Document 345589

 Saint Viator High School Presents: The Ninety-­‐Nine Minute Romeo and Juliet Oct. 17, 2014
“Oh, Romeo, Romeo.
Wherefore art thou, Romeo?”
Those classic lines come to
life this weekend when Saint Viator
High School mounts a 99-minute
version of one Shakespeare’s most
famous works, Romeo and Juliet.
“It’s a classic,” said Director
Kate Costello. “It gives students a
chance to be exposed to the greatest
dramatist in the English language.”
The show opens at 7:30 p.m. Students are taking a different approach to
Shakespeare in The Ninety-Nine Minute Romeo
Thursday, Oct. 23, and continues
and Juliet. Pictured from left to right:
with performances at 7:30 p.m.
Sophomore Zac Jones as Romeo, senior Nick
Friday, Oct. 24 and Saturday, Oct.
Crothers as Father Laurence and senior Maria
25, as well as a matinee
Werba as Juliet.
performance at 1:30 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 26. Tickets are $5 and will be
available at the door.
Since Romeo and Juliet was written more than 400 years ago, it now is in the
public domain, and can be adapted for modern audiences without fear of copyright
infringement.
Knowing that, Costello shortened the drama and placed it in 1920’s Chicago, a
time and place famous for violence. Think Al Capone and his Italian mob versus Dean
O’Banion and his Irish gang, during their bootlegging wars.
“I’ve shortened the long monologues,” Costello said, “yet the end result keeps all
of the plot and characters from Shakespeare’s original work.”
Costello and her production staff made one other key addition to the work:
they’ve added a dance scene during the Capulet ball that includes the entire ensemble.
“It’s fun,” said sophomore, Jenna Breslin who plays Mrs. Montague. “I even get
to have an Irish accent.”
In all, nearly 75 students are involved with the production, including two casts
and a tech crew. All of them were familiar with Romeo and Juliet, having read it in their
freshman English literature classes.
Yet they quickly found out that reading it and performing it were two different
experiences.
“Knowing about iambic pentameter helps,” said senior John McManus, who plays
Romeo along with sophomore Zac Jones. “It gives the lines a sort of rhythm.
“But still, it’s a lot of lines,” he added. “But once you have them down, you
realize how deep and clever they are.”
Senior Maria Werba plays the role of Juliet as does sophomore Olivia
Dominguez.
“I love the way it’s written,” Werba said. “I don’t think people today fully
appreciate the Shakespeare’s writing style, but it’s like music or poetry.”
Dominguez agreed, adding that she is enjoying playing a character with such
depth and passion.
“Once you put yourself into the character and understand her, you can take (the
characterization) to a whole new level,” she said.
Sophomore Caroline Sevilla plays Lady Capulet, with junior Megan Daugherty.
“We’re thrilled that as sophomores we’re getting to play such major parts,”
Sevilla said. “And it’s fun to play such emotional characters.”
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