Attention Integration Parents

March 2013
Attention Integration Parents
If your child is enrolled as an Integration Child in a DART Classroom and
you are planning to re-enroll your child for the fall, make sure to complete
and return the parent survey that you received in the US mail from the
DART Central Office. Your returned survey response will be
our confirmation that you wish to reserve your child's spot again for the
2013-2014 school year. We will be enrolling new students soon, so please
make it a priority to get your surveys in!
Immediate Part Time Positions
Available in DART!!!
We are looking for energetic individuals to work on a
part-time basis (Mornings 9:00-11:30 or Afternoons 12:303:00) in DART Early Intervention Preschool Classrooms and
community preschools with children of mixed ability levels.
Classrooms are located throughout Allegheny County.
Immediate openings are in Sharpsburg, Sto-Rox, South
Hills, Churchill, Woodland Hills and Moon.
Qualifications: Associate’s degree or a minimum of 462
Parapro PRAXIS score required, some experience working
with children, experience working with special needs
children preferred. Starting hourly rate is $9.25. Act
114/151/34 current clearances are required prior to hire.
Inside this issue:
Artistic Expression
Focus on Health and Safety 2
Parents Corner
3
Save the Date
4
Activity Calendar
5
Building Readers
7
Reading Extras
9
Autism-Friendly Family
Photo Time
with the Easter Bunny
ABOARD's Autism Connection of PA has teamed
with Ross Park Mall to provide an Autism-Friendly
Family Photo Time with the Easter Bunny. The Mall
will be closed to the public so that our children may
have the opportunity to meet the Easter Bunny in a
less stimulating environment.
Interested applicants should send a cover letter and
resume to:
6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Victoria Dunlop, Human Resources Department
Ross Park Mall
Allegheny Intermediate Unit
100 Ross Park Mall Drive
475 East Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15237
Homestead, PA 15201
OR Email: [email protected] (Please note DART in the
subject line)
2
Sunday, March 10, 2013
You must RSVP for this event! Go to : http://
www.aboard.memberlodge.com/Default.aspx?
pageId=260524
1
The DART Board
March 2013
Allow Your Preschooler to Explore All Types of Artistic
Expression
Children learn so much through art. They practice problem-solving when they ask themselves
questions like, "What color should I make the dog?" And when they move their crayon on paper to
make a mark, they learn cause and effect. They learn their colors. And they learn new ways to
express themselves.
Children learn more from art if you give them freedom to create--if you let them make decisions on their own.
Remember: The process of creating is more important than what your child ends up with.
To help your child explore her world through art:





Help your child get started. Say your child wants to draw a cat, but she doesn't know where to begin. Ask,
"What does a cat look like? What's the biggest part of a cat's body? How many legs does a cat have?"
Provide a variety of art supplies. Look for things around the house--glue, fabric scraps, coffee filters, egg
cartons, catalogs, paper towel tubes, string and yarn.
Don't just say, "That's pretty." Describe what your child has done. Talk about the colors and materials she
used. Note what you like most.
Give your child a chance to talk about what she made. What is it? How did she do it? How does she feel
about it?
Proudly display your child's work. Put it on the wall or refrigerator. Send it to relatives.
Be patient and sensitive. If your child doesn't want to get her hands dirty, don't push her. Introduce materials
slowly. Remember, art should be fun!
Focus on Health and Safety
There is a daily blog from Pediatric Alliance (www.thepediablog.com ), which focuses on topics which are
unique to pediatrics. Their target audience includes parents (who seek helpful and accurate answers to
their questions about pediatric health), children, grandparents (who may also be parenting) and anyone who
is interested in children’s health.
The editor of the blog is Dr. Ned Ketyer. He has special interests in developmental pediatrics and
preventative medicine, specifically how nutrition and the environment affect health.
Some of the past topics on the blog include ADHD, antibiotics, autism, bullying, chronic disease, infant
feeding, choosing milk, influenza and vaccines. Each topic can be easily searched. Most include links for
further information.
2
The DART Board
March 2013
Parents Corner
LICC – Local Interagency Coordinating Council
The LICC welcomes families and professionals who share a common interest in the services and supports
available for children involved in Early Intervention in Allegheny County.
The next LICC meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, March 6, 2013. The meeting will begin with a
speaker from the Lawrenceville Family Care Connection Program from 10:00-10:30 a.m. and from 10:3011:00 a.m. a representative from the Pittsburgh Public Schools Early Intervention Program will talk
about “Gross Motor Skills and Physical Therapy for Preschoolers”. A business meeting will follow from
11:00-12:00. (Everyone is welcome to attend the business meeting.) The meeting will take place at
ACHIEVA, 711 Bingham St., Pittsburgh, PA 15203 (South Side). To arrange for childcare or for ques ons, contact Julie Hladio at 412‐885‐6000 x 3136.
EI Families: An Education and Empowerment Workshop on the Basics of Early Intervention
Training topics include:
 PARENTING A CHILD WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS
 CREATING A PLAN FOR YOUR CHILD AND FAMILY
 ADVOCATING FOR YOUR CHILD, THE PARENT MOVEMENT AND THE LEGISLATIVE BACKGROUND
OF EARLY INTERVENTION
 PROMISING PRACTICES: INCLUSION, FAMILY CENTERED PRINCIPLES, PARENT/PROFESSIONAL
PARTNERSHIPS
 FINDING COMMUNITY RESOURCE
One Day Workshop
Date: Saturday, April 20, 2013
Time: 8:30 – 3:30
Place: UCP/CLASS (Formerly the Center for Creative Play)
1400 S. Braddock Ave.
Edgewood, PA 15218
Free on-site parking,
Child Care is provided at no cost on a limited basis.
Continental breakfast and lunch provided.
Evening Series
Dates: Thursdays, April 25, May 2 & May 9
Time: 6:30 -9 p.m.
Place: ACHIEVA
711 Bingham Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15203
Free on-site parking
Child Care is provided at no cost on a limited basis
To register, make a reservation for childcare, obtain a training brochure or for additional information, please call
Julie Hladio [email protected] at (412) 885-6000 x3136, or Elizabeth Strickland [email protected] at
(412) 323-3979.
Please RSVP 1 week prior to training.
Camp Programs
Searching for a camp for your child for the summer? Go to pittsburghparent.com to
view the February 2013 magazine featuring summer camp programs for children.
3
The DART Board
March 2013
Save the Dates for the
DART Behavior Workshops for
Parents
Evening Workshops (6:30 – 8:30 p.m)
East Area
- Monday, April 29th – Monroeville Public Library
South Area - Thursday, May 9th – Good Shepherd Lutheran Church/Scott Twp.
West Area - Thursday, May 16th – McCormick Elementary School/Moon Twp.
North Area -
Monday, May 20th – Northland Public Library/McCandless Twp.
Afternoon Workshop (12:45 – 2:45 p.m)
North/East (Allegheny Valley) – Monday, May 13th - Community Library of Allegheny Valley/Harrison
Branch.
More information will follow in the April DART Board newsletter
Questions? Contact Sue Vandervort at 412-394-5961
Allegheny Intermediate Unit DART Program
The Allegheny Intermediate Unit is an equal opportunity education institution and will not discriminate on
the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, sex, age, handicap, or limited English proficiency in its educational programs, services, facilities, activities, or employed policies as required by Title IX
of the 1972 Educational Amendments. Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended,
Section 504 Regulations of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 204 Regulations of the 1984 Carl C.
Perkins Act, the American Disabilities Act, or any other applicable federal or state statute.
The DART Board is a publication of:
Allegheny Intermediate Unit (AIU3)
DART Program
475 E. Waterfront Dr.
Homestead, PA 15120
Phone: (412) 394-5736
Fax: (412) 394-5967
We’re on the
Web!
Sources:
“Focus on Health and Safety” created by Cindy
Callaghan, DART Preschool Service Coordinator for
Physical Health.
“Allow Your Preschooler to Explore All Types of
Artistic Expression” Reprinted with permission from
the March 2013 issue of Parents make the
difference!® (Early Childhood Edition) newsletter.
Copyright © 2013 The Parent Institute®, a division
of NIS, Inc.
"Parents Corner" created by Sue Vandervort, DART
Preschool Service Coordinator.
aiu3.net/dart
The DART Board is created by Stefanie Cerminara, Special Education Teacher for the DART Program.
The DART Board is edited by Debi Nuttall, DART Service Coordinator.
4
Debi Nuttall
AIU/Dart
March • April • May 2013
Parent & Child
®
Activity Calendar
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
make the difference!
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
1
2
Practice naming the
Watch an
months of the year
educational show
with your child.
with your child.
Afterward, talk about
what is real and what is
pretend.
March 2013
3
Make puppets by
drawing faces on
the bottom flap of a
small paper bag.
4
Talk about animals
you might see in a
zoo. What do they eat?
Where do they sleep?
Are they dangerous?
5
Talk with your
Discuss the
child about things
meaning of today,
that are associated with yesterday and tomorrow
spring (flowers, picnics, with your child.
sunshine).
6
7
As you read a story,
say, “This is the
beginning.” “This is the
middle.” And, “This is
the end.”
8
With your child,
estimate how many
bowls of cereal you can
pour from one box.
Keep track until the
box is empty.
9
10
Decorate a
Encourage your
Help your child
shoebox to make
child’s creativity.
make a get-well
a treasure chest. Fill it Ask unusual questions. card for a friend or
with small treats. Hide “What would you bring relative who is feeling
it and have a treasure
to a picnic in space?”
under the weather.
hunt.
11
12
13
Measure and
Give your child
weigh your child
a gift certificate
today. Teach her about good for one special
inches and pounds.
activity with you.
14
15
Try fun ways to
practice writing,
like in salt or with
glitter glue.
16
Trace your
child’s hand on
paper. Think of ways
to be a helping hand.
Write his ideas on the
drawing.
17
Plan a week
Help your
of alphabet
child learn to
dinners—serve foods that identify coins. The
start with the same letter. penny is easiest because
Choose a different
of its different color.
letter each day.
18
19
Use a favorite
book to play
“peek-a-boo.” Take
turns hiding behind it
and then read the book
to your child.
20
Place a piece of
paper in a box.
Dip a marble in paint,
drop it in the box and
have your child roll it
around.
21
Watch or read
Play a board
the weather
game as a family
forecast together today. this evening.
Locate the hottest and
the coolest locations on
a map.
22
23
24
31
25
26
27
28
29
30
Sing your child’s
favorite song
together.
Hug your child,
for no reason
other than loving her!
Have your
child decorate a
paper plate. Cut holes
for your child’s eyes
and mouth to create a
mask.
Have your child
close her eyes.
Make a sound, such as
jingling keys. Ask her
to guess what you are
doing.
Look in the
mirror together.
Ask, “What color are
your eyes? Your hair?
How many hands do
you have?”
Give your child
an empty plastic
bucket and a wooden
spoon. Let him tap the
beat to music on his
“drum.”
Have your
child practice
counting to five. If this
is easy, count to 10
or 20.
Go to a nearby park
or running trail.
Everyone run like the
March wind!
Make a pretend
post office
out of a box. Write a
special note to your
child and let her find it.
Read it together.
Make lemonade
from eight
lemons, two quarts of
water, one and onethird cup of sugar and
ice.
© 2013 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Early Childhood Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525
5
Parent & Child
®
Activity Calendar
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
make the difference!
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
1
Celebrate April
Fool’s Day. Do
something silly with
your child.
2
Ask your child to
tell you the three
best things about
himself.
3
Ask your child to
draw a picture
of herself today. Was
she feeling happy, sad,
confused, angry?
4
Read an ageappropriate joke
book with your child
today.
5
Have a “pattern”
day. Ask your child
to notice patterns
around him, such as
a striped shirt or a
flowered sheet.
6
7
Try some “body
arithmetic.” Ask
your child how much
his fingers, knees, toes
and nose add up to.
8
Encourage some
creativity. Ask
your child unusual
questions. “What if
your hair were made of
spaghetti?”
9
Start a made-up
story. “A man went
down the road and he
met a ... .” Let your
child finish the story.
10
Make a paper
crown and let
your child play “King”
or “Queen” for a day.
What rules would your
child set?
11
Make a letter
tree. Hang new
letters from the tree as
your child learns them.
12
Share something
Go for a nature
of yours with
walk to celebrate
your child today. It’s
spring’s arrival. If
the best way to teach
allowed, pick some wild
her to share with
flowers to put in a vase.
others!
13
14
Take your
child by a construction site. Talk
about what the workers are doing and the
machines they use.
15
Teach your
child the
“Golden Rule”—treat
others as you would
like to be treated.
16
Read a story to
Tell your child
your child. Later
we learn when
ask him to retell it to
we try new things.
you from memory.
Today, try a new food
or take a new route
home.
17
18
Put as many
shoes as you can
find into a pile. Mix
them up. Encourage
your child to sort them
into pairs.
19
Have your child
draw or paint
a picture of the place
where you live.
20
Set up a welllit corner with
favorite books and
pillows. Encourage
your child to get cozy
with books.
After a bath,
let your child
make wet footprints on
colored construction
paper. What do they
look like?
21
Encourage your
child to try two
motor tasks at the same
time—for example,
clapping hands while
walking.
22
Cut out pairs
of pictures (two
dogs, two cats, etc.).
Paste on index cards.
Place face down. Match
the pairs.
23
Help your child
make a collage
from odds and ends
around the house—
ribbons, string,
buttons, etc.
24
Stand facing
your child.
Have her pretend to
be a mirror and imitate
all your movements.
Trade places.
25
Draw or scribble
to music. Give
your child crayons and
a large sheet of paper.
Put on some favorite
music.
26
Help your child
look up facts about
a favorite animal at the
library. Use the Internet,
nonfiction books or an
encyclopedia.
28
29
30
Teach your
Write a note to
Ask your child,
child the rhyme:
your child to tell
“What if your
“April showers bring
her you love her. Put it favorite animal lived in
May flowers.” Have
in a place where only
your room?”
him draw a picture of
she will find it.
rain and flowers.
Praise your child
for something she
did today. Make your
praise as specific as
possible.
27
April 2013
© 2013 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Early Childhood Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525
Parent & Child
®
Activity Calendar
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
May 2013
make the difference!
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
1
With your child,
keep a record of
the moon this month.
Look at the moon
every night and draw
what it looks like.
2
Have a pretend
phone call with
your child. Talk about
what he did yesterday
and what he wants to
do tomorrow.
3
4
What is your child’s
Enjoy some outdoor
favorite vegetable?
physical activity as a
Talk about different
family today.
ways to prepare it.
Cook it together.
5
Drink your
breakfast today!
Blend fruit, fruit juice,
ice and yogurt to make
a smoothie.
6
Teach your child
Ask your child to
about uppercase and
give you words
lowercase letters. Show that rhyme with words
her how each letter can you say: clap (tap), walk
be written differently.
(talk), cat (pat).
7
8
Help your
child think of
an imaginary land.
Together, name it
and make up a story
about it.
9
Make a book about
your child. Have
him make handprints
and footprints with
paint.
10
11
12
Use sidewalk
chalk to draw
pictures outside with
your child on a warm
day.
13
Make unusual
Look through
prints by
your child’s
dipping flowers or
baby book together.
other objects into paint Let him know you love
and then pressing them him more every year.
onto paper.
14
15
Have your child
fill a dishpan
with water. Test an
assortment of objects.
Which will float?
Which will sink?
16
Teach your
child a favorite
song from when you
were her age.
17
Cut out shapes
from paper
(triangle, rectangle,
square, circle). Your
child can arrange them
to form a boat.
18
Take your child
to the library.
Check out a book
about animals.
19
Garden together
Talk with your
today. Pull
child about
weeds, spread mulch,
families. Who is in
plant flowers outside.
your family? What do
Or pot plants indoors. families do?
20
21
Go on a color
shopping trip.
Make a list of colors
with your child. Try to
find one item of each
color in your house.
22
Ask your child
Watch an
to draw a picture
educational TV
of an imaginary garden. show with your child.
How many different
Then discuss a value
colors can he use?
or practice a new skill
from the show.
23
24
“I’d love to!”
Use these words
when your child asks
you to play, read or do
a puzzle with her.
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Have a picnic
today, either
inside or outside.
Go outside and
blow bubbles.
See if your child can
catch one without
breaking it.
Write a letter
together to a
loved one. Have your
child draw pictures.
Sing “If You’re
Happy and You
Know It, Clap Your
Hands” with your
child. Add some words
of your own.
Ask your child:
“What if trees
grew from clouds?”
Let your child
Cook breakfast
play with a
with your child
rubber ball. Encourage for the rest of the
her to bounce it and try family. Or invite
to catch it.
friends over!
Help your child
round up some
friends and play a game
together outside.
Decorate a piece
of lightweight
cardboard. Cut a hole
at the top and let your
child use it as a door
knob hanger.
© 2013 The Parent Institute®, a division of NIS, Inc. May be reproduced only as licensed by Parents make the difference!® Early Childhood Edition newsletter. 1-800-756-5525
6
Reading Readiness • March 2013
®
How Families Can Help Children Get Ready to Read
Early Intervention Program
Wish Dr. Seuss a happy birthday this month
March 2nd isn’t just Read Across America Day. It’s also Dr.
Seuss’ birthday! Celebrate both by enjoying these Seuss-inspired
activities with your child:
• Sillier Stories. Switch up the
rhymes in your child’s favorite
Dr. Seuss book! For instance, try
changing “the cat in the hat” to
“the snake in the lake” or “the
pup in the cup.” See how many
new tales you and your child
can invent.
• Character Mix-Up. What would
happen if the Lorax woke
up in Cinderella’s castle?
Or if Goldilocks turned into
Horton? Read the Dr. Seuss
original together, and then
encourage your child to imagine the story with
a twist (and then tell you about it). She’ll boost her creativity
and her language skills!
“A parent’s supporting role does not end when a child
starts formal reading instruction.”
—Jane M. Healy, Ph.D.
Understand details of reading assessments
’s conducting brief
Your preschooler’s teacher says she
diness skills. This
screenings of the class’s reading-rea
ld’s teacher recognize
chi
r
diagnostic will help you and you
y literacy skills.
earl
if he is properly developing critical
e areas:
cor
r
fou
Pre-reading assessments assess
tify sounds.
iden
ity to
• Phonological awareness, the abil
ers.
ess of lett
• Alphabet knowledge, the awaren
arate sentences and
sep
to
ity
abil
• Concept of word, the
words to text.
phrases into words and to match
ability to connect letters
• Sound-letter correspondence, the
to the sounds they make.
understand what she
Talk to your child’s teacher so you
develop a plan to make sure
finds in her screening. Together,
ing success.
that your child is on track for read
Problems
son, Ed.D., “Screening for Reading
Source: J.L. Pool, Ph.D. and E.S. John
RTI Action
the
s,”
sure
Mea
t
Selec
of
view
Over
in Preschool and Kindergarten: An
ening-forential/assessment/screening/scre
Network, www.rtinetwork.org/ess
en.
rgart
inde
nd-k
ool-a
esch
reading-problems-in-pr
Sharpen your child’s thinking with
easy-to-do activities
Solid cognitive skills
can turn your child
into a stronger reader
and a better thinker.
To hone her cognitive
skills in a relaxed way:
• Describe an object in the refrigerator
“It’s round, red and has a stem”, and
have her find it for you.
• Test her memory. Before bed, ask her
to recap what she did that day.
Source:“How to Choose Activities for Cognitive
Development,” eHow, http://tinyurl.com/8kcq82p.
Read the whole rhyme!
Classic nursery
rhymes are longer
than you think. So
don’t limit your child
to one or two verses!
From time to time, look up
the full-length versions of standbys like
“Old Mother Hubbard” and “London
Bridge” to share with your child.
Source: S.A. Perry, Ph.D., The Complete Help Your Child
Learn to Read Book, Parent-Assisted Learning Services.
When do grammar skills develop?
Kids develop grammar
skills at different rates, but
there are some agreedupon guidelines as to
which ones blossom when.
Studies show that, by the time
your child is four years old, he’ll
likely be able to understand and use:
• Pronouns (he, she and they).
• Past-tense verbs (“I went to school”;
“We walked to the park”).
• Prepositions (over, in and under).
Source: “When Speech Grammar Is Acquired,”
Markham Stouffville Hospital - Child Development
Programs, www.beyond-words.org/expressive_
language_norms.htm.
Follow us on Twitter @BuildingReaders • Copyright © 2013, The Parent Institute®, www.parent-institute.com
7
®
Use audiobooks to boost listening skills
Audiobooks do more than sharpen your child’s language skills.
They may also turn her into a more careful listener.
The next time you and your child listen to an audiobook
together:
• Pause partway through. Take a moment
to see how carefully she’s paying
attention to the details. Say, “The
kitten lost his balloon. Do you
think he sounds sad, angry or
scared?” If she’s unsure, go back
and play that part again.
• Review. When the story ends, ask your
child to retell it in her own words. The
better able she is to do so, the more you’ll know she was
listening closely.
Word games teach important language skills
Classic rhyming games build many key skills. Not only are you
boosting your child’s vocabulary, you’re also helping him with
language acquisition, motor skills and conversation abilities.
When you play:
• This Little Piggy, your child is
learning vocabulary words
(like roast beef) as well as a
math concept called one-toone correspondence. He is
associating each item counted with a number.
• Where is Thumbkin, you are
demonstrating taking turns
during conversations as well
as developing fine motor
skills that will later be used
for writing.
• One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, your
child is practicing counting
and listening to the way
words rhyme. And he will
be moving around, which
builds his motor skills and
keeps him active!
Source: T. Geiser, “Learning through
Play: What Rhyming Games Like Pat-acake Teach (and How to Play Them),”
Education.com, www.education.com/
magazine/article/learning-play-gamespatcake-piggy/.
Q: A: I printed out a stack of ABC worksheets for my
preschooler, but she’s not interested in them. Should
I force the issue?
No! At this age, learning to read should involve
play, not work. So never drill your child. Instead,
let her explore and enjoy language. Where to
start? Flip those worksheets over so she can color
letters on the back.
Do you have a question about reading? Email [email protected]
Reading Readiness • March 2013
Organize a preschool book swap
You want to pitch in at your chi
ld’s
preschool, but your days are pac
ked.
Check with your child’s teacher
to see
if you might organize a class “bo
ok
swap” to encourage
reading. With the teacher’s permission,
ask fellow parents
in your child’s class
to bring in books that
their kids no longer read. Put the
m in
a box in the classroom to create
a small
library. Invite the students to take
home whatever titles look interest
ing.
Remember: One child’s “old, bor
ing
story” is another’s brand-new favo
rite!
Books to delight your early reader
• Olivia and the Fairy Princesses
by Ian Falconer (Atheneum). With
so many frilly, pink princesses out
there, how will the spotlight-loving
piglet set herself apart? Oh, she’ll
find a way!
• Penny and Her Song
by Kevin Henkes
(Greenwillow). The
sweet little mouse
just has to sing her
song to someone! But
with the babies sleeping, will she
ever get the chance?
• Goldilocks and Just One Bear by
Leigh Hodgkinson (Nosy Crow).
When a bear is taking a walk, he gets
lost and all of a sudden is in the big
city! See where he ends up when he
finds just the right place to have a
snack and take a nap.
Building Readers®
How Families Can Help Children Become Better Readers
Publisher: John H. Wherry, Ed.D.
Editor: Stacey Marin.
Writer: Holly Smith.
Copyright © 2013, The Parent Institute® (a division of NIS, Inc.)
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1-800-756-5525, ISSN: 1531-4898
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Early Intervention Program
Teaching your child to
listen with respect
Just as children must learn to speak, they
must also know how to listen. To be successful in school, a child must pay attention to what the teacher says and then be
able to act on what he hears.
Help your child develop good listening skills
by setting an example. Listen to your child. Make eye
contact. Smile and nod. Restate what he says to show
you’ve heard and understood him.
Talk about listening respectfully. Explain why it’s
not acceptable to talk while others are talking. Nor
should he make sounds or jump around.
To boost your child’s listening skills:
• Give him multi-part instructions. “Go to your room.
Get your shoes. Bring them to me.”
• Combine words and actions. Talk about what you’re
doing as you do it.
Reading Readiness
®
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• Listen to audio recordings of books and
songs.
• Tell longer and longer stories—as long as
your child shows an interest.
• Go to storytelling hours at your local library.
• Speak in a voice that helps your child listen.
Don’t speak too fast or too softly.
• Play listening games. See if your child can
guess sounds as he hears them.
© 2012 The Parent Institute® www.parent-institute.com
May be reproduced by Building Readers® newsletter subscribers.
Reading
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