After initial screening of the application packages, potential candidates will be contacted to arrange an interview.
Interviews can be conducted in person, over the telephone, or via video conferencing. The interview location (e.g.,
telephone/video vs. in-person) will not affect standing in the ranking process. Given the timelines for matching, it
is preferred that in-person interviews be conducted either on site at ACH or at the National Academy of
Neuropsychology conference in November 2012 in Nashville, TN (pending availability of the director or a designate
to travel to the conference; please contact Dr. Brooks to inquire about conference availability).
MATCH PROCEDURES
Our program is an APPCN Match Participant (non-member). Selection of a successful candidate will therefore be
accomplished in accordance with the APPCN Match Policies. Candidates wishing to apply for the position must
therefore register to participate in the APPCN Resident Matching Program (www.natmatch.com). Information on
how to register, the deadline for submitting rank order, and date of match announcements, is available at the
NatMatch website.
This fellowship site agrees to abide by the APPCN policy that no person at this facility will solicit, accept, or use any
ranking-related information from any fellowship applicant.
INQUIRIES
Further questions should be directed to Dr. Brian Brooks through email at [email protected]
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APPENDIX A
NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP SUPERVISORS: BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES
1
CORE STAFF
BROOKS, Brian, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Neurosciences
(PhD: 2005, University of Calgary, Clinical Psychology; Fellowship training: BC Mental Health & Addiction Services
and NeuroHealth Research & Rehabilitation)
Dr. Brooks’ clinical work primarily involves neuropsychological assessment of children and adolescents with
intractable epilepsy and acquired brain injuries (i.e., traumatic brain injury, strokes, hydrocephalus, hypoxicischemic events, toxic exposure). His current research focuses on outcome after acquired injury (e.g., TBI, stroke),
return-to-play following a concussion, test development, psychometrics, and computerized neurocognitive testing.
Website: http://research4kids.ucalgary.ca/members/brooks
SLICK, Daniel, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Neurosciences
(PhD: 1997, University of Victoria, Clinical Psychology, Neuropsychology Specialization; Fellowship training: UCLA
Neuropsychiatric Institute)
Dr. Slick’s clinical work primarily involves inpatient and outpatient neuropsychological assessment of children and
adolescents with brain injuries secondary to trauma, hypoxic-ischemic events, toxic exposure and other
neurological disorders that are seen in the multidisciplinary Brain Injury Program. His current research focuses
brain injury outcomes, brain injury treatments, functional brain mapping, executive functions, psychometrics and
test development, and malingering.
AFFILIATED STAFF
FAY-McCLYMONT, Taryn, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Neuro-oncology Program
(PhD: 2009, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Fellowship training: Alberta Children’s Hospital)
Dr. Fay-McClymont specializes in the neuropsychological assessment of children and adolescents with brain
tumours and other haematology/oncology diagnoses. Evaluations include investigating the late effects of
treatment (e.g. chemotherapy and radiation). Current research focuses on neurocognitive outcomes in brain
tumor and leukaemia survivors, and early predictors of late neuropsychological effects from cancer treatment.
Research interests include quality of life in cancer survivors, sleep, quantified EEG, and diffusion tensor imaging.
MACRODIMITRIS, Sophie, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme, Foothills Medical
Centre
(PhD: 2005, York University)
Dr. Macrodimitris is the clinical psychologist for the adult Calgary Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme at Foothills
Medical Centre. Her interests include assessment (mood, personality) and therapy (CBT, interpersonal) for patients
with medical problems; conversion and somatization disorders; quality and safety improvement for inpatient and
outpatient epilepsy care; epilepsy surgery satisfaction; and enhancing treatment adherence and readiness to
change. Dr. Macrodimitris is spearheading group therapy initiatives, including a 10-session group CBT program for
epilepsy patients with comorbid depression and anxiety and a support group for parents of children with
intractable seizures, focused on increasing quality of life in families of children affected by epilepsy.
1
Presented in alphabetical order for each section.
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PARTLO, Lisa, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme, Foothills Medical Centre
(PhD: 1999, University of Calgary)
Dr. Partlo is the neuropsychologist for the adult Calgary Comprehensive Epilepsy Programme at Foothills Medical
Centre and an adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Calgary. Her interests
include neuropsychology, neurotoxicology, and epilepsy.
SHERMAN, Elisabeth, PhD, Neuropsychologist, Neurosciences (Casual Staff Position)
(PhD: 1997, University of Victoria, Clinical Psychology, Neuropsychology Specialization; Fellowship training: UCLA
Neuropsychiatric Institute)
Dr. Sherman’s clinical work primarily involves inpatient and outpatient neuropsychological assessment of children
and adolescents with seizure disorders and other neurological diagnoses. Her current research focuses on
neuropsychological functioning after surgery in adults and children with epilepsy, imaging (DTI), quality of life and
social-emotional outcome after pediatric epilepsy surgery, and ADHD and executive disorders in children with
epilepsy, in addition to psychometric research on neuropsychological tests.
Website: http://www.ucalgary.ca/research4kids/members/sherman
NEUROPSYCHOMETRISTS
CARLSON, Helen, PhD, Research Coordinator, Neuropsychology program, Neurosciences
(PhD: 2000, University of Wales, Bangor, UK, Experimental & Cognitive Psychology)
Dr. Carlson's research interests include exploring new neuroimaging techniques (like fMRI, rsfMRI, DTI, and cortical
thickness) to investigate how brain structures and thinking skills are related. These new imaging tools allow the
investigation and quantification of brain anatomy and white matter pathways. She is interested in understanding
of how changes in brain structure affect cognitive functioning and how the brain itself is organized with respect to
structure and function relationships and neuroplasticity.
MITCHELL, Lonna, BA, Neuropsychometrist, Neuropsychology program, Neurosciences
(BA: 2005, University of Calgary, Linguistics with Speech Science Distinction)
Lonna’s clinical work primarily involves neuropsychological assessment of children and adolescents with epilepsy,
traumatic brain injuries, strokes, hydrocephalus, and other general neurological, medical, and psychiatric
disorders. Her background and area of interest is in cognitive rehabilitation following acquired brain injury.
TAM, Emily, B.A. Neuropsychometrist, Neuropsychology program, Neurosciences
(BA: 2004, University of Calgary, Psychology)
Emily’s work primarily involves administration of neuropsychological tests to children and adolescents with
traumatic brain injuries, strokes, hydrocephalus, hypoxic-ischemic events, toxic exposure, and other general
neurological, medical, and psychiatric disorders.
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APPENDIX B
RECENT AND SELECTED NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FACULTY PUBLICATIONS∗
BOOKS
rd
Strauss, E., Sherman, E.M.S., & Spreen, O. (2006). A compendium of neuropsychological tests (3 Edition). New York:
Oxford University Press.
Sherman, E.M.S. and Brooks, B.L. (Eds., 2012). Pediatric Forensic Neuropsychology. New York: Oxford University
Press.
BOOK CHAPTERS
Brooks, B.L. and Iverson, G.L. (2012). Improving accuracy when identifying cognitive impairment in pediatric
neuropsychological assessments. In E.M.S. Sherman and B.L. Brooks (Eds.), Pediatric Forensic
Neuropsychology (pp. 66-88). New York: Oxford University Press.
Slick, D.J. and Sherman, E.M.S. (2012). Differential diagnosis of malingering and related clinical presentations. In
E.M.S. Sherman and B.L. Brooks (Eds.), Pediatric Forensic Neuropsychology (pp. 66-88). New York: Oxford
University Press.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Holdnack, J.A. (2012). Evidence-based neuropsychological assessment following workrelated injury. In S.S. Bush and G.L. Iverson (Eds.), Neuropsychological Assessment of Workplace Injuries.
New York: Guilford Press.
Brooks, B.L., Sherman, E.M.S., Iverson, G.L., Slick, D.J., & Strauss, E. (2011). Psychometric foundations for the
interpretation of neuropsychological test results. In M.R. Schoenberg and J.G. Scott (Eds.), The Little Black Book
of Neuropsychology: A Syndrome-Based Approach (pp. 893-922). New York: Springer.
Sherman, E.M.S., Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Slick, D.J., & Strauss, E. (2011). Reliability and validity in
neuropsychology. In M.R. Schoenberg and J.G. Scott (Eds.), The Little Black Book of Neuropsychology: A
Syndrome-Based Approach (pp. 873-892). New York: Springer.
Iverson, G.L. and Brooks, B.L. (2011). Improving accuracy for identifying cognitive impairment. In M.R. Schoenberg and
J.G. Scott (Eds.), The Little Black Book of Neuropsychology: A Syndrome-Based Approach (pp. 923-950). New
York: Springer.
MacAllister, W.S., & Sherman, E.M.S. (in press). Evaluation of children and adolescents with epilepsy. In W. Barr &
C. Morrison (Eds.), Handbook of the Neuropsychology of Epilepsy. New York: Oxford University Press.
Slick, D.J., Tan, J.E., Sherman, E.M.S., & Strauss, E. (2011). Malingering and related conditions in pediatric populations.
In A.S. Davis (Ed.), Handbook of pediatric neuropsychology. New York: Springer. pp. 457-470.
* Williams, T.S., Sherman, E.M.S., & Strauss, E. (2010). Modified Mini-Mental State Examination. In J.S. Kreutzer, J.
∗
Publications with an asterisk denote projects involving trainees (trainees are underlined).
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DeLuca, & B. Caplan (Eds.). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology. New York: Springer. pp. 1650-1653.
* Vanderhill, S., Strauss, E., & Sherman, E.M.S. (2010). Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease
(CERAD). In J.S. Kreutzer, J. DeLuca, & B. Caplan (Eds.). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology. New York:
Springer. pp. 690-692.
* Tan, J.E., Strauss, E., & Sherman, E.M.S. (2010). Clinical Dementia Rating. In J.S. Kreutzer, J. DeLuca, & B. Caplan
(Eds.). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology. New York: Springer. pp. 587-589.
* Griffiths, S., Sherman, E.M.S., & Strauss, E. (2010). Dementia Rating Scale - 2. In J.S. Kreutzer, J. DeLuca, & B.
Caplan (Eds.). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology. New York: Springer. pp. 810-811.
* Keller, A.J., Sherman, E.M.S., & Strauss, E. (2010). Blessed Dementia Scale. In J.S. Kreutzer, J. DeLuca, & B. Caplan
(Eds.). Encyclopedia of clinical neuropsychology. New York: Springer. pp. 413-415.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Ashton, V.L. (2008). Cognitive impairment consequent to motor vehicle collisions:
Foundations for clinical and forensic practice. In M.P. Duckworth, T. Iezzi, & W. O’Donohue (Eds.), Motor
vVehicle collisions: Medical, psychosocial, and legal consequences (pp. 243-310). New York: Elsevier.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Holdnack, J.A. (2008). Misdiagnosis of cognitive impairment. In R. Heilbronner (Ed.),
Neuropsychology in the courtroom: Expert analysis of reports and testimony (pp. 243-266). New York:
Guilford Press.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., White, T., & Stern, R.A. (2008). Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB):
Introduction and advanced interpretation. In A. M. Horton Jr. & D. Wedding (Eds.), The neuropsychology
handbook, third edition (pp. 279-343). New York: Springer Publishing Inc.
PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS
Slick, D.J., Hopp, G., Strauss, E., & Thompson, G. (1997). The Victoria Symptom Validity Test. Psychological
Assessment Resources: Odessa, Florida.
EDITORIALS AND POSITIONS PAPERS
Sherman EMS, & Wiebe S. (2010). Game-changing, or business as usual? New findings on naming after temporal lobe
surgery. Neurology, 74(19), 1484-1485.
Slick, D. J., Sherman, E.M.S., & Iverson, G. (1999). Diagnostic criteria for malingered neurocognitive dysfunction:
Proposed standards for clinical practice and research. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 13, 545-561.
PEER-REVIEWED RESEARCH PAPERS (past 5 years)
Jetté N., Quan H., Tellez-Zenteno J.F., Macrodimitris S., Hader W.J., Sherman E.M.S., Hamiwka L.D., Wirrell E.C.,
Burneo J.G., Metcalfe A., Faris P.D., Hernandez-Ronquillo L., Kwon C.S., Kirk A., Wiebe S.; The CASES Expert
Panelists. (2012). Development of an online tool to determine appropriateness for an epilepsy surgery
evaluation. Neurology. Aug 15. [Epub ahead of print]
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PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
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Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Ashton-Rennison, V.L. (in press). Minimal gender differences on the CNS Vital Signs
computerized neuropsychological battery. Applied Neuropsychology: Adult.
*Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Koushik, N.S., Mazur-Mosiewicz, A., Horton Jr., A.M., & Reynolds, C.R. (in press).
Prevalence of low scores in children and adolescents on the Test of Verbal Conceptualization and Fluency
(TVCF). Applied Neuropsychology: Child.
Sherman, E.M.S., Brooks, B.L., Fay-McClymont, T.B., & MacAllister, W.S. (2012). Detecting epilepsy-related
cognitive problems in clinically-referred children with epilepsy: Is the WISC-IV a useful tool? Epilepsia, 53(6),
1060-1066.
*Iverson, G.L., Echemendia, R.J., LaMarre, A.K., Brooks, B.L., & Gaetz, M.B. (2012). Possible lingering effects of
concussion in athletes with multiple injuries. Rehabilitation Research & Practice, 2012, 1-7. Article ID
316575.
Brooks, B.L. and Sherman, E.M.S. (2012). Computerized neuropsychological testing to rapidly evaluate cognition in
pediatric patients with neurological disorders. Journal of Child Neurology, 27(8), 982-991.
*Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Lanting, S.C., Horton Jr., A.M., & Reynolds, C.R. (2012). Improving test interpretation
for detecting executive dysfunction in adults and older adults: Prevalence of low scores on the Test of
Verbal Conceptualization and Fluency. Applied Neuropsychology, 19, 61-70.
*Brooks, B.L., Sherman, E.M.S., & Krol, A.L. (2012). Utility of TOMM Trial 1 as an indicator of effort in children and
adolescents. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27(1), 23-29.
*Fay-McClymont, T.B., Hrabok, M., Sherman, E.M.S., Hader, W.J., Connolly, M.B., Akdag, S., Mohamed, I.S., &
Wiebe, S. (2012). Systematic review and case series of neuropsychological functioning after epilepsy surgery
in children with Dysembryoplastic Neuroepithelial Tumors (DNET). Epilepsy and Behavior, 23(4), 481-6.
MacAllister, W.S., Bender, H.A., Whitman, L., Welsh, A., Keller, S., Granader, Y., Sherman, E.M.S. (2012)
Assessment of executive functioning in childhood epilepsy: the Tower of London and BRIEF. Child
Neuropsychology, 18(4), 404-15.
*Sherman E.M.S., Wiebe S., Fay T.B., Tellez-Zenteno J., Metcalfe A., Hernandez-Ronquillo L., Hader W.J., Jetté N.
(2011). Neuropsychological outcomes after epilepsy surgery: Systematic review and pooled estimates of
cognitive change. Epilepsia, 52(5), 857-69.
*Macrodimitris, S., Williams, T.S., Bigras, C., Sherman, E.M.S., Wiebe, S. (2011). Measuring patient satisfaction
following epilepsy surgery. Epilepsia, 52(8), 1409-17.
Macrodimitris, S., Sherman, E.M.S., Forde, S., Tellez-Zenteno, J., Metcalfe, A., Hernandez-Ronquillo, L., Wiebe, S.,
Jetté, N. (2011). Psychiatric outcomes of epilepsy surgery: A systematic review. Epilepsia, 52(5), 880-90.
Hamikwa, L.D., Hamiwka, L.A., Sherman, E.M.S., Wirrell, E. (2011). Social skills in children with epilepsy: How do
they compare to healthy and chronic disease controls? Epilepsy & Behavior, 21(3),238-41.
*Williams, T.S., Sherman, E.M.S., Dunseith, C., Mah, J., Blackman, M., Latter, J., Mohamed, I., Slick, D., Thornton,
N. (2011). Measurement of medical self-management and transition readiness among Canadian adolescents
with special health care needs. Journal of International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health, 3 (4), 527535.
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PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
(2013/2014)
*Krol, A.L., Mrazik, M., Naidu, D., Brooks, B.L., & Iverson, G.L. (2011). Assessment of symptoms in a concussion
management program: Method influences outcome. Brain Injury, 25 (13-14), 1300-1305.
Olson, R.A., Iverson, G.L., Carolan, H., Parkinson, M., Brooks, B.L., & McKenzie, M. (2011). Prospective comparison
of two cognitive screening tests: Diagnostic accuracy and correlation with community integration and
quality of life. Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 105(2), 337-344.
Sherman, E.M.S., Brooks, B.L., Akdag, S., Connolly, M.B., & Wiebe, S. (2011). Parents report more ADHD symptoms
than do teachers in children with epilepsy. Epilepsy and Behavior, 19, 428-435.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., Langenecker, S.A., & Young, A.H. (2011). Identifying a cognitive impairment subgroup in
adults with mood disorders. Journal of Affective Disorders, 132, 360-367.
Brooks, B.L. and Barlow, K.M. (2011). A methodology for assessing treatment response in Hashimoto’s
encephalopathy: A case study demonstrating repeated computerized neuropsychological testing. Journal of
Child Neurology. 26(6), 786-91.
Brooks, B.L. (2011). A study of low scores in Canadian children and adolescents on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale
for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV). Child Neuropsychology, 17(3), 281-289.
Brooks, B.L., Holdnack, J.H., & Iverson, G.L. (2011). Advanced clinical interpretation of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV:
Prevalence of low scores varies by level of intelligence and years of education. Assessment, 18, 156-167.
Sherman, E.M.S. and Brooks, B.L. (2010). Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function – Preschool Version
(BRIEF-P): Test review and clinical guidelines for use. Child Neuropsychology, 16, 503-519.
*Williams, T.S., Sherman, E.M.S., Dunseith, C., Mah, J.K., Blackman, M., Latter, J., Mohamed, I., Slick, D.J.,
Thornton, N. (2010). Measurement of medical self-management and transition readiness among Canadian
adolescents with special health care needs. International Journal of Child and Adolescent Health, 3(4), 527535.
Lange, R.L., Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Ashton-Rennison, V.L. (2010). Influence of poor effort on self-reported
symptoms and neurocognitive test performance following mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical
and Experimental Neuropsychology, 32, 961-972.
Brooks, B.L. (2010). Seeing the forest for the trees: Prevalence of low scores on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for
Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV). Psychological Assessment, 22(3), 650-656.
Brooks, B.L., Sherman, E.M.S., & Iverson, G.L. (2010). Healthy children get low scores too: Prevalence of low scores
on the NEPSY-II in preschoolers, children, and adolescents. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 25, 182190.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., Ashton, V.L., & Lange, R.L. (2010). Interview vs. questionnaire symptom reporting in
people with the post-concussion syndrome. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 25(1), 23-30.
*Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Sherman, E.M.S., Roberge, M.-C. (2010). Identifying cognitive problems in children and
adolescents with depression using computerized neuropsychological testing. Applied Neuropsychology, 17(1),
37-43.
Brooks, B.L. and Iverson, G.L. (2010). Comparing actual to estimated base rates of ‘abnormal’ scores on
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PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
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neuropsychological test batteries: Implications for interpretation. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 25, 1421.
Iverson, G.L., Lange, R.L., Brooks, B.L., & Ashton, V.L. (2010). ‘Good old days’ bias following mild traumatic brain
injury. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 24(1), 17-37.
Brooks, B.L., Sherman, E.M.S., & Strauss, E. (2010). NEPSY-II: A developmental assessment, second edition (Test
Review). Child Neuropsychology, 16, 80-101.
Iverson, G.L., Lange, R.L., Brooks, B.L., & Ashton, V.L. (2009). ‘Good old days’ bias following mild traumatic brain
injury. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 24(1), 17-37.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Young, A.H. (2009). Rapid computerized assessment of neurocognitive deficits in bipolar
disorder. Applied Neuropsychology, 16(3), 207-213.
Hamiwka LD, Yu CG, Hamiwka LA, Sherman EMS, Anderson B & Wirrell E. (2009). Are children with epilepsy at
greater risk for bullying than their peers? Epilepsy & Behavior, 15(4), 500-5.
Sherman EMS. (2009). Maximizing quality of life, life satisfaction and wellbeing: Prescriptions for practitioners and
people living with epilepsy. Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 36 Suppl 2, S17-24.
Brooks, B.L., Strauss, E., Sherman, E.M.S., Iverson, G.L., & Slick, D.J. (2009). Developments in neuropsychological
assessment: Refining psychometric and clinical interpretive methods. Canadian Psychology, 50(3), 196-209.
Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Feldman, H.H., & Holdnack, J.A. (2009). Minimizing misdiagnosis: Psychometric criteria for
determining possible or probable memory impairment. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 27, 439450.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., & Young, A.H. (2009). Identifying frank neurocognitive impairment in depression. Applied
Neuropsychology 16(4), 254-261.
Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Sherman, E.M.S., & Holdnack, J.A. (2009). Healthy children and adolescents obtain some
low scores across a battery of memory tests. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 15(4),
613-617.
Iverson, G.L., Brooks, B.L., Ashton, V.L., Johnson, L.G., & Gualtieri, C.T. (2009). Does familiarity with computers
affect computerized neuropsychological test performance? Journal of Clinical and Experimental
Neuropsychology, 31(5), 594-604.
Addas B, Sherman EMS & Hader WJ. (2008). Surgical management of hypothalamic hamartomas associated with
gelastic epilepsy. Neurosurgical Focus, 25(3), E8.
Sherman EMS, Connolly MB, Slick DJ, Eyrl K, Steinbok P, & Farrell K. (2008). Quality of life and seizure outcome
after vagus nerve stimulation in children with intractable epilepsy. Journal of Child Neurology, 23(9), 991-8.
Diaz RJ, Sherman EMS & Hader WJ. (2008). Surgical treatment of intractable epilepsy associated with focal cortical
dysplasia. Neurosurgical Focus, 25(3), E6.
* Wood LJ, Sherman EMS, Hamiwka LD, Blackman MB & Wirrell EC. (2008). Maternal depression: The cost of
caring for a child with intractable epilepsy. Pediatric Neurology, 39(6), 418-22.
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PEDIATRIC NEUROPSYCHOLOGY FELLOWSHIP
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* Wood, L.J., Sherman, E.M.S., Hamiwka, L., Blackman, M., & Wirrell, E.C. (2008). Depression, anxiety and quality
of life in siblings of children with intractable epilepsy. Epilepsy & Behavior, 31, 144-148.
Wirrell, E.C., Wood, L.J., Hamiwka, L.D., & Sherman, E.M.S. (2008). Parenting stress in mothers of children with
intractable epilepsy. Epilepsy & Behavior, 13, 169-173.
* Yu, C.G., Lee, A., Wirrell, E., Sherman, E.M.S., & Hamiwka, L. (2008). Health behaviour in teens with epilepsy:
How do they compare to healthy controls? Epilepsy & Behavior, 13, 90-95.
* Lee, A., Hamiwka, L.D., Sherman, E.M.S., & Wirrell, C. (2008). Self-concept in adolescents with epilepsy:
Biological and social correlates. Pediatric Neurology, 38, 335-339.
Sherman, E.M.S., Griffiths, S.Y., Akdag, S., Connolly, M.B., Slick, D.J., & Wiebe, S. (2008). Sociodemographic
correlates of health-related quality of life in pediatric epilepsy. Epilepsy & Behavior, 12, 96-101.
Thornton, N., Hamiwka, L., Sherman, E.M.S., Tse, E., Blackman, M., & Wirrell E. (2008). Family function in
cognitively normal children with epilepsy: impact on competence and problem behaviors. Epilepsy &
Behavior, 12, 90-95.
Brooks, B.L., Iverson, G.L., Holdnack, J.A., & Feldman, H.H. (2008). The potential for misclassification of mild cognitive
impairment: A study of memory scores on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in healthy older adults. Journal of
the International Neuropsychological Society, 14, 463-478.
Wirrell, E., Sherman, E.M.S., van Mastrigt, R., & Hamiwka, L. (2008). Deterioration in cognitive function in children
with Benign Epilepsy of Childhood with Central Temporal Spikes treated with sulthiame. Journal of Child
Neurology, 23, 14-21.
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