LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF DENTON VOTERS GUIDE – November 4, 2014

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF DENTON
VOTERS GUIDE
Denton County Election – November 4, 2014
The November 4th election is a General Election and in addition to the General Election certain jurisdictions will have issues
on the ballot. Voters in Texas may vote for any candidate they wish regardless of whether they voted in a party primary or
runoff or participated in a party convention. All candidates from all parties are on the same ballot.
The League of Women Voters of Denton’s Voters Guide for the November 4, 2014 General Elections includes the candidates
for U.S. Representative (District 24, 26), State Senator (District 30), State Representatives (District 63, 64, 65, 106), District
Judge (District 158, 211, 367), Criminal District Attorney, County Judge, Judge County Court At Law (1, 2), Judge County
Criminal Court (1, 2, 3, 4, 5), Judge County Probate Court, District Clerk, County Clerk, County Treasurer, County
Commissioner (Precinct 2, 4), Justice of the Peace (Precinct 4, 5, 6), Constable, and County Chairman.
National, state and regional races in Texas can be found in the League of Women Voters (LWV) of Texas’ Voters Guide
available along with the LWV of Denton’s Voters Guide.
Questions were sent to candidates in races that are contested. Candidates were asked to reply within specific word limits.
Answers exceeding the word limit are abbreviated at that limit, marked with three slashes (///). The League has not edited
any responses for grammar, spelling, or punctuation. Candidates who do not have an opponent on the ballot are listed in
the Voters Guide. The Voters Guide is organized by party, by office and by ballot order.
EARLY VOTING, October 20-31 by personal appearance will be available at the following locations and times for the city of
Denton:
Denton County Elections Administration: 701 Kimberly Drive; Denton
Monday-Friday
October 20-24
8am-5pm
Saturday
October 25
7am-7pm
Sunday
October 26
1pm-6pm
Monday-Friday
October 17-31
7am-7pm
For Early Voting by personal appearance locations outside of the city of Denton, contact the Denton County Elections
Administration Office at 940.340.3200 or www.votedenton.com/early-voting-information/early-voting-in-person. The new
address for the Denton County Elections Administration is 701 Kimberly Drive; Denton, TX.
POLLING PLACES on November 4th, Election Day, are by precinct.
For your Precinct and/or for Polling Place locations, contact the Denton County Elections Administration Office at
940.340.3200 or http://www.votedenton.com/election-day-information/election-day-polling-locations.
This VOTERS GUIDE is published by the League of Women Voters of Denton, with partial funding from the League of
Women Voters Texas Education fund. An electronic version of this guide is available at www.lwvdenton.org. The purpose
of the guide is to help eligible voters make an informed decision about candidates in contested races.
The LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF DENTON is a nonpartisan organization that works to promote political responsibility
through informed and active participation in government. The League does not support or oppose any political party or
candidate. The League publishes and distributes factual information to help prepare citizens to cast an informed vote. The
League takes action on selected governmental issues that it has studied.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE— JOIN US!
Be directly involved in shaping the important issues in our community. LWV is one
of America’s most trusted grassroots organizations, where nonpartisan, hands-on
work to safeguard democracy leads to civic improvement. Membership is open to men
and women 18 years and older. Visit us online at www.lwvdenton.org or send your
name, address, phone and email address, plus $50 membership fee to: LWV-Denton,
P.O. Box 424945, TWU Station, Denton, TX 76204.
This ad is paid for by the League of Women Voters of Denton.
UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVE
Questions:
1. What specific measures would you take to ensure access to affordable health care? (Limit: 100 words)
2. What are the three most critical issues facing your constituents? (Limit: 100 words)
3. What role should the federal government play in protecting the environment and human health? (Limit:
100 words)
4. What would you support to narrow the income gap? (Limit: n/a)
United States Representative, District 24
Kenny Marchant- Republican
No response
Patrick McGehearty – Democrat
1)
The Affordable Health Care Act needs careful revisions to correct errors and omissions
in the initial policy. The Medicaid Expansion needs to be accepted by Texas to provide
coverage for the millions who now must rely on expensive, legally mandated and taxpayer
funded emergency room coverage.
2)
Our children are our most precious resource. We need universal quality prekindergarden to help all children start on the road to success.
The U.S. Congress must take action to expand American job opportunities, removing current
incentives to export jobs abroad.
We need to fix the highway gridlock that cause people to sit in traffic every morning. That will require improved
funding for the National Highway Trust Fund.
3) The federal government must set and enforce air and water quality standards across all states. In addition, the
Food and Drug Administration and other agencies are necessary to protect us from dangerous additives and
untested products. The Center for Disease Control plays an important role in advancing public health in many
ways not covered by the profit motive.
4) The minimum wage needs to be raised to at least $10.10. This change will raise millions out of poverty. In
addition, tax loopholes which allow billionaires to pay lower tax rates than their secretaries need to be closed.
Those who receive great benefits need to pay their fair share of the costs of our great country.
Mike Kolls- Libertarian
No response
United States Representative, District 26
Michael Burgess-Republican
1)
Expansion of Health Savings Accounts should be first. Also, the HSA individual
contribution cap should be increased so that it is equal to the deductible at the Bronze or Silver
level under ACA. Secondly, we need to equalize the tax treatment between the individual
market and the large group market. It is not rational that employer sponsored health insurance
receives a generous subsidy from the Federal Government, and individuals do not. Also, we
need market flexibility. Health Insurance needs to be sold across state lines in a National
market, with the resultant savings available to the consumer.
2)
The Economy and Jobs - Creating jobs and getting Americans back to work is a vital
necessity. We also need a government that is efficient, less expensive, and more responsive.
Protecting our Borders and our Nation: Enforcing existing law and securing the border would go a long way to solving
our problems. We must not lose our resolve against extremely capable and committed enemies, foreign or domestic.
Since first elected to the U.S. Congress, I have been working to ensure the United States maintains the most capable
military in the world.
3) The Federal Government already plays a big role in protecting the environment and human health through
the FDA, EPA and CDC. Right now, we are faced with an unprecedented threat to our global health care
system; Ebola. This is not a political issue. I support American troops being sent to Liberia to oversee
hospitals, treatment facilities and training. The death toll is approaching 2500 and is climbing every day; their
public health system is near total collapse. This isn’t just Africa’s problem. If their economy breaks down, if it
becomes a global security threat it will affect everyone in America.
4) The one program that will provide the greatest amount of relief to the income gap is job creation and economic
growth. Any proposal that is deleterious to those two concepts will not have my support.
Mark Boler-Libertarian
1) I am running for a federal office. The Constitution grants no authority for the federal government to involve itself
in health care. Excessive government regulation starting in the 60s began the progressive slide into our
extremely expensive mess we call health care today. The best way to end it would be to allow a completely
free and competitive system much like happens with micro-segments of health care like Lasik surgery today.
Obamacare did not help it. It only made it worse and more expensive.
2) The critical issues are economy, civil rights and foreign policy. The economy would be best served by lowering
taxes, reducing spending and a return to sound money. Our rights would be best served by ending the
violations of the 1st, 2nd, 4th and other amendments and returning the federal government to what it is allowed in
Article 1, Section 8. Our foreign policy should be to keep us strong militarily, but only go to war when an actual
declaration of war is issued or when there is an immediately imminent threat on the actual territory of the
United States.
3) The federal government was created with limited powers and those powers do not grant it the right to interfere
in or control elements of health or environment. The 10th amendment says that those specific things not
granted to the federal government are to be left to the states or to the people. Which means it is the role of the
states. Any laws that have actually helped the environment like the Clean Water Act have been rendered
useless in certain circumstances for example the Halliburton Loophole. This is why it should be left to the
states.
4) It is not the role of the federal government to ensure income equality of the people. In a free country, with a free
and open market, the government does not get involved. This means that crony capitalism doesn’t flourish with
its corruption of the competitiveness of the market. When there are no excessive barriers to entry in markets,
and no excessive regulations keeping smaller competitors out, giant corporations are not given preference and
there are always smaller, leaner and more nimble competitors that prevent comfortable and ultra-lucrative
niches that allow the ultra-rich to get and stay that way.
STATE SENATOR
Questions:
1. What specific measures would you take to ensure access to affordable health care? (Limit: 100 words)
2. What are the three most critical issues facing your constituents? (Limit: 100 words)
3. What role should the federal government play in protecting the environment and human health? (Limit:
100 words)
4. What would you support to narrow the income gap? (Limit: n/a)
State Senator
Craig Estes-Republican
No response
Cory Lane-Libertarian
No response
STATE REPRESENTAIVE
Questions:
1.
What specific measures will you address to ensure that education is adequately funded? (Limit:
100 words)
2.
Do you favor expanding the rights of local government to regulate oil and gas development?
Please explain. (Limit: 100 words)
3.
What specific measures would you take to ensure access to affordable health care? (Limit: 100
words)
4.
Both adults and Juveniles with mental health needs are disproportionately incarcerated and are at
increased risk for abuse in prison. This is partially due to insufficient quality mental health services in
communities. Specifically state your position on jail diversion programs and how to fund them. (Limit:
100 words)
State Representative, District 63
Tan Parker-Republican
No response
Daniel Moran – Democrat
1)
The billions in cuts to our public schools was recently ruled as unconstitutional for failing to provide
an adequate education to all Texas children. We need to restore these cuts, and we can pay for them by
reducing, if not ending, subsidies for big business insiders that are too often not properly overseen, as was
seen by the recent audit of the Texas Enterprise Fund. In 2006 alone, we spent $1.4 billion on oil and gas tax
breaks. That money could be better spent on our children’s futures.
2)
More often than not, the legislature is too afraid to take on oil and gas regulation for fear of angering
the very powerful and influential fossil fuel industry. If the state government can’t or won’t step up to ensure
the health and safety of all Texans, then local governments should have the right to take the measures they
believe necessary in order to protect their citizens. I for one fully support the Town of Flower Mound’s oil and
gas ordinance that was passed in 2011 and that has been upheld by various courts.
3)
The first step our state must take is to accept the $70 billion in federal money to expand Medicaid,
which will give over 1 million Texans access to affordable health care, including myself, and alleviate
unnecessary burdens on our health care system. Not only is Texas losing $70 billion for not expanding, but
we’re losing $35 billion in our tax dollars to other states that have expanded Medicaid. We need to bring
Texas tax dollars back to Texas to help Texans.
4)
We need to put a greater emphasis on mental healthcare. Forcing those who are mentally ill into
prisons is a human rights violation, and we should do everything necessary to ensure that those who are
mentally ill are given the care they need so they don’t wrongfully end up in prison. One way to help pay for
these programs would be to divert money being wasted at the border for a political stunt, which is costing
Texans $3 million a week. This money could be better spent taking care of our state’s most vulnerable.
State Representative, District 64
Myra Crownover- Republican
1) As a member of the House Committee on Appropriations in 2013 I fought to restore the cuts to education
funding. In 2013, we covered enrollment growth and added 3.2 billion to public school funding. I will continue
to fight to control spending and increase efficiency in entitlement programs because entitlement spending is
crowding out funding for education.
2) I believe in local control. However, there are aspects to oil and gas that need to be regulated at a statewide
level. For example, pipelines often travel through multiple jurisdictions. If each local government sets different
standards for pipelines (size of the pipeline, how deep to bury it, etc.) the result is more dangerous than
statewide uniform regulation of pipelines would be. I also believe that the state can always improve things. In
2009, I passed legislation to require pipeline companies to use public right-of-way instead of private property
whenever possible.
3) For the last five legislative sessions I have filed legislation to increase access to Health Savings Accounts. I firmly
believe that HSAs are an important tool that give patients more control over their health care and empower
them to make decisions as a consumer. Increased use of HSAs has been shown to drive down health care costs
and increase patient participation in their health care decisions.
4) Last session I worked hard to increase funding for mental health care. I have spoken with our local Sherriff
about the high cost of imprisoning people with mental illness instead of getting them the help they need. It is
in the State's best interest to look at all solutions to provide services for the mentally ill so that we can keep
them out of our overburdened prison system
Emy Lyons – Democrat
1) We need a system that is funded based on researched data of what it takes to have a successful program. This
program would seek to inspire students, provide well compensated, trained teachers, have retention programs,
graduation success, current, truthful textbooks and updated technology. Teaching to the test and No Child Left
Behind would be eliminated. Our current system of funding does make sense as it is subject to cuts by political
agenda. Due to cuts it has failed to produce adequate numbers of graduates prepared for their university of
choice, trade school or the work force.
2) Expanding regulation of oil and gas to local government is the best policy for now. Most of the local
governments are reacting because they experience the bulk of effects from fracking in its cost, pollution, noise
and they receive fewer of the benefits. In time we will see documented effects of fracking to better support our
argument for or against this method of drilling. Until then, we need strict regulation for our protection.
Furthermore, by allowing local control, we will get more efficient regulation and have the power to obtain
equitable and fair benefits of fracking.
3) The ACA has done a great job of taking control of our healthcare costs by taking it away from the insurance
companies. It has allowed Americans access to healthcare regardless of employment status and preexisting
conditions. It also expanded coverage for young adults still in college. Where we lack is coverage eligibility for
the poorest Texans. Our failure to expand Medicaid coverage provided by the federal monies allotted, we have
cost our medical community millions and caused illness to go untreated. As a nurse, I know being proactive
with illness is best practice.
4) Funding for mental health services have been drastically cut in Texas until SB 1125 was tentatively approved.
The reasons for crime are diverse but as an educated society we know those that are chronic, acute, treatable
or not. Punishment is not an effective teacher if the criminal does not possess the capacity or ability to do
differently or to know better. Persons with autism, mental retardation and some mental illnesses should be
provided protection due to their own disability. Pilot programs that focus on fixing a problem, like found in Bexar
County and those funded by Annie E. Casey for juveniles are heading in the right direction.
Braeden Wright- Green
No response
State Representative, District 65
Ron Simmons- Republican
No response
Alex Mendoza – Democrat
No response
State Representative, District 106
Pat Fallon- Republican
No response
Lisa Osterholt – Democrat
1) I will seek to end the diversion of money away from education. Too often, funds from taxes or the lottery on not
used for education, but to shore up other areas of the budget. I will also seek to close tax loopholes that don’t
produce more jobs or added revenue in Texas. This additional money would go to hiring experienced teachers
to reduce class sizes, especially in elementary schools.
2) Yes, I do favor expanding the rights of local government to regulate oil and gas development. Voters who are
immediately affected by drilling should have a greater voice in the fate of their community because they will
bear the cost of any environmental or health impact. The best outcome would be local and state working
together to pass legislation.
3) I would immediate accept the Medicaid expansion included in the ACA. This would return $100 Billion of our
federal tax dollars back to the state over a 10 year period. We need to keep these dollars in our state. The
Center for Public Policy Priorities estimates that Denton County would create 4919 jobs, save residents $11
million, and provide 21,000 residents with health care.
4) I fully support Mental Health Jail Diversion programs like Senate Bill 1185 because they save money on the
repeated costs of incarceration. For every non-violent offender removed from the system, we save almost
$25,000. Bexar County’s Crisis Care Prevention Program has saved $800,000. Denton County has the lowest
funding per capita in the state for mental health care. Our MHMR is serving adults at 110-112% over funding
level and children at 215% over funding level every month. We can pay for these services by accepting
Medicaid expansion and requiring implementation of Crisis Care Programs throughout the state.
Rodney Caston- Libertarian
No response
DISTRICT JUDGE
1) Please describe your education, training and experience that qualify you for this position. (Limit:
50 words)
2) What are primary challenges of this position and how will you address them? (Limit: 100 words)
3) Discuss significant improvements you would like to make, if elected. (Limit: 100 words)
District Judge, 367th Judicial District
Margaret E. Barnes- Republican
1) I am the Presiding Judge of the 367th District Court. I have served as a Judge for 15 years;
prior to that, I practiced law exclusively in Denton County for 14 years. Southern Methodist
University Law School graduate. Board Certified in Family Law.
2) The primary challenge is meeting the needs of children in CPS cases. These kids truly
have no fault but bear the burden of adult decisions, both decisions made by their parent(s)
and by the state. Courts need more Court Appointed Special Advocates, who provide a voice
in the system for children. Court appointed volunteers are appointed by Judges and serve as
advocates solely for the children to provide an unbiased evaluation of what is in the best
interest of a child caught in the system. Providing a voice for a child today will provide a voice
for the child's future.
3) One improvement might be to modify Article 38.43 of the Code of Criminal Procedure "Evidence Containing
Biological Material". We have all heard about cases in which a Defendant was found guilty (some even plead guilty) in
cases which were later overturned by DNA results. Today, there are still cases in which the biological evidence is
minimal and technology is not advanced enough to provide certainty for a sample. I would like to modify 38.43 to
require biological evidence be held beyond it's current permitted destruction to allow for future scientific advancements
in science.
David Heiman – Democrat
1)
I have been practicing law in Denton County since 1989. During that time, I
have tried many cases, and have appealed others. These experiences keep me
close to the people who are actually in the Court system. I see the problems and
opportunities for improvement in our courts.
2)
One of the primary challenges is making sure that everyone in the court
system is treated with respect; treated equally; treated fairly. If elected Judge, I will
welcome feedback that I receive about the operation of the court-especially from
those who are not rich, socially-connected, nor popular. Our courts should not be
elitist. The justice dispensed by a court should not be dependent on those things,
nor on which lawyers are representing the parties to a case. The key to addressing those problems is wanting
to do so.
3) If elected, I would like to make sure that my court serves the people for whom it works—the citizens of Denton
County. That means justice will be dispensed equally, fairly, and with respect for all involved, no matter their
station in life, who their friends are, their political affiliation, nor who their lawyers are. Our courts must work for
all of us. If people lose confidence that courts are fair and impartial, then our democracy starts to fail.
Criminal District Attorney
Paul Johnson – Republican
No opposition
County Judge
Mary Horn –Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Court At Law (No. 1)
Kimberly McCary – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Court At Law (No. 2)
Robert Ramirez – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Criminal Court (Court 1)
Jim Crouch – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Criminal Court (Court 2)
Virgil Vahlenkamp, Jr. – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Criminal Court (Court 3)
David Garcia – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Criminal Court (Court 4)
Joe Bridges – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Criminal Court (Court 5)
Coby Waddill – Republican
No opposition
Judge, County Probate Court
Bonnie Robison – Republican
No opposition
District Clerk
Sherri Adelstein – Republican
No opposition
County Clerk
Questions:
1. What is your occupation? Please describe your education, training and experience that qualify you for
this position. (Limit: 50 words)
2. What are the primary challenges of this position and how will you address them? (Limit: 100 words)
3. Discuss significant improvements you would like to make, if elected. (Limit: 100 words)
Juli Anne Luke –Republican
1) My current occupation is Senior Criminal Court Clerk. I've been working in the County
Clerk's office for nine years, learning the inner workings of this large office and
establishing a professional relationship with other elected officials. I attended Riverside
College.
2) The primary challenge I see affecting this office is keeping costs down in the rapidly
growing community that is Denton County. I intend to bring positive leadership to the
office, reducing turnover, while maintaining a more efficient workforce. I would like to
reduce the travel budget by implementing more in-house training.
3) Improvements I intend to make if elected, include better leadership going forward, thus
improving office morale and increasing efficiency. I've also established a more
cooperative working relationship with other department heads and elected officials. This
will increase office productivity. I intend to treat tax dollars respectfully, and be
accountable to the taxpayers of Denton County. I will be accessible to the public.
Schyler Butler - Green
No response
County Treasurer
Cindy Yeatts Brown – Republican
No opposition
County Commissioner, (Precinct No. 2)
Ron Marchant, Republican
No opposition
County Commissioner, (Precinct No. 4)
Andy Eads, Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 1)
Joe Holland – Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 2)
James Depiazza, - Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 3)
Becky Kerbow, Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 4)
J W Hand – Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 5)
Mike Oglesby – Republican
No opposition
Justice of the Peace (Precinct 6)
Gary Blanscet – Republican
No opposition
Constable (Precinct 1)
Johnny Hammons – Republican
No opposition
The City of Denton voters will consider the following propositions:
PROPOSITION NO. 1
Proposition No. 1 authorizes the sale of $61,710,000 in public securities for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing, restructuring
and extending streets, roadways, bridges, overpasses, pedestrianways, sidewalks, landscaping, streetscapes, collectors, storm
drains, signalization, signage, other traffic and signal controls, traffic control and transportation facilities, street lighting and median
improvements; up to $30,000 of such principal amount for acquiring, constructing, and installing public art related to and being part
of some or all of the foregoing; and the purchase of land, as necessary, to support these improvements.
Ballot Language:
FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF $61,710,000 OF PUBLIC SECURITIES FOR STREET IMPROVEMENTS
AGAINST
PROPOSITION NO. 2
Proposition No. 2 authorizes the issuance of $16,565,000 of public securities for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing,
renovating, improving, expanding, equipping, and furnishing public safety facilities for the Police and Fire departments, including
related utility infrastructure, drainage, landscaping, and site and access improvements; up to $325,000 of such principal amount for
acquiring, constructing, and installing public art related to and being part of some or all of the foregoing; and the purchase of land, as
necessary to support these projects.
Ballot Language:
FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF $16,565,000 OF PUBLIC SECURITIES FOR PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES FOR POLICE AND FIRE
DEPARTMENTS
AGAINST
PROPOSITION NO. 3
Proposition No. 3 authorizes the issuance of $8,545,000 of public securities for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing,
restructuring, and installing stormwater drainage and flood control improvements; related utility relocation and bridge and street
modifications or removal; and the purchase of land, as necessary, to support these improvements.
Ballot Language:
FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF $8,545,000 OF PUBLIC SECURITIES FOR STORMWATER DRAINAGE AND FLOOD CONTROL
IMPROVEMENTS
AGAINST
PROPOSITION NO. 4
Proposition No. 4 authorizes the issuance of $11,355,000 of public securities for the purpose of constructing, reconstructing,
renovating, improving, expanding and equipping park improvements, including beautification, trails, athletic fields, water parks,
swimming pools, park buildings, and recreation facilities; up to $180,000 of such principal amount for acquiring, constructing, and
installing public art related to and being part of some or all of the foregoing; and the purchase of land, as necessary, to support these
improvements.
Ballot Language:
FOR
THE ISSUANCE OF $11,355,000 OF PUBLIC SECURITIES FOR PARK SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS
AGAINST
City of Denton Special Election
PROPOSITION REGARDING THE PROHIBITION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING
This determines whether an ordinance will be adopted amending Chapter 16, “Licenses, Permits, and Business Regulation,” of the
Code of Ordinances of the City of Denton, Texas, by adding a new Article VII, “Prohibition of Hydraulic Fracturing,” generally
providing that hydraulic fracturing operations are prohibited in the City of Denton.
Ballot Language:
FOR
SHALL AN ORDINANCE BE ENACTED PROHIBITING, WITHIN THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF DENTON, TEXAS,
HYDRAULIC FRACTURING, A WELL STIMULATION PROCESS INVOLVING THE USE OF WATER, SAND AND/OR CHEMICAL
ADDITIVES PUMPED UNDER HIGH PRESSURE TO FRACTURE SUBSURFACE NON-POROUS ROCK FORMATIONS SUCH
AS SHALE TO IMPROVE THE FLOW OF NATURAL GAS, OIL, OR OTHER HYDROCARBONS INTO THE WELL, WITH
SUBSEQUENT HIGH RATE, EXTENDED FLOWBACK TO EXPEL FRACTURE FLUIDS AND SOLIDS
AGAINST
City of Denton Special Election
LOCAL OPTION ELECTION
This authorizes the legal sale of all alcoholic beverages, including mixed beverages in the City of Denton, Texas.
Ballot Language:
FOR
THE LEGAL SALE OF ALL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES INCLUDING MIXED BEVERAGES.
AGAINST
City of Denton Special Election
PROPOSITION REGARDING THE SALE OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY OWNED, HELD OR
CLAIMED AS A PARK
This authorizes the sale of property within the North Lakes Park boundary. The subject tract for sale from the City is a 1.6598 acre
tract of land on the south west corner of the North Lakes Park boundary, south of the earthen dam embankment and related
drainage sump area. The tract does not have direct functionality with programming of the active or passive activities associated with
North Lakes Park.
Ballot Language:
FOR
SHALL AN ORDINANCE BE ENACTED AUTHORIZING THE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY CONSISTING OF 1.6598± ACRES AND
BEING A PORTION OF NORTH LAKES PARK OWNED, HELD, OR CLAIMED AS A PARK AND BEING A TRACT OF LAND IN
THE ROBERT BEAUMONT SURVEY, ABSTRACT NO. 31, AND BEING A PORTION OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT CONVEYED TO
SAID CITY OF DENTON BY DEED RECORDED IN VOLUME 647, PAGE 245, OF THE DENTON COUNTY DEED RECORDS?
AGAINST
“When voting, keep in mind that the City of Denton local elections are located at the end of
the official ballot.”
For more information regarding these ballot propositions, please call the City Secretary at (940) 349-8309.
Denton County Elections can be reached by phone at (940) 349-3200 or by email at [email protected]
You m ay bring this VOTERS G U ID E into the voting booth!
Copyright 2013
League of Women Voters of Denton
P.O. Box 424945 TWU Station Denton,
Texas 76204 website:
www.lwvdenton.org
partial funding by the League of Women Voters of Texas Education Fund