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Paternity and
Child Support
Law in Iowa
A Guide to
How Courts Determine
Child Support
in Iowa
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iowalegalaid.org
IMPORTANT NOTICE: READ THIS
INFORMATION BEFORE USING ANY PART
OF THIS BOOKLET
This booklet is a general summary of the law. It is not meant
to completely explain the subjects in this booklet. IT IS NOT A
SUBSTITUTE FOR LEGAL ADVICE.
The information in this booklet was correct as of the date it
was printed (see the back cover). The laws may have changed.
DO NOT ASSUME THAT THE INFORMATION IN THIS BOOKLET IS
NOW CORRECT.
You should see a lawyer to get complete, correct, and up-todate legal advice. Do not rely on the general information in
this booklet for your specific case.
If you need a lawyer but can’t afford one, contact Iowa Legal
Aid. You may be able to get free legal help. Call or write Iowa
Legal Aid. The address and phone numbers are on the back
cover.
AS YOU READ THIS BOOKLET, REMEMBER IT IS NOT
A SUBSTITUTE FOR LEGAL ADVICE.
Contents
INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................................................... 5
THE CHILD SUPPORT RECOVERY UNIT............................................................................5
What Does the Child Support Recovery Unit Do?.................................................................... 5
Can People Contact the Child Support Recovery Unit If They Are Not on Public
Assistance (Family Investment Program/FIP or Medical Assistance)?............................ 5
CSRU Fees for Non-FIP Cases............................................................................................................ 6
What Does the Parent Owe the Department of Human Services Once Public
Assistance is Received for the Child?......................................................................................... 6
How Does the State Keep Track of Support Payments?......................................................... 6
ESTABLISHMENT OF PATERNITY.......................................................................................6
What If the Mother Won’t Reveal the Father’s Name?............................................................. 6
What Happens After the Mother Suggests a Father?.............................................................. 6
What If He Doesn’t Think He Is the Father?................................................................................. 7
What Will Happen If He Ignores the Notice and Fails to Contact CSRU?.......................... 7
How Much Does It Cost To Get the Genetic Tests?................................................................... 7
How Are the Tests Done?................................................................................................................... 7
What Will the Tests Show?................................................................................................................. 7
How Accurate Are the Tests?............................................................................................................ 8
How Long Does It Take to Get Results?........................................................................................ 8
Can the Test Results Be Challenged?............................................................................................. 8
Are Genetic Tests the Only Way to Establish Paternity?.......................................................... 8
What If the Genetic test Shows That He Is the Father or What If the Man Does Not
Contest Paternity?............................................................................................................................. 8
Can Paternity Be Disestablished? ................................................................................................. 8
ESTABLISHMENT OF SUPPORT ORDERS..........................................................................9
What If Paternity Is Not An Issue?................................................................................................... 9
What If the Parent Gets a Notice of Support Debt from CSRU?........................................... 9
Sample Letter to Child Support Recovery Unit......................................................................... 9
Sample Letter Regarding Paternity..............................................................................................10
Is the Non-Custodial Parent (Debtor or Obligor) Entitled to a Hearing?........................10
What If the Notice Is Ignored?.......................................................................................................11
How Is the Amount of Child Support Determined?..............................................................11
What if the parents share custody?.............................................................................................12
What is Considered “Income”?.......................................................................................................13
How Does CSRU Calculate Accrued Support?.........................................................................13
What is Medical Support?...............................................................................................................13
How is “cost” defined?.......................................................................................................................13
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Can the custodial parent be required to buy health insurance?.......................................13
How is the insurance premium paid? .......................................................................................14
What if “reasonable” cost insurance is not available to either parent? ...........................14
Are there any exceptions to having to pay Cash Medical Support?................................14
What If the Noncustodial Parent Is 19 Years Old or Younger?............................................14
FOSTER CARE..................................................................................................................... 14
Do Parents Have To Pay Support If the Child Is In Foster Care?.........................................14
HOW CHILD SUPPORT IS ENFORCED............................................................................ 15
What If the Non-Custodial Parent Won’t Pay?..........................................................................15
How Much Can Be Withheld?.........................................................................................................15
1) Challenges to Income Withholding................................................................................16
2) Garnishment...........................................................................................................................16
3) Seek Work Orders..................................................................................................................16
4) Administrative Levy.............................................................................................................16
5) Contempt of Court...............................................................................................................17
6) License Sanctions.................................................................................................................17
7) Reports to Credit Bureaus..................................................................................................17
8) Centralized Employee Registry........................................................................................17
9) Tax Refund Intercept............................................................................................................18
Are There Other Ways to Collect Child Support?....................................................................18
What If the Children Are No Longer Minors?...........................................................................18
MODIFYING CHILD SUPPORT ORDERS......................................................................... 18
Review and Adjustment of Child Support Orders..................................................................18
Administrative Modification...........................................................................................................19
What if the Parent Paying Support Becomes Disabled?.......................................................19
Suspension and Reinstatement of Support..............................................................................19
Petition to Modify Support.............................................................................................................20
Motion to Release Support Judgment .....................................................................................20
What If More Than One State is Involved?.................................................................................20
Where Is the Law On Child Support Found?............................................................................20
Where Can I Find Out More About the Child Support Recovery Unit (CSRU)?............21
How Do I Contact the Child Support Recovery Unit?...........................................................21
Offices, Addresses and Service Areas..................................................................................21
Obligation to Provide Information...............................................................................................22
GLOSSARY OF CHILD SUPPORT AND PATERNITY TERMS.......................................... 24
Motion to Quash/Change Income Withholding Order.........................................................25
Information Form...............................................................................................................................27
Child Support Guidelines................................................................................................................29
4
INTRODUCTION
Children whose parents do
not live together should still
get support from both of
them. Either the State of Iowa
or custodial parent can get
an order setting how much
support the non-custodial
parent must pay to the
custodial parent. If the parent
without custody does not pay
this support voluntarily, there
are ways to force payment.
Orders for child support are
issued by a judge or by the
Child Support Recovery Unit.
Orders issued by a judge most
often occur in a divorce. A general booklet on divorce called Divorce Law in Iowa is available from Iowa
Legal Aid. Contact Iowa Legal Aid at the address or phone number on the back cover if you want to get
a copy.
Support orders may also arise when a marriage is annulled or a couple separates. Support can be
ordered when domestic abuse injunctions are issued and through paternity actions. Once the order
has been obtained, it can be enforced by the parent who is owed support. It can also be enforced by
the State of Iowa, usually through the Child Support Recovery Unit.
THE CHILD SUPPORT RECOVERY UNIT
The Child Support Recovery Unit (CSRU) is an office of the Department of Human Services. Their
purpose is to help establish support orders and collect child support payments.
What Does the Child Support Recovery Unit Do?
The CSRU can provide the following services:
1) Help locate an absent parent or anyone else who has to support the child of the custodial parent.
2) Help prove paternity and get a court order for support.
3) Help get support payments that a court has already ordered.
4) Help get income from a non-custodial parent to pay any money owed to the Department of Human
Services or to a household not on public assistance.
5) Modify and suspend child support orders.
Can People Contact the Child Support Recovery Unit If They Are Not on Public
Assistance (Family Investment Program/FIP or Medical Assistance)?
Yes. By law, CSRU must make its child support and paternity determination services available to all
households. The parent does not have to be on the Family Investment Program or “FIP.” (FIP used to be
called the ADC Program). If CSRU refuses to help, or says there will be a long delay, contact a lawyer. If
the parent cannot afford a lawyer, he or she may be able to get free legal help from Iowa Legal Aid.
5
CSRU Fees for Non-FIP Cases
Fees are charged by the Child Support Recovery Unit. An application fee may be charged. The parent may
also have to pay other fees to cover the actual costs to collect the support and determine paternity.
What Does the Parent Owe the Department of Human Services Once Public
Assistance is Received for the Child?
People who get Public Assistance agree to assign (meaning to give) to the Department of Human
Services all right to child support owed. The amount of the assignment is limited to the amount of
public assistance paid to the child’s family.
How Does the State Keep Track of Support Payments?
Support to Public Assistance households must be sent to the Collection Services Center in Des Moines.
Support to non-Public Assistance households may be sent either to the Collection Services Center or
to the County Clerk of Court. It depends on whether CSRU is enforcing the support order and whether
there is an income withholding order in place. If there is an income withholding order, payments must
go to the Collection Services Center. If not, payments go to the Clerk of Court.
If the money is paid directly to the custodial parent instead of the Collection Services Center or to
the Clerk of Court, it is not credited as paid. Therefore, the noncustodial parent should not pay the
custodial parent directly.
ESTABLISHMENT OF PATERNITY
Paternity is often established through marriage or “by operation of law.” This means that the husband
is automatically the father of every child his wife gives birth to. Even if the husband and wife are
separated or if the wife admits her husband is not the father, he will still be considered the dad.
If the parents are not married, paternity is established by court order or affidavit. Many paternity
actions are private actions, that is, the mother of the child can sue the man she believes to be the
father. However, this booklet deals with paternity actions where the state is involved. It is about cases
where the State of Iowa is suing the possible father. The State is trying to get money for expenses and
support of a child who gets “FIP” (Family Investment Program) benefits or medical assistance. FIP used
to be called Aid to Families with Dependent Children.
Paternity actions often begin when a parent who does not get child support contacts the Department
of Human Services to apply for FIP or Medical Assistance. These payments are then sent to the Child
Support Recovery Unit (CSRU). The mother must usually give the name of the father (if known) or the
names of several men who could be the father.
What If the Mother Won’t Reveal the Father’s Name?
A mother may have good cause reasons for not revealing who the father is. However, if the mother
cannot prove good cause, the mother could be charged with “failure to cooperate” and lose her FIP
(but not the child’s).
What Happens After the Mother Suggests a Father?
Once the mother has given the CSRU the father’s name (or several names), the CSRU will serve each
man a Notice of Alleged Paternity and Support Debt. The man can do one of two things at this point.
If he believes that he is the father, he can admit paternity. He can work out support payments and any
other related issues. To work out support payments, he can request a conference with CSRU and/or a
hearing. On the other hand, if he does not think that he is the father, he can challenge it.
6
What If He Doesn’t Think He Is the Father?
If the man does not believe that he is the father, he needs to tell this to CSRU and request a genetic
test. He must contact the CSRU in writing within 20 days after receiving the original Notice of Alleged
Paternity. (See sample letter on page 10). CSRU will then arrange for the test to be done. An order will
be entered requiring the mother, the child and the alleged father to submit to genetic testing. There
will be only one chance to reschedule the testing appointment. If you cannot go to the appointment,
be sure and contact CSRU beforehand to reschedule. The test results will be mailed to the alleged
father. A conference can also be requested to discuss paternity but it is important not to miss the 20day deadline to deny paternity.
What Will Happen If He Ignores the Notice and Fails to Contact CSRU?
Most alleged fathers do contact CSRU. IF HE DOES NOT ANSWER (meaning respond within the time
stated in the notice), HIS PATERNITY IS ESTABLISHED BY DEFAULT. That means the court will rule that he
is the father because he did not deny it. He can challenge the default by filing with the Clerk of Court
a written application to set aside the default within 60 days. After the 60 days, there is another court
proceeding (called “disestablishment.” See the next page) that can be started as long as the child is not
18 years old. If he wants to challenge the default order, he should contact an attorney immediately.
Do not ignore the notice or paternity will be established by default. If this happens, CSRU will enter an
administrative order for support. The order will state an amount of monthly support to be paid and
an amount of past due support. Also, at this point, income, wages, driver licenses and property can be
taken. This means that the state can take and even sell personal property to help pay the child support.
Read all notices carefully. Pay attention to all deadlines. Keep copies of all papers sent by you or CSRU.
How Much Does It Cost To Get the Genetic Tests?
If the man cannot afford to pay for the tests, the state will advance the costs for the tests. He has to sign
a sworn statement about why he can’t pay the costs of the genetic tests. If the tests show that he is the
father of the child, he will be required to pay the costs for the test. The costs are usually around $600.
How Are the Tests Done?
Most communities specify a place where genetic samples are taken. Some Child Support Recovery
Unit locations are equipped to take samples. Genetic samples can be obtained from blood or tissue.
One of the most common ways is using a cotton swab to take a sample of cells from inside the person’s
mouth. The samples are then sent to approved test laboratories.
What Will the Tests Show?
The tests used to determine paternity are scientific and accurate. The testers look at many factors to
determine genetic makeup.
The tests will show one of two things:
1. It is genetically impossible for an alleged father to be the true father, or
2. There is some chance (for example 91.2% or 96.8%) that the alleged father is the father. If the
chance of paternity is 95% or more, the alleged father is “presumed” (meaning assumed) to be
the father. This “presumption of paternity” means that, in most cases, the judge will rule the
alleged father is the father based on the test alone. The judge could rule that the man is not the
father if there is “clear and convincing evidence” to prove it. The alleged father has only 20 days
to challenge a test. The 20 days start on the date the test results are filed at the courthouse. To
challenge the results, a written notice challenging them has to be filed with the Clerk of Court.
7
If the genetic test shows a less than 95% chance the alleged father is the father, the judge may still find
him to be the father. The judge must look at all the evidence including the test to decide if he is the
father. In this case, the alleged father also has 20 days to challenge the test.
No matter what the probability of paternity is, the alleged father (or mother or CSRU) can ask the judge for
another genetic test. The judge must order another genetic test if the request for another test is reasonable.
How Accurate Are the Tests?
Thanks to scientific developments, the accuracy of genetic tests has greatly improved. The test results
will be filed with the Clerk of Court, and the man will be sent a copy, too.
How Long Does It Take to Get Results?
Results are usually reported within four to six weeks.
Can the Test Results Be Challenged?
Yes. But the objection must be filed in writing with the court within 20 days after the test results were
mailed and advance payment for additional testing must be made. A hearing will then be held in
district court to resolve the issue of paternity.
Are Genetic Tests the Only Way to Establish Paternity?
No. If the parents were not married to each other at the time of the conception and birth, they can sign
an Affidavit of Paternity. The only form that can be used is the one by the Iowa Department of Public
Health. The form is a sworn and notarized statement that the man is the biological father. The hospital
and the Clerk of Court will have the forms. The Affidavits have the same effect as a judge’s decision,
which means the father can be ordered to pay child support without any genetic testing. The father
should not sign the affidavit unless he is sure he is the father.
It is possible to rescind or cancel a paternity affidavit. This must be done by filing a signed form with
the state registrar. It must be filed either 60 days from when the affidavit was signed or before entry of
a court order in a case involving the child, whichever comes first. Either parent can file the rescission.
There may be a fee to file it. Filing the rescission will take the father’s name off the birth certificate.
What If the Genetic test Shows That He Is the Father or What If the Man Does Not
Contest Paternity?
If the genetic tests show that he is the father, or if the man agrees that he is the father, he can meet
with CSRU and/or request a hearing (see below). This meeting is called a conference and must be
requested within certain time frames. The CSRU will ask him for financial information. CSRU will then
tell him how much they believe he should pay in support. This amount is based on the Uniform Child
Support Guidelines (see pages 29 through 38). If he disagrees, he can ask for a court hearing. This also
must be done within certain time limits. (See “Establishment of Support Orders” on the next page.)
Can Paternity Be Disestablished?
Yes. A court action is needed to do this. Certain requirements must be met. These include:
1. the child must still be a minor (under age 18);
2. a guardian ad litem (or attorney) must be appointed for the child;
3. genetic tests have not already been done;
4. genetic tests are done which show the established father is not the biological father; or
5. if paternity was established by a signed affidavit, it was based on fraud, duress or material
mistake of fact.
8
The person requesting that paternity be disestablished is responsible for paying for the genetic tests.
The court action can be filed by the mother, the father or the child.
If the court does enter an order overcoming or disestablishing paternity, no more child support will be
owed. Any unpaid, past due, or accrued support will be “waived.” This means it will not have to be paid.
However, any support already paid will not be refunded.
Even if the tests show the man is not the father, the court can still decide not to overcome paternity.
To do this, the father must request that the parent-child relationship continue. Also, the court must
conclude that continuing the relationship is in the best interest of the child. Paternity can also be
disestablished in a divorce proceeding if both the husband and wife sign a statement saying husband
is not the father of a child from their marriage.
ESTABLISHMENT OF SUPPORT ORDERS
What If Paternity Is Not An Issue?
Sometimes the question of who the father is has already been decided. For example, the parents are
married but are no longer living together; or the children are living with the father; or genetic tests say
he is the father. Then the only thing for CSRU to decide is the amount of support. To make this decision,
CSRU first sends a Notice of Support Debt to the parents.
What If the Parent Gets a Notice of Support Debt from CSRU?
When the CSRU intends to establish a support order requiring the non-custodial parent to pay child
support, it will send that parent a notice called a “Notice of Support Debt.” The parent from whom child
support is sought is called the “debtor” or “obligor.”
Sample Letter to Child Support Recovery Unit
9
Sample Letter Regarding Paternity
A debtor who gets notice of a support debt from the CSRU should know the amount of the support
debt listed could be misleading. The figure listed may show how much FIP the state has been
paying to the debtor’s family, instead of the amount paid just for the children. Also, the support
debt could be less than the amount of FIP paid for the children if the debtor’s income is too low.
The notice of support debt will include a request that the parent provide financial information. The
parent will be asked to complete a financial statement. It is very important to tell CSRU accurate
income information. Under the law, CSRU can estimate or assume the parent’s income if they don’t
know for sure. This can result in support orders that are too high.
Once a debtor gets notice of a support debt from CSRU, the debtor may request a negotiation
conference. This must be done within ten days. It is in a debtor’s best interest to contact CSRU in
writing to ask for a meeting (negotiation conference). A sample letter is on page 9. At this time,
the debtor will have a chance to discuss his/her specific case with the CSRU. He or she can also try
to work out a plan for repayment of the support debt. After the conference, CSRU will issue a new
notice or a conference report.
Is the Non-Custodial Parent (Debtor or Obligor) Entitled to a Hearing?
A debtor can request a court hearing instead of participating in a negotiation conference. The
request for a hearing must be made within 30 days after receiving the first notice.
Also, a debtor can request a hearing after taking part in a negotiation conference if he or she
disagrees with the findings at the conference. This must be done within the time limit.
10
The non-custodial parent who gets a notice of a support debt from CSRU has a right to a hearing. By
law, the debtor need only ask (in writing) the CSRU to arrange such a hearing. See the sample letter on
page 9.
What If the Notice Is Ignored?
If a debtor does not contact CSRU within the time limit, CSRU will enter a default judgment. The default
judgment is a child support order and may include the full amount of support shown on the notice.
The debt may be taken from the debtor’s wages (wage assignment). At this time, a debtor’s property
may also be subject to collection action. It may be possible to set aside (remove) a default judgment,
but it is very hard to do.
How Is the Amount of Child Support Determined?
The incomes of both parents determine the amount of child support in Iowa. In most cases, the Child
Support Recovery Unit and judges must use the Child Support Guidelines which include a chart
called the Iowa Schedule of Basic Support Obligations (Schedule). The Schedule uses the combined
net monthly income of the parents. It also uses the number of children. Based on the combined
income amount and the number of children, a total amount of child support is found on the Schedule.
Each parent will “pay” a percentage or share of this total amount. The share is equal to the parent’s
percentage of their combined incomes. For example, if both parents earn the same, each share is 50%.
If one earns $1000 and the other one earns $1500, the shares would be 40%($1000 is 40% of the total
$2500) and 60% ($1500 is 60% of $2500). A copy of the Guidelines (effective as of July 1, 2009) is at the
back of this booklet. The Guidelines must be reviewed every four years. The reviews may change the
Guidelines and how child support is figured. To get a copy of the current Guidelines, contact a lawyer
or CSRU.
CSRU has a website you can use to get information about the current Guidelines. It is
https://childsupport.dhs.state.ia.us The CSRU website includes a link to an online Child
Support Estimator. The url of the Child Support Estimator is
https://secureapp.dhs.state.ia.us/childsupport/changechildsupport/asppages/CSChdEst_Dis.asp
11
The important part of the Guidelines is each parent’s “net monthly income.” The following items are
subtracted from gross income to determine “net monthly income.”
1. federal income tax;
2. state income tax;
3. Social Security;
4. mandatory pension deductions;
5. union dues;
6. actual medical support paid under court order or administrative order;
7. cash medical support ordered in this specific case;
8. child support or alimony that is being paid and was ordered before this specific case;
9. qualified additional dependent deduction; and
10.actual child care expenses while the custodial parent is employed minus the income tax
credit.
After this is all subtracted from gross income, the amount left is the “net monthly income.” The amount
for each parent is combined. The basic support obligation is found on the Schedule. The non custodial
parent will pay his/her share as described above. An example using the Guidelines will help. A couple
has one child. Assume Mom is the custodial parent. Dad’s net income is $1600 a month. Mom’s net
income is $400 a month. The total of their combined incomes is $2000. The Schedule says that the
basic support obligation is $490. Dad’s income is 80% of the $2000. . Dad would pay 80% of the $490
or $392 (492 x .8).
For low-income parents, ONLY the income of the noncustodial parent is used. The incomes are NOT
combined. The parents do not each pay a share of the basic support obligation. The noncustodial
parent pays the full amount. The Schedule shows these low income amounts by having a “shaded
area.” Example: If the noncustodial parent’s net income is only $1000 a month, and there is one child,
the parent would pay $95.
What if the parents share custody?
When the parents share custody about equally (joint physical care) support is decided a little different.
After figuring each parent’s share of support, that amount is multiplied by 1.5 and that amount is
multiplied by 50%. Support is calculated this way even if low income parents share custody.
A parent can ask a judge not to use the Guidelines to set support. This is called a Request to Deviate
from the Guidelines. For example, the parent can tell the judge that the support amount set by
the Guidelines is too high or too low. In the past it was very unlikely that the judge would deviate.
Changes to the Guidelines in 2009 may make this a little easier. According to the rules, adjustments
can be made to the support amount “to do justice between the parties...under the special
circumstances of the case.” Because the Supreme Court has said to use the Guidelines except in very
unusual cases, you will need to ask for a hearing to request a deviation. CSRU will not do it without a
judge telling them to.
If the noncustodial parent has no income, he or she will still be ordered to pay child support. If the
noncustodial parent’s net monthly income is less than $500 per month, the Judge probably will order
the parent to pay $50 per month if there is one child, $75 per month if there are two children, $100 for
three children, and $125 for four or more children.
12
If a noncustodial parent’s court-ordered visitation exceeds 127 overnights per year, the non-custodial
parent will be able to pay less in child support.
It is important for parents to tell the Child Support Recovery Unit (CSRU) how much money they make.
CSRU usually asks the parent to complete a financial statement. If CSRU does not know how much
money the noncustodial parent makes, the CSRU searches for information on the parent’s income.
They will view records at Workforce Development, Department of Revenue and other agencies. When
financial information is not available, CSRU estimates income according to the median income of all
people who work in the same type of job as the obligor. If the obligor’s occupation is not known, CSRU
may use the median income of the people on CSRU’s caseload.
What is Considered “Income”?
The only type of money not considered income is welfare or public assistance. Therefore, CSRU will
consider social security benefits, veterans benefits, pensions, unemployment benefits, wages, etc. as
income but not FIP or SSI benefits.
How Does CSRU Calculate Accrued Support?
It may take several months (or even years) for CSRU to get a support order after a child is born (or the
parents separate). That does not mean no support will be owed for this time period. CSRU may go back
36 months from the date the parent is served papers or back to the month the child began receiving
FIP, whichever is shorter. If the child has not received FIP or Medical Assistance it is quite likely no
accrued support will be required.
If accrued support is ordered, this must be paid in addition to the current obligation. A payment
schedule or income withholding order will usually require an additional 10% or 20% of the current
amount to pay on this accrued debt.
What is Medical Support?
The law says that “support” means more than just child support. It also means medical support. More
emphasis is being placed on requiring the parent to provide health insurance and/or pay medical bills
for the children. CSRU can obtain an order for just medical support and not child support. Usually both
will be ordered at the same time. Until July of 2009, Obligors could be ordered to buy health insurance
even if it was very expensive As long as it was available through his or her job, it was considered
“reasonable” in cost. Oligors would have to enroll the children in the plan. All of that changed
effective July 1, 2009. The definition of “reasonable” changed drastically. Now, the cost of the health
insurance cannot be more than a set percentage of the parent’s gross income. The percentage will be
between 1% and 5% depending on how much the parent earns. There is a Medical Support Table now
in the Guidelines which lists the correct percentage.
How is “cost” defined?
Cost is the child’s portion of the premium. To figure out this amount, you take the difference between
the price of family coverage and the price of single coverage. So, if the family coverage costs $200 and
the single coverage costs $125, $75 is the cost that must be “reasonable” under the facts of the case.
Can the custodial parent be required to buy health insurance?
Yes. This is a big change in medical support. However, this would only happen if the noncustodial
parent can’t get insurance at reasonable cost and the custodial parent can.
13
How is the insurance premium paid?
The parents share the cost according to their proportionate share of their combined incomes. For
example, assume the cost of the insurance is $75, Dad’s income is $2,000 a month and Mom’s is $1500.
Dad will pay 57% of the premium because his income is 57% of their combined incomes ($3500). The
actual child support amount will go up or down depending on who is buying the insurance to account
for this sharing.
What if “reasonable” cost insurance is not available to either parent?
The Court must order “cash medical support.” This is defined as a cash amount that must be paid in
addition to the child support and instead of buying health insurance. Only a “reasonable” amount
can be required. What is reasonable is figured the same way as what would be reasonable to pay for
health insurance. The same Medical Support Table is used to find out what percentage of gross income
is correct. Cash Medical Support will be collected the same way that child support is and will be sent
to the custodial parent. If the custodial parent is on Title 19, the money will go to the State just like
child support does when the custodial parent is on FIP. ( support is “assigned to the State” when parent
received public assistance)
Are there any exceptions to having to pay Cash Medical Support?
Yes. If the parent is very low income they cannot be required to pay cash medical support. As of July 1,
2009 if the parent’s net income is below $850 a month, no cash medical can be ordered.
Medical support orders can be challenged and may be lowered if the cost of insurance is too high.
What If the Noncustodial Parent Is 19 Years Old or Younger?
A noncustodial parent who is 19 years old or younger and who is still going to high school or getting a
GED, will have support set according to guidelines unless special circumstances justify deviation.
FOSTER CARE
Do Parents Have To Pay Support If the Child Is In Foster Care?
Yes, both the mother and father will be ordered to pay child support. The question of child support
will not be part of the ChINA case (Child in Need of Assistance) or the juvenile delinquency case. Child
support will be decided in a separate case started by the Foster Care Recovery Unit.
The Foster Care Recovery Unit will use the Child Support Guidelines (see pages 29 to 38 of this booklet)
to decide the amount of support. There will be an order for the father to pay and a second order for the
mother to pay. To determine the mother’s support, she will be considered the noncustodial parent on
the Guidelines, and they will use “$0” for the custodial parent. Then to decide how much the father will
pay in support, the same process will be used.
If the case plan is to return the child to one of the parents, then that parent may be able to argue that
he or she should not have to pay any child support. This area of the law is not clear, and the parent
should talk to an attorney immediately.
If the parents separated before the child went into foster care, there may already be a support order
in effect. If so, the amount of support payable on behalf of that child is automatically assigned to the
State. Unless otherwise set out in the Order, the amount of support payable on behalf of each child
means that each child will get an equal share of the support ordered. For example, assume Dad has
been ordered to pay $200 a month in support for two children. When one of these children is placed
in foster care, one-half of that $200 (or $100) will automatically go to the State. It will not go to the
mother as it did previously.
14
HOW CHILD SUPPORT IS ENFORCED
What If the Non-Custodial Parent Won’t Pay?
There are many ways to enforce a child support order. The following list includes the most common
ways this is done.
1) Income Withholding
Child Support can be taken directly from wages or other income. Other income includes Social Security
benefits, Worker’s Compensation benefits, unemployment and disability. Income is not withheld from
payments received from the SSI or FIP programs.
MANDATORY. The law used to say if the parent who owes support is at least one month behind, the
custodial parent can ask the Clerk of Court to take a certain amount of money directly from the wages
of the parent who owes support. This is called a “wage assignment.” This usually is equal to the current
monthly amount plus a percentage of this amount to go towards the past-due support. (See “How
Much Can Be Withheld?” below.) It can be done without a hearing because “notice” is given in the
original support order and final decree.
IMMEDIATE. Since November 1, 1990, immediate withholding of income became automatic for child
support orders entered on or after that date. It will not be necessary to be behind in support first. There
are two exceptions to this rule:
1. If good cause exists, which means it is in the best interest of the child; or
2. A written agreement exists between the parties providing for an alternative. This becomes
void if child support is assigned to the state.
Child support payments ordered before November 1, 1990, can also be subject to immediate
withholding, even if no arrearages are owed, if proper notice is given. Either parent may request
immediate withholding or CSRU may determine it is necessary.
If back-due support is owed, the amount withheld under immediate withholding will probably be the
current amount plus 10% of the current amount. The extra 10% is applied to the back-due amount.
How Much Can Be Withheld?
If there is a delinquency (back child support), there are rules that state how much money can be taken
through a wage assignment. Under the old law, the amount withheld will be the current support
obligation plus 50 percent more of this amount. Since July 1, 1998, Orders usually require the current
amount plus 20% of the current amount. However, if the total amount to be withheld is more than the
amount allowed under federal law (50-65 percent of income), the federal limits will be followed.
Also a payor can request that less money be taken to pay on the delinquency on the grounds of
hardship. Hardship means income below 200 percent of the poverty level for one person. (The poverty
level for 2010 for one person is $10,830 income per year). There is a complicated formula for figuring
how much the amount should be reduced, but the amount withheld on delinquency will never be less
than $5.00. Also, the request must be made within 15 days after receiving notice of the withholding.
Obligors who are receiving disability benefits can request a hardship reduction after the 15-day
deadline has passed.
1) Challenges to Income Withholding
It is possible to contest the withholding by filing a motion to quash in court and/or requesting an
informal conference with CSRU. The issues to be reviewed are limited in an informal conference but
include: the identity of the payor is wrong, the amount of the obligation (current or delinquent)
is wrong, or the hardship criteria are met (discussed above). There is no appeal from the decision
15
resulting from the informal conference. The conference must be requested within 15 days after the
income withholding order is issued.
Under Iowa law, it is not clear what can be challenged by a motion to quash. The grounds for
challenging an assignment are limited to “mistakes of fact.” Someone who is having money
assigned (taken) from their wages for back due child support can challenge the assignment if one
of the following errors has occurred:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The stated amount of back due or late support is not correct;
The stated amount of back due or late support has been paid;
The payment was not late;
The amount exceeds the limits allowed under federal law; or
The person whose money is being assigned is not the one who actually owes the money.
Some recent court cases suggest that you may be able to challenge wage assignments for other
reasons as well. One example of a successful challenge was when a non-custodial parent claimed
that he could not afford to pay back-due child support, because he also had to support two other
children presently in his custody.
If the parent questions the amount of wage assignment, contact a lawyer. A sample Motion to Quash/
Change Income Withholding Order is on pages 25 and 26.
2) Garnishment
Garnishment has the same results as income withholding. But it is different from income
withholding in several ways. It tends to be used for non-wage income and taking of assets such as
bank accounts, investments, business assets, etc. Also, garnishment may take more time because a
party who seeks to garnish must go to court. So garnishment is less preferable if there are wages,
but it is still an option. The court is supposed to consider each case so that all of the non-custodial
parent’s money would not be taken if he or she has no other money.
3) Seek Work Orders
If someone is not making child support payments and CSRU cannot verify that they are working, a
court order can be entered requiring that person to look for a job. The order is entered by a judge
“ex parte.” This means without the noncustodial parent being there. The order becomes effective 15
days after it is issued. The order can last up to three months. It will require the parent to look for a
job and to report to CSRU the attempts to find a job. This report must be done weekly and show at
least five new attempts to find work. Under certain circumstances the parent may be excused from
these work search requirements.
4) Administrative Levy
This law allows CSRU to “levy” or seize money in bank accounts of people who are behind in their
support payments. Notices are sent to the bank and the parent. The parent then has ten working
days to challenge the levy. CSRU will then review their information and send a second notice. The
parent can then request a court hearing which will be held within ten days. It is difficult to stop
the levy. Sometimes arguments can be made that CSRU is taking too much or that the amount of
alleged delinquency is not right.
5) Contempt of Court
When a person willfully or deliberately fails or refuses to pay child support, they can be found in
contempt of court. They can also be found in contempt if they don’t obey a Seek Work Order (see
16
the section 3 above). Contempt is similar to being charged with a crime. The process starts with a
“rule to show cause” being served on the person. This will include a hearing date and time. At the
hearing the parent has a chance to explain why they haven’t paid support. If they have a good
reason such as being sick or disabled, they may not be found in contempt.
If found in contempt of court, the judge can impose a number of penalties including: jail time,
fines, payment of child support into special accounts, community service or stopping the parent
from doing anything that requires a license (such as practicing medicine, operating a business).
Because of the possibility of a jail sentence, the parent may have the right to a court appointed
attorney. It is best to ask for a court appointed attorney before the hearing date by contacting the
clerk of court’s office.
6) License Sanctions
CSRU can cause certain licenses to be taken away (suspended, revoked, not issued or not renewed)
for failure to pay child support. These licenses include business or professional licenses as well as
licenses to drive and register vehicles and recreational licenses. The parent must be behind in his
or her payments three months and must meet certain other criteria. A notice is given to the parent
that a “Certificate of Noncompliance” will be sent to the agency or department that issues that
license. Later, that agency will also send a notice to the parent and start proceedings to take the
license.
The parent can challenge this and possibly stop or lift the sanction. They should first request a
conference with CSRU. After the conference, CSRU will issue a written decision. CSRU will not send a
Certificate of Noncompliance or will withdraw it if certain conditions are met including:
•
•
•
If the parent enters into a written agreement with CSRU regarding payments; or
If the parent pays the delinquency; or
Other facts exist which make the sanctions inappropriate.
If CSRU does issue the Certificate or won’t withdraw one, a hearing can be requested in district
court. The deadline for requesting such a hearing is 30 days after the Notice from the agency or
department that grants the license.
7) Reports to Credit Bureaus
Any parent who owes overdue support of more than $1,000 will be reported to consumer reporting
agencies (credit bureaus). This is a requirement imposed by federal law. A notice is sent to the
parent explaining that the report will be made in 30 days. The parent can request a review within
15 days from the date of the Notice. At the review CSRU will look at the evidence presented by
the parent and decide if more than $1,000 is actually owed. If so, the report will still be made. This
decision cannot be appealed through CSRU. Once the report is made, it is not possible to withdraw
it even if the delinquency gets below $1,000. The only way to prevent the report is to get the
delinquency below $1,000 before the report is made or bring the account current (pay full amount).
8) Centralized Employee Registry
All employers must report to CSRU all the people they hire. These reports are due ten days from
the date the person is hired. The report must include information on whether health insurance is
available. The goal is to help CSRU find and keep track of parents who change jobs frequently so
that wage assignments can be imposed quicker.
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9) Tax Refund Intercept
Both federal and state refunds can be taken to pay past due support. For federal refunds, the
amount of past due support that triggers the offset is either $150 or $500 depending on whether
the custodial parent is on public assistance or not. For state refunds, the amount is $50 and applies
to all cases. Other criteria must also be met and notices are sent both before the offset occurs and
at the time of the offset. An administrative review by CSRU and/or an appeal hearing can be held
to contest the offset but certain deadlines must be met. Also, the law does not allow obligors very
many reasons to undo the offset. According to CSRU, tax offset is one of the most effective and
successful collection tools they have.
Are There Other Ways to Collect Child Support?
The nine ways listed above are not the only ways to collect child support, but they are the most
common. Other ways include taking payments owed to the parent by a state agency (debtor offset)
and seizure of property.
What If the Children Are No Longer Minors?
Child support is usually no longer payable after a child is 18 years old. The support will continue until
age 19 if the child is still in high school or working on a G.E.D. However, if there is still back-due support
owed, CSRU can continue to take steps to collect it. Also, either parent in a divorce can be ordered
to pay a “post-secondary education subsidy.” This is to help with educational expenses for a child
ages 18-22 who is regularly attending college or involved in a vocational-technical program through
school. The subsidy is paid to the child or the school or to both. Before ordering the subsidy, the court
considers the educational costs, the income of the parents and the child and whether or not the child
has “disowned” the parent. CSRU does not obtain or enforce orders for an education subsidy.
MODIFYING CHILD SUPPORT ORDERS
Child support debts that have not been paid cannot be reduced or forgiven. Once a child support
debt exists, it cannot be lowered. However, future payments can be lowered if the financial situation
of the one who pays support changes a great deal or if other circumstances change that would justify
a change in child support. A person who owes support must “modify” the support order to change the
amount of support owed.
Review and Adjustment of Child Support Orders
At the request of either parent, CSRU will review the amount of the support ordered and adjust the
amount if certain conditions are met. They will look only at orders being enforced by CSRU, however.
The conditions include:
1. The current amount varies from the Guidelines by more than 20 percent, or the net monthly
income of the parent ordered to pay support does not fall within the income limits of the
Guidelines, and
2. The variation is due to financial circumstances which have lasted for three months and can
reasonably expect to last for an additional three months. Or,
3. Health coverage is available to the parent and the children are not already covered (does not
include Title XIX).
Notice will be sent to the parents that a review is being conducted. There is no time limit on how long
the reviews can take. After the review is completed, parents will get a written decision. The decision
will tell them whether CSRU will file a Petition in court or an Administrative Order to change the child
18
support amount. If a parent is not happy with the decision, they have ten days to request a review by
CSRU. After that, a final decision is made by CSRU. If changing the child support is not appropriate,
CSRU will not do anything more but parents can ask a court to review CSRU’s decision.
If, after initial or final review, adjustment is recommended, the CSRU attorney will review this
recommendation. Then that attorney will file the Petition or an Administrative Order in court. However,
if CSRU believes there is material misrepresentation of fact involved or that the reduction in income is
voluntary, no Petition or Administrative Order will be filed.
The parent can have an attorney in this proceeding. CSRU will only let people request review every two
years except in certain circumstances.
Administrative Modification
This is a second way to change child support. It is available only in special circumstances. These include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
50% change in income of either parent
A child needs to be added to the order;
The non-custodial parent is no longer a minor;
Clerical or typographic errors need to be corrected; or
The original order set support at zero or not at all.
The process is the same as in Review and Adjust but the two-year minimum does not apply.
What if the Parent Paying Support Becomes Disabled?
When a parent receives Social Security Disability benefits (or retirement), dependent children may also
receive a monthly check from the Social Security Administration. These benefits to the children can
be used to help satisfy or pay the child support. They should contact CSRU right away if they become
eligible for Social Security Disability or retirement. However, because of a change in the law, CSRU will
change or modify the order for support and will count the amount paid to the children as income to
the parent. The parent can still get credit (deduction) for the amount the children received, but the
support order must be changed to include the credit.
Suspension and Reinstatement of Support
In some cases, the people involved in a child support order experience a change in circumstances.
For example, the parents may reconcile and start living together again or the children may go to live
with the person ordered to pay child support. When things like that happen, CSRU can be required to
suspend or stop the support obligation. To do this, certain conditions must be met. These include:
1. The request to suspend the support obligation must be signed by both parents.
2. The reason for the suspension or the change in circumstances must be expected to continue
for at least six months.
3. If the request for suspension applies to at least one, but not all of the children affected by the
order, the order must contain a “step change”. This means that the order already says what
amount will be paid as the number of children entitled to support changes. (for example, $200
for 3 children; $150 for 2 and $100 for 1).
4. No prior request for suspension has been filed with the unit during the two-year period
preceding the request.
If the conditions are met, CSRU will approve the request. They will then prepare an Order for the judge to
sign suspending the support. This is a temporary order which becomes effective the date it is filed. After
six months, this temporary order becomes final by operation of law and the support obligation is ended.
19
During the six month waiting period, either person involved or CSRU can request Reinstatement of the
order. This is done by submitting a written request to CSRU. A hearing will be scheduled if any person
objects to the Reinstatement. The objections have to be filed with the clerk of court.
Sometimes support will keep adding up for a while before it can be suspended. The parent who is
owed this support can ask that this amount be “satisfied” (forgiven or considered paid) as part of the
suspension process. This means that the person previously ordered to pay support will not have to pay
this amount. People who have already gone through the suspension may need to file a Motion with
the Court to get rid of this back support. (See “Motion to Release Support Judgment” below.)
Petition to Modify Support
Child support orders can also be changed if one parent files a Petition to Modify in Court. This is like
starting a new lawsuit and a filing fee must be paid. To modify the Order there must be a substantial
and material change in circumstances. The change must also be permanent or long term. If the change
involves reduced income, the reduction must be involuntary. For example, the parent cannot quit a
good paying job just to pay less support. This process usually requires an attorney and can take several
months to finish.
Motion to Release Support Judgment
Sometimes parents start living together again or the child goes to live with the parent ordered to pay
support. The support will continue to add up unless the order is changed by the court. This can be
done through the Suspension process (explained above). However, sometimes a lot of time passes
before parents ask for the suspension. The problem of what to do about the support that adds up
during this waiting time can now be solved as part of the suspension process. This is because of a
1998 change in the law (explained above). However, if this new law did not apply or take care of the
back support it will be necessary to file a Motion. When the Motion is filed, the parent who is owed the
support signs a “release.” The release tells the court to forgive the debt of support owed to that parent.
Most of the time people need a lawyer to help file this Motion. Note: any support owed to the state
because the other parent was on FIP will not be forgiven.
What If More Than One State is Involved?
Recent changes in federal law make it mandatory that each state adopt the Uniform Interstate Family
Support Act (UIFSA). This law explains what to do in cases where the parents do not live in the same
state. The purpose of this law is to prevent several different orders for support being entered which
involve the same family. It contains rules about which state has to decide the amount of support, how
to collect support in other states and which state can modify the order. It is a very complicated law. If
your case involves more than one state, contact CSRU or a lawyer.
Where Is the Law On Child Support Found?
The area of child support law includes many different statutes in the Iowa Code: 252A, 252B, 252C,
252D, 252E, 252F, 252G, 252H, 252I, 252J, 252K, 598, and 600B. This is an area of the law that changes
often. The Code of Iowa can be found at a local library or courthouse. Recent changes in the law are
kept in special books which are usually kept with the Code itself. Talk to a librarian about using these
books, but when in doubt, see a lawyer.
You can also find the Code of Iowa on the Internet. Go to the website of the Iowa State Legislature at
http://www.legis.state.ia.us/IowaLaw.html
20
Where Can I Find Out More About the Child Support Recovery Unit (CSRU)?
The Child Support Recovery Service has a website at childsupport.dhs.state.ia.us
The website has information including:
• Support guidelines
• general information
• changing an order
• reliacard information
• forms you use
• contact information
How Do I Contact the Child Support Recovery Unit?
CSRU now has a customer service number: 1-888-229-9223. If you call the CSRU office in your area
(there are 19 different offices) you will probably be instructed to call this Customer Service number. You
can also write or visit the CSRU office in your area. If you don’t know the address, it should be on papers
you have received or through the Customer Service office.
CSRU local offices are open 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CST Monday - Friday, except state holidays. You can
also call the child support automated information line 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 1-888-229-9223
(toll free nationwide) for additional information.
Office:
Burlington Child
Support Recovery Unit
Address:
409 N. 4th St., PO Box 638
Burlington, IA 52601-0638
319-753-6322
Dubuque Child Support 960 Main St., PO Box 3068
Recovery Unit
Dubuque, IA 52004-3068
563-557-7113
Carroll Child Support
625 N. West St.; PO Box 937
Recovery Unit
Carroll, IA 51401-0937
712-792-5691
Fort Dodge Child
330 1st Ave. No
Support Recovery Unit Fort Dodge, IA 50501-3718
515-955-5464
Cedar Rapids Child
411 3rd St. S.E., Ste. 600
Support Recovery Unit Cedar Rapids, IA 52401-1842
319-362-2866
Linn County Child
411 3rd St. S.E., Ste. 200
Support Recovery Unit Cedar Rapids, IA 52401-1837
319-398-3619
Clinton Child Support
121 6th Ave. So., PO Box 1175
Recovery Unit
Clinton, IA 52733-1175
563-243-8237
Marshalltown Child
204 1/2 W. State St.
Support Recovery Unit Marshalltown, IA 50158-5842
641-753-6408
Council Bluffs Child
Support Recovery Unit
Mason City Child
Support Recovery Unit
21
300 W. Broadway, Ste. 32
Council Bluffs, IA 51503-9030
712-242-2358
Mohawk Square 22 N. Georgia Ave Ste 13
Mason City, IA 50401-3435
641-424-1147
Service Area:
Counties: Des Moines, Henry, Lee,
Louisa
Counties: Dubuque
Counties: Audubon, Carroll,
Crawford, Greene, Guthrie, Sac,
Shelby
Counties: Calhoun, Hamilton,
Humboldt, Pocahontas, Webster,
Wright
Counties: Benton, Iowa, Johnson,
Jones
Counties: Linn
Counties: Cedar, Clinton, Jackson
Counties: Grundy, Hardin, Marshall,
Poweshiek, Tama
Counties: Fremont, Harrison,
Mills, Montgomery, Page,
Pottawattamie, Taylor
Counties: Cerro Gordo, Floyd,
Franklin, Hancock, Kossuth,
Mitchell, Winnebago, Worth
Office:
Creston Child Support
Recovery Unit
Address:
215 W. Adams
Creston, IA 50801-3106
641-782-5844
Ottumwa Child Support 127 E. Main, Ste. 100
Recovery Unit
Ottumwa, IA 52501-2951
641-682-8802
Davenport Child
Support Recovery Unit
Service Area:
Establishment Counties: Adair,
Adams, Boone, Cass, Clarke, Dallas,
Decatur, Jasper, Marion, Madison,
Polk, Ringgold, Story, Union,
Warren
Counties: Appanoose, Davis,
Jefferson, Keokuk, Lucas, Mahaska,
Monroe, Van Buren, Wapello,
Washington, Wayne
Counties: Muscatine, Scott
3911 W. Locust, PO Box 4226
Davenport, IA 52808-4226
563-388-0409
Sioux City Child
520 Nebraska St., Ste. 218
Counties: Buena Vista, Cherokee,
Support Recovery Unit Sioux City, IA 51101-1315
Ida, Monona, Plymouth, Woodbury
712-255-2749
Decorah Child Support 317 Washington St., Ste. 2
Counties: Allamakee, Chickasaw,
Recovery Unit
Decorah, IA 52101-1832
Clayton, Fayette, Howard,
563-382-2666
Winneshiek
Spencer Child Support t20 W. 6th St., Ste. 200
Counties: Clay, Dickinson, Emmet,
Recovery Unit
Spencer, IA 51301-3907
Lyon, O’Brien, Osceola, Palo Alto,
712-262-1412
Sioux
Child Support Recovery Mailing Address for all Des Moines area offices:
Unit - Des Moines Area CSRU, PO Box 9135, Des Moines, IA 50306-9135
-Ankeny 1605 SE Delaware, Suite A,
Enforcement Payor O - S for
Ankeny, IA
Counties: Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke,
Decatur, Polk, Ringgold, Union
515-369-2800
Grimes 3560 SW Brookside Dr., Ste. E,
Enforcement Payor W - Z for Counties:
Grimes, IA
Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke, Decatur, Polk,
515-369-2850
Ringgold, Union
Enforcement Payor A - Z for Counties:
Boone, Dallas, Story
Pleasant Hill Indianola -
South Des Moines North Des Moines -
1300 Metro East Dr., Suite 112-114,
Pleasant Hill, IA
515-261-5870
1807 West 2nd Ave (Hwy 92 W),
Indianola, IA
515-962-5400
525 SW 5th Street, Suite H,
Des Moines, IA
515-369-2860
6200 Aurora Ave., Suite 301 East,
Urbandale, IA
515-369-2750
Enforcement Payor A - C for
Counties: Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke,
Decatur, Polk, Ringgold, Union
Enforcement Payor T - V for Counties:
Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke, Decatur,
Polk, Ringgold, Union
Enforcement Payor A - Z for Counties:
Jasper, Madison, Marion, Warren
Enforcement Payor J - N for Counties:
Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke, Decatur,
Polk, Ringgold, Union
Enforcement Payor D - I for Counties:
Adair, Adams, Cass, Clarke, Decatur,
Polk, Ringgold, Union
Obligation to Provide Information
Both parties must report certain information to keep their records current. Changes in address, driver’s
license number, employer, etc. must be reported. A sample form used by the Clerks of Court is included
on pages 27 and 28 in the back of this book. If a parent does not provide this information, he or she
may not be notified in the future if something happens in his or her case.
22
GLOSSARY OF CHILD SUPPORT AND PATERNITY TERMS
Arrears: The amount of child support that is past due or unpaid. Arrears can be set as of the date the
child support order is first entered. This is usually the case when CSRU is getting the order and the child
has been receiving welfare benefits from the State. CSRU rules say that they will calculate arrears based
on the current amount of support ordered multiplied by the number of months (up to a maximum of
36) the child has been receiving benefits. It is not unusual to have a current obligation to pay plus an
arrears totaling several thousand dollars. Payments must be made on both amounts.
Assignment: The State (DHS) gets the right to collect money owed to a parent. When a parent
receives FIP or Medicaid (Title XIX) on behalf of a child, the law requires that they assign or give their
right to receive child support to the State. The assignment is automatic, meaning it just happens
without the parent having to do much except receive the benefits. This is why child support paid will
often go to the State instead of directly to the other parent. The child support is paid to reimburse the
State for benefits paid out by FIP on behalf of the child.
An assignment also happens if a child under a child support order goes into foster care. This is an
automatic assignment of the child’s share of the order. For example, if there are three children under
the order, one-third of the support order will belong to each child. If the order requires the parent to
pay $300 per month and one of the children goes into foster care, $100 will be considered assigned to
the state. The $100 will automatically be taken from the support paid and the remaining $200 will be
sent to the other parent.
Child Support: The amount of money the court requires a noncustodial parent (the one who does
not have physical care of the child) to pay towards the cost of raising a child. The amount is based on
both parents’ income and set according to strict Guidelines.
Child Support Recovery Unit: An office of the Department of Human Services. Their job is to
obtain support orders and collect child support payments. They also locate parents and establish
paternity.
Collection Services Center: A centralized distribution center where most child support payments
are sent and then given out (distributed) to the appropriate person (parent or state). If payments are
not sent through CSC, they will probably not be counted as being paid. The CSC replaces, for the most
part, the clerks of court as a collector of child support.
Deviating from the Guidelines: The mandatory child support Guidelines will always require a
certain amount of support. The law presumes (or assumes) this amount is fair to both parents--enough
for the child while leaving enough for the other parent to live on. Sometimes parents disagree with the
amount and want the court to “deviate” or set a different amount of support. The court can do this only
under special circumstances. It is usually quite difficult to convince a court to deviate.
Disestablishment: This means a court order declaring that a man previously believed to be the
established father is not the biological father. He will then no longer have to pay child support. Certain
court procedures must be followed in order to obtain such an order.
Genetic Testing: Medical analysis of blood or body tissue (such as saliva cells) to determine if a man
is the biological father of a child. The mother, alleged father and the child give a blood or tissue sample.
A laboratory then compares genetic “markers” to find out what the probability is that the man is the
father. The results are stated in terms of a percentage (91.2 percent or 98.99 percent for example). If the
percentage is 95 percent or higher, the law assumes the man is the father. Genetic tests are considered
very accurate by scientists and the court.
Guidelines: A set of rules and charts that must be used to set the amount of child support. They are
written by the Iowa Supreme Court and are designed to make support orders “uniform” or fair for all
parents based on their income. The Guidelines work by taking the net monthly income of both parents
and placing those figures on a certain chart depending on the number of children involved. The chart
will state what percentage, such as 25 percent or 22.2 percent (of the noncustodial parent’s income) is
to be paid out in child support.
23
Income: For purposes of calculating child support, there are two basic types of income to be
aware of: gross and net. Gross income is the total amount a person earns or receives. The income
does not have to be taxable to be counted. Income includes such things as Social Security benefits,
unemployment benefits, workers compensation benefits, wages, salary, commission and VA benefits.
Some types of income, however, are not counted--such as FIP benefits and SSI. Net income is the
amount you have after taking certain deductions from gross income such as taxes, Social Security,
medical insurance premiums, other child support payments and child care costs. Net income is used
when calculating the amount of support under the Guidelines.
If the correct income of a parent is not known, the law allows the court and CSRU to impute income, or
assume the person is making a certain amount of money.
Income Withholding: This is the most common way to collect support. It involves a court order
being sent to an employer requiring them to take a certain amount of money out of the parent’s
paycheck each pay period. If the parent is behind in their support payments, this amount will include
the amount due each month (current support) plus an amount to be paid on the back support
(arrears).
A parent can challenge the amount being taken, but the reasons to lower it are fairly limited under the law.
Medical Support: The purchase of health insurance or a health benefit plan to meet the needs of
a child (and sometimes a custodial parent). It can also be a cash payment to the noncustodial parent
instead of buying the insurance. It is separate from child support and usually obtained through an
employer.
Obligee: Person legally entitled to receive a support payment on behalf of a child. Often the obligee
is the custodial parent. The obligee is also known as the payee.
Obligor: Person legally responsible for support. This is usually the noncustodial parent and is also
known as the payor.
Parental Liability: Child support assessed against a parent when their child goes into foster
care. The law says a parent must contribute something to the cost of the foster care placement. The
Guidelines are used to determine what this amount will be.
Paternity: The legal conclusion that a man is the biological or natural father of a child. Paternity can
be established a number of different ways: the parents can agree he is the father by signing a paternity
affidavit; the court can order it based on genetic test results or because a man does not deny he is the
father. Also, when the parents are married at the time the child is conceived or born, the husband will
be considered the legal father of the child.
Post-Secondary Education Subsidy: An amount either parent in a divorce may be required to
pay for education expenses of a child past high school. The child must be between the ages of 18 and
22 and be regularly attending an approved school or vocational program. The amount cannot exceed
one-third of the total cost of the education expenses. It is paid to either the child and/or the school; not
the custodial parent.
Putative Father: The man who is believed to be the biological or natural father of a child but is not
yet declared the legal father. A putative father is also called an “alleged father.”
Review and Adjust: A way to change (modify) a child support order through the Child Support
Recovery Unit. If certain criteria are met, the amount of support can be increased or decreased. Medical
support can also be added to the support order in this way.
Specialized Customer Service Unit (SCSU): A special office, located in Des Moines, to handle
questions and complaints from those paying and receiving support. The Unit’s phone number is 1-888229-9223. It is no longer possible to call the local CSRU offices. It is necessary to call the SCSU first.
Suspension: A service provided by CSRU to stop the support order due to an agreement between
the obligor and obligee. Frequently, it is because a child moved and is now living with the parent who
is currently paying support. During the first six months, the order is suspended. This means the support
does not add up. If the change in circumstances continues for six months, the order is stopped.
24
25
26
27
28
IOWA SCHEDULE OF BASIC SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS
Child Support Guidelines
1. Except as provided in 2, only the noncustodial parent’s income is used in the shaded
area in accordance with the low-income adjustment. The parents’ combined incomes
are used in the remaining (non-shaded) area of the schedule.
2. In joint (equally shared) physical care cases, regardless whether a parent is low
income, use the parents’ combined incomes in the shaded and non-shaded areas of
the schedule.
3. For combined net monthly incomes above $20,000, the amount of the basic support
obligation is deemed to be within the sound discretion of the court or the agency
fixing support by administrative order but shall not be less than the basic support
obligation for combined net monthly incomes equal to $20,000.
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
0
101
201
301
401
501
601
701
801
851
901
951
1001
1051
1101
1151
1201
1251
1301
1351
1401
1451
1501
1551
1601
1651
1701
29
-
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
850
900
950
1000
1050
1100
1150
1200
1250
1300
1350
1400
1450
1500
1550
1600
1650
1700
1750
One
Child
Two
Children
Three
Children
Four
Children
Five or More
Children
10
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
85
90
95
120
145
170
195
220
245
270
295
320
345
370
395
406
418
430
20
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
95
100
105
135
165
195
225
255
285
315
345
375
405
435
465
495
525
555
30
30
30
40
50
70
80
90
100
105
110
120
153
185
218
250
283
315
348
380
413
445
478
510
543
575
608
35
35
45
55
65
75
85
95
105
110
115
130
163
195
228
260
293
325
358
390
423
455
488
520
553
585
618
40
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
115
120
145
178
210
243
275
308
340
373
405
438
470
503
535
568
600
633
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
1751 - 1800
1801 - 1850
1851 - 1900
1901 - 1950
1951 - 2000
2001 - 2050
2051 - 2100
2101 - 2150
2151 - 2200
2201 - 2250
2251 - 2300
2301 - 2350
2351 - 2400
2401 - 2450
2451 - 2500
2501 - 2550
2551 - 2600
2601 - 2650
2651 - 2700
2701 - 2750
2751 - 2800
2801 - 2850
2851 - 2900
2901 - 2950
2951 - 3000
3001 - 3050
3051 - 3100
3101 - 3150
3151 - 3200
3201 - 3250
3251 - 3300
3301 - 3350
3351 - 3400
3401 - 3450
3451 - 3500
3501 - 3550
3551 - 3600
3601 - 3650
3651 - 3700
3701 - 3750
3751 - 3800
30
One
Child
442
454
466
478
490
502
514
526
538
550
562
574
586
598
610
622
634
647
659
671
683
695
707
717
726
736
745
754
764
773
782
792
798
803
809
815
820
826
832
837
843
Two
Children
585
615
645
675
705
727
744
761
778
795
813
831
848
866
883
901
919
936
954
971
989
1007
1024
1038
1051
1064
1076
1089
1102
1115
1127
1140
1149
1157
1166
1174
1183
1191
1200
1208
1216
Three
Children
640
673
705
738
770
803
835
868
900
933
957
978
999
1020
1041
1061
1082
1103
1124
1145
1166
1186
1207
1223
1237
1251
1265
1279
1294
1308
1322
1336
1347
1357
1367
1377
1387
1397
1408
1418
1428
Four
Children
650
683
715
748
780
813
845
878
910
943
975
1000
1021
1043
1064
1086
1107
1129
1150
1172
1193
1215
1236
1258
1279
1301
1322
1344
1365
1387
1408
1430
1451
1473
1494
1516
1537
1559
1572
1584
1595
Five or More
Children
665
698
730
763
795
828
860
893
925
958
990
1023
1045
1067
1089
1111
1133
1155
1177
1199
1221
1243
1265
1287
1309
1331
1353
1375
1397
1419
1441
1463
1485
1507
1529
1551
1573
1595
1617
1639
1661
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
3801 - 3850
3851 - 3900
3901 - 3950
3951 - 4000
4001 - 4050
4051 - 4100
4101 - 4150
4151 - 4200
4201 - 4250
4251 - 4300
4301 - 4350
4351 - 4400
4401 - 4450
4451 - 4500
4501 - 4550
4551 - 4600
4601 - 4650
4651 - 4700
4701 - 4750
4751 - 4800
4801 - 4850
4851 - 4900
4901 - 4950
4951 - 5000
5001 - 5050
5051 - 5100
5101 - 5150
5151 - 5200
5201 - 5250
5251 - 5300
5301 - 5350
5351 - 5400
5401 - 5450
5451 - 5500
5501 - 5550
5551 - 5600
5601 - 5650
5651 - 5700
5701 - 5750
5751 - 5800
5801 - 5850
31
One
Child
849
855
861
867
874
880
886
892
898
902
905
909
912
916
919
923
926
930
935
939
944
948
953
958
962
967
971
976
981
985
990
995
1000
1006
1011
1016
1022
1027
1032
1038
1043
Two
Children
1225
1233
1242
1250
1259
1267
1276
1284
1292
1297
1301
1305
1310
1314
1318
1323
1327
1332
1338
1344
1351
1357
1364
1370
1376
1383
1389
1395
1402
1408
1415
1422
1429
1436
1444
1451
1458
1465
1473
1480
1487
Three
Children
1438
1447
1457
1466
1476
1486
1495
1505
1514
1518
1522
1526
1530
1534
1538
1542
1546
1551
1558
1565
1573
1580
1587
1594
1602
1609
1616
1623
1631
1638
1645
1653
1661
1669
1678
1686
1694
1702
1710
1718
1726
Four
Children
1606
1616
1627
1638
1649
1659
1670
1681
1691
1695
1700
1704
1709
1714
1718
1723
1727
1732
1740
1749
1757
1765
1773
1781
1789
1797
1805
1813
1822
1830
1838
1847
1856
1865
1874
1883
1892
1901
1910
1919
1928
Five or More
Children
1683
1705
1727
1749
1771
1793
1815
1837
1859
1865
1870
1875
1880
1885
1890
1895
1900
1906
1914
1923
1932
1941
1950
1959
1968
1977
1986
1995
2004
2013
2022
2031
2041
2051
2061
2071
2081
2091
2101
2111
2121
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
5851 - 5900
5901 - 5950
5951 - 6000
6001 - 6050
6051 - 6100
6101 - 6150
6151 - 6200
6201 - 6250
6251 - 6300
6301 - 6350
6351 - 6400
6401 - 6450
6451 - 6500
6501 - 6550
6551 - 6600
6601 - 6650
6651 - 6700
6701 - 6750
6751 - 6800
6801 - 6850
6851 - 6900
6901 - 6950
6951 - 7000
7001 - 7050
7051 - 7100
7101 - 7150
7151 - 7200
7201 - 7250
7251 - 7300
7301 - 7350
7351 - 7400
7401 - 7450
7451 - 7500
7501 - 7550
7551 - 7600
7601 - 7650
7651 - 7700
7701 - 7750
7751 - 7800
7801 - 7850
7851 - 7900
32
One
Child
1048
1054
1059
1064
1069
1074
1079
1084
1090
1095
1100
1105
1110
1115
1120
1125
1130
1135
1140
1145
1150
1155
1160
1166
1171
1176
1181
1186
1191
1196
1201
1206
1211
1216
1221
1226
1231
1236
1241
1246
1251
Two
Children
1495
1502
1509
1516
1524
1531
1538
1545
1553
1560
1567
1574
1582
1589
1596
1603
1611
1618
1625
1631
1638
1645
1652
1659
1666
1673
1680
1687
1694
1701
1708
1715
1721
1728
1736
1743
1750
1758
1765
1772
1780
Three
Children
1734
1742
1750
1759
1767
1776
1784
1793
1801
1809
1818
1826
1835
1843
1852
1860
1868
1876
1884
1892
1900
1907
1915
1923
1931
1938
1946
1954
1962
1969
1977
1985
1993
2000
2009
2017
2026
2035
2044
2052
2061
Four
Children
1937
1946
1955
1964
1974
1983
1993
2002
2012
2021
2031
2040
2049
2059
2068
2078
2087
2096
2104
2113
2122
2130
2139
2148
2156
2165
2174
2182
2191
2200
2208
2217
2226
2234
2244
2253
2263
2273
2283
2293
2302
Five or More
Children
2131
2141
2151
2161
2171
2182
2192
2202
2213
2223
2234
2244
2254
2265
2275
2286
2296
2305
2315
2324
2334
2343
2353
2363
2372
2382
2391
2401
2410
2420
2429
2439
2448
2458
2468
2479
2490
2500
2511
2522
2533
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
7901 - 7950
7951 - 8000
8001 - 8050
8051 - 8100
8101 - 8150
8151 - 8200
8201 - 8250
8251 - 8300
8301 - 8350
8351 - 8400
8401 - 8450
8451 - 8500
8501 - 8550
8551 - 8600
8601 - 8650
8651 - 8700
8701 - 8750
8751 - 8800
8801 - 8850
8851 - 8900
8901 - 8950
8951 - 9000
9001 - 9050
9051 - 9100
9101 - 9150
9151 - 9200
9201 - 9250
9251 - 9300
9301 - 9350
9351 - 9400
9401 - 9450
9451 - 9500
9501 - 9550
9551 - 9600
9601 - 9650
9651 - 9700
9701 - 9750
9751 - 9800
9801 - 9850
9851 - 9900
9901 - 9950
33
One
Child
1256
1262
1267
1272
1277
1282
1287
1292
1297
1302
1307
1311
1313
1316
1318
1321
1324
1326
1329
1331
1334
1337
1339
1342
1344
1347
1349
1352
1355
1359
1363
1367
1372
1376
1380
1385
1389
1393
1397
1402
1406
Two
Children
1787
1795
1802
1809
1817
1824
1832
1839
1846
1854
1861
1866
1870
1873
1877
1880
1884
1888
1891
1895
1898
1902
1906
1909
1913
1916
1920
1923
1927
1933
1938
1944
1950
1956
1962
1968
1973
1979
1985
1991
1997
Three
Children
2070
2079
2087
2096
2105
2114
2122
2131
2140
2149
2158
2163
2167
2171
2175
2179
2183
2187
2191
2195
2199
2203
2207
2211
2215
2219
2223
2227
2231
2238
2244
2251
2257
2263
2270
2276
2283
2289
2296
2302
2309
Four
Children
2312
2322
2332
2341
2351
2361
2371
2381
2390
2400
2410
2416
2421
2425
2430
2434
2439
2443
2448
2452
2457
2461
2466
2470
2475
2479
2484
2488
2493
2499
2507
2514
2521
2528
2535
2543
2550
2557
2564
2571
2579
Five or More
Children
2543
2554
2565
2576
2586
2597
2608
2619
2629
2640
2651
2658
2663
2668
2673
2678
2682
2687
2692
2697
2702
2707
2712
2717
2722
2727
2732
2737
2742
2749
2757
2765
2773
2781
2789
2797
2805
2813
2821
2829
2836
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
9951 - 10000
10001 - 10050
10051 - 10100
10101 - 10150
10151 - 10200
10201 - 10250
10251 - 10300
10301 - 10350
10351 - 10400
10401 - 10450
10451 - 10500
10501 - 10550
10551 - 10600
10601 - 10650
10651 - 10700
10701 - 10750
10751 - 10800
10801 - 10850
10851 - 10900
10901 - 10950
10951 - 11000
11001 - 11050
11051 - 11100
11101 - 11150
11151 - 11200
11201 - 11250
11251 - 11300
11301 - 11350
11351 - 11400
11401 - 11450
11451 - 11500
11501 - 11550
11551 - 11600
11601 - 11650
11651 - 11700
11701 - 11750
11751 - 11800
11801 - 11850
11851 - 11900
11901 - 11950
11951 - 12000
34
One
Child
1410
1415
1419
1423
1428
1432
1436
1440
1445
1449
1454
1458
1463
1468
1473
1477
1482
1487
1492
1496
1501
1506
1511
1515
1520
1525
1530
1534
1539
1544
1549
1553
1558
1563
1568
1572
1577
1582
1587
1591
1596
Two
Children
2002
2008
2014
2020
2026
2031
2037
2043
2049
2055
2061
2068
2075
2081
2088
2095
2102
2108
2115
2122
2129
2135
2142
2149
2156
2162
2169
2176
2183
2189
2196
2203
2210
2216
2223
2230
2237
2243
2250
2257
2264
Three
Children
2315
2321
2328
2334
2341
2347
2354
2360
2366
2373
2380
2388
2396
2404
2412
2419
2427
2435
2443
2451
2458
2466
2474
2482
2490
2497
2505
2513
2521
2529
2536
2544
2552
2560
2568
2575
2583
2591
2599
2607
2614
Four
Children
2586
2593
2600
2607
2615
2622
2629
2636
2643
2651
2659
2668
2676
2685
2694
2702
2711
2720
2729
2737
2746
2755
2763
2772
2781
2790
2798
2807
2816
2824
2833
2842
2851
2859
2868
2877
2885
2894
2903
2912
2920
Five or More
Children
2844
2852
2860
2868
2876
2884
2892
2900
2908
2916
2925
2934
2944
2953
2963
2973
2982
2992
3001
3011
3021
3030
3040
3049
3059
3069
3078
3088
3097
3107
3116
3126
3136
3145
3155
3164
3174
3184
3193
3203
3212
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
12001 - 12050
12051 - 12100
12101 - 12150
12151 - 12200
12201 - 12250
12251 - 12300
12301 - 12350
12351 - 12400
12401 - 12450
12451 - 12500
12501 - 12550
12551 - 12600
12601 - 12650
12651 - 12700
12701 - 12750
12751 - 12800
12801 - 12850
12851 - 12900
12901 - 12950
12951 - 13000
13001 - 13050
13051 - 13100
13101 - 13150
13151 - 13200
13201 - 13250
13251 - 13300
13301 - 13350
13351 - 13400
13401 - 13450
13451 - 13500
13501 - 13550
13551 - 13600
13601 - 13650
13651 - 13700
13701 - 13750
13751 - 13800
13801 - 13850
13851 - 13900
13901 - 13950
13951 - 14000
14001 - 14050
35
One
Child
1601
1606
1610
1615
1620
1623
1627
1630
1634
1637
1641
1644
1648
1652
1655
1659
1662
1666
1669
1673
1676
1680
1683
1687
1691
1694
1698
1701
1705
1708
1712
1715
1719
1723
1726
1730
1733
1737
1740
1744
1747
Two
Children
2270
2277
2284
2291
2297
2302
2307
2312
2317
2322
2326
2331
2336
2341
2346
2351
2356
2361
2366
2371
2376
2380
2385
2390
2395
2400
2405
2410
2415
2420
2425
2429
2434
2439
2444
2449
2454
2459
2464
2469
2474
Three
Children
2622
2630
2638
2646
2653
2659
2664
2670
2675
2681
2686
2692
2697
2703
2708
2714
2719
2725
2730
2736
2741
2747
2752
2758
2763
2769
2774
2780
2785
2791
2796
2802
2807
2813
2818
2824
2830
2835
2841
2846
2852
Four
Children
2929
2938
2947
2955
2964
2970
2976
2982
2988
2994
3000
3007
3013
3019
3025
3031
3037
3044
3050
3056
3062
3068
3074
3081
3087
3093
3099
3105
3111
3117
3124
3130
3136
3142
3148
3154
3161
3167
3173
3179
3185
Five or More
Children
3222
3232
3241
3251
3260
3267
3273
3280
3287
3294
3301
3307
3314
3321
3328
3334
3341
3348
3355
3361
3368
3375
3382
3389
3395
3402
3409
3416
3422
3429
3436
3443
3450
3456
3463
3470
3477
3483
3490
3497
3504
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
14051 - 14100
14101 - 14150
14151 - 14200
14201 - 14250
14251 - 14300
14301 - 14350
14351 - 14400
14401 - 14450
14451 - 14500
14501 - 14550
14551 - 14600
14601 - 14650
14651 - 14700
14701 - 14750
14751 - 14800
14801 - 14850
14851 - 14900
14901 - 14950
14951 - 15000
15001 - 15050
15051 - 15100
15101 - 15150
15151 - 15200
15201 - 15250
15251 - 15300
15301 - 15350
15351 - 15400
15401 - 15450
15451 - 15500
15501 - 15550
15551 - 15600
15601 - 15650
15651 - 15700
15701 - 15750
15751 - 15800
15801 - 15850
15851 - 15900
15901 - 15950
15951 - 16000
16001 - 16050
16051 - 16100
36
One
Child
1751
1755
1758
1762
1765
1769
1772
1776
1779
1783
1786
1790
1794
1797
1801
1804
1808
1811
1815
1818
1822
1826
1829
1833
1836
1840
1843
1847
1850
1854
1858
1861
1865
1868
1872
1875
1879
1882
1886
1889
1893
Two
Children
2479
2483
2488
2493
2498
2503
2508
2513
2518
2523
2528
2532
2537
2542
2547
2552
2557
2562
2567
2572
2577
2582
2586
2591
2596
2601
2606
2611
2616
2621
2626
2631
2635
2640
2645
2650
2655
2660
2665
2670
2675
Three
Children
2857
2863
2868
2874
2879
2885
2890
2896
2901
2907
2912
2918
2923
2929
2934
2940
2945
2951
2956
2962
2967
2973
2978
2984
2989
2995
3000
3006
3011
3017
3022
3028
3033
3039
3044
3050
3056
3061
3067
3072
3078
Four
Children
3191
3198
3204
3210
3216
3222
3228
3234
3241
3247
3253
3259
3265
3271
3278
3284
3290
3296
3302
3308
3315
3321
3327
3333
3339
3345
3351
3358
3364
3370
3376
3382
3388
3395
3401
3407
3413
3419
3425
3431
3438
Five or More
Children
3510
3517
3524
3531
3538
3544
3551
3558
3565
3571
3578
3585
3592
3599
3605
3612
3619
3626
3632
3639
3646
3653
3659
3666
3673
3680
3687
3693
3700
3707
3714
3720
3727
3734
3741
3748
3754
3761
3768
3775
3781
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
16101 - 16150
16151 - 16200
16201 - 16250
16251 - 16300
16301 - 16350
16351 - 16400
16401 - 16450
16451 - 16500
16501 - 16550
16551 - 16600
16601 - 16650
16651 - 16700
16701 - 16750
16751 - 16800
16801 - 16850
16851 - 16900
16901 - 16950
16951 - 17000
17001 - 17050
17051 - 17100
17101 - 17150
17151 - 17200
17201 - 17250
17251 - 17300
17301 - 17350
17351 - 17400
17401 - 17450
17451 - 17500
17501 - 17550
17551 - 17600
17601 - 17650
17651 - 17700
17701 - 17750
17751 - 17800
17801 - 17850
17851 - 17900
17901 - 17950
17951 - 18000
18001 - 18050
18051 - 18100
18101 - 18150
37
One
Child
1897
1900
1904
1907
1911
1914
1918
1921
1925
1929
1932
1936
1939
1943
1946
1950
1953
1957
1961
1964
1968
1971
1975
1978
1982
1985
1989
1992
1996
2000
2003
2007
2010
2014
2017
2021
2024
2028
2032
2035
2039
Two
Children
2680
2684
2689
2694
2699
2704
2709
2714
2719
2724
2729
2734
2738
2743
2748
2753
2758
2763
2768
2773
2778
2783
2787
2792
2797
2802
2807
2812
2817
2822
2827
2832
2837
2841
2846
2851
2856
2861
2866
2871
2876
Three
Children
3083
3089
3094
3100
3105
3111
3116
3122
3127
3133
3138
3144
3149
3155
3160
3166
3171
3177
3182
3188
3193
3199
3204
3210
3215
3221
3226
3232
3237
3243
3248
3254
3259
3265
3270
3276
3282
3287
3293
3298
3304
Four
Children
3444
3450
3456
3462
3468
3475
3481
3487
3493
3499
3505
3512
3518
3524
3530
3536
3542
3548
3555
3561
3567
3573
3579
3585
3592
3598
3604
3610
3616
3622
3629
3635
3641
3647
3653
3659
3665
3672
3678
3684
3690
Five or More
Children
3788
3795
3802
3808
3815
3822
3829
3836
3842
3849
3856
3863
3869
3876
3883
3890
3897
3903
3910
3917
3924
3930
3937
3944
3951
3957
3964
3971
3978
3985
3991
3998
4005
4012
4018
4025
4032
4039
4046
4052
4059
Combined* Adjusted
Net Income
18151 - 18200
18201 - 18250
18251 - 18300
18301 - 18350
18351 - 18400
18401 - 18450
18451 - 18500
18501 - 18550
18551 - 18600
18601 - 18650
18651 - 18700
18701 - 18750
18751 - 18800
18801 - 18850
18851 - 18900
18901 - 18950
18951 - 19000
19001 - 19050
19051 - 19100
19101 - 19150
19151 - 19200
19201 - 19250
19251 - 19300
19301 - 19350
19351 - 19400
19401 - 19450
19451 - 19500
19501 - 19550
19551 - 19600
19601 - 19650
19651 - 19700
19701 - 19750
19751 - 19800
19801 - 19850
19851 - 19900
19901 - 19950
19951 - 20000
38
One
Child
2042
2046
2049
2053
2056
2060
2063
2067
2071
2074
2078
2081
2085
2088
2092
2095
2099
2103
2106
2110
2113
2117
2120
2124
2127
2131
2135
2138
2142
2145
2149
2152
2156
2159
2164
2169
2174
Two
Children
2881
2886
2890
2895
2900
2905
2910
2915
2920
2925
2930
2935
2939
2944
2949
2954
2959
2964
2969
2974
2979
2984
2989
2993
2998
3003
3008
3013
3018
3023
3028
3033
3038
3042
3048
3056
3064
Three
Children
3309
3315
3320
3326
3331
3337
3342
3348
3353
3359
3364
3370
3375
3381
3386
3392
3397
3403
3408
3414
3419
3425
3430
3436
3441
3447
3452
3458
3463
3469
3474
3480
3485
3491
3498
3506
3515
Four
Children
3696
3702
3709
3715
3721
3727
3733
3739
3745
3752
3758
3764
3770
3776
3782
3789
3795
3801
3807
3813
3819
3826
3832
3838
3844
3850
3856
3862
3869
3875
3881
3887
3893
3899
3907
3917
3927
Five or More
Children
4066
4073
4079
4086
4093
4100
4106
4113
4120
4127
4134
4140
4147
4154
4161
4167
4174
4181
4188
4195
4201
4208
4215
4222
4228
4235
4242
4249
4255
4262
4269
4276
4283
4289
4298
4308
4319
Printed May 2011
by
IOWA LEGAL AID
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©2011 Iowa Legal Aid
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