Pre-Student Teaching Handbook 2012-2013 Academic Year

Pre-Student Teaching
Handbook
2012-2013 Academic Year
Developed by the Office of Student Teaching/Certification
8/1/2012
Table of Contents
PAGE
Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 2
Pre-Student Teaching Links ...................................................................................................................... 3
Credential Folder ....................................................................................................................................... 3
Medaille College History & Mission Statements and School of Education Mission Statement ............... 4
School of Education Vision & Philosophy Statements ............................................................................. 5
School of Education School of Education Policy Statements—Professional Dispositions ....................... 6
Teacher Candidate Guidelines for Early Field Experiences ...................................................................... 9
Appendices
Participation/Field Experience Hours – Overview ................................................................................. 11
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Intro Letter (to school) ...................................................................... 12
Observation/Participation Reflection Descriptor..................................................................................... 13
Observation/Participation Reflection Rubric 2012-2013 ........................................................................ 14
BSED Adolescent 7-12 and Students with Disabilities
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 15
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form ................................................................... 16
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Hours Review....................................................................... 18
Acceptable Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours........................................................ 19
BSED Early Childhood/Childhood (Birth-6)
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 20
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form ................................................................... 21
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Hours Review....................................................................... 23
Acceptable Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours........................................................ 24
MSED Adolescent 7-12
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 25
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form ................................................................... 26
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Hours Review....................................................................... 28
Acceptable Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours........................................................ 29
MSED Childhood 1-6
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 30
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form ................................................................... 31
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Hours Review....................................................................... 33
Acceptable Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours........................................................ 34
MSED Student with Disabilities
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 35
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form (Gr. 1-6 or 7-12) ....................................... 36
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Validation Form (Generalist 7-12)....................................... 38
Pre-Student Teaching Experience Hours Review....................................................................... 40
Acceptable Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours........................................................ 41
Pre-Student Teaching Experiences—Volunteer Sites (Student List) ...................................................... 42
New York State Code of Ethics for Educators ........................................................................................ 44
Ontario College of Teachers Standards ................................................................................................... 46
1
Introduction
Research shows that the more first-hand classroom experiences future teachers have with
children/youth prior to student teaching, the better they perform in a student teaching experience.
Pre-student teaching experiences provide graduate and undergraduate education students with
opportunities to work with children and youth in schools and education-related settings. A teacher
candidate observes, works one-on-one with children, and performs small group reinforcement
activities.
These first-hand experiences prepare the teacher candidate with valuable opportunities to plan,
instruct, and interact with children. The activities can be used as a series of building blocks as the
teacher candidate prepares for their upcoming student teaching experiences.
Each of our pre-student teaching candidates is required to complete a specific number of field
placement hours. The exact number of hours varies from degree program and course. To determine
prior hours that may by accepted to fulfill pre-student teaching requirements, refer to the Acceptable
Educational Experiences and Permitted Hours chart for your program.
Specific questions about pre-student teaching hours will be answered by your instructor for the
course(s) that require pre-student teaching hours.
Thank you.
Crystal A. Elias
Director, Student Teaching and Field Experiences
Medaille College
2
Student Teaching Information “Links”
Looking for
“Go to link” below
Pre-Student Teaching
http://www.medaille.edu/student-teaching/pre-student-teaching
Pre-Student Teaching FAQs
http://www.medaille.edu/student-teaching/pre-student-teaching-faq
Medaille College Credential
Folder
http://www.medaille.edu/files/pdf/student-life/career-credential-packet.pdf
Credential Folder
All U.S. education students must create a credential folder with the Office of Career Planning. It is highly
recommended that Canadian education students also create a credential folder.
A credential folder is a collection of documents used to support your candidacy for a job or graduate school.
This folder is an easy, organized, effective means of communicating with prospective employers. At your
written request, references from your credential folder are sent in a professional file to a potential employer.
Credential folders should be created during your junior or senior year (undergraduates) or during your prestudent teacher semester for graduate students. It is to your advantage to assemble these credentials as you go
while faculty members, supervisors, associate teachers, etc., are available.
More information on credential folders can be found at http://www.medaille.edu/files/pdf/student-life/careercredential-packet.pdf.
3
Medaille College
History
Medaille College is a private, coeducational institution offering associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree
programs through day, evening, and weekend studies.
The College traces its roots back to 1875 when the Sisters of St. Joseph founded an Institute for the
preparation of teachers. The Institute became Mt. St. Joseph Teachers College in 1937, and was authorized to
grant baccalaureate degrees in Education to women in religious orders. In 1967 the name of the institution
was changed to Medaille College, and its charter was amended to allow it to admit both men and women. In
1968 an absolute charter was granted by the Boards of Regents, establishing Medaille College as a totally
independent institution governed by a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees.
The College grants undergraduate degrees in the liberal arts and a variety of career-related programs, and
graduate degrees in business and education.
Mission
Chartered by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York, Medaille College is an
independent, coeducational institution of higher learning. Its purpose is to make available to all qualified
students postsecondary educational opportunities to meet their individual needs for lifelong intellectual and
professional growth.
Medaille College concentrates on excellence in teaching with an emphasis on personal attention to its diverse
student body. Its curriculum provides a solid liberal arts and science foundation with early access to careeroriented education. The College offers cultural, economic, and community services as part of its educational
mission.
School of Education
Mission
The School of Education focuses on excellence in teaching with an emphasis on personal attention
to our diverse learners. Our career-oriented curriculum builds upon a liberal arts and sciences
foundation as we guide students toward initial and professional certification. This program is
flexible because of the multiple delivery systems available to traditional students and practicing
professionals. The staff and faculty are dedicated and committed to graduating students who are
effective teachers. As reflective practitioners and scholars guided by constructivist approaches
(Vygotsky, 1978) to learning and teaching, we challenge our students and ourselves to reach high
standards of achievement through the pursuit of best teaching practices. Learning occurs in our
classrooms within a caring environment, with dedicated faculty who advise, mentor, and guide
students from their admission to the program through to the completion of their capstone course.
Ultimately, we are invested in learning, teaching, and the continued success of our students.
4
Vision
The faculty of the School of Education consists of scholar practitioners focused on research-based
best practice. We take pride in graduating men and women who can successfully contribute to pupil
learning through their excellence in teaching. The School of Education continues to engage its
experienced faculty in practitioner-focused curriculum in traditional and non-traditional
instructional formats. It is the vision of the School of Education to be an effective and responsive
provider of educational programs that meet emerging needs.
Philosophy
Medaille College focuses upon excellence in teaching with an emphasis on personal attention to its’
diverse student body. The education programs provide a solid foundation in the study, design, and
implementation of instruction and evaluation in the classrooms of the twenty-first century.
The overarching philosophy of the SOE is constructivism. This philosophy is a unifying thread that
is evident in all our education programs. At the root of constructivism, Vygotsky (1978), is the
belief that students make meaning for themselves. It is a student-centered model in which the
teacher contributes more as a facilitator whose efforts assist students in developing their own
understanding and learning. They base their own prior knowledge and mental constructs on existing
knowledge bases. Knowledge does not exist independent of the learner (website link will be added
when it has been updated).
Our approach to teaching emphasizes challenging opportunities for our teacher candidates to learn
(Vygotsky, 1978). Through coaching from faculty, learners develop meta-cognitive strategies to
monitor and direct their own performance and learning. The learners assume responsibility for their
own learning. Teacher candidates work collaboratively on real-world, authentic activities (Dewey,
1916). Students are guided to develop and bring their own framework and perspectives. They
integrate multiple perspectives, which help pupils negotiate and generate meaning (Gardner, 1999).
The Master of Education programs use research to teach participants to design instruction for
classrooms with diverse learners (Bloom, 1965). Emphasizing critical thinking, research, and
academic writing, teacher candidates are academically prepared to effectively design, implement,
and evaluate curriculum for their schools and/or Districts or Boards.
Teacher candidates are encouraged to examine contemporary issues affecting curriculum and
instruction within schools. Through integrated classes such as ECI 530 and ECI 535, our students
explore culture and society. Through courses like ECI 610, EDU 469, and EDU 210, teacher
candidates learn how to examine how external forces influence school texts and pedagogy. In
addition to emphasis on curriculum and instruction in schools, our teacher candidates are
encouraged to use technology to enhance their skills, projects, assignments, and delivery of
instruction.
5
School of Education Policy Statements
Professional Dispositions
Professional Dispositions Overview
The School of Education of Medaille College prepares students to enter the world of teaching Birth-12. As
part of learning and preparation processes, students must understand and engage in professional behaviors
that adhere to both policy and guiding principles that are required in private and public schools and
community agencies. These behaviors are essential for employment and continued employment within the
professional workforce. Prospective educators are expected to view and assume these professional
dispositions as a crucial component of their academic training.
The Professional Dispositions aligned with Medaille College and the School of Education provide a
framework for professional behaviors. These standards for behavior will be implemented for all students for
any behavior that does not comply with official standards of behavior. Professors and staff will demonstrate
and work with our students to assure that they are familiar with the dispositions, understand the dispositions
and are able to demonstrate these dispositions in every class and learning experience.
It is the responsibility of Medaille School of Education students to recognize and fulfill professional habits of
conduct. Their professional commitment to becoming an excellent teacher candidate or community leader
must be evident through engagement, words and actions. During a student’s time at Medaille College when
interacting with administrators, professors, teachers, peers and students while on all Medaille campuses and
during field experiences professionalism is required.
Attendance
All Medaille students are expected to:
attend every class on time, remain in class and return from breaks on time
comply with attendance policy as stated in the Medaille School of Education Handbook
***Examples of possible infractions are being frequently late for a class/field experience or student
teaching; missing class due to vacations or personal events; leaving class to complete other work such as in
the computer lab at inappropriate times.
Conduct
All Medaille students are expected to conduct themselves in the following manner:
display professional behavior on all Medaille campuses and in schools for field experiences
(i.e. punctuality)
use professional oral and written language appropriate to purpose and audience, including
email
use positive conflict resolution techniques
be accountable and responsible toward one’s behavior
demonstrate respectful behavior both verbally and nonverbally (tone of voice, word choice,
and posturing)
respect, empathize and appreciate differences in others’ perspectives and cultures
follow established dress codes for schools during practicum and student teaching
Be mindful of wearing appropriate attire.
***Examples of possible infractions are bullying peers; not fulfilling group responsibilities; being
disrespectful towards professors and peers-verbally or in writing; improper computer, texting, or
cell phone use; displaying threatening behavior or offensive body language; using vulgarity
verbally or in written emails, intimidating or threatening professors or peers to obtain a course of
action; showing insensitivity towards ethnic, religious or racial diversity or other diversity
6
Expectations
All Medaille students are expected to:
meet NYS learning standards and/or Ontario learning standards
display a willingness to learn and grow professionally
seek and use constructive feedback for the purpose of improving one’s teaching
display a willingness to adapt and be flexible to situations as they present themselves
maintain high and appropriate standards and expectations for self and the profession
complete all course requirements
***Examples of possible infractions are an unwillingness to understand and learn new ideas and teaching
strategies; an unwillingness to participate in class activities and discussions; unprofessional discourse in
class interactions; disruptions during professor or peer presentation; engaging in other non-class activities (
i.e. Facebook, work for other classes.
Accountability
All Medaille students will be:
held accountable for all actions and decisions made as a pre-service student on any of the
Medaille campuses, in the classroom and field experiences and student teaching sites.
held accountable for the guidelines outlined in the Medaille School of Education Handbook
Legal and Ethical
All Medaille students are expected to:
act in a way that is in accordance with any legal and ethical conduct standards of Medaille
College, the School of Education Handbook, the New York State Education Department,
and federal and state laws that discuss intellectual honesty, misconduct, bias related
discrimination and sexual harassment.
maintain legal obligations regarding student privacy and confidentiality of students,
families, school personnel and teacher colleagues
***Examples of possible infractions are forging the signature of a teacher or supervisor from a field
placement/ student teaching, plagiarizing assignments from the internet or other sources without citing the
source; making cultural slurs or using a disrespectful voice or body language towards an individual based
upon culture, religion or another diversity; discussing students or teachers from a field experience or student
teaching in any setting.
Examples of infractions, listed in the five sections above, are included, but not limited to the infractions
that are listed.
Probation letters
Undergraduate students will receive a probation letter when they receive a grade of
2.0 or lower. Graduate students who receive a GPA lower than a 3.0 will receive a probation letter. Students
will receive a warning letter when they are in danger of failing the course.
Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory (S) and (U)
Students who receive a grade of unsatisfactory (U) 3 times in the same course will be dismissed from the
program.
7
Academic Review
Academic Standards reviews undergraduate students. Program directors and chairs review graduate students.
Any graduate student who earns a grade of “F” in any course or who indicates a lack of ability as determined
by faculty will experience an academic review by program directors, chairs, and the academic dean.
Behavioral Decorum
Medaille College does not tolerate sexual or racial harassment of students or employees by College faculty,
staff, or students. Students are legally protected from such activity by both state and federal legislation and
are asked to report any occurrence to the Academic Affairs Office without fear of recrimination.
The College does not tolerate immature or abusive behavior in the classroom setting from students.
Upon receipt of a written complaint from the instructor, the Vice President for Academic Affairs
may immediately remove the student from the class. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and
the appropriate College Dean will review the evidence and render a final decision.
The College does not tolerate immature or abusive behavior in an internship setting on or off
campus from students. Upon receipt of a written complaint from the instructor, the Vice President
for Academic Affairs may immediately remove the student from the class. The Vice President for
Academic Affairs and the appropriate College Dean will review the evidence and render a final
decision
8
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
TEACHER CANDIDATE GUIDELINES FOR EARLY FIELD EXPERIENCES
The following guidelines have been developed to enhance the required field experiences for teaching
candidates of Medaille College, cooperating teachers, and students (children)
Requirements: The candidate is expected to…
maintain confidentiality of students and staff at all times
maintain a professional appearance at all times
adhere to the schedule agreed upon by her/himself, cooperating teacher and course professor
inform the professor, in advance, of lateness or absence
inform the teacher of lateness or absence
sign in and out at the school on a daily basis
wear Medaille College ID
interact with children and colleagues in a pleasant, professional manner
familiarize her/himself with and adhere to the teacher’s classroom management policies
keep a journal in which they can record observations, questions, and teaching ideas. This log will be
collected and graded. Professors may ask to review it with the candidate at any time. Its purpose is to
provide the candidate ongoing, cohesive opportunities to reflect, respond, and keep track of field
experiences.
NOTE: Professors may assign specific requirements for candidates to complete during field work. These
requirements will be defined and evaluated by the professor.
The following list of suggested roles for teacher candidates is intended to assist both the candidate and
the cooperating teacher in making decisions about how to optimize the experience for everyone
involved.
____ Observe individual students and reflect on an aspect of their development (social, academic, etc)
____ Read to the class or a small group of children
____ Plan and implement a lesson for the whole class, a small group, or one child (This may not be feasible
until the candidate has participated in relevant methods/instruction classes.)
____ Work with child or small group on teacher suggested remediation/drill activities
____ Create games/teaching aids to reinforce learning
____ Help students edit/publish their creative work
____ Assist in computer lab
____ Develop and/or facilitate a learning center
____ Review teacher lesson plans
____ Review student portfolios and/ or cumulative records(with permission only)
____ Make a bulletin board
____ Grade papers with teacher direction
____ Make copies/assist with material development
____ Do support activities that extend a lesson
____ Walk children to special area classes, monitor hallways during class change
____ Observe and reflect on student-teacher and student-student interactions
____ Help individual students during study halls and/or guided independent practice time
____ Do you want another as approved by the instructor?
9
Appendices
10
School of Education
Participation / Field Experience Hours – Overview
(Effective Fall 2012)
BSED – Adolescent Education & SWD BSED – Early Childhood & Childhood Education
MSED – Childhood Education MSED Adolescent Education
BSED
Early Childhood and
Childhood
Birth – 6
BSED
Adolescent Education 712 with Students With
Disabilities
Disciplines:
English, Math,
Social Studies, Biology
EDU 240 – 10 hrs
EDU 241 – 10 hrs
EDU 242 – 10 hrs
EDU 370 – 5 hrs
EDU 371 – 5 hrs
EDU 372 – 5 hrs
EDU 373 – 5 hrs
EDU 236 – 10 hrs
EDU 237 – 10 hrs
*ESP 328 – 40 hrs
*ESP 338 – 40 hrs
*20 hrs. min. during
course
______
*EDU 378 – 100 hrs.
EDU 362-Math
EDU 363-Soc St
EDU 364-English
EDU 365-Biology
*20 hrs. min. during
course
***See Spec Ed note
below
150
50 hours/20hrs min.
during course –
discipline specific
150
MSED
Childhood
1-6
MSED
Adolescent Education
7-12
Disciplines:
English, Math,
Social Studies, Biology,
Chemistry, French
EDU 504*
EDU 667*
* 20 hrs. min. during
course
* 20 hrs. min. during
course
**a minimum of
20 hours must be in
area of concentration
***See Spec ED Note
below
100
***See Spec Ed note
100
***Special Education (SWD – Students with Disabilities) Note: A minimum of 15 hours must be working with Students
with Disabilities – mild to severe who have been identified for mandated services in their districts
LINK: www.medaille.edu/student-teaching/pre-student-teaching
School of Education
Participation / Field Experience Hours – Overview
(Effective Fall 2012)
MSED – Students with Disabilities (SWD) Post-Masters Certificate – Students with Disabilities (SWD)
MSED-SWD
Master in Education
– Students With
Disabilities
Grades 1-6
(certified)
MSED-SWD
Master in Education
– Students With
Disabilities
Grades 1-6
(non-certified)
ESP 600 – 15 hrs
ESP 602 – 10 hrs
ESP 612 – 10 hrs
ESP 618 – 15 hrs
ESP 600 – 15 hrs
ESP 602 – 10 hrs
ESP 612 – 10 hrs
ESP 618 – 15 hrs
EDL 581 – 25 hrs
ESP 607 – 25 hrs
50
100
MSED
Adolescent Education
7-12 Generalist
Disciplines:
English, Math,
Social Studies, Biology,
Chemistry, French
(certified)
ESP 600 – 15hrs
ESP 602 – 10hrs
ESP 612 – 10hrs
ESP 619 – 15 hrs
50
LINK: www.medaille.edu/student-teaching/pre-student-teaching
MSED
Adolescent Education
7-12 Generalist
Disciplines:
English, Math,
Social Studies, Biology,
Chemistry, French
(non-certified)
ESP 600 – 15hrs
ESP 602 – 10hrs
ESP 612 – 10hrs
ESP 619 – 15 hrs
ESP 620 – 25 hrs
ESP 607 – 25 hrs
100
PMC-SWD
Post Masters
Certification –
Students With
Disabilities
(Grades 1-6)
ESP 600 – 15hrs
ESP 602 – 10 hrs
ESP 612 – 10 hrs
ESP 618 – 15 hrs
50
PMC-SWD
Post Masters
Certification –
Students With
Disabilities
(Grades 7-12)
ESP 600 – 15hrs
ESP 602 - 10hrs
ESP 612 - 10hrs
ESP 619 – 15 hrs
50
Date:
To:
School Administrator
From: Crystal Elias, Director, Student Teaching and Field Experiences
Re:
Acquiring Pre-Student Teaching Hours (Field Placement)
Thank you for welcoming
, a Medaille
College School of Education student, into your building. Fieldwork is considered one of the most
beneficial components of a professional education program. Each of our pre-student teaching
candidates is required by New York State Department of Education to complete field experience
hours, as determined by their degree program and specific course requirements.
I encourage you to utilize and engage the teacher candidate in a variety of instructional and noninstructional duties such as (but not limited to): observe small and whole group class instruction,
assist during lessons or lab activities, organize learning centers, observe classroom management
techniques, and to work with students on problem solving activities or remedial instruction.
I hope that working with our teacher candidate will be a mutually beneficial experience. Our goal is
to prepare Medaille teacher candidates to be caring and reflective educators exemplifying best
teaching practices. If you have any additional questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me.
Sincerely,
Crystal A. Elias
Director, Student Teaching & Field Experiences
(course instructor name)
Office of Student Teaching/Certification
30 Wilson Road ∙ Williamsville, NY 14221 ∙ 716 932 2548 ∙ 888 252 2235 toll free ∙ 716 932 2634 fax ∙
http://www.medaille.edu/student-teaching/pre-student-teaching
School of Education
Fieldwork/Participation Reflection Descriptor 2012-2013
(BSED ADOL & SWD, BSED B-6, MSED ADOL & MSED ELED)
Reflection, as it relates to Pre Student Teaching Fieldwork/Participation activities, is the process of
looking back at the experiences, thinking about them, critiquing them, and considering how they
will affect your future teaching practices. Reflective teachers are constantly thinking about their
instructional delivery, assessing student learning, and considering how they can improve their
practice to effectively reach all of their students.
After each Pre-Student teaching Fieldwork/Participation experience, you will complete a
Reflection. The format will be as outlined in the Reflection Rubric.
As you reflect, focus on your individual growth and learning throughout the program by connecting
the best practices you have learned in the classroom to what you observe or apply in the field. The
field includes all activities related to children and adolescents (direct classroom instruction,
coaching, tutoring, etc.)
The paragraph numbers in bold below are a guide. Please be succinct and concise when writing.
Best Practice Focus: What best practice did you observe & why is it important for you as a future
teacher to observe? (1 paragraph) A specific best practice focus may be assigned by your
instructor.
Settings: Who are you observing (age; grade; gender, ethnicity, SES)? When are you observing
(time of year, time of day)? Where is the location (urban, rural, and suburban)? (1 paragraph)
Description: Explain specific details about what you actually observed in the field. What is the
teaching doing? What are the students doing? (2 paragraphs)
Analysis (Connections/Links): Analyze how the best practice you observed connects to what you
have or are learning in your courses in the program. You may also add how what you’ve observed
connects to your program goals or areas of competencies? (1-2 paragraphs)
Applications: How will the lessons you’ve learned from your observation inform you as a
beginning teacher to improve student learning? Demonstrate how you could apply the best practice
you observed in the classroom with children and/or adolescents. (1-2 paragraphs)
Revised 8/1/12
All SOE Programs EXCEPT MSED LIT (Common)
13
School of Education
Observation/Participation Reflection Rubric
Fieldwork/Participation Reflection Descriptor 2012-2013
(BSED ADOL & SWD, BSED B-6, MSED ADOL & MSED ELED)
Students’ Name _______________________________________________________________
Evaluators’ Name ___________________________________
Date ____________________
Place a check mark on the rating that best reflects the student’s performance for each category. It is
expected that the document will be grammatically correct and clearly spelled.
Category
Best Practice
Focus:
a. what
Setting:
a. who
b. when
c. where
Description:
Specific
details about
what you
observed
Analysis:
Connects and
links to
Coursework/
Program
Goals/
Competencies
Highly Successful
(3)
Identifies best practice,
provides detailed rationale
for relevance, & exhibits
focus
Describes setting,
timeline and participants
with details.
Successful
(2)
Identifies best practice,
provides some relevance,
& with some focus
Provides 5 or more
specific details of the
process with explanations,
descriptions of contexts,
events and activities.
Provides 3-4 specific
details of the process
which include
explanations, descriptions
of contexts, events and
activities.
Demonstrates some link to
coursework or literature
with some interpretations
and analysis. Strengths and
weaknesses are supported.
Describes setting, timelines
and participants with some
detail.
Unsuccessful
(1)
Mentions best
practice, inadequate
explanations, & lacks
focus
Describes 1-2 of the
settings vaguely.
Missing
(0)
Missing, no best
practice and
explanations
Provides 1-2 details
with inadequate
details, vague
explanations of
contexts, events and
activities.
Inadequate link to
coursework or
literature, insufficient
interpretations &
analysis. Strengths
and weaknesses are
not clear.
Missing, no
explanation,
descriptions of
contexts and
conditions
involved.
Missing, no link to
coursework or
literature or
interpretations&
analysis
Missing, none of
the settings listed.
Demonstrates strong
connections to
coursework or literature
with detailed
interpretations and
analysis. Strengths and
weaknesses are detailed
and supported
Applications
Clearly describes 2 or
Describes one possible
Inadequate
Missing, no
for Effective
more possible
application (classroom or
demonstration of
demonstration of
Teaching/Lear applications (classroom or other educationally related
possible applications possible classroom
ning in the
other educationally
activity) for future use with (classroom or other
applications
Future
related activity) for future children or adolescents.
educationally related
use with
Includes some details.
activity) with vague
children/adolescents.
details
Includes specific details.
This rubric was designed by utilizing a combination of SOE standard assessment language and requirements and the
stages noted in Chapter 3 of Bullock, A.A., & Hawk. Developing a teaching portfolio: A guide for pre-service and
practicing teachers, (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Merrill Prentice Hall.
All SOE Programs EXCEPT MSED LIT (Common)
15
New York State Code of Ethics for Educators
Statement of Purpose
The Code of Ethics is a public statement by educators that sets clear expectations and principles to guide
practice and inspire professional excellence. Educators believe a commonly held set of principles can assist
in the individual exercise of professional judgment. This Code speaks to the core values of the profession.
"Educator" as used throughout means all educators serving New York schools in positions requiring a
certificate, including classroom teachers, school leaders and pupil personnel service providers.
Principle 1: Educators nurture the intellectual, physical, emotional, social, and civic potential of each
student.
Educators promote growth in all students through the integration of intellectual, physical, emotional, social
and civic learning. They respect the inherent dignity and worth of each individual. Educators help students to
value their own identity, learn more about their cultural heritage, and practice social and civic
responsibilities. They help students to reflect on their own learning and connect it to their life experience.
They engage students in activities that encourage diverse approaches and solutions to issues, while providing
a range of ways for students to demonstrate their abilities and learning. They foster the development of
students who can analyze, synthesize, evaluate and communicate information effectively.
Principle 2: Educators create, support, and maintain challenging learning environments for all.
Educators apply their professional knowledge to promote student learning. They know the curriculum and
utilize a range of strategies and assessments to address differences. Educators develop and implement
programs based upon a strong understanding of human development and learning theory. They support a
challenging learning environment. They advocate for necessary resources to teach to higher levels of
learning. They establish and maintain clear standards of behavior and civility. Educators are role models,
displaying the habits of mind and work necessary to develop and apply knowledge while simultaneously
displaying a curiosity and enthusiasm for learning. They invite students to become active, inquisitive, and
discerning individuals who reflect upon and monitor their own learning.
Principle 3: Educators commit to their own learning in order to develop their practice.
Educators recognize that professional knowledge and development are the foundations of their practice. They
know their subject matter, and they understand how students learn. Educators respect the reciprocal nature of
learning between educators and students. They engage in a variety of individual and collaborative learning
experiences essential to develop professionally and to promote student learning. They draw on and contribute
to various forms of educational research to improve their own practice.
Principle 4: Educators collaborate with colleagues and other professionals in the interest of student
learning.
Educators encourage and support their colleagues to build and maintain high standards. They participate in
decisions regarding curriculum, instruction and assessment designs, and they share responsibility for the
governance of schools. They cooperate with community agencies in using resources and building
comprehensive services in support of students. Educators respect fellow professionals and believe that all
have the right to teach and learn in a professional and supportive environment. They participate in the
preparation and induction of new educators and in professional development for all staff.
Principle 5: Educators collaborate with parents and community, building trust and respecting
confidentiality.
Educators partner with parents and other members of the community to enhance school programs and to
promote student learning. They also recognize how cultural and linguistic heritage, gender, family and
community shape experience and learning. Educators respect the private nature of the special knowledge
they have about students and their families and use that knowledge only in the students' best interests. They
advocate for fair opportunity for all children.
Principle 6: Educators advance the intellectual and ethical foundation of the learning community.
Educators recognize the obligations of the trust placed in them. They share the responsibility for
understanding what is known, pursuing further knowledge, contributing to the generation of knowledge, and
translating knowledge into comprehensible forms. They help students understand that knowledge is often
complex and sometimes paradoxical. Educators are confidantes, mentors and advocates for their students'
growth and development. As models for youth and the public, they embody intellectual honesty, diplomacy,
tact and fairness.
This Code shall not be used as a basis for discipline by any employer and shall not be used by the State
Education Department as a basis for a proceeding under Part 83 of Commissioner's Regulations, nor
shall it serve as a basis for decisions pertaining to certification or employment in New York State.
Conversely, this Code shall not be interpreted or used to diminish the authority of any public school
employer to evaluate or discipline any employee under provisions of law, regulation, or collective
bargaining agreement.
Background on the Development of the Code
The State Board of Regents, as part of its teaching reform initiatives outlined in the 1998 report, New York's
Commitment: Teaching to Higher Standards, called for the State Professional Standards and Practices Board
for Teaching to develop a Code of Ethics for Teachers. In New York State, a teacher is defined as anyone for
whom a certificate is required for service in the State's public schools. This includes classroom teachers,
school administrators, and pupil personnel service providers.
The Standards Board is a 28-member board that serves in an advisory capacity to the Regents and the
Commissioner of Education. Its membership consists of teachers, school administrators, higher education
representatives, public members, and a teacher education student. The Board worked for over a year to
develop a draft Code of Ethics. The process involved a review of numerous other codes developed by
professional organizations and by other jurisdictions, both for the teaching profession and for other
professions. Individual Board members also consulted with their colleagues in the field to inform the process.
A draft was presented to the Regents Committee on Higher and Professional Education at the October 2001
Board of Regents meeting. Following this preliminary review by the Regents, the draft Code of Ethics was
released for public comment. Reactions and suggestions were received from as broad a spectrum as possible:
classroom teachers, school administrators and pupil personnel professionals, other members of the school
community, teacher education students, college faculty, professional organizations, boards of education,
parents and the general public.
The State Standards and Practices Board reviewed all comments received and produced the final version of
the code in June 2002. The New York State Code of Ethics for Educators was presented to the Board of
Regents at its July 2002 meeting, at which time the Regents authorized the release of the Code to the public.
For more information, contact:
Nancy Taylor Baumes
Secretary, State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching
New York State Education Department
Office of Teaching Initiatives, Room 5N EB
Albany, New York 12234
Phone: (518) 474-4661
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Ontario College of Teachers Standards:
The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession
Introduction
The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession represent a vision of professional practice. At the heart of
a strong and effective teaching profession is a commitment to students and their learning.
Members of the Ontario College of Teachers, in their position of trust, demonstrate responsibility in their
relationships with students, parents, guardians, colleagues, educational partners, other professionals, the
environment and the public.
The Purposes of the Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession are:
to inspire members to reflect and uphold the honour and dignity of the teaching profession
to identify the ethical responsibilities and commitments in the teaching profession
to guide ethical decisions and actions in the teaching profession
to promote public trust and confidence in the teaching profession.
The Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession are:
Care
The ethical standard of Care includes compassion, acceptance, interest and insight for developing students'
potential. Members express their commitment to students' well-being and learning through positive
influence, professional judgment and empathy in practice.
Respect
Intrinsic to the ethical standard of Respect are trust and fair-mindedness. Members honour human dignity,
emotional wellness and cognitive development. In their professional practice, they model respect for spiritual
and cultural values, social justice, confidentiality, freedom, democracy and the environment.
Trust
The ethical standard of Trust embodies fairness, openness and honesty. Members' professional relationships
with students, colleagues, parents, guardians and the public are based on trust.
Integrity
Honesty, reliability and moral action are embodied in the ethical standard of Integrity . Continual reflection
assists members in exercising integrity in their professional commitments and responsibilities.
The Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession
Introduction
The Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession provide a framework of principles that describes the
knowledge, skills, and values inherent in Ontario's teaching profession. These standards articulate the goals
and aspirations of the profession. These standards convey a collective vision of professionalism that guides
the daily practices of members of the Ontario College of Teachers.
The Purposes of the Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession are:
to inspire a shared vision for the teaching profession
to identify the values, knowledge and skills that are distinctive to the teaching profession
to guide the professional judgment and actions of the teaching profession
to promote a common language that fosters an understanding of what it means to be a member of the
teaching profession.
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The Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession are:
Commitment to Students and Student Learning
Members are dedicated in their care and commitment to students. They treat students equitably and
with respect and are sensitive to factors that influence individual student learning. Members facilitate
the development of students as contributing citizens of Canadian society.
Professional Knowledge
Members strive to be current in their professional knowledge and recognize its relationship to
practice. They understand and reflect on student development, learning theory, pedagogy, curriculum,
ethics, educational research and related policies and legislation to inform professional judgment in
practice.
Professional Practice
Members apply professional knowledge and experience to promote student learning. They use
appropriate pedagogy, assessment and evaluation, resources and technology in planning for and
responding to the needs of individual students and learning communities. Members refine their
professional practice through ongoing inquiry, dialogue and reflection.
Leadership in Learning Communities
Members promote and participate in the creation of collaborative, safe and supportive learning
communities. They recognize their shared responsibilities and their leadership roles in order to
facilitate student success. Members maintain and uphold the principles of the ethical standards in
these learning communities.
Ongoing Professional Learning
Members recognize that a commitment to ongoing professional learning is integral to effective
practice and to student learning. Professional practice and self-directed learning are informed by
experience, research, collaboration and knowledge.
For more details go to the OCT website at http://www.oct.ca/standards.
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