School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences CATALOGUE 2010-2012

CATALOGUE 2010-2012
School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences
The School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences offers programmes in a range of distinct disciplines
and sub-disciplines. It is the primary provider of postsecondary nursing programmes up to the baccalaureate
level in Trinidad and Tobago. In addition, it is the premier provider of professional allied health programmes
in critical areas such as radiation therapy, radiological sciences and medical laboratory technology. These
programmes and those in the area of environmental studies highlight the benefits of the College’s close
partnerships with its industry stakeholders.
The School of Nursing, Health and Environmental Sciences comprises four departments:
• Nursing
• Health Science Technologies
• Environmental Studies
• Natural and Life Sciences
157
Mission
• To provide the environment and resources for students to transform their innate desires into tangible careers, applicable to the overall development of the nation
• To produce confident and competently trained individuals to support key health care policies and initiate
change as pioneers in their fields
• To embrace research as a core requirement to inform professional practice.
Department of Nursing
The Department of Nursing, formerly known as the College of Nursing, was established under the National
Institute of Higher Education Research Science and Technology (NIHERST) in 1990. Over the twenty years of
its existence, the department’s programme offerings have developed from an apprenticeship programme to an
associate degree, with two options in general nursing and psychiatric nursing. In 2009, the associate degree
programmes were upgraded to bachelor’s level, consistent with international trends in nursing education.
The department continues to play a critical role in training for the health sector and remains committed to
continuously improving the services offered to its students and industry stakeholders.
Programmes
The Department of Nursing offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes
B.Sc. Nursing (General)
B.Sc. Nursing (Psychiatric)
Associate Degree Programmes
AS
Nursing (General)
AS
Nursing (Psychiatric)
Bachelor of Science - General Nursing (BSN)
The Bachelor of Science degree programme in Nursing is suitable for new applicants who want to enter the nursing
profession as well as for practicing nurses who wish to upgrade their professional status. The programme has
two tracks: general nursing and psychiatric nursing and it is designed to produce nursing professionals who are
equipped to function more efficiently and effectively in the constantly changing dynamics of the modern health
care environment. Through the curriculum, students develop an in-depth understanding of nursing philosophy,
nursing theory and conceptual frameworks that underpin nursing practice. They also acquire critical thinking
skills and the ability to engage in evidence-based practice, professional reflection and visioning, thereby
ensuring their readiness to make a meaningful contribution to nursing leadership and management in Trinidad
and Tobago.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - General Nursing
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (General Nursing track), students must successfully
complete 135 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Required courses in the major area of study
66 credits
Support courses
21 credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
135 credits
Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a
clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout
the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.
Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
NURS 115
NURS 150
NURS 156
NURS 160
NURS 211
NURS 220
NURS 223
NURS 260
NURS 275
NURS 295
NURS 306
NURS 312
NURS 320
NURS 324
NURS 334
NURS 337
NURS 401
NURS 411
NURS 445
Foundations of Nursing Practice
Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
Health Promotion and Maintenance
Nutrition I
Nursing Science
Pathophysiology I
The Childbearing Family
Nutrition and Disease
Pharmacology in Nursing
Epidemiology
Health Assessment
Mental Health
Pathophysiology II
Paediatric and Adolescent Care
Adult Nursing
Nursing Informatics
Gender Issues in Health Care
Professional Development and Management
Critical Care Nursing
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
NURS 447
NURS 499
Gerontology Senior Project - Nursing
3
4
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
3280 hours
CODE
ARTS 119
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 116
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 121
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT 120
COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Contemporary College Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
48
SUPPORT COURSES
66
BIOL 171
BIOL 172
BIOL 221
CHEM 121
COMM 119
COMM 151
MATH 108
Structure and Function I
Structure and Function II
Microbiology for Nursing
Bio-chemistry
Sign Language
Communication in Nursing
Dosage Mathematics
Total Support Course Credits
4
4
3
3
2
2
3
21
Career Option:
• Nurse
Bachelor of Science degree – Psychiatric Nursing
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Psychiatric Nursing
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (Psychiatric Nursing track), students must successfully
complete 136 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
159
Required courses in the major area of study
67credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Support courses
21 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
136 credits
Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a clinical
environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout the programme
to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.
Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
NURS 115
NURS 116
NURS 150
NURS 154
NURS 160
NURS 211
NURS 220
NURS 224
NURS 250
NURS 261
NURS 276
NURS 295
NURS 306
NURS 325
NURS 326
NURS 336
NURS 337
NURS 401
NURS 411
NURS 441
NURS 448
NURS 499
COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Nursing Practice
Foundations in Psychiatry
Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
Health Promotion and Maintenance
Nutrition I
Nursing Science
Pathophysiology I
The Childbearing Family (Psyc.)
Psycho - Pathophysiology
Nutrition and Disease (Psyc.)
Psycho - Pharmacology
Epidemiology
Health Assessment
Paediatric and Adolescent Care (Psyc.)
Introduction to Medical-Surgical Nursing
Care of the Mentally Ill Adult
Nursing Informatics
Gender Issues in Health Care
Professional Development and Management
Psychiatric Emergencies
Psycho - Gerontology Senior Project - Nursing
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
3280 hours
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
67
CODE
ARTS 119
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 116
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 121
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT 120
COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Contemporary College Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 171
BIOL 172
BIOL 221
CHEM 121
COMM 119
COMM 151
MATH 108
SUPPORT COURSES
Structure and Function I
Structure and Function II
Microbiology for Nursing
Bio-chemistry
Sign Language
Communication in Nursing
Dosage Mathematics
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
48
4
4
3
3
2
2
3
21
Career Option:
• Psychiatric Nurse
Associate in Applied Science – General Nursing
The Associate in Applied Science degree programme is appropriate for persons who wish to enter the nursing
profession. This programme has two tracks: general and psychiatric nursing. The main aim of the programme is
to prepare nurses with the critical thinking, analytical, evaluation and technology skills and competencies that
will equip them to provide quality patient care in any local, regional or international health care setting. It also
provides a sound foundation for further studies in nursing or other health science professions.
Graduation Requirements: Associate in Applied Science – General Nursing
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in General Nursing, students must successfully complete
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
74 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
37 credits
Support courses
13 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
74 credits
Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function
in a clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously
throughout the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.
Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)
3280 hours
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 221
COMM 151
NURS 115
NURS 141
NURS 150
NURS 156
NURS 160
NURS 220
NURS 223
NURS 260
NURS 275
NURS 290
NURS 295
COURSE TITLE
Microbiology for Nursing
Communication in Nursing
Foundations of Nursing Practice
Emergency Care
Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
Health Promotion and Maintenance
Nutrition I
Pathophysiology I
The Childbearing Family
Nutrition and Disease
Pharmacology in Nursing
Introduction to Adult Nursing
Epidemiology
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
2
3
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
37
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 116
PSYC 103
SCIE 121
SOCI 102
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Contemporary College Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Introduction to the Study of Society
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Clinical Experiences (Level I Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level II A Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level II B Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level III Practical Examination)
Total Credits Clinical Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 171
BIOL 172
CHEM 121
COMM 123
Structure and Function I
Structure and Function II
Biochemistry
Sign Language
Total Support Course Credits
NURS 371
NURS 372
NURS 372
NURS 373
Cr.
4
4
3
2
13
GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES
DRAM 101
ARTS 100
Drama
Steel Pan Appreciation
NC
NC
3280
Career Option:
• Nurse
Associate in Applied Science – Psychiatric Nursing
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Psychiatric Nursing
To successfully complete the Associate in Applied Science degree in Psychiatric Nursing, students must complete
77 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
43 credits
Support courses
13 credits
Core curriculum courses
Total Credits Required for Graduation
24 credits
80 credits
161
Clinical Competencies: Students are also required to demonstrate competence to function in a
clinical environment. To this end, clinical assessments will be undertaken continuously throughout
the programme to determine students’ levels of clinical competence.
Total clinical hours (Requirement of the Nursing Council)
3280 hours
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
CODE
BIOL 221
COMM 151
NURS 115
NURS 116
NURS 141
NURS 150
Microbiology for Nursing
Communication in Nursing
Foundations of Nursing Practice
Foundations of Psychiatry
Emergency Care
Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
3
2
3
3
2
3
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 116
PSYC 103
NURS 156
NURS 160
NURS 220
Health Promotion and Maintenance
Nutrition I
Pathophysiology I
3
3
3
SCIE 121
SOCI 102
NURS 224
NURS 250
NURS 261
NURS 276
NURS 290
NURS 295
The Childbearing Family (Psyc.)
Psycho-Pathophysiology
Nutrition and Disease (Psyc.)
Psycho-Pharmacology
Introduction to Adult Nursing
Epidemiology
3
3
3
3
3
3
NURS 371
NURS 372
NURS 372
NURS 373
NURS 236
Clinical Experiences (Level I Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level II A Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level II B Practical Examination)
Clinical Experiences (Level III Practical Examination)
Psycho - Pathophysiology
Total Credits – Required Courses in the Major
Total Clinical Hours
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Contemporary College Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and
Diversity
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Introduction to the Study of Society
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 171
BIOL 172
CHEM 121
COMM 123
SUPPORT COURSES
Structure and Function I
Structure and Function II
Biochemistry
Sign Language
43
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
4
4
3
2
13
GUIDED ELECTIVE COURSES
DRAM 101
ARTS 100
Drama
Steel Pan Appreciation
NC
NC
3280
Career Option:
• Psychiatric Nurse
Faculty Profile - Nursing
Rupert Jones, Department Chair
Senior Lecturer - Nursing
M.Phil, B.A, Dip, Cert
Research Interest: Nursing education
Catherine E Dalrymple
Lecturer - Mental/Orthopedic Nursing
B.Sc., BA, Cert, RGN, RN, RM
Research Interest: Nursing education
Steve Mohammed
Senior Lecturer – General and
Psychiatric Nursing
M.Ed., Dip, Cert, RN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Carolyn Bascombe-McCave
Senior Lecturer - Medical/Surgical
nursing, gynecology, obstetrics and
ICU
M.Ed., B.Sc., RN, LM, CCN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Marina Fraser
Lecturer - Nursing, psychiatry and
midwifery
ASD, B.Sc., Dip, RN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Shirley Rajkumar
Senior Lecturer - Nursing, midwifery
Dip, Cert, RN, RM,
Research Interest: Maternity and child
care
Abraham Bremnor
Senior Lecturer - Nursing and
Psychology
MA, , B.Sc, ASD (M.Phil in progress)
Research Interest: Nursing education
Maureen Giddings-Estwick
Lecturer - Nursing
M.Ed. RN, LM
Research Interest: Nursing education
Daisy S. Ramperad-Rattan
Senior Lecturer – Nursing, midwifery
and research
M.Phil, B.Sc., RN, RM,
Research Interest: Tobacco control
162
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Beryl Brewster
Senior Lecturer - General Nursing and
health visiting
M.Sc., BA, ASD, Dip, Cert, RN, RNT,
R.M
Research Interest: Nursing education
Avril Wilba Carter
Clinical Instructor
Psychiatric Nursing
ASD
Research Interest: Nursing education
Linda Lewis-Suite
Lecturer - Gerontology/clinical
nursing
RMN, RN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Henry Sandy
Lecturer - Gerontology, medical/
surgical nursing
Post cert, RN, AHA, Dip.
Research Interest: Nursing education
Ruhee Mir-Mohammed
Senior Lecturer – Nursing, health
sciences
M.Sc., B.Sc., Dip, RGN, CCN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Ynolde Sitahall
Senior Lecturer - Nursing
M.Sc., Cert, RN
Research Interest: Nursing education
Department of Health Science Technologies
The Department of Health Science Technologies offers certificates, diplomas, associate and bachelor’s degree
programmes in the fields of medical laboratory technology, health records science, pharmacy assistant, cytology,
radiography, and radiation therapy. The curriculum emphasizes competency-based learning, and students are
exposed to the most modern equipment and up-to-date techniques in the laboratory environment, through
practical sessions which directly link theory to workplace competencies. Students are also required to complete
a clinical internship at approved public and private health care facilities, thereby ensuring that they are ready
for the workplace upon graduation.
Programmes
The Department of Health Science Technologies offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes
B.Sc. Medical Lab Technology
B.Sc. Radiation Therapy
Associate Degree Programmes
AAS Medical Lab Technology
B.Sc. Radiography
Bachelor of Science – Medical Laboratory Technology
Medical laboratory technology is an important sub-discipline within the allied health sciences. The medical
laboratory technologist is an important member of the health care team and plays a critical support role in the
provision of quality diagnostic laboratory work. Students in the programme acquire knowledge and practical
skills in microbiology, haematology, immunohaematology, clinical chemistry, health policy, molecular biology,
applied research and clinical appraisal. The curriculum is organized around a sound foundation in the natural
and social sciences and develops the cognitive and psychomotor skills needed for clinical pathological testing.
Instructional activities are designed to allow students to demonstrate growth, empathy, competence and
confidence; to apply scientific principles, and to develop problem-solving skills which will enable them to easily
adjust to changes and function effectively as allied health professionals and members of society.
163
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Medical Laboratory Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science in Medical Laboratory Technology, students must successfully complete
134 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
48 credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Support courses
38 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
134 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
HLED 100
HLED 225
HLED 410
MDLT 120
MDLT 121
MDLT 125
MDLT 227
MDLT 228
MDLT 229
MDLT 297
MDLT 298
MDLT 230
MDLT 231
MDLT 281
MDLT 282
MDLT 283
MDLT 284
MDLT 286
MDLT 287
MDLT 329
First Aid and Occupational Health
Legal and Ethical Issues in Health
Health Policy
MLT Orientation
Medical Terminology
Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques
Immunology and Serology
Histology
Clinical Chemistry I
Medical Microbiology I
Medical Microbiology I: Laboratory
Hematology I
Immunohematology
Histopathology Internship
Immunology and Serology Internship
Clinical Chemistry Internship
Bacteriology Internship
Blood Bank Internship
Hematology Internship
Clinical Chemistry II
3
3
3
3
1
2
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
4
MDLT 340
MDLT 371
MDLT 411
MDLT 455
MDLT 479
MDLT 499
Hematology II
Research Project - MDLT
Quality Management in the Laboratory
MDLT Simulated Practicum
Community Project
Research Proposal Development
4
3
3
3
2
2
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
48
COURSE TITLE
ARTS 119
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 121
ENVH 102
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 106
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT120
Foundations of Art and Music
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
World Issues in Public Health
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamentals of Research
Laboratory Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
48
CHEM 134
BIOL 173
BIOL 174
BIOL 240
BIOL 241
SUPPORT COURSES
Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Genetics
Cell Biology
4
3
3
3
3
BIOL 362
BIOL 397
Genetics and Molecular Diagnostics
Medical Microbiology II
3
4
Total Support Course Credits
38
Career Options:
• Hospital laboratory technician
• Research laboratory technician
• Sales/Technical representative
• Laboratory administrator
• Medical technology educator
Associate in Applied Science - Medical Laboratory Technology
The Associate in Applied Science degree in Medical Laboratory Technology prepares students to become health-
care professionals. Graduates work in all areas of the clinical laboratory, including blood banking, chemistry,
164
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
hematology, immunology, and microbiology. They perform a full range of laboratory tests – from simple
prenatal blood tests, to more complex tests . They uncover diseases such as HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and cancer,
thus supporting diagnostic prognoses that are critical in the area of health care. Often, the medical laboratory
technician is responsible for interpreting and communicating critical patient results to the physician. This
programme is currently the required qualification for entry into the profession.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Medical Laboratory Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Medical Laboratory Technology, students must
successfully complete 79 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
28 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Support courses
27 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
79 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
HLED 100
HLED 225
MDLT 120
MDLT 121
MDLT 125
MDLT 227
MDLT 228
MDLT 230
MDLT 231
First Aid and Occupational Health
Legal and Ethical Issues in Health
MLT Orientation
Medical Terminology
Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques
Immunology and Serology
Histology
Hematology I
Immunohematology
MDLT 281
MDLT 282
MDLT 283
MDLT 284
MDLT 286
MDLT 287
Histopathology Internship
Immunology and Serology Internship
Clinical Chemistry Internship
Bacteriology Internship
Blood Bank Internship
Hematology Internship
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
1
2
4
4
4
4
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
NC
28
COURSE TITLE
COMM 117
COMM 118
ENTP 210
RELI 205
MATH 106
PSYC 103
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
Comparative Religion
Laboratory Mathematics
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Credits
CHEM 134
CHEM 229
BIOL 173
BIOL 174
BIOL 240
BIOL 241
BIOL 297
BIOL 298
SUPPORT COURSES
Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
Clinical Chemistry I
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Genetics
Cell Biology
Medical Microbiology I
Medical Microbiology I : Lab
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
27
Career Options:
• Laboratory assistant
• Medical laboratory technician I
• Sales/Technical representative
• Laboratory administration
• Medical laboratory educator
Programme Requirements: Health Science Degree Access Certificate
To successfully matriculate into the B.Sc. Radiography or Radiation Therapy programme, students must complete
37 pre-clinical credits with a minimum GPA of 2.5, according to the following distribution:
165
Foundation courses required for major area of study
13 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
37 credits
The other requirements for entry into the B.Sc. programmes in Radiological Sciences include completion of 40
hours approved volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR computer literacy and a recent police certificate
of good character.
FOUNDATION COURSES for MAJOR
CODE
BIOL 114
HLED 225
PHYS 102
PSYC 106
COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology/Medical Terminology
Legal and Ethical Issues in Health
Introduction to Physical Principles
Psychology for the Health Professionals
Total Credits for Foundation Courses
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4
3
4
3
CODE
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
LIBS 130
MATH 121
STAT 120
ECON 110
SPAN 100
13
COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Fundamentals of Statistics
Introduction to General Economics
Introduction to Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
Bachelor of Science - Radiation Therapy
The Bachelor of Science degree in Radiation Therapy is designed to prepare the student, through a combination
of classroom, laboratory and clinical education, to treat cancer patients by applying ionizing radiation safely and
accurately, using a variety of complex techniques and equipment, assessing the physical and emotional needs of
patients, while minimizing the effects of cancer and its treatment to patients. Through an integrated curriculum,
students learn to analyze, reason, work independently or collaboratively, take appropriate actions in accordance
with practice standards and evaluate the care delivered to patients through reflection, critical thinking and
research. Students enrolled in this programme are expected to exhibit exceptional professional conduct and
communicate effectively. Graduates of this programme are in high demand and qualify for entry level positions
as radiation therapists at public and private hospitals and radiation therapy centers. Graduates have the option
of advancing in medical radiation dosimetry, education or management. The curriculum is benchmarked against
international standards in radiation therapy education and graduates of the programme are eligible to apply
through the Board of Radiographers of Trinidad and Tobago, to the Council for the Professions Related to
Medicine, for registration to practise in Trinidad and Tobago.
Admission to the Programme: Due to occupational safety standards, students must be at least 18 years of age
before entering the degree programme. In general, students are admitted to this bachelor’s degree programme
after completion of a one (1) year pre-clinical radiological sciences programme called the Health Science Degree
Access (HSDA) Certificate. Due to the intensity and rigour of the training in the major area of study, students
are encouraged to complete as many college core courses as possible before entering the radiation therapy
programme. Achievement of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the HSDA certificate programme is required
for admission into the bachelor’s degree programme in radiation therapy. Courses in the radiation therapy major
require strong competence in math and physics, therefore applicants should have minimum grade ‘B’ or higher
in college physics and math courses. Other entry requirements include completion of 40 hours of approved
volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR and computer literacy. Proof of immunizations, medical clearance
and a criminal background check are also criteria for selection.
166
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Once enrolled in the degree programme, radiation therapy students must achieve a grade of “C” or higher in all
radiation therapy major courses to continue in and graduate from the programme.
The radiation therapy programme can only be pursued on a full-time basis because of the clinical experiences
needed to fulfill course requirements and develop the level of competency necessary for the profession.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Radiation Therapy
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Radiation Therapy, students must successfully complete 136
credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
97 credits
Support courses
11 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Elective courses
4 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
136 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CTIM 341
RADG 213
RADG 275
RADG 312
RADG 371
RADG 481
RADG 498
RADG 499
RADT 222
RADT 241
RADT 242
RADT 254
RADT 255
RADT 273
RADT 274
RADT 295
RADT 311
RADT 353
RADT 354
RADT 363
RADT 364
RADT 395
RADT 454
RADT 456
RADT 465
RADT 466
RADT 467
RADT 493
RADT 494
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
CT Imaging
Basic Anatomic Pathology
Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I
Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy
Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II
Research Methodology
Senior Research Project I
Senior Research Seminar
Radiation Sciences
Radiation Physics I
Physics and Instrumentation I
Radiation Therapy I
Radiation Therapy II
Clinical Practice I
Clinical Practice II
Treatment Planning I
Radiation Protection and Cellular Response
Clinical Techniques I
Clinical Oncology I by PBL
Clinical Practice III
Clinical Practice IV
Treatment Planning II
Clinical Techniques II
Clinical Oncology II by PBL
Clinical Practice V
Clinical Practice VI
Clinical Practice VII
Treatment Planning III
Treatment Planning Lab
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
1
3
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
5
2
3
4
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
97
COURSE TITLE
ARTS 119
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
Foundations of Art and Music
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 176
BIOL 276
PHAR 251
SUPPORT COURSES
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II
Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
1
3
24
4
4
3
11
ELECTIVE COURSES
One of any Imaging or Health Science
elective courses
4
Career Options:
• Radiation therapist
• With relevant, formal post graduate certification:
o
o
Radiation therapy educator
Clinical educator
167
o
Dosimetrist
o
Applications specialist
o
Brachytherapy technologist
Bachelor of Science - Radiography
The Bachelor of Science degree in Radiography is designed to prepare students to operate x-ray equipment,
position patients for x-ray procedures, practise radiation safety, produce x-ray images of human anatomy and
deliver quality patient care through a combination of classroom, laboratory and clinical education. Through an
integrated curriculum, students learn to analyze, reason, work independently or collaboratively, take appropriate
actions in accordance with practice standards and evaluate the care delivered to patients through reflection, critical
thinking and research. Students enrolled in this programme are expected to exhibit exceptional professional
conduct and communicate effectively. Graduates of this programme are in high demand and qualify for entry
level positions as radiographers at public and private hospitals and imaging centers. They are also well-prepared
to pursue advanced certification in medical imaging specialties such as diagnostic medical ultrasound, nuclear
medicine and magnetic resonance imaging, to name a few. The curriculum is benchmarked against international
standards in radiography education and graduates of the programme are eligible to apply through the Board of
Radiographers of Trinidad and Tobago, to the Council for the Professions Related to Medicine for registration
to practise in Trinidad and Tobago.
Admission Requirements: Due to occupational safety standards, students must be at least 18 years of age before
entering the degree programme. In general, students are admitted to this bachelor’s degree programme after
completion of a one (1) year pre-clinical radiological sciences programme called the Health Science Degree
Access (HSDA) Certificate. Due to the intensity and rigour of the training in the major area of study, students are
encouraged to complete as many college core courses as possible before entering the radiography programme.
Achievement of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in the HSDA certificate programme is required for admission
into the bachelor’s degree programme in radiography. Other entry requirements include completion of 40 hours
of approved volunteer service, certification in first aid/CPR and computer literacy. Proof of immunizations,
medical clearance and a criminal background check are also criteria for selection.
Once enrolled in the degree programme, radiography students must achieve a grade of “C” or higher in all
radiography major courses in order to be able to continue in and graduate from the programme.
The radiography programme can only be pursued on a full-time basis because of the clinical experiences
required to fulfill course requirements and develop the level of competency necessary for the profession.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Radiography
To successfully complete the B.Sc. in Radiography, students must complete 130 credits with a minimum GPA of
2.0, according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
88 credits
Support courses
14 credits
Core curriculum courses
Elective courses
Total Credits Required for Graduation
168
24 credits
4 credits
130 credits
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
CTIM 341
RADG 201
RADG 213
RADG 245
RADG 246
RADG 253
RADG 254
RADG 260
RADG 261
RADG 275
RADG 312
CT Imaging
Fundamentals of Radiological Sciences
Basic Anatomic Pathology
Science and Instrumentation I
Science and Instrumentation II
Imaging Procedures I
Imaging Procedures II
Clinical Practicum I
Clinical Practicum II
Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I
Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy
3
4
3
4
3
3
3
3
3
RADG 331
Quality Assurance in Medical Imaging
3
RADG 343
RADG 344
RADG 353
RADG 354
RADG 363
RADG 364
Science and Instrumentation III
Science and Instrumentation IV
Imaging Procedures III
Imaging Procedures IV
Clinical Practicum III
Clinical Practicum IV
4
4
3
3
4
5
RADG 371
RADG 444
RADG 455
Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II
Medical Digital Imaging
Imaging Procedures V
3
3
3
RADG 465
RADG 466
RADG 481
Clinical Practicum V
Clinical Practicum VI
Research Methodology
3
4
3
RADG 498
RADG 499
RADT 222
Senior Research Project I
Senior Research Project II - Seminar
Radiation Sciences
4
1
3
Total Credits Required Courses in the Major
3
3
COURSE TITLE
ARTS 119
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
Foundations of Art and Music
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
1
3
24
SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 176
BIOL 276
MGMT 125
PHAR 251
Anatomy and Physiology I
Anatomy and Physiology II
Principles of Management
Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers
Total Support Course Credits
4
4
3
3
14
ELECTIVE COURSES
Any one of the imaging of health science
electives
Total Elective Credits
4
4
88
Career Options:
• Radiographer
• With relevant, formal post graduate certification:
o
CT technologist
o
Radiography educator
o
o
MRI technologist
o
o
o
o
o
Clinical coordinator
Health policy specialist
Mammographer
Ultrasonographer
Echocardiographer
Applications specialist
Faculty Profile
Suzette Thomas Rodriguez
Department Chair
Senior Lecturer - CT imaging,
radiography, science and
instrumentation, radiation medicine
B.Sc., Dip. Ed, Cert.
Kerry Edghill
Lecturer - Science and
Instrumentation, radiography
B.Sc., M.Sc.
Research Interest: Science education
Collette Reyes-Bivins
Lecturer
Clinical techniques, radiation therapy
B.Sc., ARRT
Research Interests: The effect of early
cancer detection methods employed
in the Caribbean and how it impacts
survival rate in cancer patients
169
Sandra Ashiboe-Mensah
Lecturer - Immunology/serology,
phlebotomy, organic and
biochemistry
B.Sc.
Research Interests: Immunity to
infectious disease
Derek Emmanuel
Senior Lecturer - Genetics, molecular
biology, clinical chemistry
PhD, M.Phil., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Metabolic
anomalies, DNA Testing
Florence Ricketts
Clinical Cordinator
Imaging Procedures
DCR, Cert. Dip.
Research Interests: Science education
Edward Cazabon
Senior Lecturer - Histology,
hematology, health and health policy
B.Sc., DVM, Dip. Path, MRCVS
Research Interests: factors affecting
student performance and choice of
academic career
Shashiprabha Mohansingh
Clinical Coordinator
AASD
Research Interests: The effects
of gluthione level on HIV positive
individuals and gluthione on aging
process
Ferlin Santiago
Lecturer - Immunology/serology,
hematology, organic and
biochemistry, phlebotomy
B.Sc.
Research Interests: Phlebotomy,
Hematology
Wilma Collins
Lecturer - Radiography, medical
imaging
DCR (R+T), Dip.Ed
Research Interests: Science education
Francis Pierre
Lecturer - Hematology
B.Sc., ASD
Research Interests: Hematology
Department of Environmental Studies
The Department of Environmental
Studies plays a major role in
preparing citizens to take on the
challenges posed by the complex
environmental
problems
facing
local and regional communities.
The curriculum is designed to
ensure that students have a good
balance of theoretical knowledge
and practical skills so that they
can
make
informed
decisions
in the workplace in respect of
restorative or preventive action.
Graduates-who
are
readily
employed in private enterprises,
the industrial sector and state
agencies, including the Environmental Management Agency (EMA), Solid Waste Management Company, the Water
and Sewerage Authority (WASA) and several other agencies-are proactive problem solvers who are leading the
way in promoting responsible stewardship of the environment.
170
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Programmes
The Department of Environmental Studies offers the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree Programmes
B.Sc.
Environmental Management
B.Sc.
B.Sc.
Water Resources Management and Technology
Water and Wastewater Management Services and
Technology
Associate Degree Programmes
AAS
Environmental Health
AAS
AAS
Environmental Management
Environmental Technology
AAS
AAS
AAS
AAS
Geographic Information Systems
Occupational Safety and Health
Water Resources Management and Technology
Water and Wastewater Management Services and
Technology
Bachelor of Science - Environmental Management
Environmental management has become a key issue in the pursuit of sustainable development for small island
states, with fluctuating economies and fragile natural environments. The purpose of this programme is to produce
graduates who are knowledgeable about the complex environmental issues facing society. The curriculum is
comprehensive and action-oriented. In addition to being aligned to established standards for best practice in
environmental management, students also have an opportunity to conduct research, thereby ensuring that they
will be able to make meaningful interventions in the prudent management of our resources, and to promote
behaviors that support sustainable development.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Environmental Management
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Management, students must complete 141
credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:
Required courses in the major area of study
69 credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Support courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
141 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160
ENVS 217
ENVS 256
ENVS 257
ENVS 260
ENVS 263
ENVS 270
ENVS 300
ENVS 305
ENVS 310
ENVS 316
ENVS 318
ENVS 413
ENVS 414
ENVS 415
ENVS 420
COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I
Disaster Management
Air Quality Control
Soil Science
Environmental Studies II
Water Quality Control
Solid Waste Management
Environmental Ethics
Negotiating Environmental Issues
Land Use Management
Tropical Forest and Wildlife Management
Hazardous Waste Management
Energy Efficiency and Conservation
Coastal Zone Management and Technology
Risk Management
Sustainable Development
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
RELI 205
SCIE 121
SCIE 201
Comparative Religion
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Contemporary Issues in Science
3
3
1
171
ENVS 460
Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental
Management
3
ENVS 462
ENVS 465
ENVS 499
LAWW 165
OSHE 245
WRMT 200
Human Health and the Environment
International Perspectives on Environmental Politics
Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Occupational Health and Safety Management
Wastewater Management
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
69
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT 120
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 123
CHEM 111
CHEM 112
ECON 230
GEOG 121
GISY 172
MATH 122
PHYS 102
SUPPORT COURSES
General Biology
Concepts in Chemistry I
Concepts in Chemistry II
Introduction to Environmental Economics
Concepts in Geography
Intro . to Geographic Information Systems
Mathematical Methods II
General Physics I
Total Support Course Credits
3
3
3
48
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
Career Options:
• Environmental officer
• Compliance officer
• Conservation officer
• Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) officer
• Bio-remediation technician
• Environmental research officer
Associate in Applied Science – Environmental Management
Environmental management has become a key issue in the pursuit of sustainable development for small island
states with fluctuating economies and fragile natural environments. The purpose of this programme is to educate
participants to be sensitive, articulate, knowledgeable and action-oriented about the complex environmental
issues facing society. The degree addresses ethical considerations of environmental management-including
consideration for all life forms-with a view to creating improved standards of environmental behavior and an
appreciation for the importance of prudent management of natural resources, within a sustainable development
context.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Environmental Management
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Management, students must successfully
complete 69 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
30 credits
Support courses
15 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
69 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160
ENVS 217
ENVT 256
ENVS 257
172
COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I
Disaster Management
Air Quality Control
Soil Science
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
COURSE TITLE
BUSI 103
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Cr.
3
3
3
3
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVS 260
ENVS 263
ENVS 270
LAWW 165
OSHE 245
Environmental Studies II
Water Quality Control
Solid Waste Management
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Occupational Health and Safety Management
3
3
3
3
3
WRMT 200
Wastewater Management
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
LIBS 130
MATH 121
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Courses
3
3
3
3
24
SUPPORT COURSES
30
BIOL 123
CHEM 111
GEOG 121
PHYS 102
MATH 122
General Biology
Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I
Concepts in Geography
General Physics
Mathematical Methods II
Total Support Course Credits
3
3
3
3
3
15
Career Options:
• Environmental technologist
• Environmental officer
• Pollution control officer
• Recycling officer
• Compliance officer.
Associate in Applied Science - Environmental Technology
The Environmental Technology programme is designed to provide students with the education and training
necessary to advance in the expanding environmental field. The programme affords students a sound foundation
in the basic and engineering sciences, with an emphasis on practices related to pollution prevention and control.
The curriculum develops students’ understanding of the origin and actions leading to environmental problems,
and equips students to formulate appropriate interventions and solutions.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Environmental Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Technology, students must successfully
complete 66 credits with a minimum of GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
Core curriculum courses
Support courses
Total Credits Required for Graduation
30 credits
24 credits
12 credits
66 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 161
ENVS 204
ENVS 256
ENVS 257
ENVS 261
ENVS 263
ENVS 270
LAWW 165
OSHE 245
COURSE TITLE
Environmental Monitoring Techniques I
Surveying and Drawing
Air Quality Control
Soil Science
Environmental Monitoring Techniques II
Water Quality Control
Solid Waste Management
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Occupational Health and Safety Management
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH121
SOCI 102
STAT120
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Introduction to the Study of Society
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Courses
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
173
WRMT 255
Wastewater Engineering
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
3
SUPPORT COURSES
30
BIOL 123
BIOL 222
CHEM 111
PHYS 100
General Biology
Environmental Microbiology
Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I
Introduction to Physics
Total Support Course Credits
3
3
3
3
12
Career Options:
• Air sampling and monitoring technician
• Environmental engineering technician
• Emergency spill response technician
• Field sampling technician
• Pollution control officer
Bachelor of Science - Water Resources Management and Technology
The programme is designed to help students acquire a sound knowledge of specific water-related disciplines
and of current and emerging technologies that support modern water resource management operations. The
curriculum facilitates an integrated outlook on water resources development and a multi-disciplinary approach
to water resources management. In addition to developing the competencies that students need to address
current local and international issues in the water industry, the programme offers a strategic, future-oriented
perspective on water resources management, thus positioning graduates to be on the cutting-edge of their
profession, wherever they may be employed.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Water Resources Management and Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, students must
complete 138 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:
Courses in the major area of study
69 credits
Core curriculum courses
Support courses
Total Credits Required for Graduation
48 credits
21 credits
138 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160
ENVS 204
ENVS 209
ENVS 260
ENVS 263
ENVS 300
ENVS 310
ENVS 414
ENVS 415
ENVS 420
ENVS 460
ENVS 499
LAWW 165
174
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
CODE
Environmental Studies I
Surveying and Drawing
Quantitative Methods Applications
Environmental Studies II
Water Quality Control
Environmental Ethics
Land Use Management
Coastal Zone Management and Technology
Risk Management
Sustainable Development
Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental Management
Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
PSYC 103
Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
3
RELI 205
Comparative Religion
3
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
WRMT 180
WRMT 190
WRMT 201
WRMT 202
WRMT 203
WRMT 205
Hydrometeorology
Hydraulics I
Surface Water Hydrology I
Groundwater Hydrology I
Drainage and Irrigation
Watershed Management and Soil Conservation
3
3
3
3
3
3
WRMT 290
WRMT 301
WRMT 302
WRMT 410
Hydraulics II
Surface Water Hydrology II
Groundwater Hydrology II
Hydrological Database Development
3
3
3
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
69
SCIE 121
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT 120
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
3
1
3
3
3
CHEM 111
CHEM 306
ECON 230
GEOG 201
SUPPORT COURSES
Concepts in Chemistry I
Chemistry for Water and Wastewater
Introduction to Environmental Economics
Concepts in Geography
3
3
3
3
GISY 172
MATH 122
PHYS 102
Intro. to Geographic Information Systems
Mathematical Methods II
General Physics I
3
3
3
Total Core Curriculum Credits
48
Total Support Course Credits
21
Career Options:
• Water analyst/technician
• Assistant hydrologist
• Water supply technical operator
• Hydrological technician
Associate in Applied Science - Water Resources Management and Technology
The programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. degree in Water Resources Management
and Technology. Students pursuing the bachelor’s degree programme can exit with an Associate in Applied
Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, once they have completed the prescribed
list of courses below. Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry level positions in the job
market such as assistant hydrologists, hydrological technicians and water supply technicians/operators.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Water Resources Management and Technology
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Water Resources Management and Technology, students
must successfully complete 69 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:
Required courses in the major area of study
39 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Support courses
6 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
69 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160
ENVS 204
ENVS 209
ENVS 260
ENVS 270
LAWW 165
OSHE 245
WRMT 190
WRMT255
WMRT 280
WRMT 282
COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I
Surveying and Drawing
Quantitative Methods Applications
Environmental Studies II
Solid Waste Management
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Occupational Health and Safety Management
Hydraulics I
Wastewater Engineering
Introduction to Wastewater Operations and Maintenance
Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
CODE
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
LIBS 130
MATH 121
PSYC 103
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
3
3
3
3
3
3
SOCI 102
STAT 120
Introduction to Study of Society
Fundamentals of Statistics
3
3
Total Core Curriculum Credits
24
175
WRMT 284
Wastewater Treatment Process
3
WRMT 286
Wastewater Planning and Development
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
39
SUPPORT COURSES
CHEM 111
PHYS 100
Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I
Introduction to Physics
3
3
Total Support Course Credits
6
Bachelor of Science - Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
As our country and region continue along the path of development and diversification, appropriate measures
must be put in place to ensure that expansion trends are managed in a sustainable manner. Within this context,
there is a critical need for competent professionals who can make effective and efficient use of resources in the
provision of adequate wastewater management services. The programme will provide the requisite skills, theory
and training for students who work in the field of wastewater management, as well as the ability to implement
these skills within the work environment.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. – Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Wastewater Management, Services and Technology, students
must complete 141 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:
Courses in the major area of study
75 credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Support courses
18 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
141 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 160
ENVS 204
ENVS 209
ENVS 260
ENVS 270
ENVS 300
ENVS 309
ENVS 415
ENVS 460
ENVS 499
LAWW 165
OSHE 245
WRMT190
WRMT 255
WRMT 280
WRMT 282
WRMT 284
WRMT 286
WRMT 288
WRMT 290
WRMT 317
WRMT 425
WRMT 427
WRMT 430
WRMT 432
COURSE TITLE
Environmental Studies I
Surveying and Drawing
Quantitative Methods Applications
Environmental Studies II
Solid Waste Management
Environmental Ethics
Environmental Quality Assurance
Risk Management
Analysis and Problem-Solving in Environmental
Management
Senior Research Project – Environmental Studies
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Occupational Health and Safety Management
Hydraulics I
Wastewater Engineering
Elements of Wastewater Plant Operation and
Maintenance
Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems
Wastewater Treatment Process
Wastewater Planning and Development
Advanced Wastewater Treatment
Hydraulics II
Biological Principles of Water and Wastewater
Management
Water and Wastewater Plant Operations and
Maintenance
Water and Wastewater Collection Systems
Membrane Technology
Water Resources Management
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
176
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
75
COURSE TITLE
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 121
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
STAT 120
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behaviour and
Diversity
Comparative Religion
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
CHEM 209
CHEM 111
GEOG 121
MATH 122
PHYS 102
SOBE 335
SUPPORT COURSES
Chemistry for Water and Wastewater
Operations
Concepts in Chemistry I
Concepts in Geography
Mathematical Methods II
General Physics I
Introduction to Conflict Management
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
48
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Career Options:
• Assistant hydrologist
• Wastewater analyst/technician
• Wastewater technical operator
• Hydrological technician
AAS - Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
The programme essentially comprises the first two years of the B.Sc. degree in Water and Wastewater Management,
Services and Technology. Students enrolled in the bachelor’s degree programme can exit with an Associate
in Applied Science degree in Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology, once they have
completed the prescribed list of courses below. Graduates will be prepared for technician or technologist entry
level positions in occupations such as water supply technical operator, engineering assistant, systems operator
and assistant hydrologist.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Water and Wastewater Management, Services and Technology
To be awarded the Associate of Applied Science degree in Water and Wastewater Management, Services and
Technology, students must complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution
below:
Required courses in the major area of study
33 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Support courses
6 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
63 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
ENVS 160
ENVS 260
ENVS 263
LAWW 165
WRMT 180
WRMT 190
WRMT 201
WRMT 202
WRMT 203
Environmental Studies I
Environmental Studies II
Water Quality Control
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
Hydrometeorology
Hydraulics I
Surface Water Hydrology I
Groundwater Hydrology I
Drainage and Irrigation
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
WRMT 205
Watershed Management and Soil Conservation
3
WRMT 215
Hydrometry
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
LIBS 130
MATH 121
SPAN 100
SOCI 103
STAT120
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Introduction to Spanish
Perspectives on Contemporary Issues
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
SUPPORT COURSES
CHEM 111
PHYS 100
33
Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I
Introduction to Physics
Total Support Course Credits
Cr
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
3
3
6
Associate in Applied Science – Environmental Health
The programme is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and find solutions for
environmental problems that adversely affect the health of communities. Students learn about the operations
of efficient health management systems and are kept up to date on scientific advances in the field. In addition,
they are made aware of current regional developments in the management of environmental health systems.
177
Graduation Requirements:
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Environmental Health, students must successfully
complete 72 credits, with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the distribution below:
Required courses in the major area of study
45 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
72 credits
Support courses
3 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
ENVH 121
ENVH 122
ENVH 211
ENVH 212
ENVH 213
ENVH 215
ENVH 220
ENVH 221
ENVH 223
Introduction to Epidemiology
Vector Control
Building Science and Construction
Environmental Health I
Environmental Health II
Community Health
Food and Food Hygiene I
Food and Food Hygiene II
Environmental Health Administration and Legislation
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
ENVH 266
ENVS 217
HLED 110
OSHE 123
OSHE 201
Environmental Health Internship (8 wks)
Disaster Management
Health Education and Promotion
Intro. to Occupational Safety and Health
First Aid and CPR
6
3
3
3
3
CODE
BUSI 103
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
MATH 116
SOCI102
SPAN100
STAT 120
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 113
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
COURSE TITLE
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Contemporary College Mathematics
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
SUPPORT COURSES
Anatomy and Physiology
45
Total Support Course Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
3
3
Career Options:
• Environmental health officer
• Environmental health educator
Associate in Applied Science - Geographic Information Systems
The Geographic Information Systems programme allows students to view, understand, question, interpret and
visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns and trends in the form of maps, reports and
charts. The GIS programme integrates hardware, software and data for managing, analyzing and displaying all
forms of information. The use of this technology has expanded rapidly and GIS professionals are now in demand
in many different types of public and private sector agencies, regionally and internationally.
Graduation Requirements: AAS – Geographic Information Systems
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Geographic Information Systems, students must
successfully complete 63 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
178
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Courses in the major area of study
30 credits
Core curriculum courses
Support courses
Total Credits Required for Graduation
24 credits
9 credits
63 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
CODE
GISY 274
GISY 276
Environmental Studies I
Surveying and Drawing
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Introduction to Remote Sensing
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Programming
Spatial Database Design
Principles of Cartography
Geographic Information Applications in the Workplace
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
COMM 117
COMM 118
LIBS 130
MATH 121
PSYC 103
SPAN 100
STAT 120
GISY 299
Senior Project - Geographic Information Systems
3
LAWW 165
Introduction to Environmental Law and Policy
3
ENVS 160
ENVS 204
GISY 172
GISY 174
GISY 175
GISY 272
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
COURSE TITLE
Cr.
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total Core Curriculum Credits
24
SUPPORT COURSES
30
GEOG 201
ITEC 115
Concepts in Geography
Information Systems Project Management
ITEC 130
Program Design
3
3
3
Total Support Course Credits
9
Career Options:
• GIS technician/technologist
Associate in Applied Science - Occupational Safety and Health
The programme is designed to meet the local needs in occupational safety and health and to keep students abreast
of the changing industrial environment. Students will learn the various methods used in the identification of
potential hazards and other major issues associated with challenges in the workplace and develop the necessary
skills for the necessary corrective/preventive measures.
Graduation Requirements:
To be awarded the Associate in Applied Science degree in Occupational Safety and Health, students must
successfully complete 71 credits with a minimum of GPA of 2.0, according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
44 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Support courses
3 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
71 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
ENVS 217
ENVS 245
OSHE 123
COURSE TITLE
Disaster Management
Occupational Health and Safety Management
Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
CODE
3
3
3
3
COMM 117
COMM 118
LIBS 130
MATH 116
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Fundamental Research Skills
Contemporary College Mathematics
Cr.
3
3
3
3
179
OSHE 132
OSHE 141
OSHE 160
OSHE 201
OSHE 232
Safety Technology I
Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene I
Techniques of Safety Management I
First Aid and CPR
Safety Technology II
3
4
3
3
4
OSHE 241
OSHE 260
OSHE 290
Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene II
Techniques of Safety Management II
Legal Aspects of Occupational Safety Management
3
3
3
OSHE 292
OSHE 299
Pollution Control and Environmental Impact Assessment
Senior Project - OSH
3
3
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
PSYC103
SCIE 121
SPAN100
STAT120
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
3
3
3
3
24
SUPPORT COURSES
BIOL 113
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
Total Support Course Credits
3
3
44
Career Options:
• Occupational safety and health technician
• Safety manager
Faculty Profile:
Glenda Charles Harris
Department Chair
Senior Lecturer
Research Interests: Science education
Vanessa Elliot
Senior Lecturer – Geographic
Information Systems
Research Interests: Science education
Deryck Pattron
Senior Lecturer - Health education,
community Health
Research Interests: Food and food
hygiene
Ramona Boodoosingh
Senior Lecturer - OSH, Chemistry
MSc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Epidemiology,
community Health
Sochan Laltoo
Senior Lecturer - Environmental
management
M.Sc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Environmental
analysis
Karen Paul
Senior Lecturer - Environmental
management
Dip. Ed., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Techniques in
environmental monitoring
Dirk Chin Leung
Senior Lecturer – Environmental
engineering
MSc., BSc.
Research Interests: Contaminant fate
and support, water and wastewater
treatment
Dereck Mejias
Senior Lecturer - Occupational safety,
industrial hygiene
M.Sc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Industrial hygiene
Albert Skair
Senior Lecturer - Health education,
disaster preparedness
RSH, B.Sc.
Research Interests: Disaster
preparedness and management
Department of Natural and Life Sciences
The Department of Natural and Life Sciences offers degree programmes in biology, chemistry, physics and
geography. The Department also provides support courses for degrees in the health sciences and is responsible
for the delivery of core curriculum courses designed to ensure that all COSTAATT students have a sound
foundation in the natural sciences.
180
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Programmes
The Department of Natural and Life Sciences offers
the following degree programme options:
Bachelor Degree
Programmes
Associate Degree
Programmes
B.Sc.
B.Sc.
AS
AS
AS
AS
Biology
Geography
Biology
Geography
Chemistry
Physics
Bachelor of Science - Biology
The Bachelor of Science degree in Biology is designed for students who wish to pursue professions directly
related, or allied to, biology. The programme is structured to enable students to select from minors in ecology
or biomedical sciences. Students who choose the biomedical sciences route will be able to strengthen the
required academic foundation for a medical career; while those who elect a minor in ecology will focus on
developing solutions to environmental issues. Strong emphasis is placed on the acquisition of research skills
to equip students with the requisite competencies for entry level research positions. In addition, this degree
covers material appropriate to preparation for: general graduate admissions tests such as the Graduate Records
Examination (GRE), medical college admission tests, or entry to professional schools.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Biology
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, the student must successfully complete 135 credits
with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
75 credits
Elective courses
12 credits
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
135 credits
REQUIRED IN MAJOR COURSES
CODE
BIOL 121
BIOL 122
BIOL 198
BIOL 231
BIOL 241
BIOL 242
BIOL 256
BIOL 281
BIOL 291
BIOL 433
BIOL 455
BIOL 473
CHEM 131
CHEM 132
CHEM 204
CHEM 205
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I (with lab)
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II (with lab)
Philosophy of Biology
Ecology I
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Microbiology
Animal Diversity
Diversity of Green Plants
Biology Seminar
Biology Practicum
Animal Physiology
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
CORE CURRICULUM CREDITS
Cr.
4
4
1
3
3
3
3
4
4
1
1
4
4
4
3
3
CODE
ARTS 119
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
COURSE TITLE
Foundations of Art and Music
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
181
CHEM 208
CHEM 215
CHEM 216
PHYS 121
PHYS 122
MATH 118
MATH 160
SCIE 199
SCIE 299
SCIE 399
SCIE 499
Biochemistry
Organic Chemistry I- Lab
Organic Chemistry II- Lab
College Physics I
College Physics II
Pre-Calculus
Calculus I
Research Project I
Research Project II
Research Project III
Research Project IV
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
3
1
1
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
SPAN 100
STAT 120
Introduction to Spanish
Fundamentals of Statistics
3
3
Total Core Curriculum Credits
BIOL 378
BIOL 371
BIOL 420
BIOL 426
BIOL 478
ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS (Choose any four courses)
Biomedical Sciences Option
Vertebrate Anatomy
Animal Development
Parasitology
Histology
Immunology
48
3
3
3
3
3
75
BIOL 331
BIOL 337
BIOL 381
BIOL 431
ENVS 413
Ecology Option
Ecology II: Systems Ecology
Biogeography
Animal Behaviour
Ecology III: Surveys and Methods
Energy Efficiency and Conservation
Total Elective Credits
3
3
3
3
3
12
Career Options:
The degree will be of interest to those aspiring to teach or seek employment as scientists in the biological and
environmental sciences. In addition, it is a solid preparation for graduate or professional degrees in areas such
as medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary science.
Associate in Science - Biology
The Associate of Science degree in Biology is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in the
fundamental principles of biology. It aims to foster greater understanding of the need to conserve and protect
natural biodiversity, with special emphasis on local and regional ecosystems. As students of this programme
increase their understanding of life processes they will develop an appreciation of the importance of responsible
lifestyle choices in areas related to nutrition, exercise and safe sexual practices.
Graduation Requirements: AS - Biology
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Biology, students must successfully complete 65 credits with
a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
41 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
65 credits
REQUIRED IN MAJOR COURSES
CODE
BIOL 121
BIOL 122
BIOL 198
BIOL 231
BIOL 241
BIOL 243
BIOL 256
BIOL 281
BIOL 291
CHEM 131
182
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I (with lab)
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II (with lab)
Philosophy of Biology
Ecology I
Genetics
Cell and Molecular Biology
Microbiology
Animal Diversity
Diversity of Green Plants
General Chemistry I
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4
4
1
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 132
SCIE 199
SCIE 299
General Chemistry II
Research Project I
Research Project II
Total Credits Required for Courses in the Major
4
2
2
41
Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in biology or in a related field
of study. These may include baccalaureate degrees in, biochemistry, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary
medicine, nursing, radiological sciences, environmental health or medical laboratory technology. Graduates may
also gain employment at the technician’s level in the areas of laboratory or field work, research, or in teaching.
Bachelor of Science - Geography
The Bachelor of Science degree in Geography examines the relationship between nature and its influence on
human development, including the impact of human activity on natural environments. Students will explore
topics in physical and human geography, techniques such as mapping and geographic information systems, as
well as qualitative and quantitative research methods for geographers. Students of this programme may opt to
pursue minors in tourism, urban planning or natural hazards.
Graduation Requirements: B.Sc. - Geography
To be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree in Geography, students must successfully complete 126 credits
with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
Courses in the minor area of study
57 credits
21 credits
(Choose one of three)
Core curriculum courses
48 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
126 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr
BIOL 337
GEOG 131
GEOG 132
GEOG 141
GEOG 142
GEOG 228
GEOG 231
GEOG 236
GEOG 238
GEOG 241
GEOG 301
GEOG 325
GEOG 331
GEOG 334
GEOG 336
GISY 172
GISY 274
SCIE 199
SCIE 299
Biogeography
Introduction to Physical Geography
Applied Physical Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
Applied Human Geography
Cultural Geography
Geography of Agriculture
Physical Hydrology
Advanced Geomorphology
Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
History and Philosophy of Geography
Geography of Development
Meteorology and Climatology
General Geology
Humid Tropical Environments
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Principles of Cartography
Research Project I
Research Project II
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
SCIE 399
Research Project III
1
SCIE 499
Research Project IV
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
CODE
COURSE TITLE
ARTS 119
BUSI 203
COMM 117
COMM 118
ECON 110
ENGL 200
ENTP 210
ENVH 102
ENVH 121
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
RELI 205
SCIE 201
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
Foundations of Art and Music
Leadership and Ethics
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
Introduction to General Economics
Comparative Literature
Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
World Issues in Public Health
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Comparative Religion
Contemporary Issues in Science
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
STAT 120
Fundamentals of Statistics
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
1
3
3
3
48
1
57
MINOR – TOURISM
ENVS 310
Land Use Management
3
183
ENVS 414
GEOG 429
GEOG 440
GEOG 443
GEOG 470
GEOG 475
MINOR – URBAN PLANNING
ENVS 310
GEOG 322
GEOG 422
GEOG 429
GEOG 436
GEOG 440
GEOG 485
Land Use Management
Geography of Transportation
Advanced Themes in Urban Geography
Historical Preservation in Urban Planning
Natural Hazards
Applied Demography
Natural Resources Conservation
Total Minor Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Coastal Zone Management and Technology
Historical Preservation in Urban Planning
Applied Demography
Geopolitics & International Relations
Geography of Tourism
Ecotourism - Practice and Management
Total Minor Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
MINOR – NATURAL HAZARDS
21
ENVS 310
ENVS 414
ENVS 415
GEOG 436
GEOG 440
GEOG 465
GEOG 485
Land Use Management
Coastal Zone Management and Technology
Risk Management
Natural Hazards
Applied Demography
Global Climate Change
Natural Resources Conservation
Total Minor Credits
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
21
Career Options:
A degree in geography serves as a strong foundation for graduate studies in geography, other social and natural
sciences, and for careers in government, journalism, teaching, GIS, cartography, urban and regional planning,
and conservation and development work.
Associate in Science – Geography
The Associate of Science degree in Geography examines major physical and other factors influencing human
development. Students explore topics such as climate change, globalization, poverty and disparities in levels of
development which are related to geographical phenomena. The approach to instruction allows students to see
the world as a laboratory and develop basic research skills.
Graduation Requirements: AS - Geography
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Geography, students must successfully complete 61 credits
with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Courses in the major area of study
34 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Elective courses
3 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
61credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
GEOG 131
GEOG 132
GEOG 141
GEOG 142
GEOG 231
GEOG 236
GEOG 238
GEOG 241
GEOG 301
184
COURSE TITLE
Introduction to Physical Geography
Applied Physical Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
Applied Human Geography
Geography of Agriculture
Physical Hydrology
Advanced Geomorphology
Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
History and Philosophy of Geography
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 117
PSYC 103
SCIE 121
SOCI 102
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
College Algebra
Understanding Human Behaviour and Diversity
Foundations of Natural Sciences
Introduction to the Study of Society
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
GISY 172
SCIE 199
SCIE 299
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Research Project I
Research Project II
3
2
2
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Select any course worth at least 3 credits, for which
either, there are no pre-requisites or, they have
already been met.
34
Career Options:
At the end of this programme, students may wish to establish careers in forestry, teaching, real estate, tourism,
natural resource management, urban planning, or census data collection and analysis. The programme is
also designed to allow students to transfer into baccalaureate programmes in human and physical geography,
environmental management and science, water resource management and geology & geophysics, amongst
areas.
Associate in Science - Chemistry
The Associate of Science degree in Chemistry convinces students that the knowledge of chemistry is essential
to the understanding of all disciplines, thereby preparing them for any profession that they may pursue in any
Biological or Physical science. The interesting applications in this programme will help students to increase
their problem-solving skills and to think critically, thereby making them successful in today’s world. The degree
integrates all the major areas of Chemistry, placing emphasis on the physical principles, inorganic compounds,
biochemistry and analytical techniques. Students graduate with strong practical skills, making them adequately
qualified for many professional adventures.
Graduation Requirements: AS - Chemistry
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Chemistry, students must successfully complete 63 credits
with a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
39 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
63 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
CHEM 131
CHEM 132
CHEM 133
CHEM 202
CHEM 204
CHEM 205
CHEM 208
CHEM 210
CHEM 211
CHEM 215
CHEM 216
MATH 122
SCIE 199
SCIE 299
COURSE TITLE
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
Physical Chemistry
Food Chemistry
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Introduction to Biochemistry
Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry I - Lab
Organic Chemistry II - Lab
Mathematical Methods II
Research Project I
Research Project II
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
1
1
3
2
2
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 121
PSYC 103
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Introduction to the Study of Society
Foundations of Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Credits
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
39
185
Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in Chemistry or a related field.
These may include baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, pharmacy, and medical laboratory technology. However,
graduates may also gain employment at the technical level in the areas of laboratory or field work, quality
control, research, or in teaching.
Associate in Science - Physics
The Associate degree in Physics is the gateway to the modern world with its technological emphasis producing
graduates at all levels of familiarity with physical principles. The Associate degree in Physics is aimed at producing
a graduate with a view of the world that will stimulate interest in and care for the environment in relation to the
environmental impact of physics and its applications. The degree has a richly detailed and highly developed
system of laws and theories, which confers a high degree of mathematical rigour and makes possible quantitative
investigation over an extremely wide range of phenomena. Graduates can therefore become confident citizens
in a technological world and are able to take or develop an informed interest in matters of scientific import.
Graduation Requirements: AS – Physics
To be awarded the Associate of Science degree in Physics, students must successfully complete 65 credits with
a minimum GPA of 2.0 according to the following distribution:
Required courses in the major area of study
35 credits
Core curriculum courses
24 credits
Elective courses
6 credits
Total Credits Required for Graduation
65 credits
COURSES IN THE MAJOR
CODE
COURSE TITLE
CORE CURRICULUM COURSES
Cr.
MATH 122
MATH 123
PHYS 151
PHYS 152
PHYS 153
PHYS 154
PHYS 155
PHYS 201
PHYS 202
Mathematical Methods II
Mathematical Methods III
Mechanics and Dynamics
Waves, Light and Oscillations
Electricity and Magnetism
Heat and Thermodynamics
Nuclear and Atomic Physics
Introduction to Electronics and Microprocessors
Science of Materials
SCIE 199
Research Project I
2
SCIE299
Research Project II
2
Total Credits for Required Courses in the Major
3
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
35
CODE
COMM 117
COMM 118
HIST 210
LIBS 130
MATH 121
PSYC 103
SOCI 102
SPAN 100
COURSE TITLE
Fundamentals of Writing
Communication in the Workplace
History of Trinidad and Tobago
Fundamental Research Skills
Mathematical Methods I
Understanding Human Behavior and Diversity
Introduction to the Study of Society
Introduction to Spanish
Total Core Curriculum Credits
PHYS 203
PHYS 204
PHYS 205
Cr.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
24
ELECTIVE COURSES
Select one from below and any other college course
for which the prerequisites have been met.
Introduction to Geology and Geophysics
Environmental Physics
Medical Physics
3
3
3
Total Elective Credits
6
Career Options:
This programme prepares students for transfer into a baccalaureate programme in Physics, Engineering or related
field. These may include baccalaureate degrees in pure and applied physics, mechanical engineering, electrical
186
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
engineering, civil engineering, and Telecommunications. However, graduates may also gain employment at the
technical level in the areas of laboratory or field work, research, or in teaching.
Faculty Profile:
Delamae Wilson, Department Chair
Senior Lecturer - Biology
M.Sc, B.Sc.
Research Interests: Microbiology,
antimicrobials
Nyan Gadspy-Dolly
Senior Lecturer-Chemistry
Ph.D, Dip.Ed., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Chemical
education and research, organic
catalysis
Michelyn Phillips
Lecturer - Biology
B.Sc. (M.Phil candidate)
Research Interests: Human anatomy;
immunology, specifically autoimmune
diseases.
Sheldon Bidaisee
Senior Lecturer - Geography
M.Sc., B.A., Dip Ed
Research Interests: Physical planning
and the conservation of historical
buildings
Risha Kalloo
Senior Lecturer - Chemistry
M.Phil., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Diabetes and
metabolism
Sanjiv Ramcharan
Senior Lecturer – Biology
MSc. BSc. (PhD candidate)
Research Interests: Environmental
pollutants in water and its impact on
water quality
Patrick Campbell
Senior Lecturer – Biology
PhD., MSc., BSc.
Research Interests: Immunology, HIV
Anthony Lalla
Senior Lecturer - Chemistry
MPhil., B.Sc. (Ph.D. candidate)
Research Interests: Pharmacogenetics
Saeeda Sattar
Senior Lecturer – Biology
PhD., BSc.
Research Interests: Reproductive
Biology
Nyron Bovell
Senior Lecturer - Biology
M.Sc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Animal behaviors
and impacts on ecological systems
Karen Louison
Senior Lecturer - Physics
M.Sc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Biomedical
engineering; rehabilitation
engineering
Shireen Seenarine Gajusingh Senior Lecturer - Chemistry
B.Sc.
Research Interests: Synthesis,
characterization and testing of
complexes for anticancer and
antiviral properties
Karyn David
Lecturer - Biology
B.Sc.
Research Interests: Genetics
Patrick Medford
Senior Lecturer - Chemistry
M.Sc., B.Sc.
Research Interests: The retina:
the isolation of photoreceptor cell
terminals.
Anuradha Singh
Senior Lecturer - Biology
MPhil., B.Sc.
Research Interests: Marine biology,
animal physiology, crustacean
biology
Leone De Souza
Senior Lecturer - Biology
MPhil, B.Sc.
Research Interests: Human health and
nutrition
Jeffrey Mohammed
Lecturer- Physics
B.Sc. (M.Sc. candidate)
Research Interests: Environmental
Physics
187
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BIOL 090
Introduction to Concepts in Biology I
Through this course, students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and gain an understanding
of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students explore the following
topics: the organization of life, ecology, energy transfers, transport in living systems and the structure and
function of cells. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
BIOL 092 Introduction to Concepts in Biology II
Through this course, students acquire basic knowledge of key biological principles and obtain an understanding
of the world of biology. Through laboratory and field work, lectures and tutorials, students explore the following
topics: reproduction and the principles of inheritance, coordination and control, movement and support,
excretion and disease. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 090
BIOL 109
Introduction to Human Biology
In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of human biology as it relates to
the ways in which the human body functions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
BIOL 113
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
This course is designed for persons who have never been exposed to the study of science. Students in this course
will gain a fundamental knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:
None.
BIOL 114
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology with Medical Terminology
This course introduces students to the structure of medical terms by means of roots, prefixes and suffixes. It
also examines the structure and functions of various organs and systems in the body. Laboratory demonstrations
provide students with an appreciation of the various structures in situ. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
BIOL 119
Anatomy and Physiology
In this introductory course, students focus on musculoskeletal, circulatory, respiratory, special senses and
reproductive systems. They develop an understanding of medical terminology from an analysis of relevant
roots, prefixes and suffixes. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
BIOL 121
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology I
In this course, students learn how life at the cellular level affects life at the multi-cellular level and develop an
understanding of life’s diversity and the principles of taxonomy. They also learn how organisms acquire and
process energy and materials through photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and the mammalian respiratory,
circulatory and digestive systems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: CSEC (CXC)/GCE Ordinary Level pass in Biology
(or equivalent) or BIOL 090 and BIOL 092
BIOL 122
Fundamentals and Concepts in Biology II
In this course, students learn that movement and support, response to stimuli, control of the internal environment,
and reproduction are all complex and vital parts of life. They also gain an understanding of the genetic basis of
inheritance--particularly Mendelian genetic inheritance-- and of the ecological concept of an organism as a part
of a larger system of other living organisms. 4 Credits / Prerequisites: BIOL 121
188
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
BIOL 123
General Biology
(formerly BIOL 106)
Students learn about aspects of sub-organism biology such as cell structure, hormonal control, reproduction,
genetics and enzymes. Evolution and the diversity of plants and animals, including plant and animal taxa are
also examined. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE Ordinary Level Science Subject
or Completion of COMPASS Biology sequence
BIOL 136
Principles of Ecology
This course focuses on the study of plants and animals in relation to their environments. Students investigate
populations, communities, ecosystems, behavioural patterns and the impact of human activities on the
environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 123
BIOL 171 Structure and Function of the Human Body I
This course looks at human physiology and examines the functions of the body in relation to health and disease.
4 Credits/ Prerequisites: CSEC (CXC) Passing Grade in Biology, Human and Social Biology, or BIOL 090 and BIOL
092.
BIOL 172 Structure and Function of the Human Body II
This course examines the role of organ systems and their processes, in the maintenance of life. Students
explore the interrelationships between different organ systems and their homeostatic functions. Students will
also be exposed to topics related to cellular function and metabolism. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 171
BIOL 173 Anatomy and Physiology I
In this course, students learn about the structure and function of the human body, including the study of cells,
tissues and the skeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. MLT students are required to obtain a grade of
“C” or higher in this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CXC passes in Biology, Human and Social Biology or
BIOL 090 and 092
BIOL 174 Anatomy and Physiology II
In this course, students learn about the structure and function of the gastro-intestinal tract and the reproductive,
urinary, nervous and endocrine systems of the human body. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 173
BIOL 176 Anatomy and Physiology I - Radiological Sciences
In this course, students learn to interpret and analyze images accurately. They also acquire detailed knowledge of
the appendicular skeleton, the skull and vertebral column and the muscular, urinary and reproductive systems.
4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 114
BIOL 198 Philosophy of Biology
Through discourse, debate and reflection, students learn to appreciate science from a philosophical point of
view as well as the significance of biology to humanity. This course is designed to be a point of convergence of
the history, philosophy and ethics behind traditional and emerging theories and concepts in biology. Students
discuss the ethics and challenges involved in the treatment of patients, test organisms and in reporting research.
1 Credit/ Prerequisite: BIOL 121
BIOL 221 Microbiology for Nursing
Students in this course study the main cellular and structural features of a diverse range of micro-organisms.
They examine the physiology of micro-organisms and the factors that affect their growth. They also explore
the pathogenicity and epidemiology of the major infectious diseases which affect the human body. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: BIOL 171
189
BIOL 222 Environmental Microbiology (formerly called ENVS 141)
The study of terrestrial and aquatic microorganisms and their significance within the context of environmental
applications is the focus of this course. Students examine the role of microorganisms in the treatment of soils
and water. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 123
BIOL 231 Ecology I
In this course, students gain a thorough understanding of the field of general ecology. They learn the language
of ecology and design and conduct basic assessments of habitats and communities. They also examine how
basic ecological concepts can be used in applied fields such as environmental management and conservation
biology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122
BIOL 241 Genetics
(formerly BIOL 131)
Students learn about genetic principles and their application to some commonly occurring phenomena. They
study inheritance patterns through carefully designed exercises that allow them to quantify and predict outcomes
according to established genetic principles. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 122 or BIOL 174
BIOL 242 Cell Biology
(formerly BIOL 132)
This course focuses on cells as basic units of living organisms, and on their grouping into tissues and organs.
Constituents of cells – water, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; fluid mosaic models of membrane structure;
movement of substances into and out of cells; enzymes; nucleic acids and their roles are also examined. This
course is designed to meet the needs of MLT students. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 174
BIOL 243 Cell and Molecular Biology
(formerly BIOL 133)
In this course, students explore the structural and molecular approaches to studying the biology of a cell.
They examine the significance, history and philosophy of cell theory and identify the advances in science and
technology and their application to genetic variations and possible disorders within cells. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
BIOL 122.
BIOL 256 Microbiology (formerly BIOL 223)
This course focuses on pharmacology; methods of microbial control and the importance of micro-organisms to
health and industry. It allows students to examine the basic cellular and structural features of a diverse range
of groups of micro-organisms. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of microbiology and apply
these principles to commonly occurring phenomena. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122
BIOL 276 Anatomy and Physiology II - Radiological Sciences
In this course, students learn about the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hepato-biliary, respiratory, nervous
(including central nervous system) and endocrine systems. They will learn about the physiology of organs and
the imaging of their functionality via various modalities in order to be able to interpret and analyze images
accurately. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 176
BIOL 281 Animal Diversity
Students acquire a thorough understanding of the origin and diversity of animals. They learn the language
of zoology, and are able to recognise and describe animals from a variety of phyla. At the end of the course,
students will be able to demonstrate competence in the classification, relatedness and evolution of animal phyla.
4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 122
190
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
BIOL 291 Diversity of Green Plants
In this course, students examine kingdom plantae as a continuum of decreasing dependence on water for
reproduction and survival. They develop an understanding of the structures and adaptations that allow plants to
survive and play a distinctive role in human survival. They also explore the anatomy and biology of green plants
with respect to advancements in reproduction and movement away from water. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL
122
BIOL 299 Biology Research Project
In this course, students acquire the necessary skills to design and implement a biology research project. At the
end of the course, students submit a written report and present their data to a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/
Prerequisites: Recommendation by faculty advisor and completion of a minimum of 49 credits.
BIOL 331 Ecology II: Systems Ecology
The focus of this course is the study of the ecology of major ecosystems. Emphasis will be placed on tropical
systems, a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, the regional management of marine resources,
and on the factors that lead to dwindling global fisheries. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 231
BIOL 337 Biogeography
This course bridges the fields of biology and geography through the study of the distribution of plants and
animals across the planet. Students identify and explore how historical, physical, and biological factors affect
present and past geographical distributions of individuals, species, communities, ecosystems, and biomes. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 122 or GEOG 132
BIOL 362 Genetics and Molecular Diagnostics
In this course, students learn the fundamentals of gene structure, function and transmission; methods of genetic
manipulation, regulation and phenotypic difference determination. They also examine the aspects of critical
thinking that are fundamental to genetics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 242
BIOL 371 Animal Development
Students examine the basic patterns, processes and mechanisms of animal development in vertebrates. They
also explore the processes of fertilization, morphogenesis, organogenesis, and postembryonic developmental
phenomena at both the cellular and molecular levels. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243
BIOL 378 Vertebrate Anatomy
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the interrelationships between the structure and function
of the human body in an applied context. All physiological systems are studied with an emphasis on their
functionality, associated diseases and good health practices. The course also emphasizes a number of basic
research principles in anatomy and physiology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243
BIOL 381 Animal Behaviour
In this course, students learn methods of observing animal behaviour and techniques for analysing large data
sets to observe trends. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243
BIOL 420 Parasitology
The study of parasites and parasitism is the focus of this course. Students explore the breadth of parasitic
agents known to infect wildlife, domestic animals and humans globally as well as the parasitic agents of disease
in tropical regions. The course covers the patterns of development of various parasitic agents and the basis
191
of their successful transmission from host to host. Students also explore the ecology of parasitism and the
strategies currently employed to control some parasites. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 256
BIOL 426 Histology
This course focuses on the structure and function of normal mammalian tissues and organs. Through the use of
electron micrographs, and light microscopy, students examine details of tissue and organ anatomy and relate
structures to their functions. They acquire skills in recognising and identifying tissue layers, and learn methods
for recording their observations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and 243
BIOL 431 Ecology III: Surveys and Methods
In this course, students will focus on methods of assessing biodiversity with an emphasis on applications in
conservation biology. They will get hands-on experience in the design and practice of ecological surveys in three
main ecosystems: a tropical terrestrial forest, a tropical river system and the near shore marine environment.
Students will gain an appreciation of how these methods feed into conservation efforts and environmental
management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 231
BIOL 433 Biology Seminar
This course is designed to expose students to current and emerging fields of study and research in the area
of biology in Trinidad and Tobago. Students attend research presentations to observe, analyze and critique
methods and procedures. Through discussion and reflective writing, they explore the potential and importance
of the pursuit of science and gain an appreciation for the value of collaborative learning and are able to
identify opportunities for future research. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum 95 credits and
recommendation of faculty advisor
BIOL 455 Biology Practicum
In this course, students acquire work experience in a biology-related occupation (medical, nutritional,
environmental, business or educational). They are placed within participating organisations and assigned tasks
that utilize the knowledge and skills acquired in the classroom setting and enhance their understanding of the
practical aspects of work in the field of biology. 1 Credit/Prerequisites: Recommendation of faculty advisor
and completion a minimum of 109 credits
BIOL 473 Animal Physiology
This course provides an in-depth look at how animals use and metabolise oxygen, food and water; how they
respond to changes in temperature and how they move and acquire information. At the end of this course,
students will have gained an appreciation of the strategies animals display in dealing with environmental
adversity. Instruction focuses primarily on mammalian physiology, with comparisons to the human condition. 4
Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and BIOL 243.
BIOL 478 Immunology
In this course, students gain an understanding of the cellular, molecular and biochemical aspects of the
development of the immune system and the immune response. Instruction focuses on the development of the
immune system and the function of its major components. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 241, BIOL 243 and
BIOL 256.
CHEM 090 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry I
This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through
laboratory work, lectures and tutorials, students focus on understanding matter and learn to relate chemistry
to everyday life. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
192
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 092 Introduction to Concepts in Chemistry II
This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Through
laboratory work, lectures and tutorials, students learn to depict compounds and chemical reactions through the
use of formulae and equations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 090
CHEM 111 Concepts in Chemistry I
In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry and appreciate the
use of chemistry in everyday life. 3 Credits/Prerequisite(s): None
CHEM 112 Concepts in Chemistry II
This course seeks to expand on the basic principles of chemistry. Students develop a deeper understanding
of scientific thought and processes as they relate to modern technology. They apply scientific theories to
environmental situations and explore the usefulness, limitations, and interrelationship of scientific theories with
practical situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite(s): CHEM 111
CHEM 121 Biochemistry for Nursing
This course introduces students to biochemistry and the importance of biochemistry in understanding living
organisms. Students examine the chemical structure and basic biochemistry of the four fundamental classes of
biological macromolecules. They also selected clinical conditions for defects in the metabolism and/or structure
of these macromolecules. 3 Credits/Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or
CHEM 090 and CHEM 092.
CHEM 131 General Chemistry I
This course focuses on the quantitative aspects of general chemistry. Using the law of conservation of mass, the
laws of definite and multiple proportions, the mole concept and Avagadro’s number and law, students create
balanced chemical equations to perform various general calculations. This course has ten (10) concurrent
chemistry labs reinforcing the application of concepts learned. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in
CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or CHEM 090 and CHEM 092
CHEM 132 General Chemistry II
In this course, students study the fundamental principles, theories and laws of chemistry. Topics include atomic
theory, and the structure of the atom, states of matter, periodicity, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and the
liquid and gaseous states. This course has ten (10) concurrent chemistry labs reinforcing the application of
concepts learned. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 131
CHEM 133
Physical Chemistry
This course builds on the topics covered in CHEM 131 and CHEM 132 and covers chemical thermodynamics,
reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibria and electrochemistry. Students learn how to determine
the spontaneity of chemical reactions, analyze kinetic data, determine rate laws and understand the mechanisms
of certain reactions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132
CHEM 134 Survey of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
(formerly CHEM 241)
This course is designed for MLT students and focuses on the biological role of various classes of organic
chemicals. Their chemical and physical properties such as structures, nomenclature, preparations and reactions
are explored. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: Passing Grade in CSEC (CXC)/GCE ‘O’ Level Chemistry or CHEM 090
and CHEM 092
193
CHEM 202
Food Chemistry
In this course, students learn about the fundamental chemistry of food constituents. They learn about the
chemical and physical properties of the major food components. They also examine the functions of the various
components in foods and discuss the effects of chemical changes during processing and storage on the quality
and nutritional aspects of several food categories. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132
CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry I
This course provides a general introduction to organic chemistry. Students learn about structure, bonding,
IUPAC nomenclature, stereochemistry and functional group chemistry with emphasis on reactions and reaction
mechanisms. The functional groups include: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols alkyl halides. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: CHEM 132
CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry II
This course builds on knowledge acquired in CHEM 240, with additional emphasis on the structure, nomenclature,
properties, and reactions of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid derivatives, amines, carbohydrates, lipids,
amino acids, peptides. Students learn about modern instrumental and analytical methods including: ultraviolet
and visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: CHEM 204
CHEM 208
Introduction to Biochemistry
In this course, students are introduced to the chemical structure and basic chemistry of the four fundamental
classes of biological substances. They learn about the various types, structures and reactions of glucose and the
extent of polymerization to form different carbohydrates. They examine fatty acids as components of lipids and
the structure and chemistry of nucleic acids. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 204 and CHEM 211
CHEM 209
Chemistry for Water and Wastewater Management
(formerly CHEM 306)
This course is designed for water and wastewater professionals. In this course, students will gain a thorough
appreciation of chemistry. They will also be able to accurately perform and understand the chemical phases of
treatment including coagulation, sedimentation, softening, and disinfection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM
112
CHEM 210
Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
In this course, students learn about fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry. Topics covered include
statistical treatment of data, laboratory techniques, advanced concepts of equilibrium, gravimetric analysis, and
titration methods, volumetric analysis, spectrophotometric analysis, and chromatographic analysis. 4 Credits/
Prerequisite: CHEM 132
CHEM 211
Inorganic Chemistry I
In this course, students explore, the descriptive chemistry of Period 2 elements, the main group elements and
the first row transition elements. They gain an understanding of the chemistry of selected representative main
group elements and their compounds as well as transition metals and coordination compounds. The principles
for identification of anions and cations will also be addressed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132
CHEM 212 Inorganic Chemistry II
In this course, students learn the intermediate principles, theories and laws of inorganic chemistry. Topics include
modern atomic theory, the symmetry of compounds, atomic and molecular orbital theory, hydrogen bonding
and other weak interactions, packing in solid inorganic compounds.
compounds and their reactions. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: CHEM 211
194
Students also study the coordination
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
CHEM 215 Organic Chemistry I - Laboratory
This course comprises ten laboratory sessions that complement CHEM 204. Students acquire knowledge of
experimental techniques of modern organic chemistry, with an emphasis on reactions and reaction mechanisms
of functional groups introduced in CHEM 204. They also practice stereo-chemical modeling and learn how to
identify organic unknowns by spectroscopic and chemical methods. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: CHEM 132 /Corequisite CHEM 204
CHEM 216 Organic Chemistry II – Laboratory
This course comprises ten labs that complement CHEM 205. Students acquire knowledge in experimental
techniques of modern organic chemistry with an emphasis on the substitution and reactions of aldehydes,
ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives. 1 Credit/Prerequisites: CHEM 204 and CHEM 215
CHEM 299 Research Project
In this chemistry research project, students will learn the fundamental tools necessary for choosing a research
project and conducting and presenting the findings of that project. At the end of the course, they will be required
to submit a written report, as well as orally present their data to a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/Prerequisite(s):
recommendation of Faculty Advisor and Completion of a minimum of 49 credits
CTIM 341 Computer Tomography (CT) Imaging (formerly RASC 450)
This course introduces students to computed tomography (CT). Students learn about the principles and
instrumentation of CT and how to manipulate CT images using simulated computer programmes. The course
covers image acquisition, storage, processing, contrast enhanced images as well as retrieval, display and
transmission of the CT image. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 201
EMCM 101 Emergency Care Management I
In this course, students will gain an appreciation of the importance of emergency medicine. They will learn
assessment techniques and develop the skills necessary to assist individuals in emergency situations. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: None
EMCM 102
Emergency Care Management II
In this course, students will learn the best way to meet patients’ needs. Students will understand the concept of
an overall emergency care plan which incorporates the patient’s individual priorities and decisions based on the
unique situation of the emergency. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 101
EMCM 103 Emergency Care Management III
This course builds on knowledge gained in EMCM 102. Students will be exposed to specific medical and
psychological emergencies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 102
EMCM 104 Emergency Care Simulation and Field Experience
Students develop additional skills and increase their understanding of their roles and functions in relation to
principles, procedures, and practices involved in emergency care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 103
EMCM 105 Clinical Practice
Students will gain further understanding of their roles and functions in relation to procedures, principles and
practices involved in the emergency care. This eight-week course also includes 2 weeks of practical experience
at the Adult Priority Care Facility and the Pediatric Priority Care Facility at the Eric Williams Medical Sciences
Complex. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: EMCM 104
195
ENVH 102
World Issues in Public Health
In this course, students examine critical issues that impact public health at national, regional and international
levels. They discuss topics such as access to potable water, availability of life-saving medication and the
importance of proper sanitation in the maintenance of health and hygiene standards. Students develop an
appreciation for the impact of the individual on creation and resolution of environmental problems. 1 credit/
Prerequisite: None
ENVH 121 Introduction to Epidemiology
(formerly ENVH 261)
The course introduces the concepts and history of epidemiology and its relevance to the field of public health
practice. This includes the use of epidemiological tools in evaluation and decision-making regarding matters of
public health. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVH 122 Vector Control
(formerly ENVH 106, ENVH 129)
This course is designed to help students understand the biological basis of public health by providing knowledge
of different characteristics and species of protozoa, helminthes, fungi, arthropods and rodents of public health
importance, the diseases which they transmit and related control measures. 3 Credits / Prerequisite: None
ENVH 211 Building Science and Construction
(formerly ENVH 121)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the correct practices in building construction as it pertains
to the general health and well-being of residents and members of a community. Students are made aware of
the necessity for developing standards of practice in the building trade and of the potential health hazards in
construction. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVH 212 Environmental Health I
(formerly ENVH 100)
This course covers the treatment regimes utilized for the production of potable water, with coverage of the
infrastructural, chemical, biological and physical treatment methods utilized. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVH 213 Environmental Health II The different methods and technologies used for the treatment and disposal of waste water and solid waste are
covered, with focus placed on the legislative requirements of waste disposal and the environmental and human
impacts of improper waste disposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVH 212
ENVH 215 Community Health
This course is designed to provide students with a systematic approach to assessing the health status of a
community, including families and population groups at risk. It introduces students to basic models for planning
health programmes and monitoring relationships between needs and services, resources and consumer demands,
and goals and results. Related social, cultural, economic, psychological and environmental factors that contribute
to the health problems of that community are also addressed. 3 credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVH 220 Food and Food Hygiene I
(formerly ENVH 111)
This course covers the basic principles of food safety, sanitation and hygiene. It involves the identification,
investigation, and understanding of food groups and associated food borne diseases. 3 Credits / Prerequisite:
None
ENVH 221 Food and Food Hygiene II
(formerly ENVH 211)
This course deals with various food types, preservation, storage, premises inspection and understanding of the
spread of diseases through poor food handling practices. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVH 220
196
CATALOGUE 2010-2012
ENVH 223 Environmental Health Administration and Legislation
(formerly ENVH 244)
This course introduces students to public health law and administration, including the study of legal powers
under which environmental health officers operate; recognition and management of some of the legal problems,
and an overview of the agencies involved in environmental health. An overview is provided of the hierarchy
of the health services in Trinidad and Tobago, including management, principles of supervision, leadership,
motivation, time management and people management. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVH 266 Environmental Health Internship This course is a supervised field experience in which students apply their knowledge of environmental health
theory and skills in an actual work setting. It is intended to strengthen student competencies in environmental
health practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: Completion of all required courses in the major area of study
ENVS 121
Environmental Issues and Sustainability
This course introduces students to important environmental issues facing societies worldwide. Students will
explore the economic, cultural and social impact of topics such as environmental degradation, climate change
and loss of biodiversity. 3 Credits / Prerequisite: None
ENVS 160 Environmental Studies I
In this course, students are systematically introduced to various natural and man–made environments, together
with the variety of problems associated with these environments.
They examine government and community
efforts to protect and preserve our natural environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
ENVS 161 Environmental Monitoring Techniques I
(formerly ENVS 150)
Students in this course gain the practical laboratory knowledge and skills necessary for analyzing chemical
substances in the environment. Instruction focuses on the use of apparatus in the laboratory as well as basic
laboratory methods of analysis, including separation techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 112
ENVS 204 Surveying and Drawing
(formerly ENVS 101)
In this course, students learn about different types of engineering designs and drawings in the technical
field and how to use drafting instruments. Topics covered include orthographic and geometric construction,
dimensioning, auxiliary and sectional drawings. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 121
ENVS 209 Quantitative Methods Applications
(formerly ENVS 209)
In this course, students will acquire basic problem-solving skills for use in their roles as water resources
practitioners. The course introduces concepts in linear programming, spreadsheet analysis, sensitivity analysis,
model building, probability, uncertainty and risk evaluation and review techniques. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
MATH 121
ENVS 217 Disaster Management
In this course, students examine issues related to disaster preparedness and contingency planning. They learn
the methods, logistics, and responsibilities of incident commanders in responding to situations of disaster. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: HLED 130, HLED 110 or ENVS 160
ENVS 256 Air Quality Control
In this course, students explore the fundamentals of air quality control. They learn about air pollution, factors
influencing air quality, and the pollution abatement and control strategies used by industries to improve air
quality. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 160
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ENVS 257 Soil Science
In this course, students examine the physical, chemical and biological properties of the dynamic soil system.
Topics covered include soil formation, soil structure and function and related environmental and agricultural
issues in respect of the management of soil resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111
ENVS 260 Environmental Studies II
In this course, students gain an understanding of the social, cultural and economic causes of environmental
problems, and are exposed to the most modern perspectives and experiences in resolving environmental
problems through participatory means, conflict resolution and policy instruments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
ENVS 160
ENVS 261 Environmental Monitoring Techniques II
(formerly ENVS 250)
In this course, students learn to apply the knowledge and skills gained in ENVS 161 to analyse and assess
environmental samples. They will gain hands-on experience with field and modern analytical equipment
including those used in spectroscopy and chromatography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 161
ENVS 263 Water Quality Control
In this course, students learn about the defining features and causes of water pollution, the parameters affecting
water quality, and the measures used to protect and improve water quality. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM
111
ENVS 270 Solid Waste Management
In this course, students learn about solid waste and the methods used in its collection and disposal. Topics
covered include the generation and collection of waste, landfill designs and operations, separation processes,
incineration and hazardous waste. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 160
ENVS 300 Environmental Ethics
In this course, students develop an appreciation for different perspectives on, and attitudes towards, the
environment and ecological decisions. They examine how almost every important environmental issue discussed,
assessed and acted upon is related, directly or indirectly, to ethics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: LAWW 165
ENVS 305 Negotiating Environmental Issues
In this course, students acquire the skills necessary for affective communication and negotiations which will
enable them to address issues and problems in environmental management in an ethical, professional, effective
and efficient manner. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: COMM 108 and ENVS 160
ENVS 309 Environmental Quality Assurance
In this course, students learn to balance the legal requirements of quality assurance and health and safety with
the practical needs of industry. They develop an understanding of quality assurance as a systematic process of
checking to ensure conformity with specified requirements. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260
ENVS 310 Land Use Management
In this course, students gain a comprehensive understanding of the role of land use planning and development
control in the management of our natural resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260
ENVS 316 Tropical Forest and Wildlife Management
In this course, students learn about forestry and wildlife management and examine critical issues related to
effective management of these natural resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260
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ENVS 318 Hazardous Waste Management
In this course, students learn the principles of hazardous waste management and procedures for identifying
waste, managing it on site and preparing it for shipment. In addition they will examine topics such as waste
storage, disposal facilities and record keeping for compliance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 132 and ENVS
245
ENVS 413 Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In this course, students examine the correlation between social growth and increased energy utilization and its
effects on the environment. Instruction focuses on a critical analysis of the use of fossil fuels, particularly oil and
gas, and strategies for monitoring and managing energy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100
ENVS 414 Coastal Zone Management and Technology
In this course, students learn about coastal morphology and develop an understanding of the requirements
for the implementation of a coastal zone management plan in order to coordinate and manage the coastal
environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: ENVS 316 and ENVS 318
ENVS 415 Risk Management
In this course, students acquire the skills and techniques to identify, manage and minimize health, safety and
environmental risk. They will also examine risk assessment models, the business planning process and tools
utilized in project risk modeling. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 260 or WRMT 209
ENVS 420 Sustainable Development
In this course, students learn about the principles and practices of sustainable development. They examine the
evolution of sustainable development as a special field of study and explore the challenges and critical issues
involved in achieving sustainable development locally, regionally and globally. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS
260
ENVS 460 Analysis and Problem Solving in Environmental Management
In this course, students examine environmental problems within a social context, identifying stakeholders who
contribute to the resolution of these problems. They gain an understanding of the participatory techniques
of planning, policy formulation, research and management and are exposed to the circumstances in which
these techniques may be used in the analysis and resolution of resource management problems. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: ENVS 260
ENVS 462 Human Health and the Environment
(formerly ENVS 365)
In this course, students are made aware of the ways in which interaction with the environment can affect human
health. Instruction focuses on the maintenance and promotion of public health safety standards. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: OSHE 245
ENVS 465 International Perspectives on Environmental Politics (formerly ENVS 360)
Students examine major international conventions and the agenda of the international organizations which
generated them. They learn about the ways in which these conventions and organizations shape national and
international environmental policies, plans, laws, regulations, standards and strategies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
LAWW 165
ENVS 499 Senior Research Project - Environmental Studies
(formerly ENVS 482)
In this seminar, students conduct research on a topic approved by the lecturer, write a thesis detailing their
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research findings, and present and defend this thesis over a three-day period before a panel of examiners. 3
Credits/Prerequisite: Successful completion of all other courses in the programme
GEOG 121 Concepts in Geography
(Formerly GEOG 201)
In this course, students will explore aspects of physical and human geography. They will focus on elements of
the natural environment including climatology, landforms, biogeography, and the geography of tropical, coastal
and degraded environments. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
GEOG 131 Introduction to Physical Geography
In this course, students will acquire a sound foundation for completing more advanced courses in the Geography
programme. In addition, students will be able to define the individual elements of the physical environment
as well as the environment as a whole. Topics covered include plate tectonics, vulcanicity, weathering, mass
wasting, rivers and biomes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
GEOG 132 Applied Physical Geography
This course is designed to complement GEOG 131. Through practical laboratory experience, lectures, discussions,
presentations and case study analysis, students will gain a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the
theoretical concepts of physical geography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: GEOG 131
GEOG 141 Introduction to Human Geography
Students who have had no prior exposure to human geography will benefit from this course. They will acquire
the foundation needed to pursue more advanced courses in the Geography programme. Issues covered in this
course include the nature and evolution of human geography, basic concepts in population and settlement and
industrial activity. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None.
GEOG 142 Applied Human Geography
This course is designed to complement GEOG 141. Through practical laboratory experience, lectures, discussions,
presentations and case study analysis, students will gain a better understanding of, and appreciation for, the
theoretical concepts of human geography. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None / Co-requisite: GEOG 141
GEOG 228 Cultural Geography
In this course, students will examine western and non-western cultures in terms of their origins, population,
agriculture, politics, language, religion, folk and popular culture, ethnicity and cities. They will also focus on
cultural geographic patterns in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 231 Geography of Agriculture
Students will gain an understanding of the study of spatial patterns in agricultural activity.
They will explore
topics such as variations in agricultural activity, the delimitation of agricultural regions, and the way in which
agricultural systems change with levels of development. Special attention will be given to the future of agriculture
in Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
GEOG 236 Physical Hydrology
In this course, students will gain a greater understanding of the basic principles of the water cycle and
environmentally relevant applications. Topics include global issues related to water resources such as pollution
control, environmental rehabilitation, sustainable development and climate change. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:
GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
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GEOG 238 Advanced Geomorphology
In this course, students will study the surface of the earth and the geologic processes that modify it. They will
also explore theoretical approaches to studying geomorphology and selected geomorphologic environments
such as desert landscapes, tropical humid landscapes, coastal landscapes, karsts and limestone landscapes. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 241 Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
Students will study the physical and human geography of Latin America and the Caribbean. The course will address
the physical, socio-political and economic characteristics of the Latin American and Caribbean regions. 3 Credits/
Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 301 History and Philosophy of Geography
In this course, students will explore the different bodies of thought which have shaped geography as a field
of study from the late 19th century to the present. They will examine the intellectual trends in human and
physical geography, as well as the science of geographic information systems and will gain useful perspectives
on similarities and differences in contemporary geographic subfields. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and
GEOG 141
GEOG 322 Geography of Transportation
In pursuing this course students will gain an understanding of the dynamics involved in transporting goods,
services, and people from area to area. They will explore the development of regions and the role of transportation
planning in shaping the future of urban systems. Special attention will be given to transportation issues in
Trinidad and Tobago. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 325 Geography of Development
This course examines the measurement and practice of development throughout the world. Emphasis is placed
on the critical evaluation of the different development models used globally, including those in the Caribbean
and Trinidad and Tobago. Global patterns of inequalities in health, education and nutrition will also be covered
in this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 331 Meteorology and Climatology
In this course, students will study atmospheric properties and processes that control temperature, wind,
precipitation, and storm systems. They will discuss weather forecasting, air pollution, and the ways in which
climate change has impacted upon the earth’s climate system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG
141
GEOG 334 General Geology
In this course, students will focus on selected topics in general geology. They will study rocks and minerals,
structural geology and geological resources. Students will be exposed to both laboratory and practical settings.
3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 336 Humid Tropical Environments
Students will acquire a more in depth understanding of tropical ecosystems and the development experience
in tropical regions. Focusing on Amazonia, they will examine the biophysical characteristics of the various
humid tropical environments, indigenous peoples and commercial activities undertaken to promote economic
development in frontier areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
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GEOG 422 Advanced Themes in Urban Geography
This is a senior-level course that provides an opportunity for students to explore current issues faced by cities
and metropolitan areas, both domestically and internationally. Students will focus on broad themes such as
governability, sustainability, mobility, diversity, livability and economic restructuring. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
GEOG 325
GEOG 429 Historical Preservation in Urban Planning
This course provides an overview of the legal, economic and political issues involved in the preservation of
historical sites. Students will focus on the planning techniques that allow buildings, districts, structures, sites
and other resources to be saved and ultimately preserved. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 325
GEOG 436 Natural Hazards
In this course, students examine, through case studies, the potential effects of natural hazards on the landscape
of the Earth in general, and on populated areas specifically. They focus on both the short-term and long-term
hardships and consequences of natural disasters, as well as the scientific analyses of the nature of the hazards
and precautions to minimize damage and casualties. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 440
Applied Demography
In this course, students acquire an understanding of the science of demography. They will examine world
demographic patterns and issues surrounding the importance of population to public health. 3 Credits/
Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 443 Geopolitics and International Relations
In this course, students will explore the geographical context in which political decisions are taken. Particular
attention will be given to geopolitical issues in the Caribbean such as the Caribbean Single Market and Economy.
3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 411
GEOG 465 Global Climate Change
In this course, students will consider the rate of climate change, and the steps to be taken to reduce carbon
emissions. Elements of this course include the history of the Earth’s climate, climate change and weather,
physical impacts of climate change, social impacts of climate change and factors that militate against climate
change. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 470 Geography of Tourism
Using examples from a range of international contexts, students will gain an understanding of the key concepts
related to the geographies of contemporary tourism and recreation. They will also explore the relationships
between tourism and recreation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GEOG 475 Ecotourism - Practice and Management
In this course, students will examine the costs and benefits of ecotourism; cases of ecotourism around the
world, approaches to ecotourism, issues of cultural tourism, policies and laws relating to ecotourism, community
involvement in ecotourism enterprise establishment and management and current ecotourism trends. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: GEOG 470
GEOG 485 Natural Resources Conservation
This course examines the past, present and future of resource conservation by explaining the basic ecological
principles on which modern resource management is based. Students will consider each major resource in terms
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of its value to humans, its exploitation or degradation, and how it can be restored and sustainably managed. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: GEOG 131 and GEOG 141
GISY 172 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
(formerly ENVS 172)
In this course, students learn about the principles and concepts which define geographic information systems
and about different types of geographic information systems. They examine the main technical components of a
GIS and gain the hands-on experience in GIS design in a laboratory setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
GISY 174 Introduction to Remote Sensing
(formerly ENVS 174)
In this course, students gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of remote sensing and discuss
the satellite and sensor systems that are employed in the capture of images. They examine the most important
systems as a precursor to choosing the most appropriate image for a particular study and will discuss the
unique imaging characteristics of the American LandSat, French SPOT and the European ERS systems. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: None
GISY 175 Introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) Programming
(formerly ENVS 175)
Students will learn to use the Visual Basic for Applications [VBA] programming environment to add customized
functionality to ArcMap. On successful completion of this course, students would have acquired knowledge and
skills that can be readily applied in the workplace. Students do not require prior programming experience in
order to pursue this course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172
GISY 272 Spatial Database Design
(formerly ENVS 272)
In this course, students explore introductory-level spatial database design and development. They learn to
organise spatial and non-spatial data into databases and acquire skills for the efficient management of data. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172
GISY 274 Principles of Cartography for GIS
(formerly ENVS 274)
In this course, students will understand the ways in which maps function as visual abstractions of the real world.
They will explore the relationship between GIS and map making, as well as the peculiarities associated with
preparing spatial datasets for the cartographic process through the use of cartographic tools available through
standard industry software packages. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172
GISY 276 Geographic Information Applications in the Workplace
(formerly ENVS 276)
This course develops intermediate level skills in the use of geographic information systems in the workplace.
Instruction emphasizes applied exercises in a variety of subject areas and students develop skills in GIS software
applications necessary to design and implement basic GIS projects. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: GISY 172
GISY 299 Geographic Information Systems Senior Project
(formerly ENVS 290)
In this course, students acquire practical experience in the design and implementation of a small geographic
information system in a real world setting. Working with a real client, they will organize a project through
each successive stage—from inception to final presentation. At the end of this course, students will be able
to complete a small GIS project confidently and professionally. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: GISY 174 and GISY
272
HISM 101 Health Records Science I
This course is designed to prepare students to develop the technical skills necessary to maintain medical record
systems consistent with national medical, administrative, and ethical requirements.
Students will examine
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theories of health records management, the role and responsibility of health records personnel including legal
and ethical and legal obligations, as well as the importance of health records as a management tool. 1 Credit/
Prerequisite: None
HISM 102
Health Information Resources
In this course, students learn specific tools and techniques for using the library and internet to conduct research in
the health care field. Students are taught to evaluate the validity, authenticity and currency of health information
resources and to search for articles in major online databases such as PubMed/Medline, CINAHL, PSYCinfo. 1
Credit/ Prerequisite: None
HISM 103 Health Records Science II
In this course, students will apply knowledge gained in the courses: Health Records Science 1, Anatomy and
physiology and the Introduction to Medical Terminology. Students will be able to interpret and code medical
information using the ICD-10 layout. They will also undertake an in-depth study of hospital statistics, focusing
on sources, definitions and methods of collection. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the laws
governing the release of patient information. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: HISM 101
HLED 100 First Aid and Occupational Health
This course is designed for persons working in, or about to enter the field of allied health sciences. It equips
them with the knowledge and skills required to adopt safety measures and carry out first aid work in the home
or in the community at large. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
HLED 110 Health Education and Promotion
This course covers a wide variety of health problems in the community. It also looks at the collection and analysis
of vital statistics; the evaluation of health care services; the principles of planning, and the implementation of
health programmes in the community. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
HLED 225 Legal and Ethical Issues in Health
This course introduces students to issues in medical ethics and to the study of the sociology of relations that
enhance or inhibit ethical practice. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamics of the client-professional relationship
and will focus on the clinical environment. Particular attention will be paid to patient rights, confidentiality and
respect, and the rights of the professional in a modern clinical setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
HLED 410 Health Policy
This course provides an introduction to the laws of Trinidad and Tobago pertaining to health and includes a
study of the legal powers of healthcare providers. Students examine the organizational structure of the health
care system in Trinidad and Tobago and the agencies involved. Management principles related to leadership,
supervision, motivation and human resources in the health sector will also be discussed. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
None
MDLT 104 Introduction to Medical Terminology
This course offers an introduction to medical terminology as it relates to the work of practitioners in the field.
Students will acquire a working knowledge of the language and documents most commonly used in the health
professions. The course will include definitions, spellings and pronunciations of medical terms and definitions
of basic anatomical parts. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
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MDLT 120 Medical Laboratory Technology Orientation
(formerly MDLT 103)
This course provides an introduction to the field of medical laboratory technology. Students will examine
the role and function of medical laboratory technologists in the health care system of Trinidad and Tobago.
Particular emphasis is placed on laboratory safety and specimen collection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
MDLT 121 Medical Terminology (formerly MDLT 101)
This course will focus on the many components of a medical term and how a medical term can be broken
by simply knowing the meaning of the prefix or suffix. It also shows students how, by learning individual
parts of a medical word, they will not need to memorize hundreds of medical terms and conditions. 1 Credit/
Prerequisite: BIOL 173
MDLT 125 Phlebotomy and Laboratory Techniques
In this course, students will learn phlebotomy techniques and the proper use of laboratory tools and equipment
including microscopy and pipetting. Safe operating guidelines are introduced and emphasized, highlighting
the potential biological and chemical hazards encountered in routine specimen handling and processing. The
significance of statistical tools as a quality management strategy is also examined. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite:
None
MDLT 227 Immunology and Serology
Students will pursue immunological and serological studies including antigen - antibody tests, syphilis serology
and serological tests. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 133
MDLT 228 Histology
Students will acquire skills in the preparation, orientation, embedding, staining and mounting of histological
specimens. Emphasis will be placed on the proper preparation of specimens for microscopic examination and
interpretation of results. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 132 and BIOL 174
MDLT 229 Clinical Chemistry I
(formerly MDLT 229)
In this course students will cover theory, principles and analysis in advanced clinical chemistry and biochemistry. Emphasis is placed on the chemistry of physiological systems within the human body. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite:
CHEM 134
MDLT 230 Hematology I
Students will study and review blood cells and tissues including the origin, morphology, and function and
dysfunction of blood cells. They will also examine normal hematoproteins; abnormal morphological forms of
blood cells and diseases including anaemias and leukemias. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 173
MDLT 231 Immunohematology
The student will be introduced to coagulation mechanisms and blood banking with emphasis on the history of
blood group systems, the study of blood cells, principles and procedures of blood grouping and compatibility.
The course also examines testing, screening of donors, collection, separation, preservation and storage of blood
components. It deals mainly with major blood grouping and typing systems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT
230
MDLT 281 Histopathology Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in processing histology specimens in a histology laboratory.
Skills acquired will increase proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated procedures and
will sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230
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MDLT 282 Immunology and Serology Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in immunology and serology in an immunology/serology
laboratory.
Skills acquired will increase proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated
procedures and sensitize students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT
227
MDLT 283 Clinical Chemistry Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in biochemistry (in a biochemistry laboratory). Skills acquired
will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize students
to the patient-technologist relationship.0 Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 229
MDLT 284 Bacteriology Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experiences in bacteriology (in a microbiology laboratory). Skills
acquired will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize
students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 297
MDLT 286 Blood Bank Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experience in a blood bank laboratory. The skills acquired will increase
their proficiency in the performance of routine, special and automated procedures. Students will also be sensitized
to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 231
MDLT 287 Hematology Internship
Students will gain clinical and laboratory experiences in haematology (in a haematology laboratory). Skills
acquired will increase proficiency in performance of routine, special and automated procedures and will sensitize
students to the patient-technologist relationship. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230
MDLT 297 Medical Microbiology I
In this course, students will acquire the theoretical skills necessary to isolate and identify various classes of
micro-organisms from appropriate clinical specimens. The course also comprises the study of related diseases
and dysfunctions of which the root cause is microbial infection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MDLT 227 and
MDLT 229
MDLT 298 Medical Microbiology I - Lab
This course comprises a series of labs designed to demonstrate the application of the concepts presented in
BIOL 297. Students will acquire the practical skills necessary to isolate and identify various classes of microorganisms from appropriate clinical specimens. 4 Credits/ Co-requisites: MDLT 297
MDLT 329 Clinical Chemistry II
(formerly MDLT 329)
In this course, students will focus on the principles of detection of biochemical indictors of disease. Students
will be introduced to research and the concept of acquiring empirical data. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 132
and MDLT 229
MDLT 340 Hematology II
Students will investigate further the pathology of blood disorders, with emphasis on white cell diseases such as
leukemias, myelomas and their infiltration into secondary sites. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: MDLT 230
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MDLT 371 Research Project -MDLT
In this course, students will acquire critical appraisal skills in assessing evidence presented in health science,
with a focus on its relevance to real life. They will explore the application of statistical methods to the study of
research questions in terms of both descriptive and inferential statistics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: STAT 120
MDLT 397 Medical Microbiology II
(formerly MDLT 451)
This course is designed to introduce the scientific applications of advanced assay systems such as polymerase
chain reaction (PCR). Students will explore concepts of molecular biology as well as intermediate pharmacological
mechanisms of drug resistance and in-depth models and mechanisms of infection. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite:
MDLT 297
MDLT 411 Quality Management in the Laboratory
This course explores the factors that impact on the delivery of optimal performance of testing and results.
Organisational, process and human resource limitations are critically assessed and evaluated within the context
of laboratory management application. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
MDLT 455 MDLT Simulated Practicum
This course will enhance students’ awareness of the analytical process from input stages to final result output.
In this practicum, students will be required to demonstrate application of competencies developed. Deficient or
weak areas of competence are diagnosed, giving the student an opportunity to focus on strengthening same. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 397, MDLT 329 and MDLT 340
MDLT 479 Community Project
Students of this course are required to utilise teamwork and interactive skills, and employ appropriate
methodologies and tools to initiate and conduct a research-based study of public health and professional
interest. As part of the project, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making must be demonstrated
by the student. Management and leadership practices are applied by the student to solving community issues.
2 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
MDLT 499 Research Proposal Development
In this course the student develops a research proposal. This proposal will demonstrate the student’s critical
awareness and insight in medical laboratory technology. 2 Credits/ Prerequisites: STAT 120 and MDLT 371
NURS 111 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
(formerly NURS 101)
This course explores the historical, philosophical, scientific, ethical and legal bases for nursing practice. It
examines nursing as a profession and will equip students with the requisite knowledge and skills to function
as registered nurses. The principles, concepts and foundations explored here will provide a foundation for
successive nursing courses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
NURS 115 Foundations of Nursing Practice (formerly NURS 160)
This course introduces students to the basic foundations and concepts of nursing practice. It emphasizes
fundamental nursing skills and competencies and highlights basic needs of individuals together with the nursing
framework and activities for addressing those needs. The experiential learning that will be gained from the
nursing skills laboratory, the community and the clinical setting will further strengthen clinical competence for
the delivery of quality patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 171
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NURS 116 Foundations in Psychiatry
(formerly NURS 121)
This course forms the nucleus of the Mental Health/Psychiatric Nursing programme. Students are introduced to
psychiatric nursing, with special emphasis on the basic psychosocial concepts which underpin practice in this
field. It focuses on the delivery of basic nursing care for individuals and families with mental illness. 3 Credits/
Prerequisites: BIOL 171 and COMM 151
NURS 141 Emergency Care
This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of basic emergency care. Emphasis is placed
on the skills required for the initial management of casualties prior to their admission to a health facility. 2
Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 220
NURS 150 Introduction to the Profession of Nursing
(formerly NURS 101)
This course explores the historical, philosophical, scientific, ethical and legal bases for nursing practice. It
examines nursing as a profession and will equip students with the requisite knowledge and skills to function
as registered nurses. The principles, concepts and foundations explored here will provide a foundation for
successive nursing courses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
NURS 156 Health Promotion and Maintenance
This course looks at health promotion and related strategies as an integral component of health care delivery.
Students will examine the impact of physical, psychosocial, environmental, and lifestyle factors that influence
health and explore primary health care as the approach utilized in providing care to individuals, families and
communities. The course also provides practice in basic health promotion skills. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:
COMM 151 and BIOL 171
NURS 160 Nutrition I
(formerly NURS 110)
This course introduces students to the principles of human nutrition and current dietary trends. It will explore
the importance of certain food practices in the lives of Caribbean people. It allows the student to examine
policies, programmes and interventions taken to address food-related health issues. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:
CHEM 121 and BIOL 171
NURS 211 Nursing Science
In this course, students examine the basic philosophical, scientific and technical frameworks for nursing
practice. The course also focuses on the contribution of various theorists and provides a comparative analysis
of their respective nursing theories and models which serve to justify the designation of nursing as a science.
The nursing process will be highlighted as the standard framework for clinical nursing practice. 3 Credits/
Prerequisites: LIBS 130 and NUTR 160
NURS 220 Pathophysiology I
(formerly NURS 132)
This course introduces students to the study of the structural and physiological changes occurring in the body
as a result of disease.
Students will examine the concepts of abnormality, the sequel of diseases, alterations
in body structure and function and the nursing management of patients with pathophysiological conditions. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 172
NURS 223 The Childbearing Family (formerly NURS 151)
This course examines the health care experiences of the child-bearing family during pregnancy, delivery and
post partum. Students will gain an understanding of the role of parents and siblings, and of the nursing
management of the mother and child during the antenatal, pregnancy, delivery and post partum periods. In the
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associated clinical attachments, clinical teaching and assessment of the skills related to the theory covered is
provided. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 156
NURS 224 The Childbearing Family
(for Psychiatric nursing students only)
This course examines the health care experiences of the childbearing family during pregnancy, delivery and post
partum. Students will examine the role of parents and siblings and the nursing management of mother and
child during the antenatal, pregnancy, delivery and post partum periods. In the associated clinical attachments,
clinical teaching and assessment of the skills related to the theory covered is provided. This course is intended
for psychiatric nursing students only. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 171 and NURS 150 and NURS 156
NURS 250 Psycho-Pathophysiology
(formerly NURS236)
In this course, the student gains knowledge of the nature and causes of mental health/psychiatric disorders and
how they affect the individual’s ability to maintain psycho-physiological equilibrium. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
NURS 220
NURS 260 Nutrition and Disease
(formerly NURS 210)
In this course, students will examine the physiological requirement and functions of proteins, carbohydrates,
fats, major vitamins and minerals as determinants of health and disease. The role of diet in the development of
chronic disease will also be explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 160
NURS 261 Nutrition and Disease for Psychiatric
(formerly NURS 210 - for Psychiatric nurses only)
In this course, students will examine the physiological requirement and functions of proteins, carbohydrates,
fats, major vitamins and minerals as determinants of health and disease. The role of diet in the development
of chronic disease will also be explored. The role of diet in the development of chronic disease will also be
explored. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 220.
NURS 275 Pharmacology in Nursing
This course introduces nursing students to pharmacology, giving them a brief history of pharmacology and
information on the sources, preparation and administration of drugs. After examining the principles of
pharmacology, the course guides students in examination of drugs used for disorders of all systems of the
body. Students will be encouraged to research drugs not examined in the course and critique them using the
various pharmacological principles learned in the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 121, BIOL 172 and
NURS 220
NURS 276 Psycho-Pharmacology
This course introduces students to pharmacological concepts and facilitates the development of their
understanding of the theory and principles of pharmacology as they relate to psychiatric nursing practice.
They will examine health promotion issues related to pharmacology in the context of secondary and tertiary
prevention as intervention. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 116
NURS 290 Introduction to Adult Nursing
This course provides an introduction to the management of adult clients with medical /surgical conditions and
focuses on the physiological, psychological, environmental and spiritual needs of clients.
Students will be
encouraged to use critical thinking in the application of the nursing process with an appropriate nursing model
for the provision of care.
Practical experiences will be gained both in the simulation laboratory and in the
clinical areas. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL 172 and NURS 220
209
NURS 295 Epidemiology
(formerly NURS 201)
This course introduces the student to the key concepts of epidemiology. It examines the modes of disease
transmission, characteristics of communicable diseases, and methods of prevention at the local, regional and
international levels. Students will be guided in the identification of sources of data; the use of appropriate
measures of calculations; the analysis and interpreting of data and the application of findings to infection and
prevention and control. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS 130 and NURS 156
NURS 306 Health Assessment
This course has distinct theoretical and practical aspects. The theoretical component focuses on helping students
to acquire the skills required to conduct a comprehensive health assessment as part of the nursing process.
In the practicum, students will use interview observation, percussion, palpation, inspection and auscultation in
assessing clients throughout the life cycle in simulated and actual environments. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: BIOL
172, NURS 150 and NURS 277
NURS 312 Mental Health
This course focuses on the application of the nursing process, critical thinking skills and caring therapeutic
interventions in acute, chronic and community-based psychiatric-mental health settings. Students examine
basic mental health concepts and issues and emphasis is also placed on client advocacy, and collaboration with
members of the mental health care team. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 160, NURS 172 and NURS 220
NURS 314 Pharmacology in Nursing
(formerly NURS 233)
This course introduces nursing students to pharmacology, giving them a brief history of pharmacology and
information on the sources, preparation and administration of drugs.
After examining the principles of
pharmacology, the course guides students in examination of drugs used for disorders for all systems of the
body. Students will be encouraged to research drugs not examined in the course and critique them using the
various pharmacological principles learned in the course. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 172
NURS 320 Pathophysiology II
In this course the nursing students will relate the concepts and principles introduced in NURS 220 to their
understanding of altered physiological states in the body systems at various stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is
placed on aetiology, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of disease processes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
NURS 220
NURS 324 Paediatric and Adolescent Care
In this course, students are introduced to the field of nursing and the theory and skills relevant to the care of
children and adolescents. The nursing process framework is used to examine families in the child-bearing years
from infancy through adolescence. The course will include a clinical component which will focus on the delivery
of nursing care that is adapted to the unique health and developmental needs of children and their families. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 156 and NURS 220.
NURS 325 Paediatric and Adolescent Care
(For Psychiatric Nursing students only)
In this course, students are introduced to the field of paediatric nursing and the theory and skills relevant to
the care of children and adolescents. The nursing process framework is used to examine families in the child-
bearing years from infancy through adolescence. The course will include a clinical component which will focus
on the delivery of nursing care that is adapted to the unique health and developmental needs of children and
their families. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 156 and NURS 220.
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NURS 326 Introduction to Medical - Surgical Nursing
(formerly NURS 256)
Students in this course will acquire knowledge of common physiological dysfunctions that can affect the mentally
ill individual. Learning is consolidated through clinical practice, which includes an eight-week placement in a
medical/surgical nursing environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisitess: NURS 150 and NURS 220
NURS 334 Adult Nursing
This course focuses on the care of the adult between 20 to 64 years with common acute and chronic maladaptive
states. The emphasis will be on the provision of holistic care, with the nursing process being applied to the
planning, implementation and evaluation of nursing care. The course addresses all categories of diseases;
focuses on the major health problems and prepares the students to deliver care to the specific age group in all
care settings. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 260, NURS 275, NURS 312, NURS 320 and NURS 337
NURS 336 Care of the Mentally Ill Adult
(formerly NURS 257)
In this course, students will acquire concepts and skills which will enable them to recognize the psychosocial,
environmental and lifestyle problems of the mentally ill adult and family. Common psychological ill health
conditions are explored and the concepts and skills acquired will be applied in meeting the patient’s basic needs
through the nursing process and the promotion of a healthy lifestyle. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 150,
NURS 211, NURS 315 and NURS 316
NURS 337 Nursing Informatics
This course provides an overview of health care information technology and computer science systems to
prepare students to effectively and efficiently use technology for the identification, collection, processing and
management of data. The course will provide skills for information seeking and technology for evidence-based
nursing practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: MATH 120, BUSI 203 and NURS 211
NURS 371 Clinical Experience and Level II A Practical Examination
This clinical experience takes place over fifteen (15) weeks. During this experience, students will acquire experience
in ward-based and ambulatory paediatric care and the care of clients in the community health centres and other
out-patient departments. Students are also assigned study days for the purpose of consolidating the clinical
knowledge acquired and applying theory to practice. They will also undertake Level II A Practical Examinations
to determine the clinical competencies gained in these areas. 0 Credits/Prerequisite: Completion of Year I
of programme
NURS 372 Clinical Experience and Level II B Practical Examination
This clinical experience takes place over fifteen (15) weeks. During this experience, students will acquire clinical
experience in specialist areas such as accident and emergency; ear, nose and throat; neurosurgery; operating
theatre; orthopedics and gynecological nursing. Students are also assigned study days for the purpose of
consolidating their clinical knowledge and the application of theory to practice. Level II B practical examination
is also undertaken to determine the clinical competencies acquired in these areas. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite:
NURS 371
NURS 373 Clinical Experience and Level III Practical Examination
This fifteen-week period marks the completion of the clinical internship. During this period, students are placed
in the medical and surgical wards to gain further experience in patient care and ward management.
They are
assigned study days for the purpose of consolidating their clinical knowledge and applying theory to practice.
Level III practical examination is also undertaken to determine students’ competency in patient care and ward
management. 0 Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 372
211
NURS 401 Gender Issues in Health Care
This course is designed to enhance nursing practice by exploring social, cultural and political factors that influence
gendered aspects of health care. The course will examine ways in which gender and gender expectations affect
health behaviors. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: SOCI 102, PSYC 103 and NURS 156.
NURS 411 Professional Development and Management
(Formerly NURS 202)
This course is designed to prepare the student for supervisory and professional responsibility. It introduces
the students to the principles and practices of management, total quality management in nursing, disaster
preparedness and approaches to the management and delivery of patient care. In addition, it identifies the
legal and ethical responsibilities of the nurse and the various roles of the nurse in health care management. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: BUSI 203, NURS 111 and NURS 275
NURS 441 Psychiatric Emergencies
This course provides an introduction to the principles and practice of basic emergency care. Emphasis is placed
on skills required for the initial management of causalities prior to the admission to a Health Care Facility. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: NURS 250
NURS 445 Critical Care Nursing
The course provides students with the principles governing the care of casualties and the critically ill. Students will
integrate knowledge and principles of the biophysical and psychosocial sciences to solve life threatening problems
that affect casualties and the critically ill in a variety of health care settings. They will also apply critical thinking
skills and the nursing process in exploring case-based practice situations, thereby learning to select effective
patient care modalities as competent, caring nurses. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211, NURS 220, NURS 337
and NURS 221
NURS 447 Gerontology
This course introduces the student to the study of gerontology and is designed to focus on the needs of the
elderly in states of adaptation and mal-adaptation. It highlights the basic needs of the elderly and specifies
nursing interventions which may be necessary to maintain and promote optimum health. It also focuses on
factors that disrupt biological and psychological needs based on actual and potential health problems of
the elderly in a variety of environments and health care delivery systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS
220, NURS 314 and NURS 334 or NURS 156, NURS 211, NURS 221
NURS 448 Psycho-Gerontology
This course will enable nursing students to develop an understanding of the complexity, rewards and challenges
of working with the elderly in the context of primary health care delivery systems. Students will acquire knowledge
of treatment modalities and psychiatric nursing care related to mental health and physiological challenges facing
the elderly with a focus on specific conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, neglect and abuse. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211, NURS 261 and NURS 315 and NURS 221
NURS 499 Senior Project- Nursing
This practicum is to be undertaken throughout Year IV of the nursing programme. It will provide students with
the opportunity to undertake a research project, thereby utilizing the skills acquired and demonstrating an
understanding of various techniques utilized in conducting research. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: NURS 211,
NURS 337 and MATH 167
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
OSHE 123
Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health
This course is designed to introduce students to occupational safety and health as a field of study. It outlines
health and safety hazards and identifies the responsibilities of management and supporting agencies in
promoting good practice in occupational safety and health. It also exposes students to the principles of effective
programme design for OSH interventions. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
OSHE 124 Ergonomics
(formerly OSHE 110)
In this course students will learn about the physical stresses that common workplace activities place on the body
and the ways in which they can be minimized. Students will also understand what constitutes ergonomics and
its use in improving the work environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
OSHE 132 Safety Technology I
Students in this course learn safe working practices, how to avoid hazards and take precautions in a range of
working situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
OSHE 141 Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene I
(formerly OSHE 104)
In this course, students analyze the effects of toxic substances and physical hazards on the human body. They
examine aspects of epidemiology and toxicology and methods of evaluation and control of environmental and
other hazards. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
OSHE 160 Techniques of Safety Management I
In this course, students acquire knowledge of the standards and codes in safety management. They also gain an
understanding of management’s role in responding to hazardous situations. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
OSHE 201 First Aid and CPR
Students of this course acquire the requisite skills and learn the protocols needed to enable them to take the
correct action in treating various types of medical traumas and emergencies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: None
OSHE 232 Safety Technology II
In this course, students acquire knowledge of safe working practices which can be applied in the areas of
construction and demolition in the workplace. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 132
OSHE 241 Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene II
(formerly OSHE 104)
In this course, students learn about various types of hazardous material and acquire skills in identifying
occupation-related and communicable diseases, and their effect on the various systems of the body. Students
also engage in discussions on prevention strategies. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 141
OSHE 245 Occupational Health and Safety Management
Students are introduced to the principles of the safety improvement process and acquire the skills necessary
to incorporate safety improvement into environmental management business processes. Students learn how
to conduct audits and inspections, through case studies and field experiences in local industries. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: ENVS 160 or OSH 120
OSHE 260 Techniques of Safety Management II
In this course, students examine plant and equipment design specifications, accident investigation reports and
emergency plans to acquire the skills necessary for appraising plant safety. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE
160
213
OSHE 290 Legal Aspects of Occupational Safety Management
Students in this course will develop an understanding of the legal framework which governs the occupational
safety and health field. Areas covered will include the Factories Ordinance 1948, Health and Safety Bill, the
judicial system, Workmen’s Compensation Ordinance, International Labour Organisation Convention and
employers’ liability. Students also engage in discussions on policies on AIDS and substance abuse. 3 Credits/
Prerequisite: OSHE 123
OSHE 292 Pollution Control and Environmental Impact Assessment
In this course, students will study the causes and interrelationships of the various sources of air, land, water and
noise pollution; and the measures necessary for their prevention and control.
260
3 Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE
OSHE 299 Occupational Health Senior Project
In this course, students gain professional experience by applying knowledge acquired in the classroom to a
real world environment. Students are also required to prepare a portfolio documenting their experiences and
reflection on their learning over the course of the programme to complete the senior project requirements.
Credits/ Prerequisite: OSHE 292
3
PHAR 110 Orientation to Pharmacy Practice
In this course, students are introduced to the concept of pharmaceutical care. They learn the roles and
responsibilities of the pharmacy assistant and acquire an appreciation for the importance of professional
conduct, quality control and maintenance as they relate to the pharmacy. Students also learn how to apply
mathematical techniques to problems related to pharmacy. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHAR 113 Introduction to Pharmaceutics
Students learn how medical and pharmaceutical technology relates to the practice of the pharmacy assistant. They
also develop an understanding of the principles involved in the dispensing and compounding of prescriptions
and acquire a working knowledge of drug dosages and drug forms. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHAR 121 Introduction to Pharmacology
This course introduces students to the processes of action, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion
as well as the side-effects, indications, contra-indications and administration of some commonly used drugs.
Students will also review the principles of drug action including an introduction to pharmacolodynamics and
pharmacokinetics 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHAR 123 Pharmacy Systems and Procedures
In this course, students are introduced to the systems and procedures necessary for the smooth functioning of
a pharmacy. They also develop skills in interpreting prescription and medication content as well as completing
and filling prescription and medication orders. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHAR 133 Compounding
Students learn to create compound substances in a variety of formulations. They practise the preparation of
products in a variety of dosage forms including ointments, creams and suppositories. They also learn to prepare
emulsions for oral and topical use. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHAR 121
PHAR 138
Pharmacy Legislation and Ethics
The student will discuss all legislation related to pharmacy practice such as the Pharmacy Board Act and
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
Amendments, the Pharmacy Board Regulations, the Dangerous Drug Act, the Food and Drug Act, the Antibiotics
Act, the Pesticides Act and the Code of Ethics. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: PHAR 110
PHAR 251 Introduction to Pharmacology for Radiographers
In this course, students learn the basic principles of pharmacology. They discuss drug groups used in radiological
contrast, media studies and interventional procedures. Students also learn the classifications, characteristics,
uses and contraindications of contrast media used in radiological procedures. No prior knowledge of chemistry
is required. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHYS 090 Introduction to Concepts in Physics I
In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of measurement, mechanics, heat
and waves. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and understanding of basic concepts and their
applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHYS 092 Introduction to Concepts in Physics II
In this course students will understand basic principles of physics in the areas of electricity, magnetism,
electromagnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. They will focus on experimental inquiry, discovery and
understanding of basic concepts and their applications to the world around us. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS
090)
PHYS 100 Introduction to Physics
(formerly PHYS 171)
In this course, students will learn the fundamental principles of physics.
Emphasis will be placed on the
understanding of basic concepts and their application to the environment from a technical perspective. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: None
PHYS 102 Introduction to Physical Principles
(formerly PHYS 101)
Students in this course will learn the fundamental principles of physics relevant to radiography and radiation
sciences. Topics include the interaction of mechanical and electromagnetic waves with matter, the production
of X-rays and the measurement and monitoring of radiation with respect to safety in a clinical environment. 4
Credits/ Prerequisite(s): None
PHYS 121 College Physics I
In this course students learn the principles of mechanics, the structure of matter, waves and oscillations and
their applications. By studying these topics students will gain a better understanding of the mechanical universe,
in terms of measurement, motion, force and energy. 4 Credits / Prerequisite: CXC level pass in Physics (or
equivalent) or PHYS 090 and PHYS 092
PHYS 122 College Physics II
This course covers the concepts and principles involved with electricity, magnetism, light, atomic and nuclear
physics. Students will learn how these concepts and principles have impacted society through electronic devices,
information technology and telecommunications. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 121
PHYS 151 Mechanics and Dynamics
Through this course students will acquire the concepts and generalizations necessary for the pursuit of mechanical
physics. Emphasis is placed on measurements and units, statics and kinematics, dynamics and hydrostatics. 4
Credits/Prerequisite: CXC level pass in Physics (or equivalent) or PHYS 090 and PHYS 092
215
PHYS 152 Waves, Light and Oscillations
In this course students will study the principles of light and wave theory. Topics include simple, damped and
forced oscillations, harmonic motions and examples of the applications of these motions. Students will also
study longitudinal and transverse waves and the various aspects of propagation and interaction of these waves.
The course also takes a look at light, interference and geometrical optics. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS151
PHYS 153 Electricity and Magnetism
Students in this course will learn the basic principles and theories of electricity, magnetism and electromagnetism. Topics include simple electrostatics; electrical theory and concepts related to current electricity,
direct current (dc) circuits, electric field, and capacitance. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 151
PHYS 154 Heat and Thermodynamics
In this course students will focus on temperature, thermal properties of various materials, laws of thermodynamics,
ideal gases and transfer of thermal energy. Further, students will apply this knowledge to practical situations,
with specific reference to enthalpy and entropy reactions. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 151
PHYS 155 Nuclear and Atomic Physics
Students will gain basic knowledge of quantum physics and relativity. The course is heavily theoretical and
covers topics related to particulate matter and the structure of the atomic nucleus. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite(s):
PHYS151
PHYS 201 Introduction to Electronics and Microprocessors
In this course students gain a working knowledge of analogue systems, digital systems and electronics in society
and industry. Emphasis is placed on system modeling and control, and measures of performance and stability
of electronic devices. 3 Credits /Prerequisite: PHYS153
PHYS 202 Science of Materials
In this course students will gain detailed knowledge of structural materials and its application to engineering
structures. The content covers phases of matter, structure of materials, microstructure as it relates to properties,
materials testing, cements, glasses and ceramics. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS151
PHYS 203 Introduction to Geology and Geophysics
Students will be exposed to the principles of geology and geophysics in this course. They will explore the areas
of earth seismology; geo-hydrology; and geophysical prospecting and interpretation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
PHYS151
PHYS204 Environmental Physics I
In this course students will gain knowledge of environmental principles. Topics include physical oceanography
and climatology, earth materials and hydrology, and power sources and pollution. 3 Credits / Prerequisite:
PHYS151
PHYS 205 Medical Physics I
Students in this course will study the physics of medicine. The course covers medical imaging, physics of sight,
hearing, movement; and examines the techniques of medical diagnosis and treatment. The course outlines the
methods used in the diagnostics of medicine and the calculations involved. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS153
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
PHYS 299 Physics Research Project
In this course students will acquire the fundamental tools needed to choose and conduct a research project,
use resources to review literature relevant to the project, organize and present scientific data. They will select
a hypothesis and submit a scientific paper, which they will defend before a panel of lecturers. 4 Credits/
Prerequisite: PHYS 154
RADG 201 Fundamentals of Radiological Sciences
(formerly RASC 101)
Students are introduced to the profession of radiography, the variety of imaging modalities and the organization
and structure of national health services. Through classroom work, integrated with regular clinical observations,
students gain an understanding of the role of the radiographer and the behaviours and attitudes required to
function effectively in a radiology department. 4 Credits / Prerequisite: None
RADG 213 Basic Anatomic Pathology
(formerly RADG 113)
This course is designed to introduce students to the disease processes which are frequently encountered in a
medical imaging department. Students will discuss the signs, symptoms and prognosis of various diseases and
will also be able to correlate radiographic images with pathologic findings. 3 Credits / Prerequisite: RADG
201
RADG 245 Science and Instrumentation I
(Formerly RADG 141)
This is the first of three courses through which students will understand the science of producing a radiographic
image. They will be able to identify the equipment and instruments used in the production of radiographic
images and gain valuable experience through practice in a clinical environment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG
201
RADG 246 Science and Instrumentation II
(formerly RADG142)
In this course, students examine the components of general X-ray equipment and the accessories needed to
produce an accurate image. They will also understand manual and automatic image processing, fluoroscopy
and image intensification and be exposed to some special techniques requiring the use of general equipment. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 245
RADG 253 Imaging Procedures I (formerly RADG 151)
In this course, students acquire the radiographic and clinical skills required to perform routine radiographic
images of the skeleton (except for the skull and facial bones). They will also learn how to integrate high levels of
patient care and safety with good radiographic practice. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 201 and RADG 245.
RADG 254 Imaging Procedures II (formerly RADG 152)
In this course, students use radiographic skills, previously learnt and practised, to develop proficiency in the
performance of contrast studies. They will also acquire the skills needed to care for pediatric, geriatric and
acutely ill patients and they will learn how to function in the operating theatre. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG
253
RADG 260 Clinical Practicum I
(formerly RADG162)
In this course, students reinforce the radiographic procedures learnt thus far through practical experience
in the clinical workplace. Students’ performance will be evaluated by competency- based assessments and
benchmarked against standards for professional performance. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 201 and RADG
253.
217
RADG 261 Clinical Practicum II
(formerly RADG 163)
This clinical course continues the development of student’s skills in radiographic imaging with emphasis on
contrast media studies in the gastro-intestinal, hepato-biliary and genito-urinary systems. The student will
rotate through departments to ensure practice in these areas as well as the continuation of procedures previous
taught and practised. Attention to professional attitude will be emphasised. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG
260
RADG 275 Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine I
(formerly RADG 171)
In this course, students acquire the professional skills, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours necessary for
functioning as radiographers. The course covers ethical, legal and regulatory issues relevant to the practice of
radiography and emphasizes good communication skills and patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: PSYC 203
and HLED 225 or BUSI 203 and RADG 261
RADG 312 Imaging Correlations with Sectional Anatomy
(formerly RADG 212)
Using case-based and problem-based formats, students reinforce their knowledge of anatomy and radiography.
A series of student-centered activities allows them to examine the multi-modality and relational aspect of
anatomic visualization. The course covers the skeleton and all systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 213
RADG 331 Quality Assurance in Medical Imaging
The student will learn how to integrate quality assurance into the production of consistently high quality images.
They will also evaluate equipment and accessories to determine their efficacy. The student will also develop a
quality assurance programme which can be implemented in the clinical setting. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG
343 and RADG 353
RADG 343 Science and Instrumentation III
(formerly RADG 241)
This course introduces the student to specialized X-ray equipment including tomography as well as mobile and
accident and emergency systems. The student will also examine the role of exposure factors in determining the
quality of the image and will learn how to construct a technique chart in an imaging department. 4 Credits/
Prerequisite: RADG 246
RADG 344 Science and Instrumentation IV
(formerly RADG 242)
In this course, students learn to identify advanced medical imaging equipment and modalities. They are also
exposed to equipment used in local and international clinical settings. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 343
RADG 353 Imaging Procedures III
(formerly RADG 251)
In this course, students develop skills in performing radiography of the head including skull, brain and facial
structures. They will study the cranium, including sinuses, foreign body localization in the eye, sialography,
dental radiography and orthopantomography (OPG). Students will also be introduced to the alternate imaging
systems used in this area and learn to compare resultant images. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 254
RADG 354 Imaging Procedures IV
(formerly called RADG 252)
In this course, students are provided with an overview of non-routine imaging procedures requiring contrast
media and specialized equipment. They learn effective and efficient practice in accident and emergency situations
as well as patient positioning and how to operate X-ray bone mineral densitometry equipment. Students
also examine the role of the radiographer in terms of appropriate patient care, nursing and radiation safety
procedures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 353
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
RADG 363 Clinical Practicum III
(formerly called RADG 262)
In this course, students perform radiographic examinations under direct and indirect supervision. Students are
taught to use the equipment of conventional tomography and are exposed to the following procedures - foreign
body localization in the eye; contrast media studies; skull, facial and dental radiography; as well as routine
radiography of the skeletal system, the chest and the abdomen. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 261
RADG 364 Clinical Practicum IV
(formerly called RADG 263)
In this course, students gain wide and varied experience in the clinical setting. For a three (3)- five (5) week
period, they will be placed overseas in order to observe other practice and modalities including CT, MRI, nuclear
medicine, ultrasound, and other specialized radiological procedures. For the remainder of the period, they
practice in local settings to improve their skills and technique in patient care. 5 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG
363
RADG 371
Professional Skills in Radiation Medicine II
(formerly called RADG 271)
The course continues the focus on the psycho-social aspects of radiography and the professional skills and
qualities demanded by the radiographic profession. Students will understand the concept of reflective practice;
they practise the patient care and communication skills necessary for the radiographer in the patient-practitioner
interface at a more advanced level. They also examine the legal and ethical framework within which the
professional radiographer operates as well as the self regulation and accountability necessary for the changing
workplace. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 275
RADG 444 Medical Digital Imaging
(formerly RADG341)
This course introduces students to the acquisition, display and archiving of digital images. Students will
compare and contrast the analogue and digital image and understand the importance and impact of the nonfilm environment in the areas of digital subtraction, computed radiography, CT and MRI, image processing and
picture archiving. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADG 353 and RADG 353
RADG 455 Imaging Procedures V
(formerly RADG 351)
In this course students are exposed to advanced techniques and alternative imaging modalities. Students are
introduced to interventional imaging, comparative imaging and learn to compare the benefits, similarities and
differences of these procedures. Students discuss concepts and images of nuclear medicine, Ultrasound, CT, MRI
and portal imaging in radiation therapy. They are also introduced to the uses of Positron Emission Tomography
and fusion imaging. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 354
RADG 465 Clinical Practicum V
(formerly RADG 361)
In this course, students are allowed to perform radiographic examinations with increased autonomy. They
perform radiographic examinations in operating theatres, ICUs, wards and Accident and Emergency departments;
they are assigned specialized, more invasive procedures and also assist in patient care. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
RADG 364
RADG 466 Clinical Practicum VI
(formerly RADG 363)
This is a final course in which students reinforce the theoretical and practical elements of radiography so as to
be well grounded in the general radiography and special procedures for entry into the profession. Rotations are
arranged in CT and special imaging areas and students’ performance is evaluated in accordance with established
professional standards. Successful completion of this course certifies students as competent for the workforce.
4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 465
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RADG 471 Change Strategies for Health Professionals (Elective)
In this course, students will see change as a process. They will understand their capacity to be positive agents
of change and the best practices for implementing change in an organization. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG
275
RADG 481 Research Methodology
(formerly RADG 381)
This is the first of three courses in which students are exposed to research methodology, bioethics and presentation
skills. Students are required to develop and present a final research proposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: LIBS
130 and STAT 120
RADG 498 Senior Research Project I - Radiography
(formerly RADG 382)
In this course, students develop a research proposal in radiography, based on data collected from primary
sources such as public or private health care facilities, government agencies or other clinical settings. Students
are required to meet regularly with their lecturer to discuss progress made on the development of the proposal.
4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADG 481
RADG 499 Senior Research Project II - Seminar
(formerly RADG 383)
This final course involves the oral presentation of the research project of RADG 498. Each student will make
a 30-minute presentation to peers and faculty on his/her research project followed by a question and answer
period. The student will complete a journal outlining the project and the personal benefits gained from the
information provided. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: RADG 498
RADT 222 Radiation Sciences
(formerly RADT 122)
In this course, students will be taught the principles of radiation and its effects on the human body. Special
attention is given to radiation biology, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
PHYS 102
RADT 241 Radiation Physics I
(formerly RADT 141)
This course introduces fundamental concepts of physics and mathematics important to the therapeutic use of
ionizing radiation. Students review basic concepts in physics, discuss topics specific to radioactivity, production
of x-rays and their interactions in different media and identify applications of physics theory to radiation
therapy treatment. Students also reinforce their knowledge through problem-based laboratory work and solving
numerical problems. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 254
RADT 242 Physics and Instrumentation I
(formerly RADT 142)
Students examine the operating principles of linear accelerators, betatrons and cobalt teletherapy units, as well
as the quality and measurement of photon beams. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of dosimetric
data and the use of this data for an optimal plan. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 241/ Co-Requisite: RADT
295
RADT 254 Radiation Therapy I
(formerly RADT 151)
The course introduces the student to the hospital environment, health problems and the basic issues of safety
and comfort to be considered when working with patients. The student will be able to practise a variety of
procedures and operate equipment in the patient’s environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-Requisite:
RADT 241
RADT 255 Radiation Therapy II (formerly RADT 152)
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
In this course, students will focus on the appropriate behaviours and skills for the radiation therapist and
radiographer. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 254
RADT 273 Clinical Practice I
(formerly called RADT 162)
In this course, students will practise basic technical skills and procedures required when treating patients. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: None/ Co-Requisite: RADT 242 and RADT 295
RADT 274 Clinical Practice II
(formerly called RADT 163)
In this course students will undergo clinical assessment three days a week over a ten-week period. They will
be placed at the National Radiotherapy Centre and other private Radiotherapy Centres where they will assist in
patient care and the planning and delivery of radiation therapy treatments under the supervision of radiation
therapists. Clinical coordinators will assess their clinical competency and performance evaluation. 4 Credits/
Prerequisite: RADT 273
RADT 295 Treatment and Planning I
(formerly called RADT 192)
In this introductory course, students examine the concepts and principles of treatment planning for radiation
therapy treatment delivery. Topics covered include: the role of the radiation therapist in the treatment planning
team, patient contouring and immobilization, treatment field blocking methods, and simulation (including CT
simulation) for treatment planning. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADT 241 and RADT 254
RADT 311 Radiation Protection and Cellular Response
(formerly called RADT 211)
This course provides detailed study of ionizing radiation on living cells, and its controlled use in radiation
therapy. Students will focus on the variation in responses of different cell population types and life-cycle stages
as applicable to radiation therapy principles. They will discuss radiation units and safety guidelines as well as
focus on the practical application of radiation safety regulations and recommended practices as they apply to
radiation therapy. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 222
RADT 353 Clinical Techniques I
(formerly RADT 272)
This course combines the theory and the practice of radiation therapy into a comprehensive study of clinical
techniques. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of treatment planning, quality assurance,
oncology and patient care in a problem-based learning environment so as to complete competency assessment
assignments in the clinical area. 4 Credits/ Prerequisites: RADT 255, RADT 274 and RADT 395
RADT 354 Clinical Oncology I by PBL
(formerly called RADT 252)
In this course, students examine site-specific oncology in terms of incidence, diagnosis, treatment, side-effects
and results of treatment. Acute side-effects and complications of radiation therapy, assessment, developing care
plans for oncology patients and case study presentations are covered. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 255
RADT 363 Clinical Practice III
(formerly called RADT 262)
This course focuses on the competency-based evaluation and assessment of students’ application of clinical
techniques and procedures. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 274
RADT 364 Clinical Practice IV
(formerly called RADT 263)
This is a ten-week course that includes a three to five-week overseas clinical attachment. Students continue to
participate in all aspects of patient planning and treatment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 363
RADT 395 Treatment and Planning II
(formerly called RADT 291)
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This course is the second in a series of courses examining the concepts and applications of treatment planning
principles in radiation therapy. Students discuss quality assurance as a management concept and its application
in RT practice. They also examine the different imaging and treatment techniques used to accurately plan and
deliver treatment. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 295
RADT 454 Clinical Techniques II
(Formerly called RADT 371)
The course combines the theory and practice of radiation therapy into a comprehensive study of clinical
techniques. Students understand the principles of treatment planning, quality assurance, oncology and patient
care in a problem-based learning environment. They complete competency-based assignments related to the
clinical area. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 353
RADT 456 Clinical Oncology II by PBL (formerly called RADT 351)
In this course, students examine site-specific oncology to include incidence, diagnosis, treatment, side-effects
and results of treatment. Acute side-effects and complications of radiation therapy, assessment developing care
plans for oncology patients and case study presentations will be included. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 354
RADT 465
Clinical Practice V
(formerly called RADT361)
This course spans six weeks. Students will complete competency-based assignments and perform critical tasks.
3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT364
RADT466
Clinical Practice VI (formerly called RADT362)
This course provides students with practical experience in several areas of radiation therapy. Students will be
supervised by the clinical coordinator and staff radiation therapists in assigned clinical facilities, while they
assist in patient care and the planning and delivery of radiation therapy treatments. 5 Credits/ Prerequisite:
RADT 465
RADT 467 Clinical Practice VII
(formerly called RADT 363)
This is a final clinical practicum that is competency-based and in which students fulfill critical tasks. 2 Credits/
Prerequisite: RADT 466
RADT 493
Treatment and Planning III
(formerly RADT 292)
In this course, students will examine quality assurance concepts and their application to treatment planning and
delivery in radiation therapy. They will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of image quality and
other imaging modalities used in the treatment planning process. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 395
RADT 494 Treatment Planning Lab
(formerly called RADT 391)
This course provides the student with laboratory experiences to develop competency in clinical treatment
planning. Students will use manual methods to produce composite isodose distributions and examine the
management of digital information that has evolved as a result of increased computerization in clinical practice.
Using a variety of patient images, students will employ 3-D software to outline planning tumour volumes and
critical structures, and design optimal treatment plans. 4 Credits/ Prerequisite: RADT 493
SCIE 199 Science Research Project I
This course introduces students to the fundamental tools needed to choose and conduct a research project,
use resources to review literature relevant to the project, organize and present scientific data. At the end of the
course students will submit a hypothesis for a project. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: BIOL 121 & 122
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
SCIE 201 Contemporary Issues in Science
This course introduces students to a number of important issues in contemporary science. Students will learn
the basic principles of the scientific method. Through class discussion, they will also learn how to critically
assess industrial and scientific processes. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: None
SCIE 299 Science Research Project II
Using the hypothesis submitted in SCIE 199, students will conduct a literature review and develop a project
proposal for testing the hypothesis. At the end of this course students will submit a written literature review
and project proposal. 2 Credits/ Prerequisite: SCIE 199
SCIE 399 Science Research Project III
Students will conduct a research project based on a unique hypothesis. This project may be based on
submissions from SCIE 299. Students will collect data and orally present their methods and results before a
panel of lecturers. 1 Credit/ Prerequisite: SCIE 299
SCIE 499 Science Research Project IV
Students will submit a written scientific paper based on the research conducted in SCIE 399. 1 Credit/
Prerequisite: SCIE 399
WRMT 180 Hydrometeorology
(formerly ENVS 105)
This course gives the student an understanding of the meteorological processes that determine weather and
climate. The student learns of the general features of climatology as it relates to hydrology, with particular
emphasis on the energy budget of the earth, the general circulation, generation of precipitation, distribution of
temperature and pressure, and the effects of climate on soils and vegetation. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS
160
WRMT 190 Hydraulics I
(formerly ENVS 103)
This course is essential to the water resources practitioner who is responsible for design operation activities.
Students learn about kinematics, dynamics, statistics, pipe flow, open channel flow and introductory design of
hydraulics structures. 3 Credits/Prerequisite: MATH 121
WRMT 200 Wastewater Management
(formerly ENVS 200)
Students will focus on the maintenance of standards of public health safety as well as the importance of water
conservation. They will learn the fundamental principles and practices involved in the provision of water to, and
the collection, treatment and disposal of wastewater from homes, institutions, factories and communities. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111
WRMT 201 Surface Water Hydrology I
(formerly ENVS 201)
Students in this course gain a comprehensive understanding of the processes involved in surface water hydrology.
These processes will include precipitation, soil moisture distribution, infiltration, interception and the stream
flow mechanism. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100
WRMT 202 Ground Water Hydrology I
(Formerly ENVS 202)
Students in this course acquire knowledge of the conditions under which groundwater occurs. They also learn
about groundwater movement and storage and the relationship between groundwater and surface water. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: MATH 121
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WRMT 203 Drainage and Irrigation
(formerly ENVS 203)
Students learn about the various methods of providing a continuous and reliable water supply to crops. They
also acquire the skills necessary for the management and control of flooding in both urban and rural areas, and
the computational skills for the design of various drainage and irrigation systems. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites:
MATH 121 and PHYS 100
WRMT 205 Watershed Management and Soil Conservation
(formerly ENVS 205)
Water resources and environmental practitioners who pursue this course will acquire the skills necessary to
conserve soil, plant and water resources. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: CHEM 111 and ENVS 160
WRMT 215 Hydrometry (formerly ENVS 215)
Students in this course will acquire the skills and measuring techniques necessary for collecting reliable flow and
sediment data. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 201
WRMT 255 Wastewater Engineering (formerly ENVS 255)
In this course, students examine the concepts of the design of wastewater treatment processes. Emphasis will be
placed on the physical, chemical and biological treatment processes. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: ENVS 263
WRMT 280 Introduction to Wastewater Operations and Maintenance
(formerly ENVS 280)
This course is designed as an introduction to the basic concepts involved in wastewater plant operation and
maintenance. It includes an overview of the elements of a typical wastewater plant and introductory operational
and maintenance procedures associated with a wastewater facility. Training and knowledge of equipment, health
and safety and general administrative principles are also incorporated.
WRMT 282 Introduction to Wastewater Collection Systems
(formerly ENVS 282)
In this course, students examine the operations and components of a wastewater collection system. They develop
an understanding of the functionality and operational efficiency that is necessary to minimize environmental
degradation, while increasing the life cycle of the system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 255
WRMT 284 Wastewater Treatment Process
(formerly ENVS 284)
Students explore the various treatment processes employed in the wastewater industry. They learn that many
aspects of the wastewater treatment process are designed to imitate the natural treatment that occurs in the
environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 255
WRMT 286 Wastewater Planning and Development (formerly ENVS 286)
Students gain an appreciation of wastewater system planning and management as an integrated and holistic
approach to wastewater resource management. They learn ways of minimizing overflows through retention,
detention, proper planning and design of the wastewater collection system. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT
280
WRMT 288 Advanced Wastewater Treatment
(formerly ENVS 288)
This course exposes students to SCADA system architecture. Students are equipped with the general skills
required for maintaining the integrity of the system with real time monitoring. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT
280
WRMT 290 Hydraulics II
(formerly ENVS 250)
In this course, students acquire more in-depth knowledge required for the water resources practitioner who is
responsible for design and operation activities. Among the topics covered are the design of hydraulic structures,
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CATALOGUE 2010-2012
kinematics, pipe flow and open channel flow. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 190
WRMT 301 Surface Water Hydrology II
(formerly ENVS 301)
This course builds on the knowledge acquired in WRMT 201. Students gain a comprehensive understanding of
the processes involved in the distribution of the world’s surface water supply. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT
201
WRMT 302 Ground Water Hydrology II
(formerly ENVS 302)
In this course, students explore the three-phase process of utilizing groundwater resources: exploration,
evaluation and exploration/management. They will learn to search for suitable aquifer yields, develop optimal
strategies and assess the interactions between groundwater exploitation and the regional hydrologic system. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 202
WRMT 317 Biological Principles of Water and Wastewater Management (formerly ENVS 317)
In this course, students develop a comprehensive understanding of the major elements and processes involved
in water and wastewater management from a biological perspective. They explore various water management
issues, including treatment of water for drinking, water sanitation and the need for wastewater treatment. 3
Credits/ Prerequisite: CHEM 111
WRMT 410 Hydrological Database Development
(formerly ENVS 410)
In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of database development and management as applied
to hydrology. They will explore the principles of relational database design including the organization and
storage of information. In addition, they will examine the functions of specific hydrological database systems. 3
Credits/ Prerequisites: WRMT 301 and WRMT 302
WRMT 425 Wastewater Plant Operations and Maintenance (formerly ENVS 425)
In this course, students gain an in-depth understanding of the components of water and wastewater plants and
systems. They explore water and wastewater design, operations, monitoring and maintenance of plants. They
are also trained in equipment upkeep, safety/survival systems and administrative and organizational principles.
3 Credits/ Prerequisite: WRMT 282
WRMT 427 Water and Wastewater Collection Systems
(formerly ENVS 427)
Students explore the various processes involved in the accumulation and allocation of water and wastewater. They
learn about the development of water as a resource in terms of treatment, storage and distribution and identify
the environmental issues associated with water pollution and wastewater disposal. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite:
WRMT 282
WRMT 430 Membrane Technology
(formerly ENVS 430)
In this course, students will study the principles and applications of membrane technology in developing
supplemental water sources and treating wastewater effluents. They will also come to understand the importance
of preserving the integrity of the environment. 3 Credits/ Prerequisite: PHYS 100
WRMT 432 Water Resources Management
(formerly ENVS 430)
Students explore the issues involved in the development of water resources. They learn about the most feasible
methods of identifying and quantifying water resources on a regional basis and will gain knowledge of the
principles of surface and groundwater hydrology. 3 Credits/ Prerequisites: WRMT 203, WRMT 205 and ENVS
263
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