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ossoc and the Plantations of Dallas, Rangeley & San
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dy River
Volume 4 • Issue 2
October 10, 2014
Rangeley Rotary Club Donates $500 to
Rangeley Ecumenical Food Bank
Pictured Left to right: Audrey Hodge, Louise Doak and president of Rangeley Rotary Club Curtis Haley
WE WANT
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NEWS!
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LAUNDROMAT
"Where the sun is always shining"
OPEN EVERYDAY 7:00 am to 9:00 pm
LOCATED ON ROUTE 4, RANGELEY (NEXT TO REV-IT-UP SPORTS)
Tanning Beds Available
864-2452
SOMEONE FORGOT TO TREAT YOU TO A MASSAGE
CUT THIS OUT AND REMIND THEM
Tina Falasco, LMT
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864-5805
Specializing in
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Mountain Messenger
Page 2
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
Spruce Mountain Golfer Emily Ouellette
Emily Ouellette is junior on the Spruce Mountain
High School Golf Team. Here she hits a drive at
Livermore, Maine’s Maple Lane. Ouellette plays
the difficult game with one arm, her right, handling the drivers, irons and putter.
Spruce Mountain
junior, Emily Ouellette, had no plans
to be the next Jim
Abbot or Natalie Du
Toit. She just wants
to challenge herself
and have fun. (Jim
Abbot was the Major League Pitcher
(1989-99) with no
right hand; Natalie
Du Toit won four
Gold Medals (2004)
in Olympic Swimming with one leg.)
Emily
Ouellette
from Livermore Falls
was born with one
good arm and hand
(the right) while her
left arm stops at
the elbow. The smil-
ing sixteen year old
also has an abnormal curvature of the
spine. When she got
her legs going as a
youngster, however,
she began playing
basketball,
soccer
and softball and continued right through
middle school. In our
recent interview she
shared that soccer
wasn’t enough of a
challenge anymore.
An admission that
gave me a chuckle.
So Ouellette decided at the end of
last school year to
get ready to be on
Spruce Mountain’s
Golf Team for the
2014 season. She and
her mother began
practicing at Maple
Lane in Livermore
and at Roy’s Pine
Acres 9-Hole course
in Auburn. Emily’s
mother, Catherine,
says the Pine Acres
is a great place for a
beginner. It was also
ideal for her daughter whose back can
become painful with
all the walking and
swinging. She has
had to stop a match
early once when
competing with Erskine Academy.
Ouellette
says
that golf has turned
out to be more of a
challenge than she
thought it would be,
though she is happy
with the decision.
She loves meeting
new people, students and adults, in
the slower pace of
the sport, and she remains up for and excited about the challenge of swinging,
and controlling a golf
club with one arm.
Almost
everyone
who has tried golfing will admit it is a
difficult undertaking.
Just visit a driving
range and watch the
crazy stuff that goes
on when people take
a whack at that little
ball.
Emily has driven
the ball about 150
yards and has sunk
a 20-foot put during
a match. She rarely
scores well for the
team, but they enjoy
having her out there
being an example of
obstacle
overcoming. “Everyone is really supportive,” she
says. Along with encouragement
from
her mother, her father Stephen Ouellette is also very supportive and makes
many of her matches.
Her dad was the one
who suggested to
Catherine and Emily
that his daughter’s
efforts might make a
nice news article.
First year coach
Dianne
Fenlason
treats Ouellette like
all of her players at
Spruce. Fenlason is a
teacher in the Spruce
Mountain
schools,
and has been a big
help to Emily when
the young golfer gets
a bit discouraged.
“I enjoy seeing
how I progress,” Em-
Kim Gooding
Occupational Therapy PLLC
Specializing in:
Peadiatrics Home Evaluation/Modification
Geriatrics Neurological Conditions
Edema Lymphedema Treatment
ily also noted while
she share with me
the excitement she
had when she got
a bogie on Maple
Lane’s ninth hole.
Wouldn’t many golfers out there reading
this wish they could
get more bogies,
than doubles and
triples. Seeing herself improve is one
of the enjoyments of
the sport in addition
to ‘meeting new people’ for Ouellette.
As written above
Emily has no desire to
turn the world of Golf
upside down while
she perseveres with
her one-armed chipping and putting,
but she does have
a goal. She plans to
become a Physical
Therapist. A subgoal is to possibly
be a therapist who
helps patients with
the same disabling
condition that she
has. “I think a physical therapist that has
had to live with one
arm would be better
able to understand
what the patient is
going through.” She
mentioned this while
talking to me about
her visits to the Shriners Hospital in Boston, a facility that has
come to the rescue of
many a young person
with great physical
challenges. n
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864-5343 • www.bosspowerequipment.com
OPEN
7 DAYS A
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“Off-Road General Store”
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Now Serving Rangeley and
Surrounding Towns!
P.O. Box 303•32 Park St., Livermore Falls
www.rangeleybuilders.com
Cell 207-491-5142 Office 207-864-3925
Email: [email protected]
897-5367
RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, CAMPS
AND REMOTE LOCATIONS.
Now offering exhaust
repairs & custom
exhaust work!
FULL SERVICE GAS & DIESEL
2599 Main Street, Rangeley • 864-3494
www.domsjeep.com
October 10, 2014
Mountain Messenger
CVA Ski Sale: Oct. 11th
On Saturday, October 11th, Carrabassett
Valley Academy’s annual Ski and Sports
Equipment Sale will be
held at the Anti Gravity
Complex in Carrabassett Valley. The sale will
feature a variety of new
and used ski/snowboard equipment and
gear, as well as some
miscellaneous sporting
items.
The doors to the sale
open at 10:00 AM and
Page 3
www.turnerpublishing.net
Do Answer
YouonSudoku
page 12
close at 2:30 PM. Anyone planning to bring
items to sell may do so
on Friday, October 10th
from 5:30 PM to 8:00 PM
and on Saturday, October 11th from 8:00 AM
to 10:00 AM. n
Celebrating 20 years of
Community Health and Wellness!
207 364-7500 ext. 100
www.mainemadefurniture.com
RANGELE
Y FITNESS CENTER
Mountain Messenger
Page 4
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
Bingo Friends, This is
our 12th Year
Welcome
back,
Hugs, prizes, goodies and those classy
ladies that run it.
Pat, Anita, and Mary.
It's all free, cards
also. Everyone welcomed. October 15th
Wednesday
1PM3PM at the Rangeley Town House 14
School Street. Rangeley. There is a meal
site there, so those interested in lunch first
should call ahead:
864-3986. Questions
please call Mary 8645115 n
Rangeley’s
Contemplative
Worship Service
All are invited to
the next monthly
Contemplative Worship service at
Rangeley Congregational Church on
Wednesday, October
8th. We will begin
at 7 pm in the Barn,
the gathering space
next door to the
church’s
sanctuary
building. Facilitated by
Rev. Cathie Wallace,
this time together
will include meditative music offered
by Sue DownesBorko, prayer with
tealights,
readings and silence. Our
theme in October is
“Transition,” and
it is our hope that
members of the wider Rangeley community will feel
welcome at this alternative worship.. n
Annual Chicken Supper
The annual Chicken Supper will be
held at the Phillips
Elementary School,
on Friday October
10th from 5-6:30PM.
The menu includes
roast chicken, stuff-
P O S TI N G S
ing, mashed potatoes,
gravy, peas, squash,
cranberry
sauce,
cole slaw,rolls and
butter, with assorted
pies for dessert, and
coffee, tea, milk, or
juice. Cost is $8 for
adults and $5 for children 12 and under.
The supper benefits
the Phillips Community Church. FMI call
Barb Gardiner,
684-3394 n
CLASSIFIED AD FORM
Send this order form to
Turner Publishing
P.O. Box 214
Turner, ME 04282
Number of Weeks__________ Name_____________________________________________________
Address___________________________________________________
CityState__________________________________ Zip_____________
Up to 30 words or less
Congratulations to:
Carol James she found the in one of
last month’s Mountain
Messenger papers.
she will receive a gift
in one
certificate in the mail. Find the
of this month’s papers and you could
also be a winner!
St
Luke’s Aut
October 11
umn Fair
th, on Lake
Street from
A white ele
10 to 2pm.
phant table
,
b
a
ked goods,
luncheon w
and a
ill be avail
a
b
le includin
clam chow
g Sandi’s
der and Ca
r
m
e
n
’s
chili. Also
children, a
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cookie can
fill-up will
able. All a
be availre welcom
e to attend
. Put on b
Catholic W
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omen’s Clu
b.
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g
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l
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The Ches
supper on
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Friday, O
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6:30pm.
ser t. Adu
5:00 and
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s, breads
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chowder
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$5.00; Ch
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778-5845
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Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
Page 5
www.turnerpublishing.net
B•L•U•E•S
Buying•Local•Used & Extra•Stuff
1-DAY GARAGE SALE
OCT. 11TH 8AM-3PM.
11 High st. Rangeley.
Some antiques, mirrors, tables, camping
cots, miscellaneous.
for more info 491-2232
2000 HONDA CRV
WAGON. AWD. Inspection through June
2015. Good tires. Milage 126G New drive
train @ 120G. Very minor rust & repair $3,000
864-5037 ( Rangeley)
ATTENTION
CARPENTERS
$1,500
worth of lumber left
over from summers
projects PT 2 bys and
finished boards asking
$500 OBO Snap on Tool
box New $6,500 asking
$1,500 call 864-3074
FOR SALE: GE HARMONY WASHER/GAS
DRYER. Biggest made
(gray) topload. Metal
best pipes for a woodstove Best offer. Firm
twin mattress Best offer. Free deep bath tub
with 2 hairline cracks
864-5005
BOSE LIFESTYLE 28
SERIES II Home Theater System, in very
good condition $450.
Tel. 670-8505 (Rangeley)
PILATES MACHINE
AND ATTACHMENTS.
Only used 2 months
$295
(207-639-2515)
Phillips
JOTEL
WOOD
STOVE, #3, good condition $400.
Sleep
Number queen sized
bed. Used less than 1
month. $600 2 mid 80s
Johnson outboard motors; 6 hp and 7.5 hp.
207 864-2402
WINTER
RENTAL
RANGELEY
Available Dec. - March.
Great location on Dallas Hill Road, very
close to Saddleback
Mt. and on snowmobile trail. 2 bedroom,
2 bath, galrage and
generator.
Includes
DirectTV, internet and
utilities. Renter pays
half the heat. Sits on
large property. Great
for
snowshoeing,
cross-country skiing or
hiking. Great for family or 2 couples. $1400/
month. Call 864-3612
or 240-5248.
or call 207-864-5441.
Applications available
at www.saddlebackmaine.com
AMSEC SAFE FOR
SALE: Fire and Burglar
Proof. Ext. Dimensions:
39 1/2 H, 22 W, 22 D.
Int. Dimensions: 34 H,
16 W, 18 D. $1,500. If
interested Please call
Bob at 207-670-1112.
BLUE PINE DESK and
cabinet, pierced tin
doors. 3’x6’x6’, custom
built. Make offer 864
-2936
FOR SALE MEADE
TELESCOPE on tripod
new condition, digital
display and multiple
lenses asking $150.00
207-684-3537
FOR RENT 3 bed, 2
bath Farmhouse with
separate barn, private
views of Rangeley
Lake and Saddleback
Mountain, wood and
oil heat. South Shore
Drive, Rangeley Plantation.
$800/month.
(207) 670-8703 or (207)
542-4630.
Available
Oct. 1st.
FOR SALE IMPEX
MULTI
FUNCTION
HOME GYM, butterfly
attachment, lat pull,
front press and leg developer. Brand new,
will sell for $400. Call
864-5520 for details.
Rangeley.
FOR SALE SKIS One
pair Atomic beta-Ride
10-20’s 185cm $150.
For more information
call Kevin at 670-6007.
FOR SALE SKIS One
pair Atomic Beta-Ride
11-20’s with racing
bindings 180cm $250.
For more information
call Kevin at 670-6007.
SADDLEBACK MAINE
HOUSEKEEPERS full
and part time, positions available immediately. Email [email protected]
saddlebackmaine.com
SMOKER: cannister,
36” high x 18”wide, reconditioned. Great for
your fresh fish or hunting harvest. $35. Oquossoc. 670-6007.
FENDER SRV SIGNATURE STRATS both
in excellent shape one
like new one heavily
played call for more
information $3500 for
both or $2000 a piece.
Leave msg 860-9990
MAH JONG. Know the
game or want to learn?
Wed afternoons. Call
Jackie 207-557-2503,
or email Jackie at
[email protected]
FREE CATS for adoption to a good home,
all shapes, sizes and
color. Call 864-2000.
DYNO GLO KEROSENE Heater Also a
pail of Kerosene. Only
run 2 weeks $80 obo.
Madelyn Tyler 6844435. Strong.
WANTED I am looking for a double ender
Rangeley Boat in fairly good condition. Jim
Quimby 864-0922.
PIANO
LESTER
Spinet 64, dark finish,
needs tuning & minor
repair. 401/2”W-31”H24”D. Buyer must
move. Asking $200.
864-2153
2002 BLUE HARLEY
FATBOY motorcycle
trade for land or down
payment on land/camp
in Rangeley Plantation
or Oquossoc area’s.
<9k mileage. Tons of
extras & chrome. Rick
329-1696 or [email protected]
Named Turner Business of the Year 2013
by the Androscoggin County Chamber
Mountain Messenger’s Important Legal Info
CEO/Publisher
Jodi Cornelio
Asst. General Manager
Dede Libby
Sales Manager
Jess Small
Senior Designer
Michelle Pushard
Advertising:
Jess Small
Dede Libby
Erin Savage
Jim Foster
Paul Gagne
Writer/Photographer
Bill Van Tassel
Proof Readers
Hal Small
Graphic Design
Danielle Pushard
Office/Billing
Tom Tardif
gmail.com
FOR SALE 4 Toyota
Tacoma six bolt 16”
stock rims 2012 with
center caps. $200. 1
Thule plastic shell ski/
luggage rack. $125
Good shape. Call 2391712.
TWO 8’6” Okuma rods
with two Shakespeare
Tidewater 30 L reels
with lead core line.
$125. Call 864-3888.
BEAUTIFUL
ANTIQUE 1965 19’ mahogany Lyman Lapstrake Runabout. Volvo
Penta 125 HP dual carb
I-O drive. Low mileage, runs well. 10K.
Michael: 864-5129 or
[email protected]
ALUMINUM/STAINLESS Steel rack for
Dakota truck. Rack
clamps on - no drilling.
Will support two canoes or 650 lbs. 5’ top
rails extend to 7’. $225.
Call 864-3888.
CLEARED
HOUSE
LOT
overlooking
Rangeley Lake. Excellent views of Rangeley Lake. Cleared and
driveway in. Electric
and phone on property. $49,000, call 207491-8669 for more info.
2001 CHRYSLER VAN
Voyager LX, 150,000
miles, good condition, well maintained,
studded snow tires,
inspected. PRICE REDUCED $1,900. 5852583
EASTLAKE complete
7 piece parlor set.
Needs
restoration.
$200 OBO. Call to have
picture emailed. (207)
639-2048. Phillips.
1953 SINGER sewing
machine with wood
cabinet. #AL328595
Model #15. Best offer.
207-864-2380.
ULTIMATE SUV: 87
VW Vanagon Syncro
4WD. Wades to 30”
deep, airprecleaner for
crossing sandy deserts, skid shield for
crossing rocks, differential lock for unstopability! 4 speeds plus
ultralow crawler gear!
Weekender package:
queen bed, curtains,
captains chairs, etc.
AC, auxiliary rear
heater, lots more. 7-9
people plus luggage!
1 ton truck capacity
but 18 mpg. Inspected
to 9/2014 $9,995. 8645387 Rangeley
1953 SINGER SEWING MACHINE - With
wood cabinet #AL
328595 Model#15 BEST OFFER call Lori
Muzzy for more information at 864-2380.
(Rangeley)
WHITE MOUNTAIN
ANTIQUE ICE BOX
$500 or BEST OFFER
call Lori Muzzy for
more information at
864 2380. (Rangeley)
FOR SALE; 5 Room
House on Rt. 4 in Madrid Township. Close
to all things recreational for the 4 seasons.
Easy to heat, wood
and oil. Call 639-3646
for more information.
FOR SALE: 17’ Royalex Old Town Tripper
Canoe. Great condition – some scratches
but no dings or dents.
Army Green w/ black
molded seats. Low
mileage! $1300. OBO
864-3971
2004 LTD ROCKWOOD
HARDTOP POP UP
CAMPER. New full
canvas. Stove, Furnace, Queen and double beds. Refrigerator
propane or electric.
Very Very good condition. Asking $2,700.00
Call (207) 684-5511
Strong, Maine.
FOR SALE: 1984 Honda Motocycle, 700CC,
34,000 miles. $950 8645489
FOR SALE: 2009 Polaris Sportsman 4-Wheeler. Rear Suspension,
power steering, low
miles (around 1,000).
Used very little, extra
gas tank, rear & front
bumper guards. In
very good condition.
Call 639-3646, leave a
message.
1929 ORIGINAL C.W.
BARRETT
Rangeley Guide Boat. Documented
by
professional
surveyor:
Wineglass Stern, Original Oars,Paint, Last in
Rangeley, 1970’s found
in Wolfeboro N.H.
Brand new load rite
trailer! Museum Quality $7,750 O.B.O Call
Gary 207-860-9293
FOR SALE BY OWNER 3-4 bed, 2 bath
renovated farm house
with barn. 2.5 acres,
more
land
available, views, access
to snowmobile and
ATV trails. Low taxes.
Rangeley Plantation.
$169,000. (207) 6708703 or (207) 542-4630
RARE 1982 CM450A
HONDAMATIC Windshield, crash bar, luggage rack, sissy bar,
back rest, cover, new
tires
and
battery.
5,951 miles Excellent Condition $1,800
Strong 684-3739
RANGELEY WINTER
RENTAL Dec-March.
On Haley Pond, private road. 2 bedroom
with loft sleeps 6 one
bath. (walk to town).
Close to saddleback,
Snowmobile
trails
out the door. $1,000
Monthly
Rangeley
864-2948
PO Box 214 • Turner, ME 04282-0214
email: [email protected][email protected]
The Mountain Messenger is published by Turner Publishing Inc., P.O. Box
214, Turner, ME 04282-0214. Advertisers and those wishing to submit
articles of interest can call 1-207-225-2076 or fax us at 1-207-225-5333, you
can also send e-mail to us at: [email protected] Any views
expressed within this paper do not necessarily reflect those of this paper.
This paper assumes no responsibility for typographical errors that may
occur, but will reprint, at no additional cost, that part of any advertisement
in which the error occurs before the next issue’s deadline. This paper also
reserves the right to edit stories and articles submitted for publication.
This paper is mailed on a weekly basis, FREE to all postal customers of
Strong, Avon, Phillips, Madrid, Rangeley, and Oquossoc and the Plantations of Dallas, Rangeley & Sandy River.
Mountain Messenger
Page 6
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
The Orrington Game Sanctuary
V. Paul Reynolds
By V. Paul Reynolds
Maine has more
than 40 assorted
wildlife preserves or
sanctuaries. With a
few exceptions most
of them are off limits
to hunting and trapping. As a matter
of fact, Baxter State
Park, which is a wildlife sanctuary under
Maine law, is one of
the exceptions. Although it is not commonly known, there
are areas in the north
end of the Park that
are open to public
hunting.
In some ways, these
wildlife sanctuaries
are a throwback to
the early 1900s when
we did not have the
sophisticated wildlife management systems we enjoy today.
The sanctuary was
a method to “save
some seed” when
our deer populations
were at the mercy of
unregulated hunting
and unmanaged deer
populations. Still, the
sanctuaries remain,
an antiquated remnant of the past and
no doubt a concept
that pleases those
in our midst who
oppose hunting of
any wild animals, or,
while not opposed to
hunting, simply like
the idea that there
are wildlife sanctuaries, where the hunter
or the trapper cannot
tread.
In particular, the Orrington Game Sanctuary - sometimes
called the King’s
Mountain game preserve - is a confusing,
unresolved controversy that has simmered
beneath the radar
for a half century or
more.
If you will excuse
the pun, this game
sanctuary is neither
fish nor fowl. For starters, this sanctuary is
almost without any
solid, marked boundaries. The Maine Department of Inland
Fisheries and Wildlife does not know
just how much actual acreage comprises
this game sanctuary.
I have explored parts
of it with Warden
Sgt. alan Gillis and it
is a big parcel! One
known boundary is
the south side of the
Richardson Road and
part of an old rock
wall that extends
along the county line
off that road. Center
Drive, which leads up
to the broadcast towers on the Mountain,
transects the sanctuary.
One Center Drive
resident, Phil Eckert,
who loves the sanctuary and is kind of a
self-appointed “warden” who puts up a
lot of sanctuary and
no trespassing signs,
claims that there are
2,000 acres in this
sanctuary parcel.
Going as far back
as the days of Game
Warden Dave Mercier, no wardens have
been
comfortable
enforcing the sanctuary hunting prohibition because of
the
indeterminate
boundary lines. Warden Sgt. Alan Gillis
spent 9 days back in
1997 without much
success trying to pinpoint some of the old
boundary
markers.
Efforts by then Fish
and Wildlife Commissioner Lee Perry
to solve the problem
back in 2002, by removing the sanctuary
altogether, were put
on the back burner
when a few sanctuary residents became
vocal.
In 2008, Warden Gillis submitted a report
and recommendation
to his bosses in Augusta. He determined
that the sanctuary
residents were divided about whether
or not to remove the
sanctuary status. He
argued compellingly
that, unless the Department was ready
to pay for a major survey of this land, the
only practical solution was to remove
the sanctuary designation. After all, he
pointed out, the landowners who presently owned land on the
sanctuary,
always
had the option to post
the land against hunting if they saw fit.
That same year,
at the Department’s
recommendation,
Bucksport
legislator Kimberly Rosen
sponsored “An Act
to Remove Game
Sanctuary Status for
certain lands in the
Town of Orrington.”
It passed. During
legislative testimony, IF&W spokesman
Mark Stadler, who
was director of the
wildlife division, said,
“It is the Department’s position that
game sanctuaries are
antiquated and unnecessary, because
game
populations
are adequately protected under Maine’s
science-based game
management
programs and associated
law enforcement.”
Sanctuary
resident Phil Ekert, and
some of his sanctuary neighbors, became irate and petitioned Rep. Rosen.
She caved, asserting
that she was misled
by the Department.
Before the ink was
dry on her first bill,
she introduced “An
Act to Restore Game
Sanctuary Status for
certain lands in the
Town of Orrington. It
passed.
Eckert, who is an
amiable,
soft-spoken Korean War vet,
seems to believe that
these deer who populate the sanctuary are
his personal deer, and
his responsibility to
protect. He will fight
and petition again if
need be. “I don’t care
about those other
boundaries, or whether they exist or not,”
he told me. “That’s
not my problem.”
So what’s the answer? Removing the
sanctuary
makes
sense. It would solve
a legal issue, and create a wonderful new
hunting opportunity
in an area with a high
incidence of posted
land.
Landowners
like Eckert and author
Stephen King, who
owns 15 acres on the
top of the mountain,
can still keep hunters out by exercising
their posting option.
The roadblock to
common sense, as so
often is the case, is
purely political. Former legislator Rosen,
who is a state senate
candidate, said “I’m
willing to revisit the
issue.” Perhaps she
should, but she will
need the support of
the Fish and Wildlife
Commissioner,
his
landowner relations
coordinator, and local
and state sporting organizations. Unless
sportsmen and organizations like the
Sportsman’s Alliance
of Maine (SAM) bring
this issue back to the
front burner, little is
likely to change.
The author is editor of the Northwoods
Sporting Journal. He
is also a Maine Guide,
co-host of a weekly
radio program “Maine
Outdoors” heard Sundays at 7 p.m. on
The Voice of Maine
News-Talk Network
(WVOM-FM
103.9,
WQVM-FM
101.3)
and former information officer for the
Maine Dept. of Fish
and Wildlife. H i s
e-mail
ad- d r e s s
is [email protected] . He has two
books “A Maine Deer
Hunter’s
Logbook”
and his latest, “Backtrack.”n
Enjoy Halloween Fun Whether You’re Young
or Simply Young at Heart
Halloween hijinks
include dressing up
and scouring the
neighborhood for free
candy. Halloween is
the typically the best
day of autumn for
children who have eagerly been awaiting
the sweets free-for-all
since the start of the
school year.
But Halloween is
not just for youngsters. Many adults
are equally enamored
with Halloween, the
one day of the year
when men and women can don a costume,
act silly and let loose
for an evening.
Some adults may
wrestle with the decision to get dressed
up for Halloween. But
one trip to the costume store can shed
light on just how
popular Halloween is
among adults. Costumes devoted to older Halloween revelers
often exceed those
set aside for kids. The
choice in adult costumes is vast. Dressing up is not right for
every occasion, but
when done correctly,
it can enhance the fun
of Halloween.
Costumes at the
workplace may not al-
ways be acceptable.
It is wise to check
with human resources personnel to learn
the company policies
on costumes. If management announces
an in-office costume
contest or something
similar, then this is an
indication that costumes are acceptable.
Make sure you understand the parameters
of getting dressed up
and play by the rules,
or you could ruin the
fun for employees in
subsequent years.
Steer clear of any
costumes that may
send
inappropriate messages or use
off-color
language.
You never know who
might be in attendance at a Halloween party, and certain
costumes may be offensive.
Choose a costume
that fits your personality or one that’s the
complete opposite of
what others would
expect you to wear. A
Halloween costume
allows you to try on
a completely different
persona for a night.
Recognize there are
particular costumes
for all sorts of popular
characters and figures. Then there are
the same costumes in
risqué versions. Use
discretion with regard
HAVE YOU FOUND
THE M?
to how much skin
you want to show.
Let the type of event
(i.e., office Halloween
party or gathering
with friends) you are
attending help determine which costume
you wear.
Select a comfortable
costume. You want to
be able to mingle at a
Halloween party. Having a costume that
constricts movement
can impede your ability to have fun. A large,
cumbersome costume
also might take up too
much room in a party
space, and you may
end up bumping into
other guests.
Remember to have
fun. Embrace looking foolish for one
night and wear your
costume with pride.
If you are confident
in the costume you
choose, you can pull
off just about any
outfit and still have a
good time. n
Dessert
First
Bakery
Made to Order and Take Out
Come Visit our new Digs!
2378 Main St. at Sandy River Greens
7am - 2pm Wed. through Fri. • 8am - 2pm Sat. and Sun.
Scones, turnovers, cakes, cupcakes, tarts and more.
REALLY good coffee! Gluten-free always available.
207-864-9363
Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
Page 7
www.turnerpublishing.net
Gold Rush
John McDonald
Have you ever owned
gold? Do you intend to
join the Gold Rush and
get yourself a nice pile
of gold?
I’ve owned gold objects over the years, or
objects that supposedly contained a certain
amount of gold, but
I’ve never gone out and
bought myself a brick
or two of ‘gold.’
I wonder where you
would go if you wanted
to buy gold? I remember seeing a marquis in
front of a store in South
Portland that said “We
pay highest prices for
gold and silver” and
then it gave the current
price for each - just like
they do with gasoline
in front of a convenience store.
So, that answers the
question of where you
can sell gold, but I’m
still not clear about
where I should go to
buy gold. And when you
buy gold, how would
you carry it home: in a
shopping bag?
Lately I’ve been hearing more and more ads
on the radio telling
me why I should drop
whatever I’m doing and
dial an 800 number and
start buying GOLD!
There are even nationally syndicated talk
show hosts who weave
the ‘buy gold’ message
into their shows. You’ll
hear a host say some-
thing like: “Well, every economic indicator
that’s supposed to be
up is down and whatever is supposed to
be down is up. Unemployment will continue
to be a problem, retail
sales are poor, oil could
soon hit $200 a barrel
and $20 a-gallon before
Christmas. That’s good
news if you’ve bought
gold. That’s why I’m
planning to buy all the
Gold I can. You should
too.”
At first I ignored the
buy gold ads, just letting them roll over me.
But now there are so
many BUY GOLD! ads
that I’ve begun to wonder what’s going on?
Do these people know
something I don’t which wouldn’t be difficult - or do they just
want my money like all
the other advertisers?
These ads must be
getting to me because
recently I started asking myself: John, Why
haven’t you bought
Gold? Why isn’t gold a
part of your investment
strategy?
Is the world as we
know it coming to an
end? Will our paper
money become worthless overnight? Will the
stores where we now
trade soon refuse our
business if we don’t
have bricks of gold to
trade?
As a kid I remember
watching TV westerns where a scraggily miner – who looked
like he didn’t have two
pennies to rub together - would come into
the saloon, with the
honky-tonk piano playing in the background,
and he’d saunter over
to the bar and ask the
bar-keep for a drink.
When the bartender
would ask how he was
going to pay for it he’d
take out a small leather
pouch and pour some
gold dust on the bar.
Miners assumed that
all wild-west saloons
had scales for weighing
gold dust
Some movies would
drag the scene out further by having the bartender ask the miner if
he’d taken his gold over
to the assay office to
make sure it wasn’t iron
pyrite: FOOL’S GOLD!
In most movies the
bartender would eventually be satisfied with
the purity of the gold
dust and would place
a bottle of rot-gut whiskey and a dirty glass on
the bar in front of the
miner.
Somehow I can’t see
Hannaford and Shaw’s
and other grocery retailers going back to
those days – replacing
their debit machines
with scales and weighing gold dust with each
order.
It’s slow enough now
with debit cards, imagine how it would be
with scales?
I still haven’t decided whether I should
dial one of these 800
numbers and get me
some GOLD! Like the
bartenders in the old
westerns I don’t want
to pay for gold and end
up with a pile of iron
pyrite. n
FREE “Basic’s of Starting A Business” Class Offered
new business. This
is a three week class
and attendance at all
sessions is strongly
recommended.
Pre-registration and
attendance at both
sessions is required.
Classes will be held
on Mondays, October
20 & 27 from 9:30 to
2:30 pm at
Women, Work and
Communities Office
at 108 Perham Street,
Suite A Farmington,
ME.
For more information or to register
please call Karleen
Andrews at 557-1885.
Women, Work, and
Community is a statewide non-profit organization committed
to improving the economic lives of Maine
women and their families. The organization works with women “where they are”
and provides them
with support, guidance, and the tools
they need to take the
next steps toward a
more promising future. Women, Work,
and Community provides training, advocacy and assistance
in four program areas:
workforce development,
microenterprise development,
asset
development
and leadership development. All services
are FREE.
For more information on Women, Work,
and Community or
upcoming programs,
please check our web
site:
www.womenworkandcommunity.
org n
Stop in Columbus Day weekend for Food and Drink
Specials, October Fest beers, Music and a
Bouncy House for the kids!
World-Famous Maine fried clams - Fresh Maine seafood
Gluten-Free Menu and Beer always available!
While you are there check out other specialties:
• Hand Cut Steaks • Salads from the Garden• Mexican • Vegetarian •
Kids Menu • Award-Winning Chili & Chowder • Homemade Hearty
Soups • Homemade Berry Pies & Desserts • Fresh Dough Pizza
Try One of Our World Famous Frozen Mudslides from our Full Bar
Route 4, Oquossoc • 864-2020 • Join us on Facebook
Ask me about Accident Forgiveness.
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pfliiXk\ji`j\XjdlZ_Xj+'%9lkn`k_8ccjkXk\Ëj8ZZ`[\ek
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XZZ`[\ek%;feËknX`k:Xccd\kf[Xp%
MORTON
MORTON&&FURBISH
FURBISHINSURANCE
INSURANCEAGENCY
AGE
207-864-3334
207-864-3334
),-*[email protected]<<K
I8E><C<P
X),.-*'7XccjkXk\%Zfd
Feature is optional and subject to terms and conditions. Safe Driving Bonus® won’t apply
after an accident. In CA, you could still lose the 20% Good Driver Discount. Allstate Fire
and Casualty Insurance Company: Northbrook, IL © 2010 Allstate Insurance Company
Old Fashioned Maine Winter... Meet New Fisher Plow!
WINTER’S COMING!
See Us for All Your Fisher Plow
Sales & Service Needs!
39157
A FREE 2 week
class for anyone interested in starting a
business is being offered in Farmington
starting on October
20, 2014. “The Basics
of Starting a Business” is a joint project
of the Maine Centers
for Women, Work, and
Community and the
Women’s
Business
Center at Coastal Enterprises, Inc.
If you are thinking
of starting a business, this three week
class, developed in
partnership with the
Women’s
Business
Center at CEI will answer questions, discuss pros and cons
of being an entrepreneur, and help you
take the first steps.
The class covers the
basics of business
plan, marketing, cash
planning and is suitable for those thinking about or in early
startup phase of a
Mountain Messenger
Page 8
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
The Traditions of Halloween
October 31st is
nearly
here,
and
soon the streets will
be filled with costumed revelers eager
to get their share of
the free-flowing candy and other prizes.
Year after year, trickor-treaters don their
costumes and parade
from home to home.
But have you ever
wondered where this
and other traditions
began?
Tr i c k - o r- t re a t i n g
and wearing costumes seem like odd
traditions to those
unaccustomed to Halloween. Halloween
customs are actually a blend of Celtic,
Catholic, Pagan, and ancient Roman traditions. It is thought that Halloween celebrations date back to roughly 800 to 600 BC,
when they originally were observances of
the harvest season and nature before the
arrival of winter, which marked the barren
state of the landscape. The Celtic festival of
Samhain was a major influence on modern
day Halloween.
On October 31, Celts also believed the
door to the underworld was opened and
could let in deceased spirits. Feasts were
held and place-settings were left for deceased relatives, as they were believed
Turkey Supper
Saturday, October
11th, is the date for
the annual Rangeley
Congregational Church Mission
Board turkey supper.
This much anticipated, never duplicated
often imitated public
supper will be held at
“The Barn” on High
Street in Rangeley.
We will be serving
from 5:00 p.m. until
sold out. The menu
will include roast turkey, gravy, mashed
potatoes, green bean
casserole, stuffing,
home made rolls and
cranberry sauce. All
this and home-made
apple crisp with
whipped cream for
dessert.
Come
to
meet
with your family and
friends for a wonderful sit-down dinner
served home style.
Take out will, also, be
available.
Please call for reserved take-outs at
864-5360 or leave a
message at 864-5966.
All proceeds will be
used for the church’s
mission work locally, nationwide and
worldwide.
Our
price
will,
again, be just $8.00
for adults and $5.00
for children under
12. Hope to see you
there. n
to return home for
a visit. In addition
to friendly spirits,
mean spirts also
could cross over.
Bonfires were lit to
ward off spirits, and
extra candles would
be used in homes
and churches to
keep evil away.
Even the custom of
wearing costumes
has its roots in keeping evil spirits at
bay. Costumes and
masks were worn to
confuse bad spirits
and frighten them
so that they could
not bestow misfortune on the more fortunate. People also wore masks and ventured
out after dark so that envious ghosts who
were cold and outside could not recognize
residents of warm and inviting homes.
The trick-or-treating custom may have
blended origins. Druids believed the dead
would play tricks on mankind during Samhain, causing destruction and panic. To
appease the spirits, people would give the
dead food and other treats.
Another custom, called “souling,” can be
linked to Halloween as well. Early Christians would walk from village to village
asking for “soul cakes,” which were square
pieces of bread with currants. The more
cakes received, the more prayers the faithful would promise to say on behalf of the
dead relatives of the cake donors to expedite a soul’s passage to heaven.
Irish trick-or-treating customs may be
traced back to collecting supplies door-todoor for the festival of St. Columbkille. n
Self Confidence Building Class
Has long-term unemployment or job
search got you down?
Do you feel your confidence lagging? Attend this 3-week class
to help you assess
your self-confidence
and learn some concrete tools that can
help you to keep your
confidence
strong
throughout your job
search.
Maine Center for
Women, Work, and
Community will be offering a 3-week class:
“Building Self-Confidence During The Career Search”
Tuesdays, October 14,
21 & 28 at 10:00AM
-12:00PM noon.
This class will be
held at Farmington
Office at 108 Perham
Street, Suite A :
For more information on Women, Work,
and Community or to
register for the train-
ing please call Janet
Smith at 778-2757.
Women, Work, and
Community is a statewide non-profit organization
committed
to improving the economic lives of Maine
men, women and their
families.
The organization works with
individuals
“where
they are” and provides them with support, guidance, and
the tools they need
to take the next steps
toward a more promising future. Women,
Work, and Community provides individual
assistance and group
training in building
careers, starting and
growing businesses,
planning for financial
security, and becoming community leaders. Visit our website
at www.womenworkandcommunity.org n
Happy Halloween
SNOW PLOWING
We shovel all walkways
ROOF SHOVELING
For Reservations,
please call
864-5666
PRIME RIB & Catch of the Day
Every Friday & Saturday from 5-9 PM
Every night is Local’s Night with
all Pickford Pub Entrées under $20.
• Weekly Camp Checks • All Winter Needs
• Docks Pulled • Camps Closed
C.
IN
,
G
IN
AK
ET
AR
C
&
E
C
VI
R
SE
N
W
LA
RANGELEY
[email protected]
864-3783 • rla
P.O. Box 20, OQUOSSOC, ME 04964 •
Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
Page 9
www.turnerpublishing.net
Golf Tournament Nets $700
Doris Tutlis, Linda Baril, Sharon Cullenberg, Eileen Reading, Mary Olson, Nancy Stowell, Linda Wentzell, Suzanne Twitchell, Nancy Pratt, Exho McDonough,
Anne Nemi, Sherrill Rollins, Cynthia Judkins, Pat Durham and Judi Richard.
The women of Wilson Lake Country
Club held their annual Martha Webber
Breast Cancer Fundraiser Tournament
on September 13 that
raised $700 for the
Martha B. Webber
Breast Care Center, a
program of Franklin
Memorial Hospital.
Opening Sat., Oct. 11
d
n
a
th!
r
G
SAVE BIG
ON STOVES!
The tournament is
held each year on the
second Saturday of
September at Wilson
Lake Country Club.
Fifteen
partici-
pants took part in
the tournament and
also donated raffle
items.
Volunteers
John Wentzell, Russell Pratt, and Neil
Stinneford
additionally had roles to
make the event successful.
This was the 14th
year that Anne Nemi
and Nancy Pratt
have co-hosted the
tournament.
Over
that period of time,
the women of Wilson
Lake Country Club
have donated nearly $25,000 in Martha
Webber’s name.
This year’s winning team included
Doris Tutlis, Linda
Baril, Sharon Cullenberg, and Eileen
Reading with a net
score of 52. Eileen
Reading won the longest drive and Mary
Olson prevailed in
the
closest-to-thepin contest.
“We would like to
thank all of the men
and women who
participated, as well
as those who donated time, funds, and
raffle items,” said
Jill Gray, FCHN community relations and
fund
development
manager. “At a luncheon following the
tournament,
Kelly
Alley, a breast care
support nurse at the
center, explained to
the women how the
money may be used
to support those
with breast cancer.”
The Martha B. Webber Breast Care Center provides timely
access to state-ofthe-art breast cancer
screening, diagnostic, clinical, and care
support
services.
The center, with locations in Farmington and Livermore
Falls, memorializes
the
Carrabassett
Valley resident who
died from breast cancer.
For additional information,
contact
Gray at 779-2555. n
bald mountain camps resort
Dining
Di
inin Room OPEN Wednesday - Saturday
for Dinner 5:30pm to 9:00pm
m
•Locals Night every Wednesday 2 for $30
30
•Thursday night “Burger, Flatbread & Beer
$15”
B
$1
15”
•Prime Rib every Saturday
•Waterfront
Cabins
erfr
•Waterfront Dinning
•Full
ull Barr
/PXBU.BJO4Ut3BOHFMFZ
125 Bald Mountain Rd.,Oquossoc
864-3671
www.baldmountaincamps.com • [email protected]
Mountain Messenger
Page 10
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
Real Estate
Buying? Selling? Investing?
DIRECT MAIL WORKS!
CALL US TODAY
225-2076
Carolyn Smith
Morton and Furbish Real Estate
PROPERTY OF
THE WEEK
2478 Main Street, Rangeley
Office: 864-5777 ext. 106
Cell: 491-5800
WEBB LAKE WATERFRONT
3.6 Acre Building Lot
[email protected]
www.rangeleyrealestate.com
www.morton-furbish.com
BYRON
A very rare find on the east side of lake. property
offers gorgeous peninsula dotted with large pine
trees lot over 425 feet of pristine frontage on the
lake with building and septic permits in place located
on private drive. Start enjoying the sunset vie
ws......................................priced at $249,000
207-585-2411
set up camp in Byron with all the conveniences of home
but in the country with great mountain views. Easy access to ATV and Snowmobile trails. Located in the heart
of the western mountains. $85,000
Rt 142 Phillips Rd 70 acres with outstanding views frontage on town maintained rd. Frontage on both sides of East
Brook and very well constructed interior
road a must see at only............REDUCED
$79,900
H300 Chalet style home with large
3 car garage all located on 20 acres
of wooded privacy. This 3 bedroom,
2 bath homes is ideally located for all
recreational activity along with access
to Beaver Mountain Lake. Live in the
woods with all the comfort of home.
Sandy River Plt. $278,500
H306 Remodeled cottage only 125
feet from the shore of Rangeley Lake.
Unique opportunity to enjoy the lake
year round with deed water access and
boat mooring.. The 2 bedroom, all pine
interior, is set up for year round use.
Rangeley $209,000 PRICE REDUCED!
H402 The ultimate sportsman retreat
that offers privacy with all the comforts
of home and 2 miles from tax free NH.
Over 500 acres of deep, clear water to
fish year round. This luxury home has
room for large families or a unique B &
B or guiding business. Magalloway Plt.
$469,000
2485 Main St.,
Rangeley, ME 04970
Tel: 207 -864 -3900
Gold panning in the Swift River starts here
at this awesome camp with 18.2 acres loaded with nice mature woods. Great hunting,
snowmobiling, ATVing and all the activities
the Western mountains has to offer. Don’t be
late on this one. Listed at............... $139,500
TAIN
MESSENGER
City Cove Realty
2455 Main St., Rangeley
Office 207 864-2500
Cell 207-233-8275
Caryn Dreyfuss
Broker
[email protected] • www.realestateinrangeley.com
WHO SAYS SIZE MATTERS?
It’s What You Do With The Equipment That Counts
Mark Whitney Whitney
(207) 864-2582 4-2582
7) 232-4041
Cell (207) 232-4041
avation
• Light Excavation Work
ial
• Quality Work
er
• Commercial Snowblower
wing
• Snow Plowing
• Sanding
• Trucking
Do you enjoy
OUN
COBURN GORE #1108: Turn
of the century log fishing/hunting
lodge is part of private, gated fish
and game club located on Arnold
Pond. 5BR main house with granite
FP and incorporated woodstove,
14x18 bunkhouse, 174’ on pristine
wilderness pond. Sold fully
furnished......................$238,000
VERY WELL BUILT CAMP IN BYRON Very well
Mike Kersey, Owner/Broker • www.kerseyre.com
Serving the Western Mountains and Lakes
For over 27 years!
Participating with
Caryn’s Property of the Week
M ?
OUNTAIN
reading the...... ESSENGER
Would you like to follow the local news?
Check out the Mountain Messenger online for free at
www.turnerpublishing.net/publications
Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
Page 11
Find Your Dream Home in
Western & Central Maine
Online At.....
www.turnerpublishing.net
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GU
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The Only Real
Estate Guide That
Focuses Primarily on
Beautiful Seasonal
and Year-Round
Properties in the
Places You
Want to Live
Turner Publishing’s
Real Estate Guide
Covering Western & Central Maine
Allied Realty, City Cove Realty, Franklin Savings Bank,
Amnet Realty, Leavitt Whittemore Realty Group, Hammond
Lumber, Oxford Federal Credit Union, Kersey Real
Estate, Village Realty Inc., Rainbow Federal Credit Union,
Riverside Realty, Readfield Insurance, Byrd’s Eyeview
Custom Design Antlers, Maine Made Furniture
To list your real estate agency, or for more information,
call (207)225-2076
Mountain Messenger
Page 12
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
Crossword Puzzle Answer
Puzzle on page 14
Sudoku Answers
Enter the MM Contest and you could win a $10 gift certificate to
The 4 Seasons Cafe in Oquossoc. One of the ads in this paper
contains our MM Logo.
Find the ad with the MM logo, cut it out then mail it to us with your
name, address and phone number and all correct submissions will
be entered into the drawing once a month or email information to
[email protected] Entries must be submitted by the
Friday after the newspaper is published. Good Luck!
Mail submissions to:
MM Contest, PO Box 214,
Turner, ME 04282
One winner per month.
Odds of winning depends on the number of correct submissions.
For advertising please email [email protected]
Everyone’s
Talking about the
Mountain
Messenger!
Call today at
225-2076 and see
how direct mail
can work for
your business!
207-864-WRGY (9749)
4-7 am
7-8 am
Mon.
www.wrgy.org • [email protected]
Programming
9/27/12
- 10/25/12
Tues.
Wed. Schedule
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Sun.
8-9 am
New York
Philharmonic
Eclectic Music Mix
Santa Fe
Music
Festival
9-10 am
Ron Hoar Oldies Hour (50s/60s; 70s/80s)
10-11 am
Celtic
Connections
Bluegrass
Review2
Eclectic Music Mix
11-12
Country Classics Hour
12-1 pm
1-2 pm
2-3 pm
3-4 pm
4-5 pm
Eclectic Music Mix
Global Village
Eclectic Music Mix
5-6 pm
7-8 pm
Big Picture
Science
Bluegrass
Review1
Folk
Alley1
Bioneers/
Planetary
Radio
8-9 pm
Eclectic Music Mix
9-10 pm
10-12
12 am 4 am
Folk Alley2
San
Francisco
Symphony
Chamber
Society of
Lincoln
Center
Mayo
Clinic Radio
General
Store
New Jazz
Archive
Fur
Piece
Ranch
Best of
British
Indie
Informant
Back Story
Blues &
Beyond
Indie
Informant2
Big Band/Mellow Vocals
Late Night Rock
PO Box 844 • Rangeley, Maine 04970
Philosophy
Talk
Victrola
Show
(Open)
Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
Page 13
www.turnerpublishing.net
Bethel Outing Club Supports Healthy Lifestyles
The Bethel Outing
Club has been supporting healthy lifestyles for the past 34
years. It began when
a group of like minded people gathered
for a ski and snowshoe in Evans Notch.
They had so much
fun that they planned
to continue to meet
throughout the summer to hike and canoe.
One thing led to another and the group
decided to formalize
their gatherings by
acquiring an official
name. The group settled on “Bethel Nordic
Ski Club”, later it morphed into the “Bethel
Nordic Ski Club and
Outing Club” and to-
day it is simply identifies itself as the Bethel Outing Club.
The one activity
that all the original
members had in common was a passion for
nordic skiing in addition to being active
in the out of doors. To
support their passion,
the members decided
to focus on nordic skiing, primarily youth
development but it
didn’t end there.
The summer family
activities continued
and so did the conversations around how
to best support skiing
and skiers.
From these conversations the idea for
a ski sale and swap
was born. It was a
great opportunity to
buy new and used
equipment and to sell
old ski equipment and
clothing. This sale
continues to this day,
34 year later. It was
initially held at Telstar but soon outgrew
that venue and Gould
Academy graciously
offered the use of its
field house where the
sale is hosted to this
day on the last full
weekend in October,
which is the 24 and 25
this year.
The money raised
at the sale is used to
support a youth nordic ski coach, to purchase ski equipment
for the Telstar Nordic
Ski Team and to offer
grants for those who
compete at a regional
and national level.
After 34 years the
club continues to offer family outings but
their program has expanded. They have
hosted 2 Bill Koch Festivals, a fun and informal youth competitive ski event where
everyone wins a prize
upon completion of
the race. The Flying
Moose, a 10 and 20
km ski race, held at
Gould Academy nordic trails in February.
Kids meet weekly int
he winter for Bill Koch
ski activities on Sunday afternoons while
parents ski at the
Outdoor Center in Newry, or Carters Cross
Country Ski Center
or the Bethel Inn in
Bethel. Informal adult
gatherings have continued and include
activities such as ski
tours or attending
races as well as pot
luck suppers. The
Outing Club supports
the after school nordic
ski programs at Crescent Park where students in grades 2-5
ski during the week.
A summer event for
children, the kids triathlon is held in August.
New to the calendar
is a summer youth
training program for
teens in 7-12th grade.
They
meet
three
times a week to work
on aerobic fitness,
strength, and flexibil-
The Healthy Geezer
Q. What exactly is
a “charley horse” and
why do I get them in
my legs at night?
According to the
American
Heritage
Dictionary of Idioms, the term “charley horse” was first
used in the 1880s by
baseball players to
describe a muscle
cramp. No one knows
the true origin, but
the dictionary says:
“Among the more likely theories proposed
is that it alludes to the
name of either a horse
or an afflicted ball
player who limped
like one of the elderly
draft horses formerly
employed to drag the
infield.”
Geezers are more
likely to get charley horses because
of muscle loss that
starts in our 40s. And
your remaining muscles don’t work as efficiently as they used
to. Studies show that
about 70 percent of
adults older than 50
experience nocturnal
leg cramps.
A cramp is an involuntary contracted
muscle that does not
relax. The common
locations for muscle cramps are the
calves, thighs, feet,
hands, arms, and the
rib cage. Cramps can
be very painful. Muscles can cramp for
just seconds, but they
can continue for many
minutes.
Almost all of us have
had muscle cramps,
but no one knows for
sure why they happen. However, many
healthcare professionals attribute cramping
to tired muscles and
poor stretching. Other
suspected causes are
dehydration,
exerting yourself when it’s
hot,flat feet, standing on concrete, prolonged sitting, some
leg positions while
sedentary.
Muscle cramps are
usually
harmless.
However, they can
also be symptoms of
problems with circulation, nerves, metabolism, hormones.
Less common causes
of muscle cramps include diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, hypoglycemia, anemia,
thyroid and endocrine
disorders.
If you experience
frequent and severe
muscle cramps, see
your doctor.
The use of some
medications
can
cause muscle cramps.
For example, some
diuretic medications
prescribed for high
blood pressure can
deplete
potassium.
Too little potassium,
calcium or magnesium in your diet can
contribute to cramps.
Here
are
some
pointers for treating a cramp yourself:
stop whatever you
were doing when you
got the cramp, massage the muscle and
stretch it slowly, apply a cold pack to relax tense muscles.
To prevent cramps,
do stretching exercises especially for those
muscles that tend to
cramp, and drink water regularly. If you
are exerting yourself
in heat or sweating
for more than an hour,
you should drink fruit
juice or a sports beverage. For recurrent
ity as well as nordic
specific skills, all run
by local skier extraordinaire, Fred Baily.
The Bethel Outing
Club is a non-profit organization that
is always looking for
new members and
volunteers to help out
with their many activities. Membership
is only $10 for an individual and $15 for
a family. To sign up or
find out more information about events, volunteer opportunities
races, or the annual ski sale check out
the website at www.
bethelouting.org. n
cramps that disturb
your sleep, your doctor may prescribe a
medication to relax
your muscles.
If you have nocturnal leg cramping,
ride a stationary bicycle for a few minutes
before bedtime. The
following stretching
exercise is good, too.
You should do it in the
morning, before dinner and before going
to bed every night:
Stand about 30 inches from a wall. Keep
your heels on the floor,
lean forward and put
your hands on the
wall. Then, move your
hands slowly up the
wall as far as you can
reach
comfortably.
Hold the stretched
position for 30 seconds. Release. Repeat
twice.
If you would like to
ask a question, write
to [email protected] n
Mountain Messenger
Page 14
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
CLUES ACROSS
1. Pottery brand
6. Contemporary hit
radio
9. Tatouhou
13. Modeled
14. Whale ship captain
15. On _ __ with
16. Dirty fossil fuel
17. The same
18. Wealthy
19. Actress Baranski
21. Bangladesh’s capital, old
22. Gross receipts
23. Runs PCs
24. Yukon Territory
25. Angry
28. Have the ability to
29. City of light
31. Person from U.K.
(abbr.)
33. Helper
36. Walking steps
38. Cablegram (abbr.)
39. Slang for famous
person
41. Skin cancers
44. Boy fluids
45. More dry
46. Roman seven
48. Actress Farrow
49. 1st Lady of Song’s
initials
51. Disorderly crowd
52. Less in spanish
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
You’re not content to be just part of the party this week,
Virgo. You want to be the center of attention. You just
may get your chance later in the week when a social
occasion pops up.
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, you have a natural sense of what people want.
You may find yourself playing the role of peacemaker
this week, and it’s a role you will excel in.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Your goals are commendable, Taurus. By Friday you
may find there are some things you need to take charge
of. Don’t worry when things get hectic, as you will get
the job done.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
This is a good week to reshape and renew a personal philosophy on spirituality, Gemini. You’ll experience
breakthroughs in compassion and communication.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, you are pondering a trip out of town. A secluded cabin or campsite may be the way to go. You will
find plenty of great options if you ask around for recommendation.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
There’s more to you than meets the eye, Leo. But people often seem content with what they gleam from the
surface. This week you will show them a different side.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, don’t grow discouraged when your first try at
something doesn’t work out as you had expected. You
will have plenty of opportunities to try again.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Patience has not always been your strong suit, Scorpio.
When you set your eyes on a prize this week, you will
do anything within your power to get it.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, you know that complaining about a situation is not likely to make it change anytime soon.
Instead, put your words into action and attempt to
change things for the better.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Restlessness has you looking for a brief vacation to
somewhere within driving distance, Capricorn. It is a
great time of year for a road trip to take in the foliage.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, it may take a while to wrap your head around
a particularly trying problem. If you cannot come to a
resolution on your own, ask a friend to share his or her
perspective.
Thursday
21. Simple column
23. Constitution Hall
org.
25. Apple notebook
computer
26. Biblical Syria
27. Cuts into small
pieces
29. Talked profusely
30. Hawthorne’s city
32. Takes readings from
other distant instruments
34. 13th Hebrew letter
35. Filippo __, Saint
37. Gulf of, in the Aegean
40. Bleat
42. A bird’s beak
43. Performs a song
47. Note of hand
49. Icelandic poems
50. Ludicrous, empty
show
52. Peter Pan illustrator
Attwell
53. Broad, flat stones
55. Tibetan Buddhist
teacher
56. Mire and mud
57. Frozen drinks
58. Irish Gaelic
59. Viewed with the
eyes
61. Blackguard
65. Olde English
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Simplify your life any way you can this week, Pisces.
You will benefit from few responsibilities and no worries
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
OCTOBER 12
Hugh Jackman, Actor (46)
OCTOBER 13
Paul Simon, Singer (73)
OCTOBER 14
Stacy Keibler, Wrestler (35)
OCTOBER 15
Emeril Lagasse, Chef (55)
OCTOBER 16
Tim Robbins, Actor (56)
OCTOBER 17
Ernie Els, Golfer (45)
OCTOBER 18
Erin Moran, Actress (54)
Friday
October 9th
October 10th
Mostly Sunny
AM Rain /
Snow Showers
51°/34°
October 9th
54. Br. broad valleys
56. Good Wife’s Julianna
60. Expression of annoyance
61. Blocks
62. 4840 square yards
63. The culminating
point
64. Hit an unreturned
serve
65. Excessively fat
66. Scorch the surface
of
67. Dekaliter
68. Ruhr River city
CLUES DOWN
1. Prevents harm to
young
2. Children’s tale bear
3. Eskers
4. Small food stores
5. -__, denotes past
6 .Mentums
7. Gadoid fish
8. Rainbow effect
9. Live in or on hosts
10. Long narrative
poem
11. Informal term for
tobacco (Br.)
12. One who has attained nirvana
14. One who estranges
17. Collection of maps
20. Pouchlike structure
Saturday
October 11th
Partly Cloudy
51°/32°
56°/43°
Wednesday
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
October 14th
October 15th
Partly Cloudy
Showers
Light Rain
Rain
October 12th
October 13th
through
October 15th
Forecast from www.weather.com
51°/35°
53°/42°
59°/48°
59°/44°
Mountain Messenger
October 10, 2014
Page 15
www.turnerpublishing.net
Maine Earth Science Day
Students try their hand at panning for gold during Maine Earth Science Day at
the Maine State Museum. Maine Gold Prospectors will be returning to Maine
Earth Science Day 2014.
Scientists, artists,
educators, and industry professionals
from around Maine
will gather at the
Maine State Museum
on October 15, 2014
for the annual Maine
Earth Science Day.
Curious
students
and visitors of all
ages will find something to investigate
in the museum-wide
celebration of earth
sciences. The event
begins at 9:00 a.m.
and concludes at
3:00 p.m.
The exhibits and
hands-on activities
cover a wide variety
of Earth’s resources
and treasures. Topics for exploration
include
minerals
and gems, hydrology, meteorology, and
more. Maine Earth
Science Day’s exhibitors come from
throughout the state.
In addition to the
Maine State Museum, they include the
U.S. Geological Survey, Maine Geological Survey, Maine
Geographic Alliance,
Maine Energy Education
Program,
Maine
Floodplain
Management
Program, Dragon Products, Maine State
Aquarium, NOAA/
National
Weather
Service, Kennebec
Rocks and Minerals
Club, New England
Mineral Conference,
WABI-TV 5 Weather,
Challenger
Learning Center of Maine,
Department of Environmental Protection, and Maine Gold
Prospectors.
“Over 1,000 students, teachers, and
chaperones
from
throughout the state
are already signed
up to attend Maine
Earth Science Day,”
commented the museum’s chief educator, Joanna Torow.
“Scientists, industry representatives,
collectors, weather
forecasting professionals, and educators will show the
many ways that
earth science affects
every aspect of our
lives and encourage
responsible stewardship of the Earth.”
Admission to the
museum
is
free
of charge all day.
Teachers or parents
bringing groups of
Maine State Museum Curator Bruce Bourque explains how we use archaeology to determine what
prehistoric life was like
students are urged
to make reservations
by completing a reservation form on the
museum’s website:
http://www.mainestatemuseum.org/
learn/schedule_a_
t our_or_program/
bug_maine-ia_and_
earth_science_day_
reservation_form/
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Skowhegan, ME
(207)474-3334
The Maine State
Museum is located
at 230 State Street
in Augusta, adjacent
to the Maine State
House. For more information check the
museum’s website:
www.mainestatemuseum.org or phone
207-287-2301. n
Servicing All Chimneys
Stainless Steel Liners
Recipe of the Month
Back by popular demand!
Many readers have requested the
return of our Recipe of the Month.
If you have a favorite recipe you
would like to share with our readers
we would love to publish it for you.
Please mail recipe to:
P.O. Box 214, Turner ME, 04282
or email to:
[email protected]
WE WANT YOUR GOOD NEWS!
Mountain Messenger
Page 16
October 10, 2014
www.turnerpublishing.net
RANGELEY
PUBLIC
L I B R A RY
New Titles on the Shelves
FICTION: The Bone Clocks,
David Mitchell; Murder 101
(Decker/Lazarus), Faye Kellerman; Winter Street, Elin
Hilderbrand; The Paying
Guest, Sarah Waters; Lila,
Marilyn Robinson; A Sudden Light, Garth Stein; Some
Luck (Langdon Family Trilogy#1), Jane Smiley; Full
Measure,
T. Jefferson Parker.
The Silent Sister, Diane
Chamberlain; Cobra, Deon
Meyer; The Drop, Dennis
Lehane; Bones Never Lie
(Temperance Brennan #17),
Kathy Reichs; The Perfect
Witness, Iris Johansen; Cross
My Heart (Alex Cross #21),
James Patterson.
Deadline (Virgil Flowers
#8), John Sanford; Paris
Match (Stone Barrington
#31), Stuart Woods;
Leaving Time, Judi Picoult; Nine Days, Minerva Koenig; Agatha
Christie's The Monogram Murders, Sophie Hannah; The
Lewis Man (Lewis
Trilogy #2), Peter
May; Proof Positive
(Joe Gunther #25),
Archer Mayor.
Broadchurch, Erin
Kelly; The Girl Next Door,
Ruth Rendell; Goodbye Piccadilly (War at Home#1),
Cynthia Harrod-Eagles; Five
Days Left, Julie Lawson Timmer; Station Eleven, Emily St.
John Mandell; Gutenberg's
Apprentice, Alix Christie;
The Lost Key (A Brit in the
FBI #2), Catherine Coulter.
NON-FICTION: Killing Patton: The Strange Death of
WWII's Most Audacious General, Bill O'Reilly; Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil
War, Karen Abbott; The Book
of Barkley, L. B. Johnson.
A Wolf Called Romeo, Nick
Jans; What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd
Hypothetical Questions, Randall Munroe; 3 Hours: The
Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi,
Mitchell Zuckoff. n
OPEN HOUSE
SATURDAY, October 18th
9am - 12pm
Explore what CMCC has to offer!
s¬/N#AMPUS¬(OUSING
s¬#AREER¬4ECHNICAL¬¬4RANSFER¬0ROGRAMS
s¬/VER¬¬$EGREE¬¬#ERTIlCATE¬-AJORS
s¬ ¬&LEXIBLE¬3CHEDULING
s¬#OMPETITIVE¬!THLETIC¬4EAMS
#ENTRAL¬-AINE¬#OMMUNITY¬#OLLEGE
¬4URNER¬3TREET¬s¬!UBURN¬-%¬
¬
WWWCMCCEDU
2EGISTER¬ONLINE¬¬LEARN¬MORE¬AT
www.cmcc.edu/futurestudents/openhouse
Upcoming
Events
October 9: OWL Club, 2:45PM
October 10: Preschool Story Hour, 10:00AM
October 14: Knitting Group, 4:30PM
October 15: Rangeley Readers, 10:00AM
October 16: OWL Club, 2:45PM
October 17: Preschool Story Hour, 10:00AM
October 21: Knitting Group, 4:30PM
October 23: OWL Club, 2:45PM
October 24: Preschool Story Hour, 10:00AM
October 28: Knitting Group. 4:30PM
Special event: Maine at Work, 6:00PM
Adventure Book Group, 6:00PM
October 30: OWL Club, 2:45PM
October 31: Preschool Story Hour, 10:00AM
Book Groups
The Rangeley Readers will meet Wednesday, October 15 at 10:00AM to discuss The
Bridge at San Luis Rey, by Thornton Wilder.
On Tuesday, October 28 at 6:00PM the Adventure Book Group will gather to talk about
River of Doubt by Candace Millard.
Pick up either, or both, and join in the talk.
A good book is better when shared. n
A SALUTE
TO OUR HEROES:
OUR VETERANS
Throughout history, their hard work and sacrifice have kept us safe and
protected our freedom. We owe them a debt of gratitude that can never be
repaid, and we salute them for their service. We would like you to share
with our readers the Veterans that are near and dear to your heart. Fill out
the form attached and mail it in along with a photo to Turner Publishing,
Inc. at PO Box 214, Turner ME 04282-0214 or email info and photo to
[email protected] and they will be published free of charge
in the November issue of the Good news Gazette, Oxford Hills Observer,
Lake Region Reader, Auburn Highlights, Kennebec Current, Franklin
Focus, Country Courrier, Two Cent Times, Western Maine Foothills,
Lewiston Ledger, Somerset Express, Moose Prints, Lisbon Ledger and
Mountain Messenger.
Veterans Ad Form
Mail this form to:
Veterans Ads - Turner Publishing
P.O. Box 214
Turner, ME 04282
Veteran’s Name
Military Title
Short Message
Veteran’s Name
Military Title
Short message...