We missed you… A practical guide to student retention University of Sunderland

University of Sunderland
School of Arts, Design, Media & Culture
We missed you…
A practical guide to
student retention
Introduction How often have you walked around the university campus and spotted a student standing alone, looking lost? Students often arrive at an unfamiliar campus in an unfamiliar city without any friends and without a tutor to turn to. The first three weeks of a degree programme are crucial in retention terms, however, the spotlight on retention continues throughout the academic year. This booklet outlines the activities and successful retention practice in use across the School and beyond, it has been informed by research into the many varied retention initiatives. Programmes with 100% retention in the School cite the following as probable reasons for success:
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Time invested by staff with appropriate skills and interest to build up a very good knowledge of and relationship with students
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Interactive social events
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Progress files embedded at all three levels, full engagement of students and staff in the personal development planning process
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Excellent support from administrative and non­academic staff
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Interactive learning environment/full engagement of students in their learning The booklet has primarily been designed to provide practical suggestions and reference points to help improve the student experience at level 1. It does not refer to academic aspects but focuses on ways to enhance student ‘engagement’ at a personal and social level. The appendices include sample attendance letters and registers for use or modification by programmes to aid the difficult, but vitally important task of tracking and monitoring students. A full version of the booklet is also available in my.sunderland. Retention at level 1 (to date) has shown an improvement compared to this time last year. The 95% retention has exceeded the 90% 2005­06 target expectation set by the University.
Page 1 The School’s Student Tracking And Retention (STAR) group (listed at the end of the booklet) will continue in 2006­07 with area co­ordinators working alongside programmes to help and support retention initiatives. A short evaluation of this booklet and the effectiveness of initiatives will be carried out in the autumn 2006. Please look out for the inevitable questionnaire and provide suggestions for improvement. The STAR Group
Page 2 Contents Policy Statement .................................................................................................... 4 Intensive Care Semester 1 ..................................................................................... 5 Welcome Week............................................................................................................. 5 Weeks 1­3..................................................................................................................... 5 Weeks 4­15................................................................................................................... 6 Student Social & Support Activity Calendar............................................................ 7 Examples of Interactive Social Activities ................................................................ 8 Adventure Sunderland.......................................................................................... 10 Student Union Facilities for Social & Induction Events ......................................... 12 Useful Contacts & Telephone Numbers ............................................................... 14 The Student Gateway........................................................................................... 17 Tracy Dixon, Student Contact Officer’s poster...................................................... 18 Progress Files: Retention ..................................................................................... 19 Progress Files: Meetings Timetable ..................................................................... 20 Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) .............................................................................. 21 Withdrawal Procedure .......................................................................................... 23 Appendix 1. Becoming a Professional Student ................................................................... 24 2. Attendance – post card (sample)..................................................................... 27 3. Attendance letter 1 .......................................................................................... 28 4. Attendance letter 2 .......................................................................................... 29 5. Attendance letter 3 .......................................................................................... 30 6. Attendance – register 1 ................................................................................... 31 7. Attendance ­ register 2 .................................................................................... 32 8. ADMC ‘STAR’ members & roles...................................................................... 33
Page 3 Policy Statement Improving retention and achievement of our students is an important issue for all staff. ADMC is one of the most successful schools in the University when it comes to retention, but retention is not just an issue for the first few weeks of the academic year. Research has shown that the most successful programmes are ones where:
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Students are provided with comprehensive pre­entry information about the programme, so that they are familiar with the modules before they start. One of the main reasons why students withdraw is that their expectations are not matched by the course itself.
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Students are given an in­depth induction programme to help them settle in and get to know fellow students and staff.
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Students are part of a programme that has a strong, supportive personal tutor system.
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Students are provided with a ‘friendly’ timetable that facilitates part­time employment. Most students work throughout their studies and timetables need to reflect this.
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Students are on a programme which emphasises the importance of attendance and has a strict monitoring system.
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Students are provided with a wide range of teaching and learning techniques rather than just lectures or seminars. Students need constant feedback on their work, especially in the early stages of their studies. So what are the main reasons why students withdraw?
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Dissatisfaction with the mode of study.
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Misunderstanding of course titles.
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Students don’t always choose their own course and are influenced by teachers and family.
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Poor awareness of course content, employer demands and the realities of the degree programme.
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Genuine change of mind
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Finance
Page 4 Intensive Care Welcome Week & Weeks 1­3 The very early part of the academic year is when students are most vulnerable and likely to withdraw. Therefore a carefully planned and extended induction period (throughout semester 1) is a priority for 2006­07. Programme leaders are asked to be extra vigilant in following up missing students from programme lists, even in week one. The following calendar for semester 1 lists USSU social events and flags other key aspects, please feel free to personalise for your own use. We often forget that this is a nerve wracking and confusing time for many students who have to adjust to a plethora of new demands and situations, fathom out unfamiliar conventions, decipher confusing jargon, survive information overload and develop extraordinary map reading skills in order to sleep, eat, register and study! It is vital that students are not only guided through the necessary academic aspects, but also given continuous practical support and help to feel a part of the University, School and most importantly their student cohort. Staff, academic and non­academic, are asked to be a ‘visible and pro­active presence’ and programmes should include interactive social events during Welcome Week and at appropriate times thereafter. To assist this process examples and contacts are included later in the booklet. “We missed you…” is a postcard that will be sent out to students at the discretion of Programme Leaders. The postcard is sent to students who have ‘gone missing’ during this early period as a way of informing them that their absence has been noted, that their attendance is important and to encourage them to make contact if there is a problem.
Page 5 Weeks 4­15 Tracking and monitoring of students begins in earnest throughout this period. The success of last years central registers and attendance letter system reinforced the need to maintain accurate information and immediate follow up procedures. This year, programme teams are asked to undertake this themselves and sample attendance letters are included in the appendices for reference. Level 1 registers will be provided by the administration team from teaching week 4 and registers for levels 2 and 3 will be available on request. Administrative staff in each School office will create an ‘At Risk’ register based on information supplied by programme leaders. This will identify students who have a poor attendance record or referrals for supportive follow ups by appropriate staff, including area retention co­ordinators.
Page 6 Student Social & Support Activity Calendar
Page 7 Examples of Interactive Social Activities The following are examples of successful activities that have enhanced cohort (and at times cross­level) identity and ‘bonding’. The most successful have involved both programme staff and students in not just social but interactive events at key points throughout the year. Programmes from the same or other areas of the school could be linked up with the possibility of sharing costs? Please note the Adventure Sunderland information – a great offer from the Marine Activities Centre, Roker. Performing Arts:
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Beach Barbeque ­ Embleton – All tutors & technicians get involved with L1 and direct entry L3 students. The students are given a disposable BBQ and a budget to buy food to cook their own lunch. Each group have to use ‘found’ items to make a beach sculpture/design. L3 students devised ‘team’ activities to enhance L1 social ‘bonding’.
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Bouncy Castle ­ Held at Ashburne, a former graduate devised ‘fun’ activities for L1.
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In House Lunch ­ Groups of students are given budgets to buy food for a themed lunch and the most inventive and well displayed win a prize.
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Treasure Hunt Group task, clues led to trail along sea­front culminating in an appropriate hostelry
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Outdoor adventure course All level 3 direct entry students (Dance, Drama, music) plus staff day in Northumberland
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Dance ­ all years get together for a Xmas gathering with nibbles & drinks. Each person buys and wraps a £1.00 present for the bran tub where everyone has to guess who the present was from. Photography, Video and Digital imaging: End of year cross level photographic exhibition staged by students, including refreshments.
Page 8 Fine Art: A visit to New York to view exhibitions. Design:
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Whitby trip ­ Students design postcards based on Whitby experience
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Xmas Interactive Social event ­ All levels participate in an ‘in­house’ Xmas social event. Includes a ‘screening’ of interactive student work to provide a focal/talking point. Students and staff engage in play station games. This format can encourage cross level involvement and help to develop friendships across programmes and levels.
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Buddy/Mentor ­ Introduction of ‘buddy’ system/student mentor Tourism: Includes a visit to Alnwick Castle with associated tasks. Culture: Tree Top Adventure – There is a course near Bedale, Yorkshire, organised by Aerial Extreme, a high­adrenaline adventure ropes course that brings together the buzz of a theme park ride with outdoor adventure. In spite of its name, it is actually not very dangerous. Much fun if it is done in a group. £15 each for groups of 30+. Depending on strength and motivation, the experience can last for hours. Most groups take between 2.5 hours and 4 hours. Café and picnic area are available in the grounds. See http://www.aerialextreme.co.uk/ch/index.html for details. Media: A suggested idea includes engaging students in making a short DVD, radio broadcast, or article for a journal about their experiences in Welcome Week. This could then be used with next year’s level 1 students. A prize would be available for the most original and inventive work.
Page 9 Adventure Sunderland Adventure Sunderland, based at Roker, is uniquely placed to assist the University in ensuring that all new students get involved in their course within the first four weeks of term. Adventure Sunderland can combine traditional outdoor activities with team building and problem solving exercises delivered over a two hour session. Programmes can be arranged for a one­off event or longer course – as detailed in the information below. Contact/bookings can be made via www.marineactivitiescentre.co.uk/adventuresunderland or tel. 5144721. Proposed Programme During the first four weeks of the new term a trial programme is being offered. This would be included as a core part of the course and would involve bringing groups of students to Adventure Sunderland. The maximum group size would be 40 students split into four groups of ten to prevent introverted individuals remaining on the periphery, as they would in a larger group. It also meets the coach to student ratio that Adventure Sunderland use for safety reasons. Activities Offered Adventure Sunderland is licensed to offer a diverse range of activities. To meet the aims of this programme, the range of activities will focus on those that get the smaller groups of students working together, communicating and having fun! Even when more traditional activities like climbing or canoeing are delivered, the emphasis will still be on students working as a team and communicating with each other. It is recognised that some students may be unwilling to get wet or get involved with more “sporty” activities – the programme should address the needs of these students. For this reason four different activities might include:
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Problem solving “now get out of that” (dry)
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Bell boating (wet)
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Raft building (very wet!)
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Canoeing / kayaking (wet)
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Climbing (dry)
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Coaststeering (wet)
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Surfing (wet) The instructors in consultation with the students will determine activities as the weather may be the determining factor. Following the activities there would be an opportunity for the students to review their own and the group’s achievements. Those students who had an interest in pursuing a specific sport further would be directed to the relevant Student Union club. Indicative Costs £240 per half day for a group of 40, equating to £6.00 per student (discounted from £9.00 per head). Certification, Insurance and Staff Qualifications The centre has the appropriate certification, licenses and £5 million public indemnity insurance. The coaching staff are drawn from diverse backgrounds including business, industry, education and conventional training, their experience is unparalleled. They are the best in their field for coaching, facilitating, training, consulting and providing experiential learning. As outdoor educators, instructors and coaches, they are known for their safe and supportive approach to inclusive experiential learning using the outdoors.
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Student Union Facilities for Social & Induction Events There are two University venues available to programme/teams during 2006 for social events: Manor Quay for buffets and events and the Bonded Warehouse for BBQ, buffets and events. There is a great deal of adaptability to hold a wide range of events. Expertise is available in helping to organise these from a venue point of view at the most competitive prices within student focused service delivery. Suggestions:
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Barbeque/buffet day/night, weather depending, combined with:
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Quiz nights, small or large or mixed culminating in Grand Finale between schools.
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Multicultural nights
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Jazz nights
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Dance nights
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Casino Nights
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Ceilidh Nights
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Murder/Mystery Nights
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Treasure Hunts Availability: Every day and night, except for Wednesday and Friday nights. Capacity & Costs: The Bonded Warehouse Capacity 200 people Rent of room £150 per night (inclusion of door staff) Barbeque £6.00 per person Buffet £4.00 per person
Page 12 Manor Quay ­ 2 facilities available: Roker Bar: Capacity: 60 people (for quizzes); 60 people seated/40 standing Rent of room: £50 per day/night Finger Buffet: £4 per person Main Area: Capacity: 1000 people for dances, quiz finals etc. Rent of room: £150 per day/night Chair hire: £1 per person (outside rental) Security £100 per event * PA systems and/or Entertainments etc. costs would depend on the requirement of the events.
Page 13 Useful Contacts & Telephone Numbers The following information, apart from exchange, international and combined studies contact information, is included in Programme handbooks. Add 0191 515 from outside line UNIVERSITY SUPPORT SERVICES The Gateway, Edinburgh Building Gateway Enquiry Desk 2222 Admissions: Edith Wilson 3073 Careers and Employability Centre 2920 Chaplaincy 3482 Counselling 2940 Disability Support 2001 Financial Guidance 2284 Formal Complaints & Assessment Review 2941 Health and Wellbeing: 2938 University Nurse Student Support Adviser (racial incidents, victims of crime etc) Advisor For Mental Health (mental health issues) International Support: Sandra McLuckie and Jo Ellis 3550 Legal Advice (appointments arranged through the University) 2933 Residential Services (accommodation etc) 2943 Student Records 2077 St. Mary’s Childcare 2286 Technology Park Estates (car parking, security etc) 3666 Finance – enquiries & payment of fees 2455 ITS helpdesk (IT support) 2992 Maths Support (drop in sessions available, online support) 2280 Study Skills Support (by appointment only) 2280
Page 14 STUDENTS UNION SUPPORT SERVICES Academic Advice (plagiarism, appeals, changing courses, complaints etc) 4117 Diane Rooney/Joanne Cocklin Entertainments 3583 LGBT Advice (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender) 4118/ 4114 Sports & Recreation 4121 Student Contact Officer 3582 Tracy Dixon Student Representation Guidance/Support 3790 Julie Carolan Welfare Advice (housing, loans, benefits, immigration, visa’s, consumer 2413 rights, complaints etc) Stephen Barksby/Cheryl Klein Women’s Advice 4118/ 4114 Student Union Executive Officers Sabbatical President James Gibson 3584 Vice President/Finance & Communications Jon Pollock 2789 Education & Welfare Officer Christen Batey 4111 International & Multicultural Officer Anderida Field 3139 Sports & Recreation Officer Sam Brown 4119 Student Representation Officer Greg Du Bois 4118 LGBT Representative Stephen Jennings 4118 Women’s Representative Not yet elected 4118 Campaign’s Officer Not yet elected 4118 Non Sabbatical ADMC SCHOOL OFFICES Ashburne House 2112 Media Centre 2634 Priestman 3430 Bede Tower 3294 The Design Centre 2442
Page 15 SITE LIBRARIES Ashburne Library 2119 Murray Library 2900 St Peter’s Library 3059 EXCHANGE, INTERNATIONAL AND COMBINED STUDIES CONTACT INFORMATION Combined Studies ­ students have a specific member of staff assigned to 3099 them, but in the case of general enquiries contact: Jill Wilkinson International student support 3544 Sandra McLuckie/Heather Lee Study Abroad 3562
Joanne Ellis Page 16 The Student Gateway The Gateway is the University's latest initiative designed to improve the student experience and to provide access to a wide range of services, support and advice at a central information point. The Gateway was opened in June 2006 and is located at the City Campus in the East Wing of Edinburgh Building. The building houses a number of student services aimed at improving the students’ experience. The Gateway team provides a comprehensive range of administrative services for UK and international students and, wherever possible, resolves student issues immediately. The team support prospective and current students with any recruitment and admissions issues they may have, including information relating to course provision and entry requirements, application processes, funding, student loans, accommodation and can generally assist with enquiries concerning all aspects of university life. The Gateway works closely with the International Student Support Staff, assisting with international enquiries, such as visa renewal and processes including police registration and general well­being advice. In short, if a student has an enquiry concerning any aspect of their course record, staff liaise with Schools and Service Departments to resolve the issue. One things for sure ­ if the Gateway staff don't know the answer to any enquiry, they will make it their business to find out!
Page 17 Tracy Dixon, Student Contact Officer’s poster
Page 18 Progress Files: Retention Research (National Survey of Student Engagement) shows that “students who are engaged learn more, are more satisfied and more likely to become independent learners” – with the logical assumption that they are less likely to withdraw. The Personal Development Planning aspect of Progress Files provides an ideal opportunity for personal tutors to engage students in one to one dialogue, also facilitating the development of a professional working relationship. Enabling students to identify and reflect on personal strengths and weaknesses and subsequently set their own achievable goals is an effective means of not only progressing learning, but also ensuring open, effective communication channels. Full information about Progress Files, including process and structure, is located on the my.sunderland website. The personal planning aspect of Progress Files is now embedded at levels 1 and 2 in all under­graduate programmes across the school with level 3 to follow in 2006­07. It is important to remember that the above information is intended as a guide and to get the best out of progress files programmes should either modify to suit their needs or substitute them for their own material and processes. In so doing, staff and students will have a greater sense of ownership and so increased benefit.
Page 19 Progress Files: Meetings Timetable The School recommends the first three meetings with students as a minimum standard: Welcome Week ­ Introduction to Progress Files and meet group of students – provides a chance for students to share past experiences/get to know each other (1 hour) S 1 Weeks 1­3 ­ Individual meetings/tutorials to help students set personal goals for semester 1 (20 minutes) S 2 Weeks 1­3 ­ Individual meetings/tutorials; review S1 and help students set personal goals for S2 (20 minutes) S2 Weeks 10­13 – Individual meetings/tutorials: review S2, progress during level 1 Optional (20 minutes)
Page 20 Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) PAL Targets support at difficult subjects and/or courses aiming to improve student retention. A brief overview PAL is a scheme that fosters cross­year support between students on the same course. It encourages students to support each other and learn co­operatively under the guidance of students from the year above. Benefits to academic staff
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Reduced number of 'minor' requests from students (they are dealt with by leaders).
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It helps students to become better prepared for classes, manage their workload and keep up with course work.
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It helps students learn to work more effectively in a peer­based group.
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Leaders give regular feedback on how course content is being received by first year students. Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) PAL has five main aims and is intended to help students: 1. Adjust quickly to university life 2. Acquire a clear view of course direction and expectations 3. Improve study skills and adjust their study habits to meet the requirements of higher education 4. Enhance their understanding of the course subject matter through collaborative group discussion 5. Be well prepared for assessed work and examinations After receiving training, the more experienced students, called PAL Leaders, facilitate weekly or fortnightly study support sessions for groups of students from the year below.
Page 21 PAL sessions are intended to be informal and friendly. In PAL, the emphasis is on everyone in the group working co­operatively to develop their understanding. PAL is therefore about exploratory discussion led by the PAL Leaders. The more everyone joins in these discussions, the better the sessions work. Content for PAL sessions is based on existing course material includung handouts, notes, textbooks and set reading. Peer Assisted Learning is NOT:
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Targeted at weak or problem students ­ all participants should benefit
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Teaching by students
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A means of reducing existing lecturer/student contact For further information, or to join the scheme, contact Julie Archer on 3272. .
Page 22 Withdrawal Procedure (a last resort!) There are a variety of reasons why a student may consider withdrawing, such as feeling like they have chosen the wrong course, dissatisfaction with the mode of study, feeling isolated in a new environment or even a genuine change of mind. However, withdrawal really should be a last resort. Quite often problems can be addressed fairly easily through discussions between the student and their tutor or support services. Alternatives to withdrawal include changing the mode of study, for example from full time to part time, changing optional modules or even changing courses. If the student feels that withdrawal is the only option for them, then the student must complete a withdrawal form. This must be signed by the student (for international student withdrawals it must also be signed by the senior international administrator in Student Records) and the programme leader. This allows the student every opportunity to discuss their reasons for withdrawal and for them to consider the alternatives available to them. The last date of attendance field must be accurate as it affects the recalculation of any fees due (where appropriate), as well as entitlement to receive state benefits. If the student can not access the Programme Leader, Student Records will forward the form on to them for signing. If notification of withdrawal comes from someone other than the student, for example a college, Student Records will forward the form to the student for completion. The form should be handed to Student Records by the student. If it is handed in anywhere else in the institution then it must be forwarded to Student Records at room 503, Edinburgh Building, Chester Road, Sunderland SR1 3SD.
Page 23 Appendices 1. Becoming a Professional Student The following information (plus Tracy Dixon’s poster and useful contacts/telephone numbers) is included in programme handbooks. Note the omission of the word retention as an attempt to encourage students to adopt a positive and professional attitude towards their studies and so heighten engagement. It is hoped that all staff will reinforce the message during the induction period and beyond. This short section is aimed at helping you get the best out of your time at the University of Sunderland, complete your studies and obtain the highest degree possible. You will no doubt suffer from ‘information overload’ at the beginning of the year, so rather than duplicate material contained, for example, in the University Handbook, Student Union Handbook and elsewhere in this Programme Handbook, the following pages flag up key aspects that you may be unaware of, including who to contact for additional information or support. Positive – try to action these throughout your degree 1. Adopting a positive attitude 2. Being a pro­active communicator 3. Managing your time effectively 4. Seeking to ‘get involved’ Danger Zone – areas to be aware of and take early action 1. Plagiarism 2. Falling behind 3. Thinking of withdrawing At the end of this section is a list of useful contacts – a helpful list of telephone numbers e.g. if you want to join a society, need information or help to solve a problem.
Page 24 Positive 1. Adopting a positive attitude – University life can be a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops. In order to get the best from your studies regular attendance is essential. Research has shown that students who miss sessions are more likely to get a low mark or even fail. If you are unable to attend due to illness or personal problems, then you must inform your programme leader or module tutor before the session. Keep in contact at all times. 2. Being a pro­active communicator – The key to university life is keeping in touch with fellow students and tutors. Email is the best method to keep in contact, so make sure you use your university account as staff are restricted from using other servers. Also, the university account means that tutors can identify mail from students. 3. Managing your time effectively – Time management is crucial to achieving success. Life at University is demanding so it is vital to balance all aspects, this can be done by careful advance planning. You will also be facing a number of deadlines throughout your studies, so learning to prioritise is essential. 4. Seeking to get involved – Students who actively involve themselves and engage in all facets of university life (academic and social) are more likely to become independent learners and so gain the most from their studies. Find out what is on offer as there really is something for everyone. Danger Zone 1. Plagiarism – A major part of your studies will involve researching other people’s ideas and often using these to inform your own work, but to do so without acknowledgement is called plagiarism. Presenting other people’s work as your own is a serious offence and could result in loss of marks or failure. You must therefore ensure that all work is properly referenced. Information about referencing and plagiarism is detailed in other
Page 25 handbooks. If you are unsure about how to reference your work ­ ask your tutor. 2. Falling behind – Tutors understand the pressures that many students face, so if you do find yourself falling behind in your studies talk to your personal tutor or Tracy Dixon, the Student Union Contact Officer, as soon as possible. Don’t leave it too late. 3. Thinking of withdrawing – Before you take any action, think through your options (such as change of programme or taking a year out) and, above all, talk to your tutors or Tracy. Sometimes issues that appear to be insurmountable can be resolved with the right help at the right time.
Page 26 2. Attendance – postcard (sample) School of Arts, Design, Media & Culture
Page 27 3. Attendance letter 1 «Forename11» «Surname1» «Contact_Add_1» «Contact_Add_2» «Contact_Add_3» «Contact_Add_4» «Contact_Add_5» «Postcode1» Date Programme: «Crs_Title» Dear «Forename11» I hope that all is well. I am contacting you because you have missed some lectures or sessions (Module Code) and I am worried that you may have tried to get in touch but have been unable to get through. Please either ring «Module_Leader» on «MLTel» or send an email to «Mlemail». Failing that, you could contact the school office on «School_Office» and leave your mobile or telephone number so they can get back to you. If you are no longer taking this Module, please contact your School Office to make sure your records are up to date. I am enclosing a list of University Student Support Services numbers in case you need specific guidance. Tracy Dixon is the Student Union Contact Officer (0191 5153582) and is a really useful person to speak to (confidentially) about any issue that may be of concern. Kind Regards Module Leader enc. cc «Programme_Leader»
Page 28 4. Attendance letter 2 «Forename11» «Surname1» «Contact_Add_1» «Contact_Add_2» «Contact_Add_3» «Contact_Add_4» «Contact_Add_5» «Postcode1» Date Programme: «Crs_Title» Dear «Forename11» I have been asked to contact you for a second time. Our records indicate that you have missed module «Wk6» since my previous letter. Please contact the Module Leader «Module_Leader» on «MLTel», or failing that the School Office («School_Office») and provide a telephone number on which we’ll be able to get in touch with you. Should you no longer be taking this module, would you please inform the School Office on the above number. Yours Sincerely Module Leader cc. «Programme_Leader»
Page 29 5. Attendance letter 3 «Forename11» «Surname1» «Contact_Add_1» «Contact_Add_2» «Contact_Add_3» «Contact_Add_4» «Contact_Add_5» «Postcode1» Date Programme: «Crs_Title» Dear «Forename11» Our records indicate that you have now missed 3 teaching sessions. Please contact your Programme Leader «Programme_Leader» on «PL_Tel» as a matter of great urgency to discuss this. Failure to do so may result in your de­ selection from «Wk6», if the 3 absences are from this one module. If you are no longer registered on the above module, please contact «Module_Leader» on «MLTel» as soon as possible. To remind you, if for very good reason you are absent from a module, please ensure that you inform the Module Lecturer, (if possible in advance of the teaching session), to avoid future letters being issued. Yours Sincerely Module Leader cc. «Programme_Leader»
Page 30 6. Attendance – register 1
Page 31 7. Attendance ­ register 2
Page 32 8. ADMC ‘STAR’ members & roles David Taylor Associate Dean Quality Ian Blackhall Area representative for Media Laura Candlish Publications and Marketing Officer (ADMC) Lesley Younger School Retention Group Representative & Chair of STAR Area representative for Arts & Design Nina Anderson School Retention Administrator Simon Henig Area representative for Culture Tracy Dixon Students’ Union Contact Officer
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