UU THE N SLETTER

THE NUUSLETTER
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CHURCH OF CHATTANOOGA
3224 NAVAJO DRIVE CHATTANOOGA, TN 37411 423-624-2985 FAX 423-624-0519
0CT0BER, 2014
A LIBERAL RELIGIOUS COMMUNITY
WWW.UUCC.ORG
MINISTER’S MUSINGS
Developmental
Minister
Rev. Cathy
Harrington
In the brief time that I have been serving this church, I have been welcomed with many
gifts—gifts of nourishment, encouragement, support, furniture, a dryer, bookcases,
and so much more. In 21 days, I have attended umpteen meetings, encountered a
congregation filled with devoted members who are stewards of this church and of our
larger faith. There is a great poem about these kinds of people. It’s called “Long Haul
People.”
You find them in churches
when you’re lucky;
other places too, though I mostly
only know ecclesiastical varieties.
Board President
Leslie Brock
Long haul people
upon whose shoulders
(and pocketbooks and casseroles
and daylight/nighttime hours)
a church is built and—more importantly—
maintained
after the brass is tarnished and
cushions need re-stitching.
Religious
Education
Director
Kay McCurdy
Church
Administrator
Chris Tregaskis
the nUUsletter
Editor
Wendy Sapp
For long haul people bless a church
with a very special blessing.
~Rudy Nemser
UUCC is blessed by “long-haul people” I am very optimistic for our future work
together. If you haven’t read the article in the new UU World magazine about
developmental ministry, please do so. If you don’t have a hard copy, it can be found
online or contact me and I’ll share a copy with you. If you’ve been wondering about
Developmental Ministry and what is possible, this article will answer those questions.
During a finance workshop, the Reverend Terry Sweetzer shared this wonderful story:
A person went to Henry Ward Beecher and said, “Mr. Beecher, I have a good
horse to sell. He’s a good family horse, works double or alone, is gentle,
intelligent, not easily frightened, will stand without hitching and is thoroughly
sound and reliable.” Mr. Beecher replied, “I can’t buy your horse, sir, but I’d like to have it as a
member of my church.””
See you in church!
In faith,
Cathy
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
SERVICE TITLES & DESCRIPTIONS ~ OCTOBER, 2014
Connections, a time for personal sharing, meets every Sunday at 10:45.The worship service begins at 11:00 am.
October 5 ~ Holy Heresy by Reverend Cathy Harrington
The place where we meet to seek the highest is holy ground. ~ Felix Adler
The Rochester UU Church describes itself on their website as “A place of healing, hope, and occasional heresy.”
Heresy is derived from the Latin word, haeresis which means “to choose.” Ours is a “chosen faith.” Heresy is often
necessary in the cultivation of hope and healing.
October 12 ~ Difficult Conversations: Religion, Abortion, and Justice by Katie Garcia, MSW
Katie Garcia, MSW, of Healthy and Free Tennessee will discuss how to have difficult conversations about religion,
abortion, sexuality and justice. Steve Hollingsworth and Anne Johnson will be service leaders.
October 19 ~ Start With the Heart by Reverend Cathy Harrington
In the peace process the negotiator must help the parties define the problem so that they both recognize a dream
or interest in common. Negotiation has been describes as “a shared effort to solve a problem," or in other words,
common ground. One small success can pave the way for future negotiations making a peaceful solution possible
where it once seemed impossible.
October 26 ~ Walking Together by Reverend Cathy Harrington
To the prophet Amos’ question: Can two walk together except they be agreed? The liberals reply: Yes, they can
walk together despite disagreements. [But I caution that they cannot walk together] unless they can agree on some
basic attitudes and values that they are freed to tolerate much diversity in other matters. (from Walking Together,
by Conrad Wright)
FIRST HOUR
Two first hour options are offered each Sunday 9:30-10:30 downstairs.
Date
October 5
Forum Room
Sofia Fahs Room
Forum: Cashflow Projection Algorithms: UUCC Pagan Group
member, John Beck, will lead the forum through the
logical process that has to be contained in any
computer program in order for the computer to carry
out the task.
October 12
October 19
October 26
Forum: What is Amendment 1 and What Does It Meditation
Mean? Led by Local activists Katy Garcia of Healthy
& Free Tennessee, Lauren Kramer of Choice
Chattanooga & Danielle Walker, of Vote No on 1 TN
Forum: Topic to be announced
Common Read: Reclaiming Prophetic
Witness: Liberal Religion in the Public
Square, by Paul Rasor (7 books
available)
Forum: Topic to be announced
Poetry Circle led by Nancy Beel. See
page 10 for more information.
Page 2 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
UUCC will be hosting an Arts & Crafts Fair on Saturday, October 11, from 9 am to 5 pm in the Sanctuary! There
will be live music, lunch (soup, bread, and desserts) for purchase, door prize giveaways, and lots of beautiful
handmade items, such as: notecards, jams & jellies, jewelry, walking sticks, aprons, soap, lip balms, face creams,
handbags, baby sweaters, little girl aprons and dresses, and Waldorf dolls. Plan to do your Holiday shopping at
Church this year! We need volunteers to bake desserts and make soups, to sell lunches and desserts, and for help
with cleanup. All volunteers will enjoy a free lunch! Please contact Leslie Brock ([email protected]) or
Nancy Beel ([email protected]) if you are interested in volunteering, or if you simply have questions.
WUTC
By the time this is published, most of us WUTC listeners have heard "Funding comes from the Unitarian Universalist
Church of Chattanooga" opening words several times and hasn't it been exciting to hear? We've introduced our
new minister Cathy Harrington, spoken up for our Small Group Ministry program, and promoted our upcoming crafts
fair. However, around the beginning of October WUTC's appeal for individual pledges will begin in earnest. Please
stop and think about how the UUCC promos have been made possible! It's only because many of us have funneled
our WUTC support through UUCC and our name will stay on the air only with our ongoing support.
We are getting feedback that these spots on WUTC are working. People are coming in our doors because our
announcements are on WUTC. Let's not stop now!
So follow these simple steps: If you normally (or realize that you listen often and really ought to) support WUTC
public radio, write your check to UUCC with WUTC in the memo line. WUTC gets the money; UUCC gets
underwriting announcements! There are also options to make monthly donations. Contact Chris in the UUCC office
or call Steve Hollingsworth at (423) 240-3619.
Page 3 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
PRESIDENT’S LETTER
by Leslie Brock, President, Board of Trustees
Deciding what to write about each month is a bit more difficult than I originally thought it would be. I usually don’t
have any problem finding things to talk about, as many of you already know.
There is a whirlwind of activity surrounding the arrival of our developmental minister, Reverend Cathy Harrington.
Reverend Cathy jumped in even before her first sermon with her attendance at the Labor Day picnic. It was a good
opportunity for introductions in a casual setting. The Water Communion service was very well attended, and
Reverend Cathy’s next sermon gave us our first glimpse of how her journey started.
Reverend Cathy has already been hard at work, meeting with individuals and committees and performing other
ministerial duties. We are very lucky to have such an experienced and dedicated professional to help us with the
work at hand.
After much checking of schedules, we have been able to schedule the board retreat. It’s going to be in late October
which is a bit later than would be ideal, but that was the best that busy schedules could accommodate, and as you
can imagine, it is important for everyone to be there.
As I compile the agenda for the day and a half we will be meeting, I would welcome any suggestions of topics,
ideas, or projects that you would like to be considered.
One area that I would like to take a closer look at is the church’s event calendar. Over the last several years, many
fun fellowship activities have fallen by the wayside. I had been previously told that this happened because no one
volunteered to organize them, however I seemed to have missed the communications soliciting organizers.
Personally I miss having annual events such as the church retreat, chili cook-off, and circle dinners; and I would
like to guard against losing the new events such as the labyrinth, harvest festival, and Wednesday night meditation
and pot luck.
If anyone has something they’d like to see back on the calendar or added to the calendar, please let me know.
Our agenda will also include planning for the rest of the church year, to include topics such as the stewardship
campaign and how to achieve the goals we set for ourselves this year.
As always, board meetings are open and if anyone has something to present to the board please contact me at
least a week before the meeting so I can include it in the agenda.
FACEBOOK AND TWITTER
Find us on Facebook!
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Unitarian-Universalist-Church-of-Chattanooga/301318569903599
Or search Unitarian Universalist of Chattanooga
Follow us on Twitter @UUofChatt
Page 4 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
THE DARK, AND THE LIGHT: RELIGIOUS EDUCATION NEWS
by Kay McCurdy, Director of Religious Education
We are all just walking each other home.
~ Ram Dass
This past August, the Religious Education Committee gathered at the home of Wendy Sapp for a day long
retreat. Sometimes in life you get lucky, and the people you work alongside turn out to be people you genuinely
like and admire. Such is the case with our committee: Brenda Ford (chair), Wendy Sapp, Leslie Brock, James
Joyner, tom kunesh and Cecile deRocher. Good folks and good friends, all.
We spent our time together engaged in various tasks: the development of a mission statement for our program;
laying the groundwork for OWL (OWL stands for Our Whole Lives, the UUAs sexuality education curriculum);
familiarizing ourselves with the RE budget and allocating funds; setting our annual calendar of events.
So, here ‘tis….the official mission statement of the UUCC Religious Education Program for Children & Youth,
along with our new “brand” (or, as we like to call it, “the three E’s”.)
We seek to create a safe, welcoming community where children of diverse needs may explore
a variety of beliefs. We strive to empower youth through the principles of social justice, free
inquiry, and community involvement.
Educate….Explore….Empower!
And, below, our annual calendar of RE sponsored events.
See a happening that sparks your interest? We are always in need of volunteers, so drop an email to Kay
at [email protected], and join the fun!
October 11th
Harvest Festival
December 31st
New Year’s Eve Game Night
November 1st
Box City: Camp Out to Stamp Out Homelessness
January 19th
Martin Luther King, Jr March
November 20th
Transgender Day of Remembrance
February 13th
Valentine Dance Party
November 27th
Grateful Gobbler Walk
March 15th
Strides of March
December 1st
Rosa Parks Birthday Celebration
April 5th
Easter Egg Hunt
December 14th
No Rehearse Christmas Pageant
May 19th
Malcolm X Day
December 21st & 22nd
Indoor Walking Labyrinth
May 31st
End-of-Year-Party
Page 5 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
SOCIAL JUSTICE
STRENGTH IN NUMBERS
by Elaine Watkins, Social Justice
The UUCC Social Justice Committee does not exist in a vacuum. At our monthly meetings, we explore a wide range
of topics. We do a lot of “thinking globally.” But inevitably, we come back to Chattanooga and ponder ways in which
we can “act locally.”
Chattanooga’s social problems mirror those of many American cities. There is a disturbing level of socio-economic
inequality. We have food deserts. Social agencies are underfunded and becoming more so. People of limited means
feel little common ground with the politicians and business leaders, and there is deep distrust of motives.
An old tune from the 1960s says “Something’s happening here, but you don’t know what it is…”
Despite a sincere desire to keep abreast of all the high-level decisions that can affect the average Chattanoogan’s
future for better or worse, it’s all too much for any small group to keep up with. I often see parallels between our
Social Justice committee and the association that represents my neighborhood. In both cases, the members have
“day jobs” and responsibilities that make it virtually impossible to keep up the momentum necessary to feel that
we’re really making a difference. In both organizations, there are budgets to be protected, fundraising dilemmas,
limits on time and energy. “No one person can do it all” is an oft-repeated lament.
In between recent meetings of the SJ Committee and my neighborhood group, I also attended an informational
gathering hosted by a group called Chattanooga Organized for Action (COA). Like our committee, COA is
concerned with economic justice, LGBT rights, reproductive freedom, and a host of other issues that directly affect
people in our city. The August 13 meeting at the downtown library was attended by representatives of the smaller
neighborhoods. It made me especially mindful of my neighborhood’s fundraising activities. What are we raising
funds for? It’s nice to have street-sign toppers, but I now wonder if these are distractions. My neighborhood has a
great deal in common with Southside, Lincoln Park, and many other economically vulnerable pockets throughout
this city. The neighborhood’s interests might be better served by combining our voices with all the others that I
encountered at the COA meeting.
The same is true when it comes to our committee. We're on the right track when it comes to addressing the larger,
global concerns – economic inequality; “the system,” as represented by the Citizens United decision; the right to
marry; human trafficking; world hunger; fair treatment for veterans; oppression of women, etc. But if we also try to
appoint ourselves citizen watchdogs over the city council and various local business groups, we’ll burn out in a
hurry and come away with a sense of failure when our favorite causes are defeated in the next election. We are by
no means the only group in Chattanooga that cares passionately about social justice. We can get more “bang for
our buck” by seeking out others of like mind and joining forces. We can all accomplish more together than
separately.
SAVE THE DATES!
Beginning Wednesday, October 29th,
tom kunesh, MA, M.Div., will lead
Neighboring Faiths
An introduction to other local religions and their spaces
The twenty-nine sessions are in three parts: class, panel of speakers and visits to places of worship.
For more information, please contact tom ([email protected]).
Page 6 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
GREEN SANCTUARY INITIATIVE
by Sandy Kurtz, Green Sanctuary Initiative
I pledge to make my life a blessing for the Earth.
This is the pledge that GreenFaith asks people to take www.greenfaith.org). If you had to take this pledge, what
would you do to follow through? GreenFaith has some suggestions. The organization seeks to inspire, educate,
and mobilize people of diverse religious backgrounds for environmental leadership. Tools are made available to
help religious institutions and their members adopt sustainable consumption habits in all environmental action
categories.
To fulfill your pledge should you choose to accept it, GreenFaith recommends you take three quick action steps:
1. Adjust your thermostat 1 degree (lower since it’s winter).
2. Make your lunch or dinner today a vegetarian one.
3. Take one hour away from electronics and towards Creation.
FAITH IN ACTION
By the time you read this, the Climate March in New York City will have been completed. GreenFaith served as a
coordinator for the interfaith component of the march. What a job it is to pull everything together with so many
people and faiths involved: An assembly area at 9th Avenue and 58th Street including music from world famous
cellist Michael Fitzpatrick and a multi-faith prayer service; signs for all the different faith traditions, and then getting
in place for the march from Columbus Circle to Central Park to 42nd Street ending beyond 11th Avenue. Once at the
end after about 2.5 hours of marching, people could participate in a follow-up multipath international campaign
called Our Voices in support of a strong climate treaty globally. People could participate in a Climate Ribbon
ceremony by writing something that is needed for a future sustainable climate on a small ribbon. Whew! Behind the
scenes, arranging for greeters, maps, security issues, transportation arrivals, and before and after communication
primarily on line at the Faith Hub plus all social media were all needed for success.
Then there was the program for people who couldn’t get to NYC. People took part in the Global Climate Chorus at
1 p.m. in your own time zone. The goal was to make some kind of sound that would draw people to reflection,
prayer, or meditation and indication of concern for climate disruption.
To bring new life to the land
To restore the waters
To refresh the air
We join with the earth and with each other.
~ Litany from Web of Creation
Rev Cathy and her mother would like to extend a special thank-you to
Greg Cruz and tom kunesh for their help in getting my bookcases and
table delivered, Dr. John Standridge for the gift of a beautiful sofa, table,
and lamps, and Sandy and Bill Kurtz for their gift of bookcases for my
office. Thank you so much for your generosity, it has made our transition
from Michigan to Tennessee much easier.
Page 7 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
NEWS FROM THE LANDSCAPING COMMITTEE
by Dave Benn, Landscaping Committee Chair
Regular members of the UUCC Landscape Committee (tom kunesh, Marge Pasch, Greg Cruz, Dave Benn, and
Bonny Sinclair) take time once or twice per month to keep the church grounds looking trim and beautiful. If it rains
regularly, grass and weeds grow rapidly, flowers proliferate then overreach, and garden plants multiply fruits too
fast to pick. It’s a nonstop effort to keep up with nature, and to hold her accountable from reclaiming what human
beings really want for themselves (like grass and the playground). We want to reach an accord with nature, so
during our first meeting of the new church year the committee revisited the Green Sanctuary plan to identify parts
of our property that are still overgrown so much we cannot enjoy them. We focused on weedy growth southeast of
the driveway along the I-24 right-of-way and decided to clear some of the noxious plants to make way for more
flowers and trees. We also decided to maintain the path in the Lewis Bird Sanctuary in its present form (with poison
ivy issues) until we poll the congregation about how to use this forested area. We discussed noise abatement with
regard to I-24 traffic. More about that later.
MEMORIAL FUND
Easily Provide Support through Your Will
One of the most popular and easiest ways to support the good work of our community is to remember our
congregation in your will. Although the legacies you typically read about in the papers are grand in scope, most
people who leave assets to charitable organizations through their wills are of modest means. Here are some future
and ongoing needs that your donation could support:
• Expand and enhance programs or initiatives in our congregation
• Continue to maintain facilities
• Ensure the future of our religious community
Completing Your Endowment Gift
So how do you remember us in your will? While planning or updating your will, simply tell your attorney that you
want to leave something for the UUCC Endowment Fund. A common practice when including a bequest in your
estate is to leave a percentage, rather than a fixed amount, to us. That way, your bequest to the congregation
remains in proportion to other bequests. Additional information is available through the church office.
UUCC Board of Trustees, 2014-2015
President, Leslie Brock
President-Elect, Monique Lewis
Immediate Past President, Frank Caperton
VP, Resources Ministry, Buck O’Rear
VP, Congregational Life Ministry, Greg Cruz
VP, Outreach Ministry, Linda Park
VP, Religious Growth Ministry, Cecile de Rocher
Secretary, Jim Welborn
Treasurer, Daidee Springer
Page 8 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
PAGAN NEWS
The first Sunday of the month, the Pagan group will meet at 9:30 downstairs in the first room on the left.
This month is busy with many different holidays and celebrations in the pagan world.
October
October
October
October
November
3
8
18
31
2
Roman Festival of Bacchus
Full Moon (Blood Moon)
New Moon
Samhain and Halloween
Dia del los Muertos ceremony
Most pagans follow the Wheel of the Year, which follows the seasons through the cycle of Birth (spring), Growth
(summer), Death (end of fall and into winter), and Rebirth (end of winter into spring). At the beginning of October
we may be collecting the last of our harvest, biting into juicy apples, raking up piles of brightly colored leaves and
anticipating the crisp bite of the air after a too-hot-summer. But by the end of October, the nights are growing cold
and in some places you may even see the first snowfall. The warm times are over and the natural world goes
dormant and dies.
The wheel turns again and we must turn with it. We say goodbye to the things that grew and blossomed for us in
the season past; we mourn that which we lost, or which failed to flourish. And we look ahead to the endless
possibilities of a new year, in which we can try gain.
For the first of the following month (November 1st and 2nd) the pagan group will be sponsoring a Dia de los Muertos
celebration on November 2nd at 5:30. Please contact James Joyner ([email protected]) with any questions
or if you wish to participate and the event is open to anyone who wishes to attend.
There is a harmony in Autumn, and a luster in its sky…
~ Percy Bysshe Selley
POETRY MAKES THE HEART GROW STRONGER!
by Nancy Beel
In the August 2, 2004 issue of Time magazine, there is a short article entitled “Does Poetry Make the Heart Grow
Stronger?” It tells the tale of a group of European researchers who taught volunteers to recite passages from Homer
and discovered that “the result was an increase in the synchronization of cardiorespiratory patterns of cardiac
patients.” Apparently speaking poetry was much more beneficial than ordinary breathing exercises!
Join me for First Hour Poetry Circle this month on the 4th Sunday, October 26, at 10 AM. We will gather in one of
the downstairs rooms to read our favorite poems out loud. All are welcome. May our hearts grow stronger together!
Poetry is what gets lost in translation
~ Robert Frost
Page 9 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
ART ON THE WALLS
TEEN ABSTRACT ART PROJECT
by Carol Hobbs
On Sunday, September 7, 2015, fifteen UUCC teens gathered in
the Thoreau Room and on the playground to transform canvas and
paint into colorful, often intense abstract art pieces. Participating
were Channon Arden, Emma Farrell-Oberschmidt, Samantha
Jolly, Lily Joyner, Greg Kertay, Sam Kertay, wenona kurtz-kunesh,
Isabelle McCurdy, Sophie
McCurdy, Sky Papendorp,
Tamblin Papendorp, Lauren
Solomon, Hunter Stinnett,
Caroline Vanderhoof, and
Isabella Vanderhoof. Adult
facilitators were Carol Hobbs,
Karl Hunt, and Kay McCurdy.
After an introduction to approaches for creating abstract art (organic shapes,
texture, geometrics, artful smears, drips, splatters), the teens began their
journey into pure creativity. Their imaginative creations will be exhibited on our
walls from October 19 through November 30. The art in this exhibit will be for
sale and all monies will be used to benefit the Teens’ plans for trips or gettogethers. More of the original art work will be featured in next month’s
newsletter.
by Hunter
by Lauren
Page 10 of 15
by Sophie
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
MONEY MATTERS
by Daidee Springer, Treasurer
-
$205,243 is our budget for fiscal year 2014-2015
$ 22,292 is what we've spent in the first two months of the fiscal year
$ 35,233 is our income for the first two months of the fiscal year
$ 8,531 was our pledge income in August, 2014
$ 11,339 was our pledge income in August, 2013
The numbers look good right now. Income exceeds expenses by $12,941. But this is deceiving. As I said last
month, a number of folks have chosen to pay their pledges in full. Unless they increase their pledges, we'll receive
no more from them. Moreover, we had a brief reprieve from some usual recurring expenses in July and August.
When you look at the last two numbers, $8,531 and $11,339, you realize we're on a slippery slope. Our pledge
income in August, 2014, was almost $3,000 less than our 2013 August pledge income. That's cause for concern. I
titled this column “Money Matters” because money really does matter. Trust me.
WEDNESDAY EVENINGS AT UUCC
5.30 meditation downstairs, Sofia Fahs room
w/music to meditate by
Our meditation time is
• sitting quietly for about 20 minutes
• clearing our minds, focusing on something different, like breathing
Our goal is a little bit more mental peace.
We share leadership with whoever attends.
6.00 shared dinner / common meal
bring what you want to share
6.30 Love Beyond Belief Project starts
the 3rd Wednesday of every month
(continuing from the Thandeka workshop, uucc.org/religious-growth/rgm/)
7:00 Parents as Resident Theologians part 2
of a six-part course led by DRE Kay McCurdy, held Wednesdays evenings
on Sept 10, 17, 24, Oct 1, 8, 15, from 7-8:30 pm. contact [email protected]
BOARD MINUTES
To help the board communicate the events of the board meetings in a timely manner, the minutes will be posted
on the church website. Minutes from the current and previous board meetings can be found at
http://www.uucc.org/about-the-uuc/board-meeting-minutes/
Page 11 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
HERE COMES SANTA CLAUS,
HERE COMES SANTA CLAUS!
The morning of October 18th, Santa
is stopping by the church. He said you could
come and get your picture made for a
monetary contribution to the church—if
you’ve been good! Bring your own flash drive
and you can take your pictures home that
day. No flash drive—pictures will be
available on disk on Sunday.
CHIONS
October 11, 2014 Meeting
10:30 A.M-noon
Key Competencies of Intercultural Effectiveness
Dr. Mark Mendenhall
As global citizens who also live and work within various domestic subcultures, what competencies must we possess
in order to live and work productively with people who differ culturally from us? Over thirty years of research has
isolated the key competencies associated with intercultural effectiveness, and social scientists are learning more
and more about how these competencies can be developed. Implications of this research for us as individuals,
managers, educators, and community leaders will be discussed.
Mark E. Mendenhall holds the J. Burton Frierson Chair of Excellence in Business Leadership at the University of
Tennessee, Chattanooga. He received his B.S. degree (1980) in psychology and his Ph.D. degree (1983) in social
psychology, both from Brigham Young University. Dr. Mendenhall is an internationally recognized scholar in the
field of global leadership and international human resource management. He has published numerous journal
articles and scholarly book chapters in a variety of publications. Dr. Mendenhall has traveled widely and has lived
overseas for nine years (New Zealand, Japan, Switzerland, and Germany).
GOODNESS IS THE ONLY
INVESTMENT THAT NEVER FAILS
~HENRY DAVID THOREAU
Page 12 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
CALLING ALL CREATIVE GEEKS!
To: Creative Geeks
From: Wowzers (Working on Worship) Committee
Re: A Request for Volunteers
There is a need for a special subcommittee to assist with visual presentations during our Worship service of hymns,
responsive readings, and pictures from the Story for All Ages. Google docs is the format so information can be
shared between contributors. Do you have the talent and skill? If so, please contact [email protected]
or [email protected]
BRUCE MCDUFFIE
AUGUST 25, 1921-SEPTEMBER 12, 2014
Bruce McDuffie passed away on September 12, 2014, at age ninety-three. Bruce is survived by his
loving wife of sixty-four years, Winifred Groover McDuffie, as well as his three devoted children, three
grandsons, and one great-grandchild.
Bruce taught analytical chemistry at Emory University, Washington and Jefferson College, and for
many years at SUNY Binghamton. His students dubbed him “the smiling assassin” for his pleasant
demeanor and strict grading policies. Bruce made international headlines in 1970 when, testing a
can of tuna from Wini’s kitchen, he discovered high levels of methyl mercury in tuna fish and,
subsequently, in swordfish. He remained very active in environmental studies and chemistry until his
retirement from teaching in 1988.
Bruce enjoyed many interests in his long and full life. He was active in the peace and civil rights movements
including participating in the 1963 March on Washington. He volunteered with voter registration and the Big Brothers
program. At age sixty Bruce rediscovered running and participated in numerous races and triathlons. Bruce played
golf avidly and enjoyed music and singing throughout his life. He leaves behind many beautiful paintings, and will
also be remembered for his unique sense of humor.
Bruce was a loving husband, father, and brother and will be sorely missed. The family extends their grateful thanks
to Bruce’s devoted caregivers and to Hospice of Chattanooga for making his transition comfortable and peaceful.
A memorial service will be scheduled at a later date. Donations in Bruce’s memory may be made to Princeton
University, the American Friends Service Committee, or to Hospice of Chattanooga.
UU101 IS BACK!
OCTOBER 12, 19, AND 26
UU101, the series of classes about our church, will be held immediately after church on Sundays: October 12, 19,
and 26. These classes are specifically designed for new members, but anyone who wishes to learn more about our
history and ways to be a part of the church are welcome to attend.
A head count is requested so enough food will be provided. Child care available upon request. Contact Maurine
Olin at 423-479-2476 or [email protected]
Page 13 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
SMALL GROUP MINISTRY
by Miranda Cagle, SGM Steering Team
I must admit I have a soft spot in my heart for Small Group Ministry. As a professor, I spend most of my time not
just speaking and preparing to speak, but also responding and seeking responses in turn. And there’s a lot of focus
on the right responses, as well. That makes sense with the purpose of that environment. But in our social and
personal lives, sadly sometimes we have that same experience – that expectation of response, that idea of the
“right” words. For me, time with my Small Group is compassionate practice, toward myself as much as to others. It
can be so relieving and refreshing to free yourself to just listen without having to consider how and whether you
should respond, and to just speak without having to prepare for how or whether someone else will respond. It’s
nice now and then to let each other off the hook of knowing what to say. Sometimes when we do that, our own
words begin to flow more easily. Funnily enough, Small Group Ministry has shown me that we can really get to
know each other well by not talking to each other, but with each other
I have participated in Small Group Ministries as a group member, facilitator, and now as part of the Steering
Committee. I’m happy to assist a new season of church members in having this unique experience. After the
September 21st service, the Steering Committee members and facilitators met downstairs to assign interested
members into groups. Luckily, nearly everyone received their first or second choice of meeting day and time, and
within the hour we had four strong groups ready to go in October! Even though the initial registration period has
ended, each group always leaves a single chair unoccupied as a reminder to always be ready to welcome someone
new who is willing to commit to the group. Anyone that is still or newly interested in joining a group should contact
Linda Helton at 423-413-2417. The meetings available are 2nd Tuesdays (6:30-8:30pm), 1st and 3rd Tuesdays (79pm), 2nd and 4th Wednesdays (10am-noon), and 2nd and 4th Thursdays (6:30-8:30pm). The Thursday group
has babysitting available.
See you in the circle!
SERVICE AND VOLUNTEER SCHEDULE
DATE
10/5
TOPIC
Holy Heresy
SPEAKER
GREETERS
Rev. Cathy Harrington
Mary Hunter
Pat Mann
Linda Helton
AND
USHERS
10/12
Difficult
Conversations:
Religion, Abortion,
and Justice
Kate Garcia
Linda Park
Margaret Hudson
Richard Ralston
10/19
10/26
Start with the Heart
Walking Together
Rev. Cathy Harrington
Carol Hobbs
Link Christensen
Tacie Overbeck
Rev. Cathy Harrington
Harriet Cotter
Chuck Mehan
Kelly Garren
Our job is to love others without stopping to inquire whether or not
they are worthy. That is not our business and, in fact, it is
nobody's business. What we are asked to do is to love, and this
love itself will render both ourselves and our neighbors worthy.
~ Thomas Merton
Page 14 of 15
THE NUUSLETTER
OCTOBER, 2014
October, 2014
Sun
28
Mon
29
Tue
30
Wed
October 1
9 am - 3 pm DRE Office
10 am - 2 pm Minister Office
5:30 pm - 6 pm Meditation
6 pm - 6:45 pm Wed Dinner
Thu
2
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
6:45 pm - 8:15 pm
Parents as Res Theologians
5
6
9 - 10 am Choir Rehearsal
7
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
9:30-10:30 am Forum
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Pagan Group
7 - 9 pm
Social
Justice
Meeting
10:45-11 am Connections
11 am - 12 pm
Worship Service
7-9 pm
SGM
12
13
9 - 10 am Choir Rehearsal
14
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
9:30-10:30 am Meditation
9:30-10:30 am Forum
9:30 am - 10:30 am
RE Committee
6:30 pm 8:30 pm
SGM
10:45-11 am Connections
11 am - 12 pm
Worship Service
8
9 am - 3 pm DRE Office
10 am - 12 pm SGM
10 am - 2 pm Minister Office
5:30 pm - 6 pm Meditation
6 pm - 6:45 pm Wed Dinner
6:30-8:30 pm Finance Comm
9
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
6:30 pm 8:30 pm
SGM
Fri
3
Sat
4
5 pm 12:30 pm - 5:30
9:30 pm pm
Move to UCG
Amend
Mtg &
Movie
10
11
4 pm - 9 9 am - 5 pm
pm
Fall Craft
Craft
Fair(Sanctuary
Fair
& Fellowship
Setup
areas)
10 am - 12 pm
CHIONS
6:45 pm - 8:15 pm
Parents as Res Theologians
15
9 am - 3 pm DRE Office
10 am - 2 pm Minister Office
5:30 pm - 6 pm Meditation
6 pm - 6:45 pm Wed Dinner
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Love Beyond Belief Project
6:45 pm - 8:15 pm
Parents as Res Theologians
16
17
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
18
12:30 pm - 4:30
pm
CofG
6 pm - 10 pm
Bridge Group
6:30 pm 9 pm
Board
Meeting
8:30 pm - 11:30
pm
Santa Pictures
12:15 pm - 2:15 pm
UU101 Class
19
20
9 - 10 am Choir Rehearsal
21
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Common Read
9:30-10:30 am Forum
7 pm - 9
pm
SGM
10:45-11 am Connections
11 am - 12 pm
Worship Service
22
9 am - 3 pm DRE Office
10 am - 12 pm SGM
10 am - 2 pm Minister Office
5:30 pm - 6 pm Meditation
6 pm - 6:45 pm Wed Dinner
23
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
24
25
4 pm - 9 12:30 pm - 5:30
pm
pm
Board
UCG
Retreat
6:30 pm 8:30 pm
SGM
12:15 pm - 2:15 pm
UU101 Class
26
9 - 10 am Choir Rehearsal
9:30-10:30 am Poetry
9:30-10:30 am Forum
10:45-11 am Connections
11 am - 12 pm
Worship Service
27
28
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
29
9 am - 3 pm DRE Office
10 am - 2 pm Minister Office
5:30 pm - 6 pm Meditation
6 pm - 6:45 pm Wed Dinner
6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Neighboring Faiths
12:15 pm - 2:15 pm
UU101 Class
Page 15 of 15
30
10 am - 2
pm
Minister
Office
31
1
12:30 pm - 5:30
pm
UCG