ROLE OF TATA-MSSRF-ISRO VILLAGE RESOURCE CENTRE ON KNOWLEDGE

ROLE OF TATA-MSSRF-ISRO VILLAGE RESOURCE CENTRE ON KNOWLEDGE
DISSEMINATION IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT – A STUDY
A Project report submitted to
A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous)
Affiliated to Bharathidasan University, Trichirapalli
In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the
Award of the degree of
MASTER OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
By
S. KALIMUTHU KUMARAN, B.Sc.,
Reg.No.06LIS404
Under the guidance of
Dr. A. GANESAN, Ph.D.,
P.G. DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
A.V.V.M.SRI PUSHPAM COLLEGE (AUTONOMOUS)
POONDI-613 503
THANJAVUR DISTRICT
APRIL 2008
1
A.V.V.M. SRI PUSHPAM COLLEGE (AUTONOMOUS)
POONDI, THANJAVUR- 613503
DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the project entitled
ROLE OF TATA-MSSRF-ISRO VILLAGE RESOURCE CENTRE
ON KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION IN
NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT – A STUDY
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of
MASTER OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
Is bonafide record of the original work done by
S. KALIMUTHU KUMARAN
Register Number - 06LIS404
Department of Library and Information Science,
A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College
Poondi, Thanjavur -613 503
During the period 2007-2008
Signature of the HOD
VIVA VOICE Examination for this project was held
Internal Examiner
External Examiner
2
Department of Library and Information Science
A.V.V.M.Sri Pushpam college (Autonomous)
Poondi, Thanjavur-613503
(Affiliated to Bharathidasan University, Trichy)
CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the project work done under my guidance of dissertation titled “ROLE OF
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO VILLAGE RESOURCE CENTRE ON KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION IN
NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT – A STUDY” is the bonafide record of work done by
S. KALIMUTHU KUMARAN, Reg. No.06LIS404 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the
award of the degree of MASTER OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE during the
academic year 2007-2008.
Signature of the Guide.
Examiners
1.
2.
3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
At the outset I thank the Lord, my parents and the Guide for giving me the grace and strength
to complete this project successfully.
It is my unique honor to convey my heartful thanks to the Management and particularly the
Secretary and Correspondent Sri.Poondi Ayya of A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College for providing
opportunity to study MLIS course and do this project.
I owe personal dept of gratitude to any faculty Guide Dr. A. Ganesan, Coordinator, PG.
Department of Library and Information Science, A.V.V.M.
Sri Pushpam College, Poondi for his
valuable support, inspiration, guidance and timely help at each and every stage of this project.
My heartful thanks to Dr. A. GANESAN, Ph.D., P.G. Dept. of LIS, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam
College, (Autonomous), Poondi.
My Sincere thanks to TATA-MSSRF-ISRO VILLAGE RESOURCE CENTRE and VILLAGE
KNOWLEDGE CENTRES IN NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT for timely help in completion of this project
I also thanks to my friend Mr. S. SENTHILKUMAR, B. RAJASEELAN and V. RAJAVEL
LIS,Students.
.
S. KALIMUTHU KUMARAN
4
CONTENTS
CHAPTER NO.
TITLE
PAGE NO
1
INTRODUCTION
1
2
M.S. SWAMINATHAN RESEARCH FOUNDATION
11
3
PROFILE OF NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT
16
4
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
22
5
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
27
6
DATA ANALYSIS
32
7
FINIDNGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION
52
5
CHAPTER – I
INTRODUCTION
The contemporary society needs information for planning and development activities in every
sphere of works namely decision making, policy making as well as in formulation of plan of action.
These decisions and plans of action are needed at various levels-national, regional and international
and for planning level, administrative level and execution level. The Department of Science and
technology needs information for formulation of science plan for the Council of Scientific and Industrial
Research, the department of Electronic etc. will need information for formulating a plan in their areas.
A laboratory director will need specific information for determining priorities and testing facilities. A
research worker will need information for executing his research work. From this it is observed that
the nature of required information from every ones point of view is different and varied. Hence mere
collection of information is not enough for utility, but the raw information is to be processed to yield a
systematic and integrated information needed for a specific purpose.
1.1 Meaning of information system
A system may be defined as an arrangement of components or elements working in relation
to the other to perform a set of operations in the accomplishment of the purpose of the whole.
The term “Information System” refers to the methods, materials, media, producers, recipients
and services and service products involved in an organised way to effect information transfer within a
specific field, activity or organisation. It consists of complex collection of information, persons who
produce them, institutions which process them and a set of
behaviour
patterns, customs, and
traditions by which these persons and institutions interrelate.
1.2 Information Centre
The task of handling information for storage and retrieval for service has been the major
objectives of libraries, archives and information centres. If any institution handles information for
storage and retrieval activities, it is termed as information centre.
6
1.3 Definition
A precise definition of an information centre is difficult because of its various changing
denotation. But it is obvious that the centres that are components of their parent bodies would have
been created owing to pressing demand/need of the institutions. Cohan and Crowen observe that the
increase of Research and Development activities has stepped up the demand of laboratory and
administrative personnel for expanded, more efficient, and better integrated information services. As
a result, effort has been made to unify libraries, patent, report writing, archival, abstracting, literature
search, editorial, communication and publication activities within a single facility. The centralisation of
all the above leads to the formation of information centre.
1.4 Library as Information Centre
Library is considered as one of the information centre. For the provision of information to the
users, it collects, process, stores and retrieves the right information for the right reader at the right
time. The users are mostly expected to locate the specific information themselves with the help of
secondary sources, such as abstracting, indexing periodicals, bibliographies, etc.
A documentation centre in an information centre which acquires, processes, organizes and
disseminates information from primary, secondary & tertiary sources.
1.5 Different Information centres
Due to the proliferation of knowledge and the document publications and the never ending
demands for different types of information by different users, the documentation centre has been
observed splitting into so many information centres depending upon the nature of materials, collection
processing and services and products. Such information centres, Referal centres, Clearing houses,
Translation centres, Reprographic centres, Bibliographic centres etc.
1.6 Data Centre
Data centre as an organization handling quantitative numerical data.
Such centres take
primary function of collecting, organising and disseminating data mainly numerical and also provide a
measurement service and be in a position to advance relevant measurement techniques. They store
data which are related to a narrow field of specialisation.
The term ‘data centre’ is used
7
interchangeably to define a range of information centres. Data centres handle only numerical data by
themselves. Any institution interested in developing data handling capacities may be called data
centre.
1.7 Referal centre
Information centres like libraries have been providing reference service to their clientele to
meet their information requirements with their documents available within the library and with their
personnel information resources. Herron and Mcclure state, that sometimes the information seeking
behaviour of users may make the librarian refer other libraries for information as the library may not
contain comprehensive collection. In such situation, the librarians, can assist the public in negotiating
various information providers for prompt resolution of an information need.
In the Librarians Glossary and Reference book, edited by Harrod, the referral centre is
defined as an organisation for directing researchers for information and data to appropriate sources
such as libraries, information evolution centres documents or documentation centres and individuals.
A referral centre does not supply data or documents.
`In other words Referral centre is an organisation for the indication of sources persons
institutions, publications etc. from which scientific information may be obtained on a given subject. It
provides a mechanism for switching users to such sources.
1.8 Clearing House
The Harrods “Librarians” Glossary defines clearing-house as “an organization that collects
and maintains records of research, development and other activities being planned, currently in
activities, and referral services to other sources for information relating to these activities”.
The Websters’ New Collegiate Dictionary defines a clearing house as an establishment
maintained by banks for settling mutual claims and accounts or a central agency for collection,
classification, and distribution, especially of information.
The latter definition would compass all
information centres and most specially the conventional libraries. It is, therefore, not surprising to find
many disseminating, using the word clearing house in their titles, so much so, in fact, that the term
conveys only the broadest of images and cannot be used to differentiate among the many activities
with which information centres are concerned.
8
1.9 Information Analysis Centre
The term information analysis centre is very recent, but the concept is as old as human
culture. Brady has hypothesized that the monoliths in the stone age may have functioned as an
information centre. Bering sees the Information Analysis Centre concept operating in the Oracle at
Delphi and in the medicine man of primitive tribes. Horning has observed,
“In a sense every individual acts as a small information analysis center when he writes a
research paper or uses existing knowledge to solve or even to formulate a problem”.
But this is not what we mean when we use the term ‘information center’. An information
analysis centre is a person or a group of persons who have accepted a responsibility to gather
together everything known that is relevant to a particular well defined field, to organise the information
in some systematic fashion so that they and others will know what information exists to analyse… the
contents in such a fashion that they create new knowledge and to maintain these activities as a long
term commitment for a substantial portion of their
professional career. This type of activity, of course, has long been an integral part of science and
technology. Specific roots of the information analysis centre according to Kertesz. are imbedded in
the tradition of the nineteenth century scientists such as Belistein and Gmelin, who accepted the
challenge to bring some kind of order into the ever-increasing flood of data, to make experimental
findings conveniently available to other scientists by means of their hand books and data
compilations.
An Information Analysis Centre is distinguished by its function, service and its products, and
by the nature of the patron. Where as output in a special library is the same as its input, but in a
different format (ie. In the form of an abstract), the output in an Information Analysis Centre is
analysed and evaluated information by human brain. The Information Analysis Centre is usually
attached to an organisation devoted to in depth research on a micro subject such as Nuclear
spectroscopy, Soil Science etc; its primary goal is to provide information and sifted through human
brain.
9
1.10 Translation Centres
The term ‘translation’ means the act of conversion of a written text from one language to
another. Usually it is the act of conversion from unknown language to known language in which there
is need to have the original ideas expressed through the unknown language.
In the field of science and technology, more and more scientific information is being
generated in every branch of knowledge in a variety of languages. The information users are found to
be reluctant to read materials in languages with which they are unfamiliar. This phenomenon has
been termed as ‘the foreign language barrier’ which happens to be an important problem faced by
scientific community. This problem has also tempted librarians to device new way and means to
overcome the problem in a variety of ways.
1.11 MSSRF – Village Knowledge Centre:
M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation information centres are referred as Village
Knowledge Centres.
10
CHAPTER – II
M. S. SWAMINATHAN RESEARCH FOUNDATION
2.1 Introduction:
The M. S. Swaminathan Research Foundation started its work sixteen years ago in the
thematic areas of coastal systems, biotechnology, biodiversity, ecotechnology, food security and
information, education and communication. The approach was based on strategic and participatory
research, capacity building networking and partnership building, based on the principles of social
inclusion in access to technologies which help to enhance income and environment. Research and
outreach strategies were devised to bridge the rich-poor and gender divides in the areas of
information, knowledge and skill empowerment.
2.2 History of M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation
M. S. Swaminathan Research Foundation was registered in 1988 as a non-profit Trust. The
basic mandate of M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation is to impart a pro-nature, pro-poor and
pro-women orientation to a job-led economic growth strategy in rural areas through harnessing
science and technology for environmentally sustainable and socially equitable.
2.3 Five areas of research:
•
Coastal Systems Research,
•
Biodiversity and Biotechnology,
•
Ecotechnology and Sustainable Agriculture,
•
Reaching the Unreached, and Education,
•
Communication, Training and Capacity Building.
2.4 Chairman
Professor Swaminathan contributions to the agricultural renaissance of India have led to his
being widely referred to as the scientific leader of the GREEN REVOLUTION movement.
His
11
advocacy of sustainable agriculture leading to ever-green revolution makes him an acknowledged
world leader in the field of sustainable food security. The International Association of Women and
Development conferred on him the first international Award to significant contributions to promoting
the knowledge, skill and technological empowerment of women in agriculture and for his pioneering
role in main streaming gender considerations in agriculture and rural development.
Professor Swaminathan is a fellow of many of the leading scientific academies of India and
the world, including the Royal Society of London and the United States National Academy of
Sciences.
Professor M.S. SWAMINATHAN has been acclaimed by TIME Magazine as one of the
twenty most influential Asians of the 20th century and one of the only three from India, the other two
being MAHATMA GANDHI and RABINDRANATH TAGORE. He has been described by the United
Nations as “THE FATHER OF ECONOMIC ECOLOGY”.
Awards by the President of India
¾
Padma Shri (1967)
¾
Padma Bhushan (1972)
¾
Padma Vibushan (1989)
2.5 Priorities were determined to be:
¾
The conservation and enhancement of natural resources - particularly land, water, and
biodiversity.
¾
The promotion of sustainable and equitable agricultural and rural development.
¾
The generation of greater opportunities for skilled employment, particularly for rural women
and youth.
¾
Reaching the unreached and voicing the voiceless in terms of techniracy and gender equity
12
2.6 Conferences:
M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation started its research work with the help of
infrastructural facilities provided by the Anna University and the Indian Institute of Technology,
Chennai where
Dr. M. S. Swaminathan was appointed Honorary Research
Professor. Four important conferences supported by national and international bodies were organised
at Chennai.
They were:
¾
The Keystone International Dialogue on Plant Genetic Resources
¾
Asian Network on Biological Sciences
¾
Meeting of the International Society for Mangrove Eco-systems
¾
Wheat Revolution in Asia - A Dialogue
2.7 Gaining Strength
The highlight of this period of growth in M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation's history
was its being awarded the 1996 Blue Planet Prize. On 5 June 1996, World Environment Day, the
Foundation's staff members received the news with great pride and joy. This prize was instituted by
the Asahi Glass Foundation of Japan on the occasion of the United Nations Conference on
Environment - and Development held at Rio in June 1992. It was a recognition of the efforts by M.S.
Swaminathan Research Foundation to promote sustainable livelihoods in rural areas and
conservation of natural resources. M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation is the first and only
institution in Asia chosen so far for this prize.
Research projects continued to be undertaken. Memoranda for short and long term projects
were signed with the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial
Research, Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Environment and Forests, Wasteland
Development Board of the Government of India, Council for Advancement of People's Action and
Rural Technology, the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, and the Hunger Project. International banking came
from Swedish International Development Agency, the Canadian International Development Agency,
the Darwin-Initiative (United Kingdom), and the Norway International Developmental Agency, among
others.
13
2.8 Other important consultations:
Two other important consultations of M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation were:
¾
Impact of Climate Change on Food and Livelihood Security: An Agenda for Action
¾
Agrobiodiversity and Farmer's Rights: Technical Consultation on an Implementation
Framework for Farmers Rights
2.9 Ongoing Today:
The President of India inaugurated M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation's second
building, the premises for the J. R. D. Tata Centre for Ecotechnology, in July 1998. Established with
the financial support of Tata Trusts, the major goal of this Centre is to seek solutions to some of the
problems of contemporary development like environmental degradation, endemic hunger and
extensive human deprivation, feminisation of poverty, and jobless economic growth. The work of the
J. R. D. Tata Ecotechnology Centre is supported by a generous endowment grant made by the Sir
Dorabji Tata Trust. Keeping to
M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation's ideals, this new
building too is a blend of modern and traditional structures. The multi-purpose auditorium is a flexible
place designed like a conventional koodam, making maximum use of natural light and ventilation. The
landscape and garden reflect the principles of sustainable agriculture and land management such as
recycling waste and vermicomposting. A park based on the concept of sacred groves of the past has
been established adjoining the J. R. D. Tata Ecotechnology Centre.
2.10 About Board of Trustees:
Prof. M.S. Swaminathan, Chairman
Ms. Mina Swaminathan
Dr. Madhura Swaminathan
Mr. N. Ram
Dr. T. Ramasami
Dr. D. Suman Sahai
Mr.V.Namasivayam
Dr. Vijay Mahajan
Dr. Tushaar Shah
Ms.Rita Saran
14
2.11 Further Contact:
M S Swaminathan Research Foundation
3rd Cross Street, Institutional Area, Taramani Chennai - 600113, India
Ph: +91-44-22542698, 22541229 Fax: +91-44-22541319
You can write to :
[email protected] for general enquiry
[email protected] to contact Prof.M.S.Swaminathan, Chairman
15
CHAPTER – III
PROFILE OF NAGAPATTINAM DISTRICT
Nagapattinam is a coastal District; covering a total area of 2,71,583 hectares. Out of the
total area, around 1,26,149 hectare Livestock played a major role in strengthening livelihoods,
particularly the small ruminants, generally small ruminants are reared in stall-fed system, using tree
fodder, supplemented during lean season by open grazing in the agricultural fields Agricultural work is
the major livelihood for the agricultural labourers, supplemented by major multiple livelihoods like
seasonal fish catch in the rivers/backwaters, prawnfarms, coconut leaf mat making, copra preparation,
etc.
Between 1891 and 2000, nearly 26% of cyclones that formed in the Bay of Bengal struck the
coast of TamilNadu; of which 55 severe cyclones crossed the region, mostly during the months of
October and November. In addition to frequent cyclones crossed, mid-season drought, floods and
water logging due to the flat topography and improper/distributed drainage systems, make the region
more vulnerable. Thus the soil resources in this region show fluctuating characteristics of soluble salt
concentrations is classified as wetland, 61,880 hectares as dry land, and the remaining 83,548
hectares as ‘poramboke’ or Government land.
Around 74% of the cultivators have less than 1
hectares of land and another 15% hold between one to two hectares. The remaining 11% of the
households own above two hectares of land. Though the area receives an average rainfall annually,
nearly 76% occurs during the Northeast Monsoon, followed by 17.3% during the southwest
Monsoon. The soil is predominantly sandy in texture and clayey in certain
Pockets, with slight
salinity/ alkalinity. The soil in the belongs to Valudalakudi series; dark brown to brown, deep, sandy
and possessing characteristics, of mild to moderate alkalinity levels. The area lying between north of
Nagapattinam, to the border of Cuddalore District is covered under the Delta irrigation system.
Agriculture in this region is dominated by rain fed and canal irrigated cultivation,
supplemented by tank irrigation for the main camp of rice and small–scale irrigation using under
ground water for the secondary crop viz pulses, gingelly, groundnut etc. Paddy is the primary
subsistence crop being traditionally cultivated in different methods. More than two third of the forming
community are the small and marginal holders, and paddy is the most suitable staple crop.
Groundnut, coconut, cashew, mango, vegetables like brinjal, clusterbean, lady’sfinger etc are
cultivated using small scale irrigation, cotton and Casuarina are the other commercially important
crops .in some of the areas. Pulses like greengram, blackgram and crops are cultivated as secondary
crops (relay crop) after first season. Paddy or finger millet, gingelly, sun hemp etc, are grown.
16
Livestock played a major role in strengthening livelihoods, particularly the small ruminants,
generally small ruminants are reared in stall-fed system, using tree fodder, supplemented during
lean season by open grazing in the agricultural fields Agricultural work is the major livelihood for the
agricultural labourers, supplemented by major multiple livelihoods like seasonal fish catch in the
rivers/backwaters, prawnfarms, coconut leaf matmaking, copra preparation, etc.
DISTRICT-PROFILE
(LATEST UPTO 2008)
NAGAPATTINAM
3.1 Geographical Position
North Latitude
between 10 10 and 11 20
East Latitude
between 79 15 and 79 45
3.2 Revenue Adminstrative Divisions
Revenue Divisions
:2
Revenue Taluks
:7
Revenue Firkas
: 31
Revenue villages
: 523
3.3 Local Bodies
Corporation
Municipalities
: Nil
:7
Panchayat union
: 11
Town panchayat
:9
Village panchayat
: 434
17
3.4 Banking and Insurance
Bank offices
: 20
Life Insurance Offices
:3
Policies issued
: 34338
Sums Assured
: 246.47
[Rs in crores]
3.5 Area and Population:
Area
: 2,71,583 sq.km
Population
: 1488839
Male population
: 739074
Female population
: 749765
Rural population
Urban population
Density
: 1158557
: 330282
: 548
Literates
: 996580
3.6 Temperature : [In Degree Centigrades]
Plains:
Maximum
Minimum
: 32.0
: 24.6
Hill station:
Maximum
Does not arise
Minimum
Does not arise
18
3.7 Rain Fall:[in mm]
South west:
Normal
274.1
Actual
291.1
Northeast:
Normal
: 886.4
Actual
: 1155.9
3.8 Natural Resources:
Name of the minerals found
:Silica, crudeoil, NaturalGas
Lime shall, Earthsend
3.9 Agriculture:
Total cultivated area
Net area sown
: 241291
: 148542
Area sown more than once
: 92749
3.10 Area and Production of Principle Crops
S.NO
AREA
PRODUCTION
(HEC)
(Tones)
CROP
I
Rice
158
864 Kg/Hec
II
Millets &other orals
15
454 Kg/Hec
III
Pulses
65
203 Kg/Hec (green gram)
193 Kg/Hec (Black gram)
IV
Sugar cane
3
92 Tone/Hec
19
V
Groundnut
2.7
3350 Kg/Hec
VI
Gingelly
137
472 Kg/Hec
VII
Cotton
2.1
362 Kg/HEc
3.11 Agriculture Land Holdings:
Area [in Hectares]
155866
Average size of Holdings
0.8615
Important Food crops
Paddy, Greengram, Black
gram
Important non-food crops
Cotton, Groundnut,
Coconut, Gingelly, oilpalm, Flowers
3.12 Main Workers
Cultivators
72010
Agri labourers
308768
3.13 Fisheries
Length of coastal line
No of coastal Blocks
No of coastal centers
: 189.9 KM
: 5
: 51
Marine Fish production [tonne]
Inland Fish production [tonne]
Number of fishermen engaged
:7010
: 13304
[Marine/Inland]
Fishermen villages
: 51
20
3.14 Important Fishing Harbours:
Nagapattinam
Thirumullaivasal
Poombukar
Nagore
Tranquebar
Aarkattuthurai
Kodiyakkarai
21
CHAPTER IV
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Jo Connelland Paul Reynolds (1986), The implications of technological developments on
Tourist Information Centres
This study implies technological developments are increasingly
touching and changing the nature of and processes in industry and society. Tourism is by no means
exempt from these changes. The aim of the research reported in this article is to address the issue of
the implications of technological development in Tourist Information Centres. The main areas of
concern are a combination of social and technical issues which need to be addressed in order for
Tourist Information Centres to keep up with the demands of the consumer. In addition, a shift to a
sales and service led operation would appear to be a necessary course of action. Recommendations
are made to assist in tackling these problems at an operational level and it is recognised that greater
attention must be focused on this area in order to ensure the future effectiveness of the tourist
information service.
A. Satten, Ph.D.,
Y. Dodd, Ph.D., (1986) Estimated Risk of Transmission of the Human
Immunodeficiency Virus, by Screened Blood in the United States
Purpose of this study in the
United States, transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus by blood transfusion occurs almost
exclusively when a recently infected blood donor is infectious but before antibodies to HIV become
detectable (during the "window period"). We estimated the risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus
transmission caused by transfusion on the basis of the window period associated with the use of
current, sensitive enzyme immunosorbent assays and recent data on HIV The Influence of State
Patrick T. Tierney (1987) Traveler Information Centers on Tourist Length of Stay and
Expenditures, This article reports effect of travel information centers in Colorado. Stopping at the
Travel Information Centre resulted in a 2.2 day average increase in length of stay and an estimated
$1,026,000 additional spending. The income groups most affected were middle and high income level
groups. Most travelers who stopped did so to get information — a finding in contrast to earlier studies.
incidence among blood donors. Methods We analyzed demographic and laboratory data on more than
4.1 million blood donations obtained in 1992 and 1993 in 19 regions served by the American National
Red Cross, as well as the results of HIV-antibody tests of 4.9 million donations obtained in an
additional 23 regions. Results We estimated that, in the 19 study regions, 1 donation in every 360,000
(95 percent confidence interval, 210,000 to 1,140,000) was made during the window period. In
addition, it is estimated that 1 in 2,600,000 donations was HIV-seropositive but was not identified as
such because of an error in the laboratory. We estimated that 15 to 42 percent of window-period
donations were discarded because they were seropositive on laboratory tests other than the human
22
immunodeficiency virus-antibody test. When these results were extrapolated to include the additional
23 Red Cross service regions, there was a risk of 1 case of human immunodeficiency virus
transmission for every 450,000 to 660,000 donations of screened blood. If the Red Cross centers are
assumed to be representative of all U.S. blood centers, among the 12 million donations collected
nationally each year an estimated 18 to 27 infectious donations are available for transfusion
Patrick T. Tierney (1987) The Influence of State Traveler Information Centers on Tourist Length
of Stay and Expenditures, This article reports on a study of the effect of travel information centers in
Colorado. Stopping at the TIC resulted in a 2.2 day average increase in length of stay and an
estimated $1,026,000 additional spending. The income groups most affected were middle and high
income level groups. Most travelers who stopped did so to get information — a finding in contrast to
earlier studies.
Frederic Dimanche, Marlise Moody Taylor (1989) An Analysis of the Differences between State
Welcome Center Users and Local Visitor Center Users: A Profile of Louisiana Travelers, The
purpose of this study was to contribute to the existing body of highway visitor research by
investigating differences between visitors to state welcome centers and visitors to local welcome
centers. More than 3,000 self-administered questionnaires collected in state and local visitor centers
throughout Louisiana were used to differentiate automobile travelers. State visitor center users
significantly differed from local center visitors for most behavioral trip characteristics. This study
confirms previous findings that users of state welcome centers are not representative of all automobile
travelers. States that want to conduct visitor profile studies at welcome centers should include local
welcome centers in their studies.
Richard R. Perdue (1989) Traveler Preferences for Information Center Attributes and Services,
The purposes of the research reported in this article were to measure consumer preferences for
different visitor information center attributes, to examine the importance of these attributes for travelers
as compared to center managers, and to determine the best location for a proposed new visitor
information center in Colorado. The data collection included an open-ended attribute identification
task, a Likert assessment to determine the importance of the identified attributes, and a conjoint
experiment to determine more specifically the importance of selected center access attributes. The
key center attributes were ease of access into the center, ease of access back onto the interstate, and
distance from the interstate. Distance from the state border and location vis-à-vis the first exit with
extensive services were not important to travelers. Visitation estimates as a function of traffic flow and
center attractiveness were then calculated for each of the proposed sites for the new center.
23
Timothy J. Tyrrell and Robert J. Johnston (1990) Assessing Expenditure Changes Related to
Welcome Center Visits, This article illustrates a methodology for assessing expenditure changes
associated with welcome center visits and applies this methodology to assess the effectiveness of the
Rhode Island Interstate 95 welcome center. The model is distinguished by (1) the use of detailed
information from both on-site and follow-up surveys and (2) a means to correct for potential
nonresponse bias in the follow-up sample. Results of the analysis illustrate that a visit to the Rhode
Island welcome center increases visitors' average in-state expenditures. The estimated expenditure
change for the average visitor group—which varies from $104 to $111, depending on model
specification—is significantly greater than the expenditure change anticipated during the initial on-site
survey. On the basis of model estimates, the authors conclude that the welcome center generates
approximately $35 in new tourism expenditures for every dollar of operating budget.
Daniel R. Fesenmaier (1992) Traveler Use of Visitor Information Centers: Implications for
Development in Illinois, This study implies a key goal of tourism marketing is to use information to
modify travelers' behavior to increase the number of days spent in a state as well as the level of visitor
expenditures. Many tourism promoters are concerned about the efficiency of alternative locations and
forms of tourist information centers in meeting the information needs of visitors traveling in the state.
Consistent with previous studies, results indicate the large majority of respondents stopped to use
restrooms, stretch and exercise, and obtain refreshments. However, almost 32% of the respondents
indicated they stopped to pick up travel and tourist information. Ease of access, availability of
restrooms, and convenience were the most common reasons for stopping at the tourist information
center rather than leaving the interstate. Fifty-two percent of the respondents appear willing to
consider alternative off-interstate tourist information locations. The service setting is the single most
important aspect affecting respondents' decisions concerning off-interstate locations; access (being
located on a frontage road next to the interstate) is the second most important element. The findings
indicate the tourist information center acts as one of the most important communication channels with
which to attract and educate travelers about the benefits of visiting the state. The results also provide
encouraging support for locating and developing an alternative system for meeting the information
needs of visitors to the state.
Am J Health-Syst Pharm (1997) Comparison of information obtained from a Usenet newsgroup
and from drug information centers, This study implies responses to drug information questions
posted on the Internet Usenet pharmacy newsgroup sci.med. pharmacy were compared for accuracy
with responses from drug information centers. Twenty-five questions were randomly selected from the
past five years' continuing-education sections of the Annals of Pharmacotherapy, and possible
answers were determined on the basis of corresponding articles. The questions were randomly
submitted to sci.med.pharmacy from various e-mail accounts over a 10-week period. The same
24
questions were submitted by telephone to randomly selected Drug Information Centres. The
correctness of responses was judged by a panel of four pharmacists. The questions received 31
responses from sci.med.pharmacy and 38 from the Drug Information Centres. The responses from
sci.med.pharmacy received 38 (31%) judgments of correct and the responses from the Drug
Information Centres, 85 (56%). A significantly smaller proportion of drug information responses from
the Usenet newsgroup sci.med.pharmacy were judged as being accurate compared with responses
from Drug Information Centres.
James C. Brancheau and James C. Wetherbe (1999) Key Issues in Information Systems
Management, The results from a five-part Delphi survey of chief IS executives and corporate general
managers indicate the most critical information systems management issues and consensus on their
importance. The research project is the second in a series of such studies conducted by the Society
for Information Management and the MIS Research Center at the University of Minnesota. The
research confirmed the expected in some areas and revealed surprises in other areas. While strategic
planning continued to top all issues in importance, many changes have occurred since 1983. Three
new issues have joined the top ten issues in importance. Also, the rank order of several issues in the
top ten has shifted. Survey results are discussed in terms of the differing views of IS executives and
corporate general managers. A review of how these views have changed over time is also presented.
A number of conclusions are drawn about managing information systems and about the changing
nature of the IS executive's job.
SL Beaird, RM Coley, and KA Crea (1999) Current status of drug information centers This study
implies the current status of drug information centers in the United States and trends that have
developed over the past two decades were studied. In February 1990, questionnaires were sent to
218 pharmacist-operated drug information centers nationwide. The centers were identified through
previously published directories and the ASHP electronic bulletin board PharmNet. The survey
consisted of 182 questions designed to gather updated data on each drug information center.
Responses to each question were coded individually, and data were analyzed by using a statistical
analysis program. One hundred fifty-four drug information centers responded; of these, 130 provided
usable responses. The results showed that the number of drug information centers has increased
compared with earlier surveys. Also, the centers handle substantially larger workloads. Few drug
information centers indicate a fee-for-service system. Computer use and online searching by drug
information centers have increased. Most of the centers participate in the formal education of
pharmacy students. Increases in the number of drug information centers and in their workload
substantiate the growing importance of these centers to the health-care professions.
25
3.15 Name of the Important Pilgrim Centre
Nagpattinam
Sikkal
Velankanni
Nagore
Thirukadaiyur
Vaitheeswaran kovil
Ettukudi
Thiruvenkadu
Sirkali
Mayiladuthurai
Vedaranyam
3.16 Important Tourist Places:
Nagapattinam
(Neelayadakshi Amman Sametha Kayarohana Eswarar Temple)
Nagapattinam Seaport
Velankanni church
Nagore Durgah
Poombukar Art Gallery
Tranquebare Danish Fort
Kodiyakarai Birds sanctuary.
26
CHAPTER – V
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
5.1. Need for the study
Information centres providing lot of services to the various peoples of the community
belonging to Agriculture, Fisheries, Industries and Education.
5.2 Objectives of the study
The study began with the following objectives
¾
To study the collection, aims and services of information centres.
¾
To find out the importance and benefits of the information centres in information Era.
¾
To study about TATA-MSSRF-ISRO–Village Resource Centre at Nagapattinam.
¾
To find out the beneficiaries of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO–Village Resource Centre at
Nagapattinam.
¾
To study the services and functions of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO–Village Resource Centre at
Nagapattinam.
5.3 Method of data collection
The researcher collected data by case study method.
5.3.1 Case Study
Case study method is an important tool of social investigation developed in United States of
America and it is used extensively in psychology, education, sociology, economics and political
science. Case study refers to the intensive investigation of a particular unit, the case study seeks to
explore and analyse the life and growth/decay of a social unit by a systematic gathering of adequate
27
information to enable a clear understanding of the causes. It exposes the interrelationship of the
various complex forces operating directly or indirectly upon the subject of the study.
5.3.2 Meaning of Case Study
The term ‘case’ has different meanings in different disciplines of professions. For instance in
medicine it means a patient who has approached the doctor for specific treatment, in education the
mal adjusted interpersonal problem in social research the term ‘case’ refers to a unit of study.
The case study method means “a careful and complete observation of a social unit, be that
unit a person a family or institution, a cultural group or even the entire community. This is a very
popular method of collecting information about personal life of an individual or a group of persons”.
5.3.3 Definition of Case Study Method
Pouline V. Young has defined it in his book entitled “Scientific Social Surveys and Research”
as “a comprehensive study of a social unit, be that unit a person, a group a social institution, a district
or community”.
Start a Queen has stated that Case study is “the examination of a single situation, persons,
group of institution as complex wholes in order to identify types and process”
Goode and Hatt have given their definition of case study method in their book ‘Methods in
Social Research’. According to them, “It is a way of organizing social data so as to present the unitary
character of the social object being studied”. .
5.3.4 Steps of case study method
As we have seen that the case study method is based on certain well set assumptions, it
involves certain phases/steps analysing different cases. There are no hard and fast rules for analysis
of cases. However, the following steps are considered as the general guidelines of the case study
method.
28
A. Defining or discovering or identifying the specific problem
This is the first step in case analysis the basic issues are required to be defined, thus
the first step may present only the definition of the problem in question
B. Collection of Data and history of the given Phenomena
The second step in case study method is the collection of data, it is also required that the
historical background of the problem must be given.
C. Analysis of problem
The third step in case study method is of analysing the problem in question. Analysis is the
process of breaking down a problem into rational easily understood divisions which can be examined
separately.
D. Application of remedial measures: (i.e) Treatment and Therapy
Once the problem is defined and analysed then one has to suggest suitable remedies to solve
the problem or to overcome the problem. Application of remedial measure plays significant role in
case study method.
E. Evaluating, Finding and Establishing conclusions
The alternatives for solution or decision should grow out of analysis, case study is extensively
used in teaching law, personnel management, industrial relation, marketing and so on, it should be
noted that there can’t be a single answer to a particular problem. Hence different solutions must be
suggested to the problem concerned.
29
F. Follow-up Program
Once the treatment is applied and solutions are found one has to follow up the program to
determine the effectiveness of the treatment applied.
5.3.5 The Aim of Case Study
The main aim is to find out the factors that account for the behaviour pattern of the unit and
it’s relationship with the environment. In other words, the social researcher through the case study
method tries to understand the complex of factors that are co-operative with in a social unit as on
integrated totality.
5.3.6 Advantages of case study method
¾
Case study method is very intensive in nature. It aims at studying everything about a few units
rather than something about several units.
¾
In case study method data collection is flexible because a researcher is completely free to
approach the problem from any angle he desires.
¾
In this method data is collected in natural setting.
¾
This method is usually less expensive than other methods e.g. Laboratory experiment, field
experiments and sample surveys.
¾
This method is useful for generating hypothesis for later full-scale studies.
¾
Case study method being an exhaustive study of a social unit. It enables us to understand
fully the behaviour pattern of the concerned unit.
¾
This method helps us to obtain real and enlightened record of personal experiences which
forces the man to adopt a certain pattern of behaviour.
¾
Case study thus helps to generalise knowledge. It substantiates our research activities.
¾
It helps the researcher in formulating relevant hypothesis along with the data which would
help in testing the hypothesis.
¾
In case study method, the researcher can use more than one research method, such as
depth interviews, questionnaires, documents, study reports of individual letters, etc.
¾
The case study method can be used in case of those units which have universal nature.
Hence it is also called “Mode of Organizing Data”.
30
¾
This method is also used as one of the means to study the historical background of the unit
under consideration.
¾
This method is useful in using sociological material as they represent a real record of
personal experiences.
¾
This method is useful in enhancing the ability and skill of the researcher.
¾
This method is also useful in understanding the social change.
¾
Case study method is useful in diagnosis and therapy and in solving the practical problems.
5.4
Statement of the problem
This study about
“Role of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO–Village Resource Centre on knowledge dissemination in
Nagapattinam district” - A study
5.5
Research Design
This study is based on the analysis of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO-Village Resource Centre in
Nagapattinam district
5.6 Chapterization
This study has the following chapters.
i.
Introduction
ii.
M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation
iii.
Profile of Nagapattinam district.
iv.
Review of Literature
v.
Research Methodology
vi.
Data Analysis
vii.
Findings, Suggestions and Conclusion
31
CHAPTER – VI
DATA ANALYSIS
Village Knowledge Centre
Introduction:
The Village Knowledge Centre programme was started in January 1998 in the Union
Territory of Pondicherry (now Puducherry). In order to ensure access to all the Village Knowledge
Centres are located in public buildings (Panchayats, Self-help groups building, community hall,
school, farmer and Fishermen Associations, Women Self help groups, Community based organisation
etc).
Aim of Village Knowledge Centre
The main aim of Village Knowledge Centre is to empower vulnerable people to make
appropriate choices and achieve better control of their own development and to build skills and
capacities of the rural poor with a view to enhancing livelihood opportunities.
Concept of Village Knowledge Centre
The concept of Village Knowledge Centre was thus born in the dialogue held in 1992.
Information Technology, “Reaching the unreached”, participants in the dialogue suggested that the
generic content received from universities, Natural Informatics Centres and Remote Sensing
Agencies need to be made more demand driven and local specific with the help of experts, these
contents are converted into vernacular language in an understandable manner, based on the needs
of the rural community.
This local specific demand driven content is transmitted to block level
language. The Village Knowledge Centre receives this locate-specific demand driven knowledge from
block level knowledge centre. Apart from that, this local specific language is disseminated to the rural
community through different techniques.
32
Purpose of Village Knowledge Centres:
The Village Knowledge Centres provide information on agriculture, health, employment,
weather, education, government entitlements, micro enterprises training, etc., in each case, the
community or local partner provides an accessible rent-free building, electricity and volunteers in turn
the M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation provides all the needed equipment, training and helps in
collecting data gender concerns are central to the project.
Coastal Grid of Village Knowledge Centres:
With the help of several partners, the M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation has setup
coastal grid of Village Knowledge Centres in the Tsunami affected areas. The main aim is to convert
the Tsunami tragedy into an opportunity for the information and knowledge empowerment of
fisher and farming committees in areas of importance to their lives and livelihoods. The network of
coastal knowledge centres will help to change for the better human security in all its dimensions in
coastal areas.
Awards to Village Knowledge Centre Programme:
The following awards are received by Village Knowledge Centre Programme from various
organizations all over the world.
¾
Motorola Dispatch Solution Award – 1999
¾
Stockholm Challenge Award – 2001
Village Resource Centre:
Village Resource Centres are connected through Indian Satellite Research Organisations
uplink and downlink satellite facilities. Users located at one node of this network can fully interact
with others located at another node through video and audio links.
33
TATA – MSSRF – ISRO Village Resource Centre at Nagapattinam:
With the generous support of Tata Relief Committee, M.S.Swaminathan Research
Foundation has setup one Village Resource Centre at Nagapattinam. Indian Satellite Research
Organisation generously providing satellite connectivity and in developing a special database for
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre and Village Knowledge Centres. NASSCOM FOUNDATION
is upgrading hardware items for Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre and supporting Village
Knowledge Centres.
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre inaugurated by Honourable Former President of India
Dr. ABJ. Abdul Kalam by video conferencing from Hyderabad on January 2006.
Location of TATA – MSSRF – ISRO Village Resource Centre:
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre located at head quarters of Nagapattinam District.
Address:
M.S.Swaminathan Research Foundation,
Village Resource centre,
23,behind marriamman temple,
South palpannaicherry
Nagapattinam 611001
Telephone 04365-250347
Email: [email protected]
Contact
Ms. S. Velvizhi
(M) 9443261799
[email protected]
34
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO – Village Resource Centre Library:
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre has a small library of a few reference books, related
to that area, major livelihoods, etc. and few monthly and daily local newspapers and magazines.
TATA – MSSRF – ISRO Village Resource Centre Hardware Port:
Regarding hardware port of Nagapattinam, Village Resource Centre has about eight to ten
computers, internet facility, telephone, printer, scanner, web camera, digital camera, power backup
and speakers.
Village Knowledge Centres at Nagapattinam District:
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre caters to the needs of seven Village Knowledge
Centres with the radious of twenty kilometers based on the range of access.
1. Village Knowledge Centre, Akkaraipettai.
2. Village Knowledge Centre, Prathabaramapuram
3. Village Knowledge Centre, Agalankan
4. Village Knowledge Centre, Pillai Perumal Nallur
5. Village Knowledge Centre, Vettaikaraniruppu
6. Village Knowledge Centre, Poombukar
7. Village Knowledge Centre, Chirankudi.
Process for setting up Village Resource centre and Village Knowledge Centres:
Before setting up Village Resource Centre and Village Knowledge Centres Nagapattinam
Village Resource Centre holds extensive discussion with policy makers, research institutions,
academics, panchayat leaders, community based organizations, different associations such as
farmer, fishermen, coconut growers, vegetable growers etc.
35
Nagapattinam Village Resource Centre collects the village profiles which consist of several
parameters such as name of the panchayat, name of the Village Knowledge Centre village, total
number of hamlets, different caste groups in the panchayat, educational status, occupational pattern,
fishing pattern, infrastructure facilities communication network etc.
Village Resource Centre also adopts different strategies such as sub grouping the fishing
communities based on specific needs (e.g. sea fisherman, labourers, women vendors, inland
fishermen, boat worker fishermen, fisher women and men in mongrows etc. and subgrouping the
farming communities based on their needs (labourers, dry land farmers, small and marginal farmers
etc.). The purpose of such sub-grouping is to provide focused awareness and training to each of
those, identifying the prime movers in each sub-group, report building with different sectors and
identifying representatives from different sub-groups to represent in the Village Management
Committee. This is nutshell enables pooling together. The varied needs of the farming, fishing and
the landless rural communities.
Need assessment helps the Village Resource Centre to create awareness among villages
about the concept and activities of Village Knowledge Centres to involve the community from the day
one in the project activities, to find out the problems of socially under privileged people.
Based on need assessment Village Resource Centre develops a local-specific demanddriven content, organizes training and awareness programmes and makes linkages, with several
leading institutions/ organizations for transferring the content into action/application.
Partners of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre for setting up of Village Knowledge
Centres in Nagapattinam:
Regarding the setting up of Village Knowledge Centres, Nagapattinam Village Resource
Centre has been working closely with a number of partners (consisting of individuals, groups or
organizations with which we interact directly to develop the appropriate programmes and create
opportunities for favourable influence). The list of partners is as follows:
1. Constitutional panchayat
2. Traditional panchayat
3. Non Government Organisations
36
4. Fishermen Associations
5. Farmer Associations
6. Youth Associaitons
Need Assessment
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre, Nagapattinam collected queries from the
villagers related to the respective villages by conducting user meetings, participatory rural
appraisal, question method, focus group discussion, patrons and knowledge workers feed
back.
After the above, collected queries are categorized and priority given with respect to
importance of the queries.
Addressing the needs:
TATA MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre addressing the needs as knowledge by using
three ways.
(i)
Content
(ii)
Capacity building training and awareness programmes
(iii)
Linkages
I. Content:
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre, Nagapattinam generate contents based on
season based queries focus group meetings, user meetings etc. This content is called as local data
base “VALAM”.
37
FLOWCHART
This Flow chart represents the knowledge dissemination activities of TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village
Resource Centre, Nagapattinam
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre
Village Knowledge Centre
Need Assessment
(Need assessment tools are User meetings/participatory rural appraisal/Questionary method/Focus
group discussion/Partners/Knowledge workers feedback etc.)
Categorisation of Needs
Prioritization of needs
Knowledge dissemination
(Addressing the needs)
Content
Local specific
demand driven
Information
Training
Conducting capacity
building Trainings and
awareness Programmes
i
Linkage
Establishing Linkages
With related
institutions
38
Content Dissemination Tools:
Contents are disseminated by using different content dissemination tools like
i)
Notice board
ii)
Public Addressing System
iii)
Fisher Friend Mobile Application (FFMA)
iv)
Namma Ooru Seithi
v)
Knowledge workers
vi)
Pamphlets
vii)
Volunteer
viii)
Video conferencing
ix)
User meetings etc.
Notice Board:
A black board mounted in well visible place at TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre
and all Village Knowledge Centres, Knowledge workers delivers new information on the Notice board
collected from content and other sources of information
Public Addressing System:
All services offered at villageknowledge centre benefit the rural people in day-to-day life,
knowledge worker disseminates informations through public addressing system
Fisher Friend Mobile Application (FFMA)
Few mobile phones given to the representatives of fishermen to connect with Village
Resource Centre through Internet that mobile phone displays detail in following areas:
¾
Weather news once in a 48 hours
39
¾
Wave height once in a 32 hours
¾
Other news such as general news to over all Tamil Nadu, Government schemes, local market
rate for sea food once in a 24 hours.
Namma ooru seidhi:
Namma ooru seidhi is a local –centric publication in Tamil, the local language, and it has a
succinct presentation of needs, information, advice and commentaries. This newspaper published
twice a month and has proved extremely valuable to the village communities, who have now come to
rely on it for a variety of reasons. and adults can increase their knowledge about the out side world.
Oftentimes it carries news on latest scientific or medical research.
Farmer learns about Availability of quality seeds /seedlings or about organic farming,
cultivation practices, crop management, fertilizers, vermicompost, and live stock management. People
get to know about Government schemes /entitlement related to agriculture, related activities; the
young women and men learn about several technical courses, and self employment training
programs, the young men seeking jobs get to know of vacancies and opportunities or higher
educational details. Children and others can showcase their talents and skills in writing, drawing etc.
There is valuable information on health, and traditional medicine, easy and healthy food recipes,
information given in the newsletter is mostly local-specific, catering to needs of the community.
Knowledge workers:
Knowledge workers will be selected by the community. Village Resource Centre continuously
provides training to Knowledge Workers in the maintenance and management of Village Knowledge
Centres.
Village Resource Centre regularly conducts
Knowledge Workers meeting
at Village
Resource Centre. Every month Knowledge Workers submit a report on Village Knowledge Centres
activities to Village Resource Centre.
The knowledge
workers are involved in the
knowledge
dissemination activities.
Volunteers:
Some of service mind oriented people are also helping to the Village Knowledge Centre for
disseminating knowledge and developing rural poor.
40
List of the contents:
Some of the content( data base VALAM) available in the TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village
Resource Centre and Village Knowledge Centres are listed below:
Fisheries:
¾
Fishing techniques
¾
Sea related business opportunities
¾
First Aid Methods for fishermen
¾
Announcements from fisheries department
¾
International fishing rules
¾
Fish preservation methods, etc.
Village Profile
Name of
Panchayat
Village
Revenue
Village
Block
Taluk,
District
Assembly,
Constituency
Parliamentary
Constituency
Etc.
41
Total
Population of
village etc
Area of village
Address of
Community
organizations,
etc.
Government
Organisations
News Today
Government
Announcements
And
Current News etc.
42
Tsunami News:
Tsunami
Related
Government Orders
Affected
areas
Relief and
rehabilitation etc.
Weather Report
Weather
Report on
Temperature,
rain, huminity
Sea wave
height etc.
43
Catering
Ginger pickle etc.
Fish cutlet
Prawn foods
Chinese foods
Amlo pickle
Collon cutlet
Tomato pickle
Biodiversity, etc.
Important telephone
numbers in
Nagapattinam District
Marriage Financial
Aid
Snake bite
Thiruvaiyaru history
Self help groups
Health projects
General information
Informations on
Cooking tips on
44
Tailoring and Embroiding
Bee culture
Washing powder preparatiom
Chockpiece
preparation
Mosquito coil preparation
Pineoil preparation
Solar water heater
preparation
Blue water preparatiom
Bee culture
Tailoring and Embroiding
Small enterprises:
Small enterprises
Information on
45
Introduction to Windows XP,
etc.
Storage devices
Types
Hardware & Software
Generation
Introduction
Computer Education
Computer
46
Blue fever, etc.
Rabbit diseases
Goat diseases
Purified milk
preparation
First Aid
Jasmine, etc.
Coconut
Sappotta
Mango
Sunflower
Banana
Sugarcane
Paddy
Agriculture
Cultivation methods
of
Livestock maintenance
Livestock
47
Distance studies, etc.
Pilot training courses
Fisheries related
educational institution
Bio-informatics
studies
Marine Technology
studies
First Aid, etc.
Cancer
Eye Diseases
TB
AIDS
Medical
Informations about
Education
Informations about
48
Capacity Building Trainings:
TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre providing training to the farmer, fishermen and
students and to others called as capacity building training. Following are the training given by Village
Resource Centre through Village Knowledge Centres.
Farmer Training:
Training programmes on crops;
Panjakavyam preparation
Asola preparation
Vermic compost
Soil test methods, etc.
Fishermen Training:
Hygienic handling of fish preservation and processing, Boat mechanism trainings,
Training in Global Positioning System and other fish finding equipment to find out Fishing
area, Fishing direction and Potential fishing zone, etc.
Computer Trainings:
Thorough Village Knowledge Centres several computer related courses conducted for the
students and public for giving basic computer knowledge, internet handling, adult education through
computer, account handling by using computer, desktop publishing courses, Compact Disk writing
practice and other system related courses with Microsoft certificate
49
CALP-Computer Aided Literacy Program:
With the help of the Azim premji Foundation, the computer Aided Learning Programme was
initiated in all the Village Knowledge Centres. So for 50 Compact Disks have been developed on
various topics such as the importance of conserving energy, learning English and learning to invest in
small business.
A Teaching program for students from first standard to eighth standard in this school syllabus
teaches in virtual method by using the software provided by Azim Premji Foundation.
MUPP- Microsoft Unlimited Potential Program:
Microsoft Unlimited potential Programme focus of the programme is to provide opportunity for
improving life long learning of under served young and adult persons by giving training communication
technology skills. it is hoped that through this programme, people across all age groups and social
backgrounds can learn computer skills. This programme is an opportunity for the course participants to
develop their skills in communication, in gaining access to educational services and becoming skillful
employee.
Course includes a wide range of applications such as basic computer skills, information
literacy, and digital photography, web page design and desktop productivity software.
Significantly, this course emphasis’s practical hands –on training, unlike similar courses offered in
other institutions. It generally aims to target self-help groups, woman and men from farming and
fishing communities, unemployed youth, schoolteachers, and students.
ALP-Adult Learning Program
Common program for
illiterates to teach reading ,.writing and signature practice by using
sixteen lessons.
50
INTEL PROGRAM
It is more different among all other teaching programs because there is no teacher user learn
Microsoft office package with out the help of master or knowledge workers. Age limit for attending this
program 10 to 13.
Fast Track:
MS Office teached in this program for students in their summer vocation named as fast track
because the course goes to complete within two months.
Linkages:
Based on the needs of the Village Knowledge Centres, TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource
Centre establish linkages with various research institutions, Government departments, Research
organizations, voluntary organizations for generating content and capacity building programs etc.
Such as
¾
Social Welfare department
¾
Health department
¾
Fisheries department
¾
Agriculture department
¾
Horticulture department
¾
Marine product export development authority.
¾
Annamalai University, Chidamabaram
¾
Bharathidasan University, Thiruchirapalli
¾
Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai
¾
Krishi Vighan Kendra, Sikkal, Nagapattinam District, etc.
51
CHAPTER VII
FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS AND CONCLUSION
Findings:
1. Village Knowledge Centre programme received more number of awards for its services.
2. Nearly seven Village Knowledge Centres are functioning under TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village
Resource Centre, Nagapattinam.
3. M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation disseminates knowledge in Nagapattinam district
through seven Village Knowledge Centres.
4. M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation helps to build skills and capacities of the rural poor.
5. Village Knowledge Centres are having database, it contains details of district profile,
agriculture and fisheries etc.
6. Village Knowledge Centres are delivered new and current information in the notice board.
7. M.S. Swaminathan Research Foundation provides weather reports to fisheries, farmers and
others through Village Resource Centre and Village Knowledge Centres.
8. Village Resource Centre is given few mobile phones to representatives of fishermen to
connect that through internet.
9. Namma Ooru Seidhi tamil newspaper published twice a month by TATA-MSSRF-ISRO
Village Resource Centre.
10. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre’s Library is having some books, pamphlets for
fishermen, farmers and others.
11. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre is given training programme related to
Panjakavya preparation, Asola preparation, Vermic compost, soil test methods etc.
12. Village Knowledge Centres provides information related to education.
13. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre is disseminating the knowledge by content,
capacity building, training and linkages.
14. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre is offering computer aided literacy programme,
Microsoft unlimited potential programme, adult learning programme, intel programme and fast
track programme.
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Suggestions:
1. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre can increase number of books related with
competitive examinations.
2. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre can also provide information on scholarships
all over the world other than Government sector.
3. TATA-MSSRF-ISRO Village Resource Centre can take tuitions (or) additional classes for
students community.
Conclusion:
The preference, in respect to others, should be given for national information system in each
country. Information centres are the national sources and essential base for the national development
of countries, so that each member may get benefit from them.
M.S.Swamianthan Research
Foundation is providing information to village peoples at the Nagapattinam district in the field of
fishing, agriculture etc. Therefore these information must be provided in such a way by information
centres by which they easily can get.
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