ers  Estimation Savings  Reference Manual 

Savings Estimation Technical Reference Manual for the California Municipal Utilities Association ers
energy & resource
solutions
Corporate Headquarters:
120 Water St., Suite 350
North Andover, Massachusetts 01845
California Office:
152 N. 3rd Street, Suite 520
San Jose, CA 95112
(408) 217-6460
May 5, 2014
ers
Contents
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................1-1
2. INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................................2-1
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
Purpose .............................................................................................................................................. 2-1
Background ........................................................................................................................................ 2-1
Approach ............................................................................................................................................ 2-1
Manual Organization .......................................................................................................................... 2-2
Manual Update Process ..................................................................................................................... 2-3
Applicable State and Federal Codes ................................................................................................. 2-4
3. DEFINITIONS .........................................................................................................................3-1
4. COMMON DEFAULT FACTORS ............................................................................................4-1
5. HVAC MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL .............................................................................5-1
5.1 Commercial Air Conditioning Units and Heat Pumps ........................................................................ 5-1
5.1.1 Unit Efficiency Ratings – 5 Tons and Smaller ............................................................................. 5-2
5.1.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings ‒ Greater Than 5 Tons ........................................................................... 5-3
5.2 Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps ......................................................................... 5-4
5.2.1 Unit Efficiency Ratings ................................................................................................................. 5-5
5.2.2 Federal Code Efficiency Standards ............................................................................................. 5-5
5.2.3 Measure Cost .............................................................................................................................. 5-6
6. LIGHTING MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL .......................................................................6-1
6.1 Semi-Custom Lighting and Lighting Control Measures ..................................................................... 6-1
6.1.1 Lighting Control Default Savings Factor Table ............................................................................ 6-2
6.2 Reduced Wattage Lamp and Ballast ................................................................................................. 6-3
6.2.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 6-4
6.3 De-Lamp Fluorescent Fixture ............................................................................................................ 6-5
6.4 LED Lighting ....................................................................................................................................... 6-6
6.5 LED Refrigerated Display Case Lighting ........................................................................................... 6-7
6.5.1 Energy Savings and Cost Table ‒ LED Display Case Lighting ................................................... 6-8
6.5.2 Energy Savings and Cost Table ‒ LED Display Case Lighting with Occupancy Sensor ............ 6-9
6.6 Bi-Level Lighting Fixture – Stairwells, Hallways, and Garages ......................................................... 6-10
7. REFRIGERATION MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL ..........................................................7-1
7.1 Commercial Ice Machines .................................................................................................................. 7-1
7.2 Commercial Solid Door & Glass Door Refrigerators .......................................................................... 7-2
7.2.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 7-3
7.2.2 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 7-3
7.3 EC Motor for Cold Storage Evaporator Fans ..................................................................................... 7-4
7.4 Refrigerated Display Case EC Motor Retrofit .................................................................................... 7-5
7.5 EC Motor with Fan Cycling Controls for Cold Storage Evaporator Fans ........................................... 7-6
7.5.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 7-7
7.6 Strip Curtain Infiltration Barrier for Refrigerated Space ..................................................................... 7-7
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
i
Contents
7.6.1 Energy Savings Table – Restaurant ............................................................................................ 7-8
7.6.2 Energy Savings Table – Grocery ................................................................................................ 7-8
7.7 Refrigerated Display Case with Doors ............................................................................................... 7-9
7.7.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 7-10
7.8 Auto-Closers for Main Cooler or Freezer Doors ................................................................................ 7-11
7.8.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 7-12
7.9 Anti-Sweat Heater Controls ............................................................................................................... 7-12
7.9.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 7-13
8. ALL OTHER NONRESIDENTIAL MEASURES ......................................................................8-1
8.1 Pump and Fan Variable Frequency Drive Control ............................................................................. 8-1
8.1.1 Performance Curve Charts .......................................................................................................... 8-3
8.2 Vending Machine Controller ............................................................................................................... 8-4
8.3 Vending Machine Controller ‒ Non-Refrigerated ............................................................................... 8-5
8.4 Insulated Holding Cabinets ................................................................................................................ 8-6
8.5 Commercial Combination Oven ......................................................................................................... 8-7
8.6 Commercial Electric Steam Cooker ................................................................................................... 8-8
8.7 Commercial Electric Convection Oven .............................................................................................. 8-9
8.8 Commercial Electric Fryer .................................................................................................................. 8-10
8.9 Commercial Electric Griddle............................................................................................................... 8-11
8.10 Commercial Dishwasher .................................................................................................................... 8-12
8.10.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 8-12
8.10.2 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 8-14
8.11 High Efficiency Clothes Washers in Multifamily Properties ............................................................... 8-14
8.12 ENERGY STAR Uninterrupted Power Supply ................................................................................... 8-15
8.13 Plug-Load Occupancy Sensor ........................................................................................................... 8-16
8.14 Smart Power Strip – Commercial Use ............................................................................................... 8-17
8.15 Kitchen Exhaust Hood Demand Ventilation Control System ............................................................. 8-18
9. HVAC MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL .....................................................................................9-1
9.1 Residential Air Conditioners ............................................................................................................... 9-1
9.1.1 Code Baseline Efficiency Table ................................................................................................... 9-3
9.2 ENERGY STAR Room Air Conditioner .............................................................................................. 9-3
9.2.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 9-4
9.3 Whole-House Ventilation Fan ............................................................................................................ 9-5
9.3.1 Savings and Cost Table .............................................................................................................. 9-5
9.4 Duct Sealing ....................................................................................................................................... 9-7
9.4.1 Energy Savings Table – at 20% Duct Leakage Reduction ......................................................... 9-8
10. LIGHTING MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL ..............................................................................10-1
10.1 LED Lights .......................................................................................................................................... 10-1
10.2 LED Holiday Lights ............................................................................................................................. 10-2
10.3 ENERGY STAR Ceiling Fan .............................................................................................................. 10-3
11. APPLIANCES – RESIDENTIAL..............................................................................................11-1
11.1 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator ............................................................................................................. 11-1
11.1.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 11-2
11.2 Refrigerator and Freezer Recycling ................................................................................................... 11-2
11.3 Heat Pump Water Heater ................................................................................................................... 11-3
11.3.1 Energy Savings Tables ................................................................................................................ 11-4
11.4 Energy Star Dishwasher, Compact and Standard Size ..................................................................... 11-5
11.5 High Efficiency Residential Clothes Washer ...................................................................................... 11-6
11.5.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 11-7
ii
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Contents
12. BUILDING ENVELOPE – RESIDENTIAL ...............................................................................12-1
12.1 Ceiling Insulation ................................................................................................................................ 12-1
12.1.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 12-2
12.2 Wall Insulation .................................................................................................................................... 12-3
12.2.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 12-4
12.2.2 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 12-4
12.3 Solar Attic Fan .................................................................................................................................... 12-4
12.3.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 12-5
12.4 Reflective Window Film ...................................................................................................................... 12-6
12.4.1 Savings Table .............................................................................................................................. 12-6
12.5 Solar Screen ...................................................................................................................................... 12-7
12.5.1 Savings Table .............................................................................................................................. 12-8
12.6 Reduced Building Leakage ................................................................................................................ 12-8
12.6.1 Savings Table .............................................................................................................................. 12-9
13. ALL OTHER – RESIDENTIAL ................................................................................................13-1
13.1 Smart Power Strip .............................................................................................................................. 13-1
13.2 Variable Speed Residential Pool Pump ............................................................................................. 13-2
13.3 Electric Domestic Hot Water Storage Heater..................................................................................... 13-3
14. GAS MEASURES - NONRESIDENTIAL .................................................................................14-1
14.1 Tank Insulation ................................................................................................................................... 14-1
14.1.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 14-2
14.1.2 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 14-2
14.2 Hot Water and Steam Pipe Insulation ................................................................................................ 14-2
14.2.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 14-3
14.2.2 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 14-4
14.3 High Efficiency Commercial Gas Hot Water Heaters ........................................................................ 14-5
14.3.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 14-6
14.3.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings ................................................................................................................. 14-6
14.3.3 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 14-7
14.4 Ozone Laundry................................................................................................................................... 14-8
14.5 Steam Traps ....................................................................................................................................... 14-9
15. GAS MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL ........................................................................................15-1
15.1 High Efficiency Residential Furnace & Boiler .................................................................................... 15-1
15.1.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 15-2
15.1.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings ................................................................................................................. 15-2
15.1.3 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 15-3
15.2 Domestic Hot Water Piping Insulation – Multifamily Recirculating System ....................................... 15-3
15.3 Domestic Hot Water Heater Meeting CEE Efficiency Requirements ................................................. 15-4
15.3.1 Energy Savings Table ................................................................................................................. 15-5
15.3.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings ................................................................................................................. 15-5
15.3.3 Measure Cost Table .................................................................................................................... 15-5
15.4 Low-Flow Showerheads ..................................................................................................................... 15-6
15.5 Faucet Aerators .................................................................................................................................. 15-7
16. CUSTOM MEASURE PROTOCOL .........................................................................................16-1
16.1 Baseline Use in Estimating Energy Savings ...................................................................................... 16-1
16.1.1 Baseline Examples ...................................................................................................................... 16-2
16.1.2 Dual Baseline............................................................................................................................... 16-3
16.2 Energy Savings Estimate Approach .................................................................................................. 16-4
16.3 Measure Description .......................................................................................................................... 16-4
16.4 Savings Calculation Methods ............................................................................................................. 16-5
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
iii
Contents
16.4.1 Engineering Model ....................................................................................................................... 16-5
16.4.2 Model Transparency .................................................................................................................... 16-6
16.4.3 Measurement and Verification ..................................................................................................... 16-6
16.5 Quality Assurance and Savings Validation ........................................................................................ 16-7
16.6 Documentation ................................................................................................................................... 16-7
17. REFERENCES........................................................................................................................17-1
TECHNICAL REFERENCE MANUAL (TRM) SPREADSHEETS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
iv
TRM100_NONRES AC AND HP UNITS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM101_NONRES PTAC_2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM102_REDUCED WATTAGE LAMP AND BALLAST_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM103_DELAMP FLUORESCENT LAMP_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM104_LED LIGHTING_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM105_LED REFRIGERATED CASE LIGHTING_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM106_FOOD SERVICE_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM107_EC MOTOR FOR WI COOLERS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM108_EC MOTOR WITH CONTROLLER FOR WI COOLER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM109_DISPLAY CASE EC MOTOR_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM110_STRIP CURTAINS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM111_REFRIGERATED DISPLAY CASE WITH DOORS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM112_AUTO DOOR CLOSERS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM113_ASH CONTROLS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM114_VENDING MACHINE CONTROLLER_NONREFRIGERATED_V2 182014.XLSX
TRM115_ENERGY STAR UPS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM116_COMMERCIAL DISHWASHER_V4 28 2014.XLSX
TRM200_RESIDENTIAL AC_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM201_ROOM AC_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM202_WHOLE HOUSE FAN_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM203_REDUCED BUILDING LEAKAGE_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM204_RESIDENTIAL LED_V4 23 2014.XLSX
TRM205_LED HOLIDAY LIGHTS_V2 18 2014.XLS
TRM206_RESIDENTIAL CEILING FANS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM207_REFRIGERATOR RECYCLING_V4 23 2014.XLSX
TRM208_ENERGY STAR REFRIGERATORS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM209_RES HOT WATER HEATER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM210_RES ENERGY STAR DISHWASHER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM211_ RESIDENTIAL CEILING INSULATION_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM212_WALL INSULATION_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM213_RESIDENTIAL SOLAR ATTIC FAN_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM214_VARIABLE SPEED RESIDENTIAL POOL PUMPS_V2 182014.XLSX
TRM215_ELECTRIC STORAGE WATER HEATER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM216_CLOTHES WASHER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM217_MF CLOTHES WASHER_2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM218_RESIDENTIAL WINDOW FILM_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM219_RESIDENTIAL SOLAR SCREEN_V2 18 2014.XLSX
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Contents
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
TRM300_PIPE INSULATION_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM301_MF DHW PIPE INSULATION_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM302_OZONE LAUNDRY_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM303_TANK INSULATION_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM304_COMMERCIAL DHW_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM305_RESIDENTIAL FURNACE_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM306_LOW FLOW SHOWERHEADS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM307_HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM308_FAUCET AERATORS_V2 18 2014.XLSX
TRM400_ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR_NONRES LIGHTING_V4 29 2014.XLSX
TRM401_ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR_PUMP AND FAN VFD_V4 1 2014.XLSX
TRM402_ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR_STEAM TRAPS_V4 2 2014.XLSX
TRM403_ENERGY SAVINGS CALCULATOR_DUCT SEALING_V2 18 2014.XLSX
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
v
1
Executive Summary
1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The savings estimation technical reference manual describes – for program administrators,
regulatory agencies, program evaluators, utility customers, and other interested stakeholders –
how California publicly owned utilities 1 consistently, reliably, and transparently calculate
energy savings for their energy efficiency programs.
The reference manual provides the methods, formulas, and default assumptions used for
estimating energy savings and peak demand impacts from energy efficiency measures and
projects. The energy savings estimates are used to report program accomplishments and
measure progress towards program goals.
Energy efficiency measures are documented and classified as either unit energy savings
measures, semi-custom measures, or custom measures. The manual presents both
nonresidential and residential measures. Each measure type is presented in separate
sections and grouped by technology type. Measure information is presented in a consistent
tabular format.
The reference manual also includes spreadsheets that provide detailed and transparent measure
calculations and, for certain semi-custom measures, energy savings calculators for estimating
energy savings for project-specific measures. The measure spreadsheet includes summary tables
for transferring measure savings data into the program’s regulatory compliance reporting tool.
Utilities sponsoring the TRM include: Silicon Valley Power, City of Palo Alto Utilities, Alameda
Municipal Power, Biggs, Gridley, Healdsburg, Lodi Electric Utility, Lompoc, Plumas-Sierra Rural Electric
Cooperative, Port of Oakland, Redding Electric Utility, Roseville Electric, Truckee Donner Public Utility
District, Ukiah Public Utility, Anaheim Public Utilities, Azusa Light & Water, Banning Electric Utility,
Burbank Water & Power, Cerritos, Colton Electric Utility, Glendale Water & Power, Imperial Irrigation
District, Los Angeles Department of Water & Power, Pasadena Water & Power, Riverside Public Utilities,
Vernon Light & Power, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Victorville, Trinity Public Utility District,
Corona Department of Water & Power, Lassen Municipal Utility District, Moreno Valley Utility, Merced
Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District, Needles, Island Energy, Rancho Cucamonga Municipal
Utility, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, and Turlock Irrigation District.
1
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
1-1
2
Introduction
2. INTRODUCTION
The savings estimation technical reference manual describes – for program administrators,
regulatory agencies, program evaluators, utility customers, and other interested stakeholders –
how publicly owned utilities consistently, reliably, and transparently calculate energy savings
for their energy efficiency programs.
2.1
Purpose
The reference manual provides the methods, formulas, and default assumptions used for
estimating energy savings and peak demand impacts from energy efficiency measures and
projects. The energy savings estimates are used to report program accomplishments and
measure progress towards program goals.
2.2
Background
California publicly owned utilities annually report their program accomplishments to the
California Energy Commission. As mandated by California state law (SB1037, AB2021, Section
9505 of the Public Utilities Code), each utility reports its program energy savings on an annual
basis. Since 2006, California publicly owned utilities have collaborated to develop tools and
resources for consistently and reliably reporting program energy savings.
The first source of energy savings estimates used to report program savings was published in
2006 and subsequently updated in 2008 and 2009. This reference manual supersedes these
previous sources and has been developed specifically for the sponsoring utility programs.
2.3
Approach
The reference manual documents and classifies energy efficiency measures in three ways: unit
energy savings (UES) measures, semi-custom measures, and custom measures. Not included in
the current version of this manual —although they may be added in future versions — are
provisional unit energy savings measures (UES-provisional).
UES measures, previously defined as deemed savings measures, are normalized savings
estimates that represent the most typical savings expected from a range of similar measures.
These savings estimates are used for reporting savings at the program or at a regional level.
The UES measures provided in this manual are based on credible and reliable sources of
energy savings estimates and savings estimate parameters, generally those that have been
documented and vetted through either peer engineering review or a regulatory process
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
2-1
Section 2
Introduction
governing efficiency programs. As such, the UES savings estimates are based on the most
current and best available resources.
Semi-custom measures are measures for which the savings estimates can vary significantly
depending on how or where the measure is used. Savings estimates are calculated using
standard methodologies based on project-specific parameters. For semi-custom measures, the
manual documents the savings methodology and may also provide a standardized savings
calculator for use in estimating energy savings.
Custom measures are project-specific actions, equipment changes, or system improvements
that reduce energy consumption. This manual outlines a protocol for program administrators
to use that will consistently and reliably estimate and document energy savings estimates for
custom measures.
Provisional unit energy savings measures are measures that do not yet meet the reliability
standard of a UES measure. The most typical are emerging technology or newly-adopted
program measures that exhibit significant energy saving potential. Provisional savings
estimates provide an interim solution for reporting measure savings while testing, evaluation,
or demonstration efforts are under way to validate energy savings estimates.
2.4
Manual Organization
The reference manual consists of both this document and its supporting spreadsheets.
The manual presents both nonresidential and residential measures. Each measure type is
presented in separate sections and grouped by technology type. Measure information is
presented in a consistent tabular format consisting of the following sections:
 Measure summary information – Provides a brief description of the measure, its
applicability, savings type (UES, semi-custom), energy savings, incremental measure cost,
and effective useful life (EUL)
 Baseline and efficient case conditions – Defines the baseline type (see Section 3 –
Definitions) and provides a brief description of the baseline and efficient case conditions.
 Savings calculation – Documents the savings methodology and algorithms used to
estimate savings
 Key parameters – Lists key operating parameters that have the most influence on energy
savings estimates
 Quality assurance, design, installation, commissioning, and operation – Provides key
quality assurance checks to help ensure that the estimated savings are realized
 Important notes – Provide further explanation, clarifications, or relevant supporting
information
All references and data resources are identified in the table footnotes.
2-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Introduction
Section 2
As needed, each section also contains supplementary tables and charts to provide additional
measure details. Measures with multiple savings values (savings by size, building use, varying
levels of efficiency, etc.) will have savings and cost data listed in a supplementary table. If the
number of measures is too large to include in a supplementary table, they are listed in the
supporting spreadsheet summary table. The spreadsheet summary table allows measures to be
filtered by climate zone and, if applicable, by building type.
The last section of the manual provides the custom measure protocol, which outlines a process
for estimating and documenting custom measure savings.
The reference manual spreadsheets provide the detailed measure calculations. For UES
measures, the spreadsheet consists of a summary table, a calculation narrative, measure savings
calculations, and reference data. The summary table is constructed to provide easy transfer of
measure data into the program’s regulatory compliance reporting tool.
Energy savings calculators are also provided as part of the reference manual. The calculators
are Excel spreadsheet-based engineering models for estimating semi-custom measures per the
described methodology. They provide a simple and transparent approach for estimating
project-specific energy savings.
2.5
Manual Update Process
In order to maintain the most current and best available estimates of energy savings, the
reference manual should be reviewed and updated on a regular basis. Measures should be
reviewed to determine if newly adopted code changes will affect the energy savings estimates.
Measure savings estimates may need to be updated based on new sources of information, such
as market research studies, technology studies, or program impact evaluation reports. In
addition, assumptions used in the measure baseline definitions may over time become obsolete
or otherwise no longer applicable.
Manual review and updates to incorporate code changes should occur on an annual basis, or at
the time when code updates go into effect. Updates for measures which represent a significant
amount of program energy savings should occur on an annual basis. Manual updates to
incorporate the most current and best available information for all measures should occur every
2 to 3 years.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
2-3
Section 2
2.6
Introduction
Applicable State and Federal Codes
Within each measure description, the measure savings estimate baseline is described. Where the
appropriate baseline is determined to be code, the applicable state or federal code is identified.
The codes used in determining savings estimate baselines include:
 California 2012 Appliance Efficiency Regulations (California Code of Regulations, Title 20,
sections 1601‒1608)
 California 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential
Buildings (California Code of Regulations, Title 24, part 6 and associated administrative
regulations, part 1)
 Department of Energy Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, 2012‒ 2013 Editions
2-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
3
Definitions
3. DEFINITIONS
In this manual, the following definitions apply:
custom measure – Any measure not defined by this manual as either a unit energy savings
measure or a semi-custom measure. In more general terms, a custom measure is defined as an
energy-related project, action, equipment change, or system improvement that reduces energy
consumption.
effective useful life (EUL) – An estimate of the median number of years (from a statistically
representative sample) that an installed measure is expected to be operable and capable of
performing its intended function. The primary source of EUL is the California Public Utilities
Commission’s Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER).
efficient case – Describes the affected equipment or system condition after an energy efficiency
measure has been implemented or installed. Also referred to as the post-retrofit condition.
energy use baseline – Energy use that is compared to the efficient case energy use for the
purposes of estimating future annual energy savings. The baseline is identified as being one of
the four following types:
natural replacement – code – Describes an energy use baseline that is based on current
minimum energy efficiency code requirements as established by the applicable local,
state, or federal jurisdiction.
natural replacement – current practice – Describes an energy use baseline that is based
on standard industry practice or market availability.
natural replacement – preexisting conditions – Describes the projected energy use
baseline that is based on the energy performance of the existing systems or
equipment that was in place before a measure was implemented. This baseline is
applicable if retaining the preexisting conditions over the entire effective useful life
of the measure is a realistic option.
dual baseline – early retirement – Describes the use of two energy use baselines to
determine energy savings where equipment with remaining useful life (RUL) is
replaced. In general, the first baseline is based on preexisting conditions and the
second baseline is one of the three types of natural replacement. See Section 16.1 for
a description of how a dual baseline is used in estimating measure cost-effectiveness.
measure cost – The incremental cost of implementing the energy savings measure. For
measures with an adjusted baseline, it is the incremental cost of the more-efficient measure
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
3-1
Section 3
Definitions
compared to the cost of a code-compliant or current practice measure. For a preexisting
baseline, it is the full implementation cost of the measure. Installation costs not directly
associated with the energy savings measure are not included.
peak demand – The California grid-level average hourly peak demand occurring during a 3hour time period (2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.) on a summer weekday from June to September. It also
can be defined for weather-sensitive measures as the maximum hourly peak demand occurring
between 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. during 3 consecutive weekdays containing the weekday with
the hottest temperature of the year.
semi-custom measure – An energy savings measure for which the savings estimates varies
significantly depending on how or where the measure is used (project-specific parameters).
Semi-custom measure savings are calculated using standard methodologies or standardized
saving estimate models (e.g., spreadsheet models).
UES measure – A unit energy savings measure that has unitized savings estimates (e.g., savings
per motor, savings per hp) that represent an average or weighted average of similar savings
measures. UES measures were previously known as deemed savings measures.
The UES measures provided in this manual are based on credible and reliable sources of
energy savings estimates and savings estimate parameters, generally those that have been
documented and vetted through either peer engineering review or a regulatory process
governing efficiency programs.
3-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Common Default Factors
4
4. COMMON DEFAULT FACTORS
This section provides the default values used in estimating energy savings for UES and semicustom lighting measures. Three default values are used: HVAC interactive effect, operating
hours, and peak demand factors.
Energy efficient lighting measures reduce the internal heat gain of air-conditioned spaces. This
reduction in heat gain reduces the cooling energy consumption and increases heating energy
consumption. Default interactive effect factors have been developed as part of the DEER
resources 2 to account for these interactions in typical building end-use types. These default
interactive effects are used in the savings estimates for UES and semi-custom measures
provided in this manual.
Tables 4-1 through 4-4 provide the air-conditioning cooling interactive effect factors (HVAC IE
factors) used for lighting measures.
2
DEER, Lighting HVAC Interactive Effects_9 Sept 2013.xls
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
4-1
Section 4
Common Default Factors
Table 4-1
HVAC IE Factors for Climate Zones 2, 3, 4, and 5
CZ02
Building Type
CZ03
CZ04
CZ05
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Assembly
1.03
1.18
1.02
1.18
1.05
1.18
1.03
1.17
Primary school
1.06
1.00
1.07
1.00
1.08
1.62
1.06
1.23
Secondary school
1.04
1.00
1.04
1.00
1.07
1.32
1.04
1.22
Community college
1.09
1.20
1.08
1.12
1.11
1.36
1.08
1.22
University
1.10
1.20
1.10
1.14
1.12
1.27
1.10
1.23
Relocatable classroom
1.02
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.05
1.22
1.02
1.26
Grocery
0.91
1.19
0.87
1.18
0.94
1.24
0.87
1.17
Hospital
1.10
1.19
1.11
1.16
1.11
1.22
1.09
1.19
Nursing home
1.03
1.19
1.02
1.13
1.05
1.24
1.01
1.14
Hotel
0.97
1.23
0.98
1.20
1.01
1.24
0.97
1.21
Motel
1.02
1.21
1.03
1.19
1.05
1.22
1.02
1.20
Bio/tech mfg.
1.11
1.19
1.12
1.14
1.12
1.15
1.11
1.18
Light industrial mfg.
1.04
1.17
1.04
1.11
1.05
1.15
1.03
1.17
Large office
1.11
1.26
1.11
1.16
1.12
1.28
1.10
1.23
Small office
1.05
1.20
1.05
1.13
1.07
1.24
1.06
1.19
Sit-down restaurant
1.01
1.21
1.00
1.18
1.04
1.20
1.00
1.19
Fast-food restaurant
1.03
1.17
1.02
1.14
1.05
1.18
1.02
1.15
Department store
1.07
1.19
1.08
1.19
1.09
1.20
1.08
1.18
Big box retail
1.06
1.19
1.06
1.19
1.08
1.20
1.06
1.19
Small retail
1.06
1.18
1.06
1.17
1.08
1.19
1.06
1.17
Conditioned storage
0.95
1.21
0.92
1.01
0.98
1.26
0.91
1.15
Unconditioned storage
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Refrig. warehouse
1.59
1.32
1.63
1.29
1.62
1.32
1.58
1.26
Exterior
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
4-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Common Default Factors
Section 4
Table 4-2
HVAC IE Factors for Climate Zones 8, 9, 10, and 11
CZ08
CZ09
CZ10
CZ11
Building Type
Assembly
Energy
1.13
Demand
1.23
Energy
1.12
Demand
1.26
Energy
1.09
Demand
1.22
Energy
1.05
Demand
1.18
Primary school
1.18
1.34
1.16
1.86
1.13
1.88
1.06
1.00
Secondary school
1.16
1.31
1.15
1.84
1.12
1.77
1.07
1.00
Community college
1.17
1.28
1.16
1.31
1.15
1.29
1.12
1.44
University
1.17
1.27
1.16
1.27
1.15
1.26
1.12
1.34
Relocatable classroom
1.11
1.29
1.11
1.29
1.11
1.31
1.04
1.00
Grocery
1.05
1.25
1.06
1.27
1.05
1.28
0.99
1.28
Hospital
1.17
1.26
1.17
1.28
1.14
1.27
1.11
1.23
Nursing home
1.10
1.29
1.10
1.31
1.09
1.32
1.06
1.25
Hotel
1.11
1.28
1.10
1.29
1.07
1.29
1.02
1.25
Motel
1.15
1.27
1.14
1.30
1.12
1.30
1.05
1.23
Bio/tech mfg.
1.18
1.26
1.18
1.26
1.14
1.26
1.12
1.34
Light industrial mfg.
1.11
1.20
1.11
1.22
1.08
1.21
1.04
1.15
Large office
1.18
1.33
1.17
1.33
1.17
1.32
1.13
1.29
Small office
1.16
1.28
1.15
1.32
1.13
1.29
1.07
1.28
Sit-down restaurant
1.12
1.24
1.11
1.26
1.09
1.23
1.04
1.19
Fast-food restaurant
1.11
1.22
1.11
1.24
1.09
1.22
1.05
1.18
Department store
1.17
1.22
1.15
1.25
1.13
1.23
1.07
1.19
Big box retail
1.15
1.24
1.14
1.27
1.12
1.25
1.06
1.20
Small retail
1.15
1.23
1.14
1.26
1.12
1.24
1.06
1.19
Conditioned storage
1.05
1.32
1.04
1.34
1.04
1.31
0.98
1.21
Unconditioned storage
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Refrig. warehouse
1.60
1.25
1.59
1.26
1.58
1.26
1.55
1.25
Exterior
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
4-3
Section 4
Common Default Factors
Table 4-3
HVAC IE Factors for Climate Zones 12, 14, 15, and 16
CZ12
Building Type
CZ14
CZ15
CZ16
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Energy
Demand
Assembly
1.04
1.18
1.07
1.14
1.19
1.20
0.99
1.19
Primary school
1.07
1.00
1.09
1.40
1.21
1.34
0.97
1.00
Secondary school
1.06
1.00
1.09
1.47
1.21
1.30
0.98
1.00
Community college
1.11
1.28
1.12
1.33
1.24
1.34
1.04
1.24
University
1.12
1.22
1.13
1.28
1.20
1.28
1.06
1.23
Relocatable classroom
1.04
1.00
1.09
1.33
1.19
1.31
1.00
1.00
Grocery
0.96
1.28
1.05
1.32
1.13
1.30
0.96
1.25
Hospital
1.11
1.23
1.13
1.28
1.19
1.29
1.06
1.23
Nursing home
1.05
1.25
1.08
1.32
1.16
1.33
0.99
1.27
Hotel
1.00
1.25
1.03
1.30
1.16
1.29
0.90
1.27
Motel
1.04
1.23
1.08
1.32
1.20
1.32
0.96
1.25
Bio/tech mfg.
1.11
1.20
1.14
1.23
1.19
1.26
1.07
1.21
Light industrial mfg.
1.04
1.18
1.06
1.20
1.15
1.29
0.99
1.19
Large office
1.12
1.31
1.16
1.31
1.23
1.32
1.08
1.29
Small office
1.07
1.23
1.11
1.30
1.21
1.30
1.01
1.27
Sit-down restaurant
1.03
1.18
1.07
1.16
1.17
1.26
0.99
1.21
Fast-food restaurant
1.05
1.18
1.07
1.23
1.15
1.23
1.00
1.20
Department store
1.07
1.21
1.09
1.21
1.17
1.24
0.99
1.21
Big box retail
1.06
1.20
1.09
1.26
1.17
1.26
0.98
1.21
Small retail
1.06
1.20
1.09
1.20
1.17
1.24
0.99
1.21
Conditioned storage
0.98
1.25
1.01
1.29
1.11
1.30
0.91
1.27
Unconditioned storage
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Refrig. warehouse
1.57
1.32
1.52
1.32
1.63
1.26
1.38
1.27
Exterior
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
4-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Common Default Factors
Section 4
Table 4-4
HVAC IE Factors – California Average
CA Average
Building Type
Assembly
Primary school
Secondary school
Community college
University
Relocatable classroom
Grocery
Hospital
Nursing home
Hotel
Motel
Bio/tech mfg.
Light industrial mfg.
Large office
Small office
Sit-down restaurant
Fast-food restaurant
Department store
Big box retail
Small retail
Conditioned storage
Unconditioned storage
Refrig. warehouse
Exterior
Energy
Demand
1.08
1.11
1.10
1.13
1.13
1.07
0.99
1.14
1.07
1.04
1.09
1.15
1.07
1.14
1.11
1.07
1.07
1.12
1.10
1.10
1.00
1.00
1.59
1.00
1.21
1.33
1.28
1.28
1.26
1.20
1.25
1.23
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.23
1.18
1.27
1.25
1.22
1.20
1.21
1.23
1.21
1.24
1.00
1.29
1.00
Lighting UES measure energy savings are based on lighting run times (operating hours) for the
same typical end-use space types. Table 4-5 provides the default factors.
Table 4-5
Default Lighting Operating Hours
Building Type
Assembly
Primary school
Secondary school
Community college
University
Re-locatable classroom
Grocery
Hospital
Nursing home
Hotel
Motel
Bio/tech mfg.
Savings Estimation TRM
Operating
Hours
2,610
Building Type
Light industrial mfg.
Large office
Small office
Sit-down restaurant
Fast-food restaurant
Department store
Big box retail
Small retail
Conditioned storage
Unconditioned storage
Refrigerated warehouse
2,140
2,280
2,420
2,350
2,480
4,910
5,260
4,160
1,950
1,550
3,530
ers
Operating
Hours
3,220
2,640
2,590
4,830
4,840
3,380
4,270
3,380
3,420
3,420
4,770
4-5
Section 4
Common Default Factors
To determine the peak demand reduction associated with lighting measures, the lighting
measure reduction in lighting power is multiplied by a default peak coincident demand factor
(CDF). Tables 4-6 and 4-7 provide the factors for twelve climate zones and Table 4-8 provides
the statewide average factors.
Table 4-6
Peak Coincident Demand Factors (CDF)
4-6
Building Type
CZ02
CZ03
CZ04
CZ05
CZ08
CZ09
Assembly
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
Primary school
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.62
0.62
0.02
Secondary school
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.71
0.71
0.02
Community college
0.49
0.49
0.49
0.81
0.81
0.49
University
0.44
0.44
0.44
0.72
0.72
0.44
Relocatable classroom
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.70
0.70
0.02
Grocery
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
Hospital
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
Nursing home
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
Hotel
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
Motel
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
Bio/tech mfg.
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
Light industrial mfg.
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
Large office
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
Small office
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
Sit-down restaurant
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
Fast-food restaurant
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
Department store
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
Big box retail
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
Small retail
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
Conditioned storage
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
Unconditioned storage
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
Refrig. warehouse
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
Exterior
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Common Default Factors
Section 4
Table 4-7
Peak Coincident Demand Factors (CDF)
Building Type
CZ10
CZ11
CZ12
CZ14
CZ15
CZ16
Assembly
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
Primary school
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
Secondary school
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
Community college
0.49
0.49
0.49
0.49
0.49
0.49
University
0.44
0.44
0.44
0.44
0.44
0.44
Relocatable classroom
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
Grocery
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
Hospital
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
0.83
Nursing home
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
0.68
Hotel
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
0.24
Motel
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
0.17
Bio/tech mfg.
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
Light industrial mfg.
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
0.92
Large office
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
0.71
Small office
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
0.69
Sit-down restaurant
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.80
Fast-food restaurant
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
Department store
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
Big box retail
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.85
Small retail
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.88
Conditioned storage
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
Unconditioned storage
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
0.70
Refrig. warehouse
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
0.56
Exterior
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
4-7
Section 4
Common Default Factors
Table 4-8
Peak Coincident Demand Factors (CDF)
CA
Average
Building Type
4-8
Assembly
0.53
Primary school
0.12
Secondary school
0.14
Community college
0.53
University
0.48
Relocatable classroom
0.14
Grocery
0.69
Hospital
0.83
Nursing home
0.68
Hotel
0.24
Motel
0.17
Bio/tech mfg.
0.85
Light industrial mfg.
0.92
Large office
0.71
Small office
0.69
Sit-down restaurant
0.80
Fast-food restaurant
0.81
Department store
0.76
Big box retail
0.85
Small retail
0.88
Conditioned storage
0.70
Unconditioned storage
0.70
Refrig. warehouse
0.56
Exterior
0.00
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
5
5. HVAC MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL
5.1
Commercial Air Conditioning Units and Heat Pumps
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of new high efficiency air conditioning (AC) units, including single unitary
package units and split system units. Both AC and heat pump units are included.
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
Applicable to both retrofit and new construction
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1. See TRM100 spreadsheet summary table. Savings vary based on unit size,
building type, and climate zone. With thirty-two unit types, twenty-two building
types, and twelve climate zones, savings for more than 8,000 measure savings
estimates are provided.
2. All savings are listed per ton of cooling.
Incremental measure cost
1. See TRM100 spreadsheet summary table
1
2. All costs are listed per ton of cooling
2
EUL
15 years
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1. Natural replacement – code
2. Dual baseline – early retirement
Baseline description
1. For natural replacement, the baseline is the minimum unit efficiency allowed by
code.
2. For the remaining useful life (RUL) time period, the baseline is the preexisting
unit vintage efficiency weighted by building vintage.
3
Efficient case description
New units with efficiency levels consistent with CEE Tier I and Tier II efficiency
levels. Unit efficiency ratings are provided in the Unit Efficiency Ratings Table.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
Savings for AC and heat pumps are obtained from the DEER 2014 database
formula
(EQUEST parametric modeling simulations), which includes updates based on the
2013 Title 24 code requirements.
For SEER 15 measures (units 5 tons or less) not provided in DEER, DEER data was
extrapolated to estimate savings (7.2 percent savings increase over SEER 14).
Peak demand reduction
See above
Definitions
Vintage = Year that the building type was built
EER = Energy efficiency ratio = 12 × kW/ton cooling
IEER = Integrated energy efficiency ratio – Weighted average of part-load efficiencies of an
HVAC unit for a specified set of loads and outdoor air temperatures (OATs)
SEER = Seasonal energy efficiency ratio – Weighted average of part-load efficiencies of an
HVAC unit for a specified set of loads and OATs
Key Parameters
Building type
Determines the average hours of operation and internal building loads
HVAC unit size
Savings Estimation TRM
Measure name includes unit cooling capacity in both units of tons and kBtu/h. Tons
are representative of the nominal cooling capacity of equipment sizes available from
most equipment manufacturers. kBtu/h savings are useful for comparison to code
requirements and CEE unit size categories.
ers
5-1
Section 5
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Determine if new unit will be replacing a functional unit or a failed unit.
2. If new unit is replacing existing functional unit and RUL savings will be applied, record age, make, model, size,
and type of unit to be replaced.
3. Verify that new unit meets minimum efficiency requirements.
4. Verify that new unit is properly installed and commissioned.
Important Notes
N/A
1
Measure cost data was derived from the following sources:
a.PG&E work paper, PGECOHVC126, “Unitary Air-Cooled Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps <65kBtu/h Revision
#3,” 6/20/2012
b. PG&E work paper, PGECOHVC128, “Unitary Air-Cooled Commercial Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps >= 65 kBtu/h,” Revision
# 3, 6/20/2012
2DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
3Consortium
for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Commercial Unitary AC and HP Specification, Effective January, 6, 2012.
http://www.cee1.org/files/CEE_CommHVAC_UnitarySpec2012.pdf
5.1.1
Unit Efficiency Ratings – 5 Tons and Smaller
This table lists peak (EER) and seasonal (SEER) efficiency ratings for both AC and heat pump
units that are 5 tons or less in capacity. It also indicates the applicable CEE tier level. For all
units 5 tons and smaller, the minimum efficiency rating allowed by code (2012 Appliance
Standards) is 13 SEER and 7.7 HSPF (heat pumps only).
Measure Name
AC split unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-14 SEER
AC split unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-14 SEER
EER
Rating
SEER
Rating
HSPF
Rating
CEE
Tier I
12
14
X
CEE
Tier II
12
14
X
AC pkg unit – < 5 tons (55kBtu/h)-14 SEER
11.6
14
X
AC pkg unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-14 SEER
11.6
14
X
AC split unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-15 SEER
12.5
15
X
AC split unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-15 SEER
12.5
15
X
AC pkg unit – < 5 tons (55kBtu/h)-15 SEER
12
15
X
AC pkg unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-15 SEER
12
15
X
HP split unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-14 SEER 8.5 HSPF
12
14
8.5
X
HP split unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-14 SEER 8.5 HSPF
12
14
8.5
X
HP pkg unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-14 SEER 8.0 HSPF
11.6
14
8.0
X
HP pkg unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-14 SEER 8.0 HSPF
11.6
14
8.0
X
HP split unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-15 SEER 9 HSPF
12.5
15
9.0
X
HP split unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-15 SEER 9 HSPF
12.5
15
9.0
X
HP pkg unit – < 5 tons (55 kBtu/h)-15 SEER 8.5 HSPF
12
15
8.5
X
HP pkg unit – 5 tons (55-64 kBtu/h)-15 SEER 8.5 HSPF
12
15
8.5
X
5-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
5.1.2
Section 5
Unit Efficiency Ratings ‒ Greater Than 5 Tons
This table lists peak load (EER) efficiency ratings for both air conditioner and heat pump units
larger than 5 tons in capacity. It also indicates the applicable CEE Tier level and unit size
minimum full load and part-load efficiency ratings required by code (2013 Title 24).
EER
Rating
HSPF
Rating
T24 Min
1
Eff Rating
CEE
Tier I
AC unit – 6 to 8.5 tons (65–109 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER
11.5
N/A
11.0 EER
11.2 IEER
X
AC unit – 10 tons (110–134 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER
11.5
N/A
11.0 EER
11.2 IEER
X
AC unit – 12 to 17 tons (135–239 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER
11.5
N/A
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
AC unit – 20 to 60 tons (240–759 kBtu/h) -10.5 EER
10.5
N/A
9.8 EER
9.9 IEER
X
Measure Name
CEE
Tier II
AC unit – 6 to 8.5 tons (65–109 kBtu/h) -12 EER
12
N/A
11.0 EER
11.2 IEER
X
AC unit – 10 tons (110–134 kBtu/h) -12 EER
12
N/A
11.0 EER
11.2 IEER
X
AC unit – 12 to 17 tons (135–239 kBtu/h) -12 EER
12
N/A
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
AC unit – 20 to 60 tons (240–759 kBtu/h) -10.8 EER
10.8
N/A
9.8 EER
9.9 IEER
X
AC unit – >60 tons (760 kBtu/h) -10.2 EER
10.2
N/A
9.5 EER
9.6 IEER
X
HP unit – 6 to 8.5 tons (65–109 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER 3.4
COP
11.5
3.4
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
12
3.4
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
11.5
3.4
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
12
3.4
10.8 EER
11.0 IEER
X
11.5
3.2
10.4 EER
10.5 IEER
X
12
3.2
10.4 EER
10.5 IEER
X
10.8
3.2
9.3 EER
9.4 IEER
X
HP unit – 6 to 8.5 tons (65–109 kBtu/h) -12 EER 3.4
COP
HP unit – 10 tons (110–134 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER 3.4 COP
HP unit – 10 tons (110–134 kBtu/h) -12 EER 3.4 COP
HP unit – 12 to 17 tons (135–239 kBtu/h) -11.5 EER 3.2
COP
HP unit – 12 to 17 tons (135–239 kBtu/h) -12 EER 3.2
COP
HP unit – 20 tons (240 kBtu/h) -10.8 EER 3.2 COP
1
For units with electric resistance heat, add 0.2 to both EER and IEER to determine minimum rating requirements
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
5-3
Section 5
5.2
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency packaged terminal AC units (PTAC) or heat pumps
(PTHP) in hotel or motel facility.
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
1.
For retrofits, the units meet the regulatory definition of replacement units: non-standard
sized units (less than 16 inches high or less than 42 inches wide with a cross-section area
less than 670 square inches) specially manufactured for replacement applications. The
units are designed to fit into the sleeve of the replaced unit.
For new construction, the units exceed the new construction (standard size) code
efficiency requirements ‒ see the Unit Efficiency Ratings Table.
New construction measures are limited to units with a capacity of less than 7,000 Btu/h.
2.
3.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
4.
Measure savings are found in the TRM101 spreadsheet.
With twelve climate zones, sixteen unit types, and two building types, savings for 384
measures are provided.
Each replacement unit measure has both natural replacement-code and dual baselineearly retirement savings values.
All savings are listed per ton of cooling.
1.
$144 per ton for replacement units
2.
$34 per ton for new construction unit costs
3.
Incremental measure cost
EUL
1
2
15 years
3
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1. Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
1.
2.
Efficient case description
1.
2.
For retrofit units, the baseline efficiencies are based on non-standard, replacement
2
units as defined in Federal Code of Regulations . The federal code requirements can
also be found in the 2013 Title 24 code requirements.
For new construction units, the baseline efficiencies are based on standard units as
defined in the Federal Code of Regulations..
For retrofit units, the minimum unit efficiency rating meets the requirements listed in
the Unit Efficiency Ratings Table.
For new construction units, the minimum unit efficiency rating meets the
requirements listed in the Unit Efficiency Ratings Table.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
Peak demand reduction
Savings for this measure were derived from figures contained within the 2011 DEER
database. The DEER database contains savings for code and weighted by vintage
preexisting unit baselines.
For new construction units, savings are extrapolated from DEER savings values by
comparing the new construction net efficiency improvements to the DEER net
efficiency improvements. See TRM101 Savings spreadsheet for savings calculations.
See above.
Definitions
EER =
Energy efficiency ratio = 12 × kW/ton cooling
Key Parameters
Building type
Used in DEER to determine the average hours of operation and internal building loads.
HVAC unit size
Total full-load cooling capacity in tons; unit savings assume units are properly sized.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Determine if unit meets the definition of retrofit (replacement) or new construction unit.
Verify that new unit meets minimum efficiency requirements.
Verify that new unit is properly installed and commissioned.
5-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
Section 5
Important Notes
Due to the recent federal code changes, there are currently (as of March 2013) no ENERGY STAR-qualified PTAC or
PTHP units.
Most new construction units available (per AHRI directory) do not exceed code efficiency requirements by enough to
provide sufficient savings to be a cost-effective measure. Therefore, the only size category included in the new
construction savings estimates is for PTHP and PTAC units with a capacity of less than 7,000 Btu/h.
4
Based on a 2011 market survey conducted by U.S. EPA , there are a limited number of replacement units available at the
efficiency ranges assumed by DEER (nearly 20% greater than code).
1PG&E
work paper, PGECOHVC114 PTAC and PTHP Revision 3, June 21, 2012.
2
Federal Code of Regulations, 10 CFR part 431.
3DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls.
4
ENERGY STAR Market & Industry Scoping Report, Packaged Terminal Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, December 2011.
5.2.1
Unit Efficiency Ratings
This table shows the unit efficiencies used to estimate savings.
Retrofit
Installed Unit
Efficiency (EER)
New
Construction
Baseline
Efficiency
(EER)
New Construction
Installed Unit
Efficiency (EER)
9.31
11.17
11.9
12.2
PTHP – 7,000 to 15,000 Btu/h
8.46
10.15
10.7
N/A
PTHP – >15,000 Btu/h
7.61
9.13
9.5
N/A
PTAC – <7,000 Btu/h
9.41
11.29
11.7
13.2
PTAC – 7,000 to 15,000 Btu/h
8.56
10.27
10.5
N/A
PTAC – >15,000 Btu/h
7.71
9.29
9.3
N/A
Retrofit
Baseline
Efficiency
(EER)
PTHP – <7,000 Btu/h
Unit Size and Type
PTHP Units
PTAC Units
The efficiency rating for PTAC retrofit units in the 7,000 to 15,000 Btu/h size range is based on a
unit size of 11,000 Btu/h. To determine the efficiency rating for all unit sizes within this range
that provide the same level of energy savings, the following formula is used: EER = 13 - (0.25 ×
Cap/1000), where Cap is the unit-rated cooling capacity in Btu/h. For PTHP retrofit units, the
formula is: EER = 13 - (0.255 × Cap/1000).
5.2.2
Federal Code Efficiency Standards
The following table shows the minimum unit efficiency rating as required by code.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
5-5
Section 5
HVAC Measures – Nonresidential
Equipment
Category
PTHP
Standard size
Cooling Capacity (Btu/h)
<7,000
EER = 11.9
COP = 3.3
7,000 to 15,000
Non-standard
size
Standard size
EER = 9.5
COP = 2.9
<7,000
EER = 9.3
COP = 2.7
EER = 7.6
COP = 2.5
<7,000
EER = 11.7
EER = 13.8 - (0.30 x Cap /1000)
> 15,000
EER = 9.3
<7,000
EER = 9.4
7,000 to 15,000
> 15,000
5.2.3
EER = 10.8 - (0.213 x Cap/1000)
COP = 2.9 - (0.026 x Cap/1000)
> 15,000
7,000 to 15,000
Non-standard
size
EER = 14.0 - (0.30 x Cap /1000)
COP = 3.7 - (0.052 x Cap/1000)
> 15,000
7,000 to 15,000
PTAC
Minimum Efficiency Rating
EER = 10.9 - (0.213 x Cap/1000)
EER = 7.7
Measure Cost
The incremental measure cost for all retrofit units is $144 per ton of cooling capacity. For all
new construction units, the incremental measure cost is $34 per ton of cooling.
5-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
6
6. LIGHTING MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL
6.1
Semi-Custom Lighting and Lighting Control Measures
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Lighting retrofits, lighting controls, lighting fixture replacements, and new lighting
fixtures
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
Covers measures not specified as a UES lighting measure; however, UES measures
with project-specific parameters are eligible under this measure
Savings type
Semi-custom
Unit energy savings
Project-specific savings are calculated using the TRM400 energy savings calculator.
The calculator can also be used to develop program-specific unit energy savings
estimates for common lighting measure retrofits
Measure cost
Project-specific costs are used to determine cost-effectiveness
EUL
1.
2.
Rated lamp life divided by default annual operating hours for each building type
1
8 years for lighting controls
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1.
2.
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Either the code minimum lighting power density requirement or preexisting light
fixture power
Efficient case description
Retrofitted fixtures, replacement fixtures, newly installed fixtures, or newly installed
lighting controls
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
Savings can be estimated using the lighting savings calculator, an Excel 2010
spreadsheet model for estimating energy savings.
The TRM400 energy savings calculator for nonresidential lighting is intended for use
by utility program administrators and covers all lighting measure types. Savings
calculation formulas and methodologies are fully documented in the calculator. The
calculator can be converted into a lighting rebate calculator for use by program
participants by adding the applicable lighting incentive rates.
Peak demand reduction
Default CDF factors are used to estimate peak demand reduction.
Key Parameters
The TRM savings calculator allows the use of either default operating hours by building type or manual input of
operating hours based on building operator interviews or field-measured data.
2
1. Lighting control savings factors are primarily based on studies with measured field data. However, given the
large variability in control savings, project-specific measured data may be preferred over the default values. In
addition, 2013 Title 24 requires controls for many end-use space types. Where applicable, the lighting calculator
includes code-required controls in the measure baseline.
2. Space end-use types are used to determine default operating hours. Where code baseline requirements will be
applied, the space end-use type also determines the lighting power allowance used in determining the space
baseline lighting power.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
6-1
Section 6
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Confirm that the existing fixture quantity, fixture type, location/end-use type, and control type are correctly
entered into the calculator.
The retrofit and replacement fixture type selected in the calculator should be verified as an appropriate
replacement for the existing fixture.
Lighting operating hours should be verified through operator interviews or field measurement.
New lighting controls installed should be verified to be applicable to the space where they are applied.
New lighting controls installed should be commissioned to ensure they are properly functioning.
Important Notes
2013 Title 24 requirements (effective July 1, 2014) are more complex and stringent than current code. The calculator
is capable of assisting with determining code applicability to fixture replacement baseline conditions
1DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2LBNL–
6.1.1
A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings, 2011
Lighting Control Default Savings Factor Table
The savings calculator is capable of estimating savings from the installation of lighting controls.
Users may input savings factors based on project-specific measured data, or select the
appropriate default savings factor. Controls savings are determined by multiplying the lighting
operating hours by the default control savings factor.
Occupancy Sensor,
Wall- or Ceiling1
Mounted
Daylight Sensor
Combined
Occupancy &
1
Daylight Sensors
Assembly
36%
36%
40%
Break room
20%
20%
40%
Classroom
18%
29%
34%
Computer room
35%
N/A
34%
Conference room
35%
18%
40%
Dining
35%
18%
40%
Gymnasium
35%
35%
40%
Hallway
15%
15%
N/A
Hospital room
45%
N/A
N/A
Industrial
45%
N/A
N/A
Kitchen
30%
N/A
N/A
Library
15%
18%
34%
Lobby
25%
18%
40%
Lodging (guest rooms)
45%
N/A
40%
Open office
22%
27%
40%
Parking garage
15%
18%
40%
Private office
22%
27%
40%
Process
45%
N/A
40%
Public assembly
36%
36%
40%
Space Type
6-2
ers
1
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Section 6
Occupancy Sensor,
Wall- or Ceiling1
Mounted
Daylight Sensor
Combined
Occupancy &
1
Daylight Sensors
Restroom
40%
N/A
40%
Retail
15%
29%
34%
Stairs
25%
N/A
N/A
Storage
45%
N/A
40%
Technical area
35%
18%
40%
Warehouses
31%
28%
40%
Other
7%
18%
34%
Space Type
1
1
Data sources for lighting savings factors:
a.
b.
c.
LBNL – A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings, 2011
CA IOU SPC Manual
Efficiency Maine TRM
After July 1, 2014, the 2013 Title 24 code (when applicable) requires occupancy sensor controls
for several space end-use types. In these circumstances, the occupancy control savings factor is
included in the baseline energy use calculation.
Daylight controls may also be applicable to a space if the lighting power exceeds a certain
threshold. However, actual application of daylight controls is determined through space
daylight zone analysis. If this analysis indicates that fixture daylight control is required, the
daylight sensor savings factor should be applied to the preexisting (baseline) conditions.
6.2
Reduced Wattage Lamp and Ballast
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Install 4-foot reduced wattage T8 lamp & ballast system in existing fluorescent fixture
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table for average savings by climate zone. See TRM102 spreadsheet
for energy savings by each building type in each climate zone
Measure cost
$21.13 per installed lamp, based on weighted average cost for various fixture configurations
EUL
See Energy Savings Table. The full range of EUL values (5–15 years) can be found in the
TRM spreadsheet. EUL is the rated lamp life divided by default annual operating hours for
each building type)
For replacement of T12 or first generation T8 lamps and ballasts
Not applicable for a lamp-only retrofit
Savings are applicable for retrofits exempt from 2013 Title 24 requirements
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions, code
Baseline description
First-generation, 4-foot T8 lamps with normal light output ballasts
Efficient case description
1.
2.
Savings Estimation TRM
2
CEE reduced wattage system, consisting of a 4-foot, 25 W, or 28 W reduced wattage
T8 lamp with high efficiency ballast.
32 W high performance T8 lamp with high efficiency ballast that achieves the same or
greater levels of efficiency than a reduced wattage lamp and ballast system
ers
6-3
Section 6
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
kW avg =
hrs =
IE =
IEd =
CDF=
ℎ =  (ℎ)()
 =  ()( )
Weighted average demand reduction for a range of fixtures
3
Default operating hours by building type
3
HVAC interactive effects, energy
3
HVAC interactive effects, demand
3
Coincident demand factor
Key Parameters
Operating hours
3
Default operating hours by building type are used in the savings estimates .
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
Verify that new lamp and ballast is listed on CEE qualified products list.
Verify that ballast efficacy factor (BEF) for new lighting system meets CEE specifications for ballast performance
characteristics.
Important Notes
1.
2.
Savings for interior fixtures by building type include climate-specific HVAC interactive effects.
Savings do not include the project-specific effects associated with the 2013 Title 24 requirements. If code
requirements apply, the lighting savings calculator can be used to estimate savings for reduced wattage lamp and
ballast retrofits.
1
Variety of sources were used to derive costs – See TRM reduced wattage lamp and ballast spreadsheet
2
Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) High Performance and Reduced Wattage T8 Specifications
http://www.cee1.org/com/com-lt/com-lt-main.php3
3
Operating hours, peak coincident demand factors, and HVAC interactive effects from DEER 2011
6.2.1
Energy Savings Table
The following table provides the average annual energy savings per lamp and measure life
values for all building types. Refer to the TRM102 reduced wattage lamp and ballast
spreadsheet for savings, demand reduction, and measure life values for each building type. The
TRM spreadsheet provides building type values based on the specific climate zone selected.
6-4
Climate Zone
Energy Savings
(kWh/yr)
EUL (Years)
2
3
4
16
16
16
8
8
8
5
16
8
8
17
8
9
17
8
10
17
8
11
16
8
12
16
8
14
17
8
15
16
18
15
8
8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
6.3
Section 6
De-Lamp Fluorescent Fixture
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Permanent removal of fluorescent lamp and lamp holder in existing fluorescent fixture
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
Applicable for removal of T12 or first generation T8 lamps
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See TRM103 spreadsheet. Savings vary depending on lamp length, building type,
and climate zone.
Measure cost
$9.56 per removed lamp for all lamp lengths
EUL
Range of 10–15 years (rated ballast life divided by annual operating hours for each
building type)
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions, code
Baseline description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Efficient case description
Lamp and lamp holder permanently removed or disabled, resulting in fixture with
fewer lamps than preexisting conditions.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
kW =
hrs =
IE =
IEd =
CDF=
Key Parameters
Operating hours
First generation T8 lamp with normal output ballast
4-foot lamp: T8, nominal wattage 32 W lamp (actual wattage 28 W)
2-foot lamp: T8, nominal wattage 17 W lamp (actual wattage 16 W)
3-foot lamp: T8, nominal wattage 25 W lamp (actual wattage 22 W)
8-foot lamp: T8, nominal wattage 59 W lamp (actual wattage 55 W)
ℎ = (ℎ)()
 = ()( )
Removed lamp wattage
2
Default operating hours by building type
2
HVAC interactive effects(varies by climate zone), energy
HVAC interactive effects (varies by climate zone), demand
2
Coincident demand factor, varies by climate zone
2
Default operating hours by building type are used in the savings analysis
2
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that lamps and lamp holders are permanently removed or otherwise permanently disabled.
Important Notes
Savings account for HVAC interactive effects
1
Based on time required to remove a lamp and lamp holder from fixture as part of a fixture lamp and ballast retrofit. Derived from
U.S. DOE and lighting contractor interviews.
2
Operating hours, peak coincident demand factors, and HVAC interactive effects from DEER 2013
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
6-5
Section 6
6.4
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
LED Lighting
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency LED lamps and fixtures
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See savings summary table in the TRM104 spreadsheet. Savings are available for
fifteen retrofit measures:
1. LED parking lot fixture (existing W<250)
2. LED parking lot fixture (existing W≥250)
3. LED wall pack (existing W<250)
4. LED wall pack (existing W≥250)
5. LED parking garage fixture (existing W<250)
6. LED parking garage fixture (existing W≥250)
7. LED fuel pump canopy fixture (existing W<250)
8. LED fuel pump canopy fixture (existing W≥250)
9. LED outdoor pole decorative fixture (existing W<250)
10. LED outdoor pole decorative fixture (existing W≥250)
11. LED down light fixture, 9–15 W, interior, replacing incandescent
12. LED down light fixture, 9–15 W, interior, replacing (2) 26 W CFL
13. LED down light, screw-in lamp, 1–3 W, interior
14. LED down light, screw-in lamp, 4–20 W, interior
15. LED MR16, pin-based lamp, interior
Savings vary by fixture or lamp size, building type, and climate zone. With 125
measures available for each climate zone, there are more than 1,500 savings
estimates provided.
Measure cost
See TRM104 spreadsheet
EUL
Range of 5–15 years (rated fixture or lamp life divided by annual operating hours for
each building type)
ENERGY STAR and DesignLights Consortium qualified LED lamps and fixtures
For fixture replacements, savings are applicable for retrofits exempt from 2013
Title 24 requirements. For screw-based lamp replacements, 2013 Title 24
requirements do not apply.
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
The baselines are based on typical existing fixtures and lamps.
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR and DesignLights Consortium qualified LED lamps and fixtures
1
2
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
ℎ =  (ℎ)()
 =  ()( )
No peak demand reduction for exterior fixtures
Definitions
 =
hrs =
IE =
IEd =
CDF=
6-6
Average kW reduction of typical retrofits
Default operating hours by building type
3
3
HVAC interactive effects (varies by climate zone), energy
HVAC interactive effects(varies by climate zone), demand
Coincident demand factor, varies by climate zone
ers
3
3
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Section 6
Key Parameters
3
Operating hours
Default hours by building type used in savings estimate
Assumed wattage reduction
Based on typical LED replacement wattages for existing fixtures and lamps
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that new fixture or lamp is listed on ENERGY STAR or DesignLights Consortium qualified products list.
Important Notes
1.
2.
Savings for interior fixtures includes HVAC interactive effects.
Savings do not include the project-specific effects associated with the 2013 Title 24 requirements. If code
requirements apply, the TRM lighting savings calculator can be used to estimate savings.
1
ENERGY STAR lists qualified LED fixtures and qualified screw-in LED lamps:
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductGroup&pgw_code=LU
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductGroup&pgw_code=LB
DesignLights Consortium Qualified Products List: http://www.designlights.org/
2
3
Operating hours, peak coincident demand factors, and HVAC interactive effects from DEER 2013
6.5
LED Refrigerated Display Case Lighting
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of an existing fluorescent lighting with LED lighting in refrigerated
display cases.
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
Refrigerated display lighting retrofit. Also applicable to display lighting in walk-in
coolers.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
299‒1,364 kWh per fixture. See Energy Savings and Cost Table.
Measure cost
$144‒$195 . See Energy Savings and Cost Table.
Effective useful life (EUL)
16 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
1.
2.
3.
Efficient case description
LED lighting and LED lighting with occupancy sensor
Savings Estimation TRM
For 5-foot fixtures, T8HO lamp
For 6-foot fixtures, T12HO lamp
For all other lengths, T8HO lamp
ers
6-7
Section 6
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
kW =
hrs =
IE =
IEd =
CDF=
OS =
%P =
ℎ = (ℎ)()()(%). See TRM105 LED refrigerated case lighting
spreadsheet for full calculation details.
 = ()( )
Baseline fixture wattage (kW) – Installed fixture wattage (kW)
Default grocery store operating hours (4,910)
2
Refrigeration interactive effects, energy (1.59)
2
Refrigeration interactive effects, demand (1.29)
Coincident demand factor (0.56)
2
2
3
Occupancy sensor operating hour reduction factor (35%)
LED lighting power in occupied (100%) and unoccupied (0%, 20%, & 40%) mode
Key Parameters
Length of light fixture, vertical or horizontal orientation, occupancy sensor control,
existing fixture number of lamps, and occupancy sensor control strategy
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Verify existing lamp type, length, and location.
Manufacturer specifications sheets should be obtained for verification of fixture power and efficacy.
Occupancy sensors should be commissioned to ensure proper operation.
Important Notes
For accurate project-specific savings estimates, use the TRM400 lighting savings calculator.
1PG&E
work paper, LED Refrigeration Case Lighting with Occupancy Sensors, June 2012.
2Operating
hours, peak coincident demand factors, and HVAC interactive effects from DEER 2013
3Occupancy
sensor operating hour reduction factor based on PNNL study (Demonstration Assessment of LED Freezer Case
Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, October 2009)
6.5.1
Energy Savings and Cost Table ‒ LED Display Case Lighting
This table provides the cost and savings data for LED display case lighting.
Cost
Units
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 5 ft, center & end mount,
replacing single lamp fixture
$144
Fixture
0.044
299
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 5 ft, center & end mount,
replacing multi-lamp lamp fixture
$144
Fixture
0.089
649
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 6 ft, center & end mount,
replacing single lamp fixture
$173
Fixture
0.100
720
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 6 ft, center & end mount,
replacing multi-lamp lamp fixture
$173
Fixture
0.175
1,304
LED refrigerator display case lighting, all other lengths,
horizontal and vertical mount, replacing single and multi-lamp
fixture
$29
Linear feet
of fixture
0.011
73.9
6-8
ers
Peak kW
Annual
kWh
Measure Name
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
6.5.2
Section 6
Energy Savings and Cost Table ‒ LED Display Case Lighting with Occupancy
Sensor
This table provides the cost and savings values for LED display case lighting controlled by
occupancy sensors.
Cost
Units
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 5 ft, center & end
mount, replacing single-lamp fixture ‒ with occupancy sensor
$162
Fixture
0.044
340
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 5 ft, center & end
mount, replacing multi-lamp lamp fixture ‒ with occupancy
sensor
$162
Fixture
0.089
690
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 6 ft, center & end
mount, replacing single-lamp fixture ‒ with occupancy sensor
$195
Fixture
0.100
780
LED refrigerator display case lighting, 6 ft, center & end
mount, replacing multi-lamp lamp fixture ‒ with occupancy
sensor
$195
Fixture
0.176
1,364
LED refrigerator display case lighting, all other lengths,
horizontal and vertical mount, replacing single- and multi-lamp
fixtures ‒ with occupancy sensor
$32
Linear feet
of fixture
0.011
78.2
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
Peak kW
Annual
kWh
Measure Name
6-9
Section 6
6.6
Lighting Measures – Nonresidential
Bi-Level Lighting Fixture – Stairwells, Hallways, and Garages
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Automated bi-level lighting fixture with integrated motion sensors installed in a
stairwell, garage, or hallway. The fixture provides lower levels of lighting during
unoccupied periods. Fixtures have fail-safe operation with minimum 15-minute
timer duration.
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
248 kWh per fixture
Measure cost
$229 per fixture
EUL
8 years
Fixtures with integrated occupancy sensors with fail-safe feature.
Fixtures operate at low light levels during unoccupied periods.
Low light fixture power is a maximum of 35% of full fixture power.
Low lighting levels must meet life safety code requirements.
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Two-lamp, T8 fixture with no occupancy sensor
Efficient case description
Two-lamp T8 bi-level fixtures with integrated sensor, 62 W at full fixture power, 18 W
at low fixture power
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
formula
IOU work paper savings analysis assumes the fixture operates 8,760 hours and 69%
of the time at low fixture power.
Peak demand reduction
0.002 kW
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Low fixture power lighting levels should meet life safety code requirements.
Important Notes
Savings for this measure are limited to applications where the 2013 Title 24 code requirements do not apply.
1PG&E
6-10
work paper, PGECOLT101, Revision 3, 6/18/2012
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
7
7. REFRIGERATION MEASURES – NONRESIDENTIAL
7.1
Commercial Ice Machines
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency ice machine generating small ice cubes (2 oz or
smaller).
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
1. Applicable to air-cooled batch machines (self-contained, icemaker heads, or
remote condensing).
2. Equipment is listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance
List or listed as ENERGY STAR-qualified.
3. Machines make ice cubes (2 oz or smaller) flaked, crushed, or fragmented ice.
4. Machine performance is tested using ARI Standard 810.
5. Remote machines are used with qualifying remote condenser or remote
condenser/compressor unit.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
(Ice harvest rate) – (savings)
101–300 lbs/day – 805 kWh/yr
301–500 lbs/day – 1,117 kWh/yr
501–1000 lbs/day – 1,807 kWh/yr
1001–1500 lbs/day – 2,601 kWh/yr
1
>1500 lbs/day – 3,641 kWh/yr
1
1
Measure cost
EUL
101–300 lbs/day – $306
301–500 lbs/day – $266
501–1000 lbs/day – $249
1001–1500 lbs/day – $589
>1500 lbs/day – $939
10 years
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Natural replacement – code
Applicable baseline types
Baseline description
Efficient case description
Minimum efficiency units compliant with California Appliance Standards (Title 20)
ENERGY STAR or FSTC qualified high-efficiency units
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
7-1
Section 7
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
1.
2.
3.
Unit capacity is assumed to be the midpoint of the capacity bin.
Annual ice production (Prod) = .75 × Rated daily capacity × 365 days
3
Baseline efficiency (BE) = Title 20 minimum efficiency
4.
5.
Installed efficiency (IE) = Value from PG&E work paper
Annual savings (kWh/yr) = [Prod (lbs/yr)/BE(kWh/lbs)] – [Prod (lbs/yr)/IE (kWh/lbs)]
1
ARI Standard 810 provides the assumed standard operating conditions of the machines
during the demand period. A coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as per DEER methodology.
101–300 lbs/day – 0.092 kW
301–500 lbs/day – 0.115 kW
501–1000 lbs/day – 0.186 kW
1001–1500 lbs/day – 0.267 kW
>1500 lbs/day – 0.374 kW
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List and/or meet ENERGY
4
STAR Version 2.0 (2013) requirements .
Important Notes
The ENERGY STAR calculator may also be used to develop custom measure savings estimates for ice machines..
1
PG&E work paper PGECOFST108, “Commercial Ice Machines,” Revision 3, 5/30/2012
2
DEER 2011 Version 2011.4.01
3
2007 California Energy Commission (CEC) Title 20 Appliance Efficiency Regulations, CEC 400-2007-016, p. 112
4
ENERGY STAR Commercial Ice Makers Specification V2.0, in effect on February 1, 2013
7.2
Commercial Solid Door & Glass Door Refrigerators
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Self-contained energy efficient commercial reach-in solid and glass door refrigerators
and freezers.
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
1.
2.
For self-contained refrigeration units ‒ not applicable to refrigerators with remote
condensing units
Equipment is listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance
List ‒ all units listed meet the ENERGY STAR 2.0 Commercial Refrigerators and
Freezers Program requirements
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table – Varies based on unit type and size.
Measure cost
See Cost Table – Varies based on unit type and size.
EUL
12 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Minimum efficiency units compliant with California Appliance Efficiency Standards
2
(Title 20)
Efficient case description
High efficiency units listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying
Appliance List and meeting ENERGY STAR 2.0 Commercial Refrigerators and
Freezers Program requirements
Savings Calculation
7-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Section 7
Annual energy savings
formula
California 2012 Appliance Standards and ENERGY STAR 2.0 standards have a
series of formulas that define the maximum daily rated energy use of a refrigerators
and freezers with solid and glass doors. These formulas are used to find the daily
energy usage of the baseline and proposed units. Units are assumed to operate
3
8,760 hours per year.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout any 24-hour period. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 8,760 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
N/A
1
DEER 2011 Version 2011.4.01
2
3
2012 California Appliance Standards (Title 20)
PG&E work paper, PGECOFST123, “Reach-In Refrigerators and Freezers – Commercial,” Revision 0, 6/8/2012
7.2.1
Energy Savings Table
This table provides the ranges of savings values for each refrigerator & freezer type for a variety
of sizes and door styles.
Unit Volume (Cu ft)
Refrigerator savings
(kWh/yr)
Freezer savings
(kWh/yr)
7.2.2
Door Type
< 15
15–29
29–49
>49
Solid door
270
493
854
1,279
Glass door
723
661
773
934
Solid door
595
869
2,074
4,552
Glass door
1,693
2,010
4,599
8,103
Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure cost.
Unit Volume (Cu ft)
Refrigerator incremental
cost ($)
Freezer incremental
cost ($)
Savings Estimation TRM
Door Type
Solid door
< 15
$961
15–29
$1,241
29–49
$1,732
>49
$2,396
Glass door
$91
$760
$947
$1,363
Solid door
$227
$1,200
$1,370
$1,732
Glass door
$22
$109
$189
$791
ers
7-3
Section 7
7.3
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
EC Motor for Cold Storage Evaporator Fans
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of an existing standard efficiency shaded-pole evaporator fan motor
with an electronically commutated motor (EC motor) of the same size for evaporator
fans in walk-in coolers and freezers
End use
Refrigeration – all climate zones
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
This measure is valid only as a retrofit; EC motors are required by the California
2012 Appliance Standards for all new installations.
Applicable for replacing a shaded-pole motor.
Not applicable for replacement of a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor.
Savings are approximately 50% less if a PSC motor is replaced.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Savings are based on motor size and are per motor
1. 16 W ‒ 408 kWh
2. 1/15 hp and 1/20 hp ‒ 1,064 kWh
3. 1/5 hp ‒ 1,409 kWh
4. 1/3 hp ‒ 1,994 kWh
5. 1/2 hp ‒ 2,558 kWh
6. 3/4 hp ‒ 2,782 kWh
Measure cost
$231 per motor
EUL
15 years
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Shaded-pole evaporator fan motor in walk-in cooler or freezer
Efficient case description
High efficiency EC motor; electrical motor efficiency of at least 66%
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
1
Savings obtained from IOU work paper and are based on the following data and
assumptions:
1. Motor wattages: baseline and replacement motors
SHP Motor
Wattage
92
EC Motor
Wattage
48
1/15 or 1/20 hp
186
72
1/5 hp
361
210
1/3 hp
563
349
1/2 hp
799
524
3/4 hp
1,087
788
Motor Specification
16 W
Peak demand reduction
7-4
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
16 W ‒ 0.047kW
1/15 hp and 1/20 hp ‒ 0.0121 kW
1/5 hp ‒ 0.161 kW
1/3 hp ‒ 0.228 kW
1/2 hp ‒ 0.292 kW
3/4 hp ‒ 0.318 kW
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Section 7
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify EC motor size and efficiency and verify that motor being replaced is shaded pole and not permanent-split
capacitor.
Important Notes
The original analysis indicates that additional research is needed regarding refrigeration load energy savings
associated with this measure.
1PG&E
7.4
work paper PGE3PREF123,“ECM for Walk-In Evaporator Fan”, 6/20/2012
Refrigerated Display Case EC Motor Retrofit
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
End use
Project eligibility
Savings type
Unit energy savings
Replacement of an existing standard efficiency shaded-pole evaporator fan motor
with an EC motor in a refrigerated display case.
Refrigeration ‒ all climate zones
For replacement of shaded-pole motors only. Does not apply to replacement of
permanent split capacitor fan motors.
UES
1
705 kWh per motor
1
Incremental measure cost
$169
EUL
15 years
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Shaded-pole display case evaporator fan motor with no controls. EC display case
motors are not governed by state or federal standards.
High efficiency EC motor with a minimum efficiency of 66%.
Efficient case description
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1
See TRM109 spreadsheet. Savings analysis is from IOU work paper. Savings
values are the average of all available climate zones. Savings differ slightly by
climate zone and building vintage. However, the difference is negligible.
Assumptions for display case motor distribution:
a.
b.
c.
9% 9 W motors
49% 19.5 W motors
42% 37 W motors
Assumptions for direct energy savings:
a.
b.
c.
Baseline shaded-pole motor efficiency of 26%
Installed EC motor efficiency of 66%
Baseline on evaporator fan motors operating 8,760 hours per year
Assumptions for indirect refrigeration savings:
a.
Refrigeration equivalent full load hours (EFLH) were determined using
DOE 2.2R models
Refrigeration system efficiency (EER) = 9.36
b.
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
Savings Estimation TRM
0.073 kW
N/A
1
ers
7-5
Section 7
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that EC motor efficiency is 66% or greater and verify that motor being replaced is shaded pole and not part
permanent-split capacitor.
Important Notes
N/A
1 PG&E work paper, PGE3PREF124-R1, “Display Case ECM Motor Retrofit,” June 14, 2012
2 DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
7.5
EC Motor with Fan Cycling Controls for Cold Storage Evaporator Fans
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of an existing shaded-pole evaporator fan motor with an EC motor
with fan cycling controls for a walk-in cooler.
End use
Refrigeration-all climate zones
Project eligibility
Minimum EC motor efficiency of 66% with a fan cycling controller
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Savings Table. All savings are per motor.
Incremental measure cost
$468 per motor
EUL
15 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Efficient case description
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
Shaded-pole evaporator fan motor, 8,760 hour operation
High efficiency EC motor with controller integrated into the compressor controller,
which reduces fan speed when refrigerant is not flowing to the evaporator coils.
2
See TRM108 spreadsheet. Savings analysis is from IOU work paper. Savings
values are the average of all available climate zones. Savings differ slightly by
climate zone. However, the difference is negligible.
Assumptions for direct energy savings:
a. Baseline shaded-pole motor efficiency of 26%
b. Installed EC motor efficiency of 66%
c. 8,760 hours – baseline operation
d. Installed EC motors reduced to 75% speed when compressors cycle off
e. Compressors assumed cycle off 4,380 hours
Assumptions for indirect refrigeration savings:
a. Refrigeration EFLH from custom DOE 2.2R model.
b. Refrigeration system efficiency (EER) = 6.29
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
N/A
16 W motor & controller – 0.071 kW
1/15 hp or 1/20 hp motor & controller – 0.157 kW
1/5 hp motor & controller – 0.266 kW
1/3 hp motor & controller – 0.402 kW
1/2 hp motor & controller – 0.553 kW
3/4 hp motor & controller – 0.711 kW
Key Parameters
N/A
7-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Section 7
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Verify that EC motor efficiency is 66% or greater
2. Verify that motor being replaced is shaded pole and not part permanent-split capacitor.
3. Confirm the fan speed is reduced when refrigerant compressor cycles off.
Important Notes
3
EC motors are required by code for new walk-in coolers or new fan coil installations. Therefore, the savings related
to the installation of an EC motor are not applicable for new construction or major renovation projects.
1
Work Paper PGE3PREF126, “ECM for Walk-In Evaporator with Fan Controller,” June 20,2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
3
2012 California Appliance Efficiency Standards (Title 20)
7.5.1
Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings for each motor size and the percent savings attributable
to the fan controller.
Demand
Reduction (kW)
Energy
Savings
(kWh)
Controller
Savings
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 16 W
0.071
620
34.2%
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 1/15 hp + 1/20 hp
0.157
1,379
22.9%
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 1/5 hp
0.266
2,329
39.5%
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 1/3 hp
0.402
3,518
43.3%
Measure Description
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 1/2 hp
0.553
4,841
47.2%
ECM for walk-in evaporator fan with controller – 3/4 hp
0.711
6,226
55.3%
7.6
Strip Curtain Infiltration Barrier for Refrigerated Space
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of new strip curtains in doorways of walk-in coolers & freezers
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
Installation of new strip curtains in existing doorways without an infiltration barrier or
replacement of a failed strip curtain older than 4 years. Not applicable for newly
constructed cold storage.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See energy savings table . Savings provided by end-use type (restaurant and
grocery store). Units are kWh per sq ft of door opening
Measure cost
$10.22 per sq ft of door opening
EUL
4 years
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ preexisting conditions
Baseline description
1.
2.
Efficient case description
Savings Estimation TRM
Existing doorway between refrigerated and non-refrigerated spaces without an
infiltration barrier.
Code baseline applies to newly constructed cold storage areas. Since current
code requires an infiltration barrier be installed, measure savings are not
2
applicable to new construction .
New strip curtains
ers
7-7
Section 7
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
IOU work paper . Savings are based on grocery and restaurant installations;
however, savings may be used for strip curtain installations in refrigerated doorways
in any end-use space.
Peak demand savings
See energy savings table
Key Parameters
Strip curtain effectiveness
Install ratio
Doorway usage
= Average preexisting infiltration effectiveness: 40%. post-retrofit: 92%
= 80% installed in refrigerated doorways and 20% in freezer doorways
= Assumes 108 doorway openings per day
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Ensure that strip curtains are properly installed.
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work paper, PGECOREF 103, “Strip Curtains, Revision 4,” May 25, 2012
2
2012 Title 20 Appliance Efficiency Standards provide requirements for walk-in cold storage areas less than 3,000 sq ft, 2013 Title
24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards provide mandatory requirements for cold storage equal to or greater than 3,000 sq ft.
7.6.1
Energy Savings Table – Restaurant
The following table provides energy savings and demand reduction for strip curtains per
square foot of door opening.
By Storage Type
Walk-In Coolers
Climate
Zone
Demand
Reduction
Energy
Savings
2
0.009455
118
3
0.008138
4
Weighted Savings
Walk-In Freezers
Demand
Reduction
80% Cooler, 20% Freezer
Energy
Savings
Demand
Reduction kW
Energy
Savings kWh
0.027327
336
0.013
162
106
0.023354
302
0.011
145
0.007967
107
0.022823
304
0.011
146
5
0.007171
97
0.020319
273
0.010
132
8
0.008138
111
0.023354
315
0.011
152
9
0.009056
119
0.026149
341
0.012
163
10
0.010313
131
0.029774
374
0.014
180
11
0.011259
136
0.032315
386
0.015
186
12
0.010313
128
0.029774
366
0.014
176
14
0.012302
150
0.03491
426
0.017
205
15
0.013153
175
0.036853
495
0.018
239
16
0.008138
99
0.023354
282
0.011
136
7.6.2
Energy Savings Table – Grocery
The following table provides energy savings and demand reduction for strip curtains per
square foot of door opening.
7-8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Section 7
By Storage Type
Walk-in Coolers
7.7
Weighted Savings
Walk-in Freezers
80% Cooler, 20% Freezer
Climate
Zone
Demand
Reduction
Energy
Savings
Demand
Reduction
Energy
Savings
Demand
Reduction kW
Energy
Savings kWh
2
0.002899
91
0.018733
307
0.006
134
3
0.004114
82
0.015448
273
0.006
120
4
0.004014
82
0.015021
274
0.006
120
5
0.003552
74
0.013044
244
0.005
108
8
0.004114
85
0.015448
285
0.006
125
9
0.004659
92
0.017742
310
0.007
136
10
0.005421
102
0.020834
344
0.009
150
11
0.006004
106
0.023086
358
0.009
156
12
0.005421
100
0.020834
337
0.009
147
14
0.006657
118
0.025468
397
0.010
174
15
0.007197
138
0.027323
464
0.011
203
16
0.004114
76
0.015448
255
0.006
112
Refrigerated Display Case with Doors
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of vertical low-temperature (LT) and medium-temperature (MT)
refrigerated display cases without doors with new display cases with doors.
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table
Measure cost
MT: $575 per linear foot of case
LT: $493 per linear foot of case
EUL
12 years
New units replace multi-deck display cases without doors.
New display case consists of standard glass doors, EC evaporative fan motors,
and T8 lamps.
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Existing refrigerated display case with no doors
Efficient case description
New refrigerated display case with doors, EC evaporative fan motors, and T8 lamps
with electronic ballast
Savings Calculation
2
Annual energy savings
IOU work paper . Savings are based on grocery store building energy simulations.
Peak demand reduction
MT: 0.004 – 0.094 kW
LT: 0.075 – 0.149 kW
Key Parameters
Refrigeration systems
Building type
Savings Estimation TRM
= Multiplex-compressors
= Grocery store with space cooling and natural gas heating
ers
7-9
Section 7
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2PG&E
7.7.1
work paper, “New Display Cases with Doors,” Revision 4, May 11, 2012
Energy Savings Table
The following table provides energy savings and demand reduction for medium and low
temperature display cases with doors.
Medium Temperature
7-10
Low Temperature
Climate
Zone
Demand
Reduction
(kW)
Energy
Savings
(kWh)
Therm
Savings
Demand
Reduction
(kW)
Energy
Savings
(kWh)
Therm
Savings
2
0.049
143
26
0.075
993
42
3
0.024
143
30
0.075
978
50
4
0.089
135
24
0.080
942
42
5
0.020
136
29
0.121
965
49
8
0.012
103
18
0.089
928
39
9
0.094
110
18
0.079
939
38
10
0.073
118
18
0.085
922
35
11
0.046
170
22
0.090
1,031
37
12
0.065
140
23
0.083
968
39
14
0.047
210
20
0.123
1,040
34
15
0.004
76
12
0.149
1,123
24
16
0.019
169
27
0.096
936
43
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
7.8
Section 7
Auto-Closers for Main Cooler or Freezer Doors
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a door auto-closer on the main door of a walk-in cooler or freezer.
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
Only applicable as a retrofit for walk-ins built before 2006 without door auto-closers.
Not applicable for a replacement for a failed auto-closer. Not applicable for reach-in
doors.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Auto-closer for walk-in cooler ‒ 979 kWh average for all climate zones. See Energy
Savings Table for values by climate zone
Auto-closer for walk-in freezer ‒ 2,421 kWh average
Measure cost
$157 per auto-closer
EUL
8 years
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ preexisting conditions
For walk-ins built after 2006, the baseline is natural replacement ‒ code. California
Appliance Efficiency Standards (Title 20) require auto-closers after 2006.
Baseline description
Main walk-in door of walk-in cooler or freezer without an existing auto-closer.
Efficient case description
Auto-closer installed on walk-in door.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
DEER 2005, IOU work paper
Peak demand reduction
0 kW
1
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1PG&E
work paper, PGECOREF110, “Auto-Closers for Main Doors,” Revision 3, May 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
7-11
Section 7
7.8.1
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction for each climate zone.
Cooler Door
7.9
Freezer Door
Climate
Zone
Demand
Reduction
Energy
Savings
Demand
Reduction
Energy
Savings
2
0.162
980
0.452
2,450
3
0.127
958
0.296
2,394
4
0.143
981
0.363
2,365
5
0.165
961
0.192
2,378
8
0.108
998
0.280
2,394
9
0.181
1,005
0.422
2,432
10
0.190
1,022
0.326
2,442
11
0.159
1,014
0.363
2,457
12
0.149
998
0.400
2,453
14
0.225
1,000
0.141
2,495
15
0.060
892
0.141
2,409
16
0.149
943
0.326
2,386
Average
0.152
979
0.309
2,421
Anti-Sweat Heater Controls
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of anti-sweat heater (ASH) controller on a low- or medium-temperature
display case with doors. The ASH controller senses the relative humidity of the air
surrounding the display case and reduces or turns off the anti-sweat heaters of the
glass door and/or door frame during periods of low humidity.
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
Applicable to existing refrigerated (cooler and freezer) display cases with
continuously operating anti-sweat heaters where the anti-sweat heater power is:
•
More than 7 watts per square foot of freezer door opening, or
•
More than 3 watts per square foot of cooler door opening
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Savings Table
Measure cost
$48 per linear foot of display case
EUL
12 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ preexisting conditions.
Baseline description
Refrigerated display case with anti-sweat heaters always on with no controller
Efficient case description
Anti-sweat heater controller that cycles off door frame heaters based on the relative
humidity of the surrounding air or the amount of condensation in the inner glass.
Control logic reduces power when relative humidity is 55% or lower and continues to
decrease power as the relative humidity decreases.
7-12
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Refrigeration Measures – Nonresidential
Section 7
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
IOU work paper
Peak demand reduction
See Energy Savings Table
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1SCE
work paper SCE13RN009, “Anti-Sweat Heat (ASH) Controls,” May 2012
7.9.1
Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction for each climate zone.
Savings are normalized per linear foot of refrigerated display case. Savings are provided for
both low temperature and medium temperature display cases.
Low Temperature
Medium Temperature
Climate
Zone
Demand
Reduction
(kW/lf)
Energy
Savings
(kWh/lf)
Demand
Reduction
(kW/lf)
Energy
Savings
(kWh/lf)
2
0.047
673
0.046
374
3
0.017
546
0.049
371
4
0.001
556
0.044
374
5
0.073
552
0.048
372
8
0.034
551
0.043
376
9
0.002
584
0.052
379
10
0.034
631
0.048
376
11
0.050
767
0.049
376
12
0.058
651
0.048
376
14
0.092
936
0.052
376
15
0.014
827
0.044
375
16
0.049
694
0.046
365
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
7-13
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8
8. ALL OTHER NONRESIDENTIAL MEASURES
8.1
Pump and Fan Variable Frequency Drive Control
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Retrofit of a pump or fan system by installing a variable frequency drive (VFD) for
variable load or fixed constant load control.
End use
HVAC, process
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Constant-flow pump or fan serving a variable load.
Oversized constant volume pump or fan serving a constant load.
Variable flow pump or fan controlled inefficiently, such as a poorly functioning inlet
guide vane or a throttling devise (discharge damper, balancing valve).
Not applicable for cooling tower fan control.
Not applicable for systems with high static head. For example:
a. Open-system irrigation water pumps.
b. Water pump lift stations.
c. Poorly designed VAV supply air fan systems with incorrectly positioned static
pressure control sensor.
d. Poorly designed water or air distribution systems with undersized branches or
circuits. These types of systems are often operated with a high static pressure
setting to overcome design deficiencies.
Savings type
Semi-custom
Unit energy savings
Project-specific savings are calculated using the TRM401 energy savings calculator.
Measure cost
Project-specific costs are used to determine cost-effectiveness.
EUL
15 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
1.
2.
Efficient case description
1.
2.
3.
Savings Estimation TRM
Fans – savings calculator selection choices:
a. Constant volume
b. Inlet guide vane, forward curved (FC) fans
c. Inlet guide vane, backward inclined (BI), & airfoil fans
d. Inlet damper box
e. Eddy current drives
f. Outlet damper, FC fans
g. Outlet damper, BI, & airfoil fans
Pumps – calculator selection choices:
h. Mechanical flow control
i. Recirculation
j. Throttle valve
VFDs installed on either a fan or pump system
Variable flow system with pump or fan speed control
VFD replacing a throttling valve to provide constant flow with reduced system pressure
ers
8-1
Section 8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
1.
2.
3.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are project-specific and can be estimated using the TRM401 pump and
fan VFD calculator, an Excel 2010 spreadsheet model for estimating energy
savings.
Fan and pump performance curves used to estimate savings are generic curves
2
developed by BPA and are based on manufacturer performance data.
The VFD calculator allows for either standard load profiles or custom load
profiles developed by the user based on actual operating conditions.
In general, there is no peak demand reduction for this measure. It is possible,
depending upon operating conditions, that there is a 2%–5% demand penalty due
to the efficiency losses associated with the addition of a VFD controller operating at
100% flow.
Key Parameters
Performance curves and
load profiles
For improved accuracy, generic performance curves can be replaced with
performance curves developed using actual manufacturer data. Load profile accuracy
can be improved by trending post-installation fan performance.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Determine design and control mechanism for preexisting fan or pump system.
Determine if load being served is constant or variable.
Determine if the application of VFD control is appropriate (e.g., no high static head or operational performance
issues).
Ensure that the VFD is installed correctly and that pump or fan speed is controlled appropriately.
Important Notes
1.
2.
3.
Installation of VFDs is considered industry standard practice for a majority of applications and is required by
code for a variety of HVAC applications. Savings are applicable only if a VFD would not have been installed
otherwise.
Using measured trend data to estimate and validate energy saving is the most accurate method for estimating
energy savings for fan and pump VFD retrofits. When measured data is unavailable, the VFD calculator will
provide a reasonable estimate of potential energy savings given the project meets the eligibility criteria
previously stated.
The calculator includes a default load profile for a garage fan being controlled by a CO2 sensor, based on
measured field data.
1
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls (VSD Supply Fan Motors, Variable Flow Water Loop – VSD Pump, Variable Air Volume Box,
VSD Fan)
2
Bonneville Power Administration BPA ASD Calculator for Fan & Pump Applications – Summary of information provided in "Flow
Control,” a Westinghouse publication, Bulletin B-851, F/86/Rev–CMS 8121.
8-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.1.1
Section 8
Performance Curve Charts
These charts illustrate the power curves used by the VFD calculator to estimate energy savings.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-3
Section 8
8.2
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Vending Machine Controller
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Occupancy sensor controller installed on refrigerated vending machines for
nonperishable bottled and canned beverages.
End use
Refrigeration, lighting
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1,612 kWh/yr
Measure cost
$215 per unit
EUL
5 years
3.
For controlling refrigerated vending machines
The controller includes a passive infrared occupancy sensor that turns off the
lights and compressor when the area is unoccupied for 15 minutes or longer.
The control logic should periodically power up the machine at 2-hour intervals.
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Vending machine with no controls
Efficient case description
Vending machine with control system installed which completely powers the unit
down when the area is unoccupied for 15 minutes.
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
formula
Energy savings are achieved by reducing the operating hours of the vending
machine by shutting off the compressor and lighting during hours when the
surrounding area of the unit is not occupied. DEER lists a single savings value for all
commercial building types and vintages.
Peak demand reduction
No peak demand reduction is associated with this measure.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units have occupancy sensors correctly installed and calibrated.
Important Notes
N/A
1
2
PG&E work paper, PGECOREF111, “Vending Machine Controller,” Revision 3, 6/8/2012
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
8-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.3
Section 8
Vending Machine Controller ‒ Non-Refrigerated
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of an occupancy sensor controller on a nonperishable snack dispensing
vending machine
End use
Lighting, appliance
Project eligibility
Retrofit ‒ vending machine has a lighted front and/or internal lighting
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
410 kWh
Incremental measure cost
$144
EUL
5 years
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions. There are no applicable federal or state
code requirements.
Baseline description
Existing vending machine with no lighting occupancy sensor control
Efficient case description
Installation of a passive infrared occupancy sensor that turns off the vending machine
lights when the area is unoccupied
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Work paper adjusts DEER 2005 value to account for HVAC interactive effects
Peak demand reduction
No demand savings are associated with this measure.
Definitions
N/A
Key Parameters
Hours of operation
8,760 hours before installation of controller
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Verify that existing lighting is not controlled.
2. Verify that occupancy sensor is located properly,
3. Verify that sensor control is tested and commissioned to function as intended.
Important Notes
N/A
1PG&E
work paper, PGE3PLTG168 Vending Machine Controller – Uncooled R0, June 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-5
Section 8
8.4
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Insulated Holding Cabinets
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
High efficiency ENERGY STAR-compliant half-size and full-size insulated hot food
cabinets ranging in size from 0.3kw to 0.8kW
End use
Appliance - food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Half-size – 1,807 kWh/yr
Full-size – 3,942 kWh/yr
Measure cost
Incremental cost
1
Half-size – $2,336
Full-size – $381
EUL
12 years
Electric hot-food holding cabinets.
Cabinet is fully insulated with solid doors.
Maximum of 20 W per cubic foot per ASTM Standard F2140
Equipment is listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
California Appliance Efficiency Standards (Title 20), which require all new commercial
hot- food holding cabinets to have a maximum normalized idle energy rate of 40 W/ft³
based on ASTM F2140.
Efficient case description
The measure case data was drawn from the CEC Appliance database that met the
specified idle energy rate of 20 W/ft³ or less.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
3
Annual hours of operation = 15 hours/day × 365 days/yr
Typical setpoint temperature = 150ºF
Half-size unit
Size = 10 cu ft
Baseline efficiency = 40 W/ft³
Installed efficiency = 5.7 W/ft³
Full-size unit
Size = 25 cu ft
Baseline efficiency = 40 W/ft³
Installed efficiency = 11.3 W/ft³
Annual savings = (Annual hours) × [(Size) × (Baseline eff) – (Installed eff)]/1000
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 15 hours/day of operation. The
15 hours of operation are all assumed to occur during peak periods. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 5475 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology.
1
Half-size – 0.30 kW
1
Full-size – 0.65 kW
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work paper, PGECOFST105, “Insulated Holding Cabinet – Electric,” Revision 3, 6/8/2012
2 2011
3
DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC) – Qualified Insulated Holding Cabinets
8-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.5
Section 8
Commercial Combination Oven
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Energy-efficient commercial combination oven capable of cooking food in either
convection or steam mode
End use
Appliance – food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Equipment has a tested steam mode cooking energy efficiency of ≥50% and
convection mode cooking energy efficiency of ≥70% utilizing American Society
for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard F2861.
Equipment is listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
3.
<15 pan capacity – 11,497 kWh/yr
15 – 28 pan capacity – 15,074 kWh/yr
>28 pan capacity – 22,009 kWh/yr
Measure cost
1.
2.
3.
<15 pan capacity – $1,568
15 – 28 pan capacity – $1,584
>28 pan capacity – $7,048
EUL
12 years
1
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
There are no applicable Title 20 or Title 24 minimum efficiency standards for
combination ovens. Baseline for this measure was established by the Food Service
Technology Center.
Convection cooking energy efficiency – 65%
Steam cooking energy efficiency – 40%
Efficient case description
Installed energy efficiency minimum efficiency requirements for this measure were
established by the Food Service Technology Center.
Convection cooking energy efficiency – 70%
Steam cooking energy efficiency – 50%
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM106 spreadsheet for assumptions and calculations.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 12 hours/day of operation. The
12 hours of operation are assumed to all occur during peak periods. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 4,380 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology. The original analysis (work paper) did not take into
account the 0.9 coincidence factor.
1
<15 pan capacity – 2.36 kW
15 – 28 pan capacity – 3.10 kW
>28 pan capacity – 4.53 kW
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
N/A
1
2
3
PG&E work paper, PGECOFST100, “Commercial Combination Oven,” Revision 4, 5/31/2012
2011 DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC)
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-7
Section 8
8.6
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Commercial Electric Steam Cooker
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Energy efficient electric steamer
End use
Appliance ‒ food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Electric self-contained unit.
The commercial steam cooker must meet ENERGY STAR specifications for
energy efficiency or must have a tested heavy-load potato cooking energy
efficiency of 50% utilizing ASTM Standard F1484.
Equipment must be listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying
Appliance List.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
All units – 5,431 kWh/yr
Measure cost
All units – $2,132
EUL
12 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
There are no applicable Title 20 or Title 24 minimum efficiency standards for
commercial steamers. Baseline for this measure was established by the Food
Service Technology Center. The measure case data was drawn from the list of
commercial steamers that have been tested by IOU testing laboratories as of April
20, 2012.
Steam cooking energy efficiency is 38%.
Efficient case description
Installed steamers must meet ENERGY STAR specifications or must have a tested
heavy-load potato cooking energy efficiency of 50% utilizing ASTM Standard F1484.
Steam cooking energy efficiency is 68%.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See the TRM106 spreadsheet for assumptions and calculations.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 12 hours/day of operation. The
12 hours of operation are all assumed to occur during peak periods. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 4380 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology. The original analysis ( work paper) did not take into
account the 0.9 coincidence factor.
1
All units – 1.12 kW
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
Baseline energy use used in this savings estimate is lower than what is indicated in the reference work paper (work
paper overestimates annual usage).
1
2
PG&E work paper,PGECOFST100, “Commercial Combination Oven,” Revision 4, 5/31/2012
2011 DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures
3
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC)
8-8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.7
Section 8
Commercial Electric Convection Oven
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Energy efficient electric convection oven
End use
Appliance ‒ food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
3.
Half-size – 2,518 kWh/yr
Full-size – 2,774 kWh/yr
Large full-size – 3613 kWh/yr
Measure cost
1.
2.
3.
Half-size – $793
Full-size – $1,007
Large full-size – $649
EUL
12 years
Electric self-contained unit.
Energy efficiency ≥ 70% per ASTM Standard F1496.
Equipment must be listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying
Appliance List.
1
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
1.
2.
Efficient case description
There are no applicable California Title 20 or Title 24 minimum efficiency
standards for combination ovens. Baseline for this measure was established by
the Food Service Technology Center. The measure case data was drawn from
the list of commercial steamers that have been tested by IOU testing laboratories
as of April 20, 2012.
Performance characteristics for the baseline equipment are listed below in the
savings calculation section.
Installed steamers must meet ENERGY STAR specifications or must meet the
following minimum efficiency requirements:
1. Half-size – ≥70% cooking energy efficiency – ≤1.0 kW idle rate
2. Full-size – ≥70% cooking energy efficiency – ≤1.6 kW idle rate
3. Large full-size – ≥73% cooking energy efficiency – ≤1.9 kW idle rate
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM106 for assumptions and calculations.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 12 hours/day of operation. The
12 hours of operation are assumed all to occur during peak periods. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 4,380 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology.
1
1. Half-size – 0.52 kW
2. Full-size – 0.57 kW
3. Large full-size – 0.75 kW
1
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
N/A
1
2
PG&E work paper, PGECOFST101, “Commercial Convection Oven,” Revision 4, 6/5/2012
2011 DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures
3
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC)
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-9
Section 8
8.8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Commercial Electric Fryer
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Energy efficient electric fryer
End use
Appliance ‒ food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
All units – 3,061 kWh/yr
Measure cost
All units – $769
EUL
12 years
Fryer is an electric self-contained unit.
Energy efficiency ≥ 80% per ASTM Standard F1361
Equipment is be listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying
Appliance List
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
There are no applicable California Title 20 or Title 24 minimum efficiency standards
for fryers. Baseline for this measure was established by the Food Service Technology
Center. The measure case data was drawn from the list of commercial steamers that
have been tested by IOU testing laboratories as of April 20, 2012.
All units
1. Idle energy rate – 1,200 W
2. Cooking energy efficiency – 75%
Efficient case description
Installed fryers must meet the following minimum efficiency requirements:
All units
1. Idle energy rate – 860 W/sq ft/hr
2. Cooking energy efficiency – 85%
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM106 spreadsheet for assumptions and calculations.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 12 hours/day of operation. The
12 hours of operation are assumed all to occur during peak periods. As such, the
annual savings figure is divided by 4380 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as
per the DEER methodology. Original analysis (work paper) did not take into account
the 0.9 coincidence factor.
All units – 0.54 kW
Installed energy use used in these savings estimates is different than that used in
source work paper.
1
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List.
Important Notes
N/A
1
2
PG&E work paper,PGECOFST103, “Commercial Fryer – Electric and Gas,” Revision 4, 6/13/2012
2011 DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures.
3
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC)
8-10
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.9
Section 8
Commercial Electric Griddle
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Energy efficient electric griddle
End use
Appliance ‒ food preparation
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Electric self-contained unit
Meet ENERGY STAR specifications or energy efficiency ≥ 70% per ASTM Standard
F1275
Equipment is listed on Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
All units – 2,663 kWh/yr
Measure cost
All units – $774
EUL
12 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
There are no applicable California Title 20 or Title 24 minimum efficiency standards for
griddles. Baseline for this measure was established by the Food Service Technology
Center. The measure case data was drawn from the list of commercial steamers that
have been tested by IOU testing laboratories as of April 20, 2012.
Efficient case description
All units
Cooking energy efficiency – 60% (ASTM F1275 test)
Installed griddles meets ENERGY STAR specifications or must meet the following
minimum efficiency requirements
All units
Cooking energy efficiency – 75% (ASTM F1275 test)
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM106 spreadsheet for assumptions and calculations.
Peak demand reduction
Savings are assumed to be constant throughout the 12 hours/day of operation. The 12 hours
of operation are assumed to all occur during peak periods. As such the annual savings figure
is divided by 4,380 and a coincidence factor of 0.9 is applied as per the DEER methodology.
The original analysis (work paper) did not take into account the 0.9 coincidence factor.
1
All units – 0.49 kW
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that units are listed on the Food Service Technology Center's Qualifying Appliance List
Important Notes
N/A
1
2
3
PG&E work paper, PGECOFST103, “Commercial Griddle,” Revision 4, 5/2/2012
2011 DEER database shows an EUL of 12 years for all cooking appliance measures.
PG&E Food Service Technology Center (FSTC)
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-11
Section 8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.10 Commercial Dishwasher
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
ENERGY STAR-qualified commercial dishwasher
End use
Appliance ‒ food preparation
Project eligibility
Installation of an ENERGY STAR (specification version 2.0) qualified commercial
dishwasher of the following types: under counter, door-type, single-tank conveyor
and multi-tank conveyor
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table. Savings varies by type of dishwasher, water temperature
and energy source of hot water.
Incremental measure cost
See Cost Table. Incremental cost varies by the type of dishwasher
EUL
10 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ code
Baseline description
Standard efficiency unit
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR 2.0-qualified unit
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
3.
4.
Peak demand reduction
The energy savings were determined using the ENERGY STAR commercial
1
kitchen equipment calculator .
The calculator defaults to 365 days/year operation for all dishwasher types and
assumes an average daily cycle value for each dishwasher type.
o
For low-temperature dishwashers, a 40 F change in temperature is assumed.
o
The change in temperature for a high-temperature dishwasher is 70 F.
The calculator determines the annual water consumption by multiplying the
water used per cycle by the assumed number of cycles per year and multiplying
that product by the amount of energy needed to heat that amount of water to the
required temperature.
N/A ‒ peak savings demand reduction estimate is not available
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the dishwasher meets the ENERGY STAR specifications.
Important Notes
N/A
1
ENERGY STAR commercial kitchen equipment calculator (Nov-2013). Available at: www.energystar.gov.
8.10.1 Energy Savings Table
The table below provides the ranges of savings values for the four types of dishwashers (under
counter, door-type, single-tank conveyor, and multi-tank conveyor) used in buildings with
either gas or electric water heating. The dishwashers with booster heating are also separated by
either gas or electric heating.
8-12
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Section 8
Annual
kWh
Annual
Therms
Water
(Gallons)
Low temp. undercounter, gas heat
N/A
106
14,783
Low temp. undercounter, elec. heat
2,540
N/A
14,783
High temp. undercounter, gas heat, gas booster
1,471
71
6,296
High temp. undercounter, gas heat, electric booster
2,089
45
6,296
High temp. undercounter, electric heat, gas booster
2,553
26
6,296
High temp. undercounter, electric heat, electric booster
3,171
N/A
6,296
N/A
675
94,024
16,153
N/A
94,024
827
461
40,880
High temp. door-type, gas heat, electric booster
4,840
294
40,880
High temp. door-type, electric heat, gas booster
7,850
168
40,880
High temp. door-type, electric heat, electric booster
11,863
N/A
40,880
584
545
75,920
Low temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat
13,626
N/A
75,920
High temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat, gas booster
2,511
280
24,820
High temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat, electric booster
4,948
178
24,820
High temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat, gas booster
6,775
102
24,820
High temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat, electric booster
9,212
N/A
24,820
N/A
786
109,500
Low temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat
18,811
N/A
109,500
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat, gas booster
1,986
1,063
94,170
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat, electric booster
11,230
676
94,170
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat, gas booster
18,163
386
94,170
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat, electric booster
27,408
N/A
94,170
Dishwasher & Fuel Type
Low temp. door-type, gas heat
Low temp. door-type, electric heat
High temp. door-type, gas heat, gas booster
Low temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat
Low temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-13
Section 8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
8.10.2 Measure Cost Table
The cost data below is from the ENERGY STAR calculator.
Measure Name
Cost
Low temp. undercounter, gas heat
$50
Low temp. undercounter, electric heat
$50
High temp. undercounter, gas heat, gas booster
$120
High temp. undercounter, gas heat, electric booster
$120
High temp. undercounter, electric heat, gas booster
$120
High temp. undercounter, electric heat, electric booster
$120
Low temp. door-type, gas heat
$0
Low temp. door-type, electric heat
$0
High temp. door-type, gas heat, gas booster
$770
High temp. door-type, gas heat, electric booster
$770
High temp. door-type, electric heat, gas booster
$770
High temp. door-type, electric heat, electric booster
$770
Low temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat
$0
Low temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat
$0
High temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat, gas booster
$2,050
High temp. single-tank conveyor, gas heat, electric booster
$2,050
High temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat, gas booster
$2,050
High temp. single-tank conveyor, electric heat, electric
booster
$2,050
Low temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat
$970
Low temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat
$970
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat, gas booster
$970
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, gas heat, electric booster
$970
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat, gas booster
$970
High temp. multi-tank conveyor, electric heat, electric booster
$970
8.11 High Efficiency Clothes Washers in Multifamily Properties
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
New high efficiency front-loading or top-loading clothes washer installed in a
multifamily property
End use
Appliance ‒ residential
Project eligibility
Installation of a CEE Tier 3 clothes washer in a multifamily residence. Clothes washer
can be installed in the residential unit (in-unit) or be a coin operated washer installed
in a common area.
Washer meets or exceeds CEE Tier 3 performance specifications (dated Jan -2011):
1. Modified energy factor (MEF) = 2.40 or greater
2. Water factor = 4.0 or less
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1. In-unit clothes washer – 144 kWh/yr, 0.082 kW, 9.6 therms/yr
2. Coin operated clothes washer – 645 kWh/yr, 0.076 kW, 51.8 therms/yr
1
Incremental measure cost
$284
EUL
8-14
11 years
1
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Section 8
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement ‒ code
Baseline description
Title 20 compliant clothes washer, MEF = 1.26.
Efficient case description
CEE Tier 3-qualified clothes washer
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
IOU work paper
1
Energy savings are achieved by a reduction in heated water use and a reduction in
dryer energy use (efficient water spin cycles remove more water from clothes).
Savings values are based on various assumptions regarding clothes washer market
shares, weighted average efficiencies of standard and efficient washers, and RASSbased populations of gas and electric dryers and hot water heaters.
Peak demand reduction
The residential energy/peak factor of 0.417 from DEER 2005 was used to calculate
the peak demand.
Definitions
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that clothes washers meet CEE Tier 3 specifications - see CEE list of qualifying products.
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work paper PGECOAPP120 R3 Clothes Washers MF, June 2012
8.12 ENERGY STAR Uninterrupted Power Supply
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of an ENERGY STAR-qualified uninterrupted power supply (UPS)
End use
Process ‒ electronic equipment
Project eligibility
ENERGY STAR products in the following category are eligible:
1. Commercial UPS intended to protect small business and branch office
information and communication technology equipment such as servers, network
switches and routers, and small storage arrays
2. Data center UPS intended to protect large installations of information and
communication technology equipment such as enterprise servers, networking
equipment, and large storage arrays
3. Telecommunications DC-output UPS/Rectifier intended to protect
telecommunication network systems located within a central office or at a remote
wireless/cellular site
The following products are not eligible:
4. Consumer UPS intended to protect desktop computers and related peripherals,
and/or home entertainment devices
5. Products that are internal to a computer or another end-use load
6. Industrial UPS specifically designed to protect critical control, manufacturing, or
production processes
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
204 kWh per rated kVA
Incremental measure cost
$59 per rated kVA
EUL
10 years
Savings Estimation TRM
1
2
ers
8-15
Section 8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
Non-ENERGY STAR-qualified UPS
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR-qualified UPS
Savings Calculation
Energy savings
Based on average efficiency gains of an ENERGY STAR UPS (3%–5%). Savings are
calculated for the three DOE test sizes based on typical UPS loading and efficiency
gains, then averaged together to arrive at a single savings estimate. For calculation
details, see TRM115 ENERGY STAR UPS spreadsheet.
Peak demand reduction
No peak demand reduction is estimated for this measure.
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
UPS Power and Performance Data Sheet (PPDS) should be checked to verify that it indicates that the UPS
equipment meets ENERGY STAR requirements.
Important Notes
Little to no cost data on ENERGY STAR units is currently available; cost data should be collected to help verify
incremental measure costs.
1
Incremental measure cost based on average UPS costs for a range of sizes, assuming a 30% premium for an ENERGY
STAR UPS.
2
Useful life for UPS can exceed 10 years (per manufacturer literature) and possibly be as high as 20 years. However, some UPS
internal components may fail earlier. Ten years is used as a conservative estimate for EUL.
8.13 Plug-Load Occupancy Sensor
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of standard electric power strips with occupancy sensor-controlled
strips in commercial office space
End use
Plug load ‒ consumer electronics
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Power strip must control electricity-using equipment in offices or cubicles,
including shared copiers and/or printers.
Power strip must be controlled by either passive infrared and/or ultrasonic
detectors.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
64 kWh per smart strip installed
Measure cost
$37.29 per smart strip
EUL
8 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Preexisting standard power strips without any control mechanism and which are
controlled with a single manual switch.
Efficient case description
Occupancy sensor-controlled power strips that use an ultrasonic or infrared sensor
and automatically turn off ancillary plug loads connected to the power strip when an
area is unoccupied. Plug loads are devices that plug into a building’s electrical
system; they include task lights, appliances, entertainment equipment, vending
machines, and office equipment: fax machines, computers, printers, and copiers.
8-16
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Section 8
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
Calculations are based on the IOU work paper .
1. Power strip is assumed to control both a tack light as well as a computer
monitor.
2. Total controlled wattage is calculated to be 23.9 W and includes a weighted
average of computer monitors (95% LCD 5% CRT) and a weighting on
monitors that are capable of going into sleep mode (75%) as well as a 10 W
task light.
3. Occupancy sensor is assumed to reduce annual operating hours of the monitor
and task light by 2,450 hours per year.
Peak demand reduction
Demand savings for this measure are calculated by multiplying the total occupancy
sensor-controlled wattage by both the demand period HVAC interactive effects and a
demand coincidence factor as defined in DEER 2011
Total controlled wattage – 23.9 W
Demand interactive effects – 1.285
Coincidence factor – 0.65
3
3
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
Ensure that the occupancy sensor is correctly calibrated.
Ensure that all appropriate ancillary electronic devices are connected to outlets controlled by the occupancy
sensor .
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work Paper PGECOALL101, Revision 3, 6/22/2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls. Assumed equivalent to occupancy sensor control.
3
Peak coincident demand factors, and HVAC interactive effects from DEER 2013
8.14 Smart Power Strip – Commercial Use
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of electric power strips that turn off office equipment based on the power
strip control outlet’s sensor reading
End use
Plug load ‒ consumer electronics
Project eligibility
Applicable to smart power strips installed in nonresidential buildings
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
100 kWh per smart strip
Measure cost
$37 per smart strip
EUL
8 years
1
2
3
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Preexisting standard power strips without any control mechanism and which are
controlled with a single manual switch
Efficient case description
Smart power strip with the capability to sense the drop in current that occurs when
the control device enters a low-power mode. A current-sensing transformer
attached to an outlet on the plug strip monitors the current draw of the designated
device. When the current draw of this device drops below a certain threshold,
power is disconnected from the controlled outlets on the plug strip.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-17
Section 8
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
Savings are based on the results of RTF study and analysis.
Peak demand reduction
No peak demand reduction
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Ensure that the master electronic device is connected to the appropriate master outlet on the power strip.
Important Notes
N/A
1
RTF study and analysis, SmartPlugPowerStrips_v2_0.xlsm
2
Work Paper SCE13CS002, Revised May 8, 2012
3
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls, assumed equivalent to occupancy sensor control.
8.15 Kitchen Exhaust Hood Demand Ventilation Control System
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of VFD on kitchen exhaust fans for type I (smoke- and grease-producing
cooking) exhaust hoods in conjunction with a control system that adjusts fan speed
based on cooking demand. Make-up air fan speed, if part of the kitchen ventilation
system, is also controlled by the new control system.
End use
HVAC ‒ kitchen ventilation
Project eligibility
Applicable for both new systems and system retrofits. Not applicable for Type II
exhaust hoods (non-grease rated).
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
4,197 kWh per exhaust fan hp
105 therms per exhaust fan hp ‒ no savings if make-up air is not heated. Therm
savings are the average savings for all climate zones.
Measure cost
$1,991 per exhaust fan hp
EUL
15 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – current practice
Baseline description
Kitchen type I exhaust hood with manual or automatic on/off control and constant volume
exhaust fans. Make-up air may be through make-up air fans or by transfer air from
conditioned spaces. Make-up air may be unconditioned, heated, or heated and cooled.
Efficient case description
1.
2.
VFD control of exhaust hood fans and, as applicable, make-up air fans.
New exhaust hood control system that controls fan speed based on control
inputs (e.g., optic and/or temperature sensors that determine the presence and
volume of heat or smoke)
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
IOU work paper savings are based on the following data and assumptions:
1. Savings are based on average fan speed and power reduction achieved in the
PG&E, FSTC, and SCE field-monitored case studies.
2. Savings are normalized to rated exhaust fan horsepower
3. Coincidental HVAC cooling savings are not included in savings estimate
4. Natural gas savings are based on heated make-up air sized for 80% of total exhaust
airflow and 65°F setpoint. Overall fan speed reduction is assumed to be 26%.
Peak demand reduction
0.542 kW per exhaust fan hp
Key Parameters
8-18
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other Nonresidential Measures
Section 8
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Ventilation system controls must be properly installed and commissioned to ensure optimal performance and prevent
control system override by end user.
Important Notes
For simplicity, the savings have been normalized to the rated horsepower of the exhaust hood fans. However,
exhaust fan hp is not a good indicator of overall system cost and this may not accurately reflect the savings potential
for all system types and sizes. For more accurate project-specific savings estimates, custom energy savings
estimates are recommended.
1
PG&E work paper, Commercial Kitchen Demand Ventilation Controls, June 18, 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
8-19
HVAC Measures – Residential
9
9. HVAC MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL
9.1
Residential Air Conditioners
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency split-system air conditioner, split-system air
source heat pump, or ductless mini-split system
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
1.
2.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See TRM200 spreadsheet. There are 19 measures for each climate zone, with each
measure consisting of two savings estimates (code and early retirement baselines).
In total, there are 456 measure savings values provided.
Incremental measure cost
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
EUL
15 years
Unit meets the applicable efficiency level.
For mini-split systems, the measure savings are limited to applications where it
is a viable option to install a standard split system (condensing unit and ducted
fan coil unit).
1
15 SEER unit: $153
16 SEER unit: $169
17 SEER and larger: $211
2
Evaporative-cooled split system air conditioner: $750
3
15-16 SEER ductless mini-split: $252
17-19 SEER ductless mini-split: $452
20-21 SEER ductless mini-split: $748
4
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1. Natural replacement – code
2. Dual baseline – early retirement
Baseline description
1.
2.
Efficient case description
Savings Estimation TRM
See Code Baseline Efficiency Table for code requirements used in natural
replacement baseline.
For dual baseline/ early retirement measures, the efficiency level is an average
of typical unit efficiency levels for various building vintages (DEER
methodology).
Unit meets or exceeds the applicable efficiency level:
1.
Heat pump, 15 SEER, 8.4 HSPF
2.
Heat pump, 16 SEER, 8.4 HSPF
3.
Split-system air conditioner, 15 SEER, 12.5 EER
4.
Split-system air conditioner, 16 SEER, 13 EER
5.
Split-system air conditioner, 17 SEER, 13 EER
6.
Split-system air conditioner, 18 SEER, 13 EER
7.
Split-system air conditioner, 19 SEER, 14 EER
8.
Split-system air conditioner, 20 SEER, 14 EER
9.
Split-system air conditioner, 21 SEER, 15 EER
ers
9-1
Section 9
HVAC Measures – Residential
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Evap-cooled split-system air conditioner, 15 EER
Ductless mini-split heat pump, 15 SEER
Ductless mini-split heat pump, 16 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 15 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 16 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 17 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 18 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 19 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 20 SEER
Ductless mini-split air conditioner, 21 SEER
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
See TRM200 spreadsheet.
Savings derived from DEER 2014 data
Savings for 16 SEER unit is estimated as the average savings value for a 15
SEER and 17 SEER unit.
Savings for 20 SEER unit is estimated as the average savings value for a 19
SEER and 21 SEER unit.
Ductless mini-split savings based on IOU work paper adjustment factors (1.14 for
energy, 1.25 for demand) for adding supply air fan savings associated with a
ductless system.
See TRM200 spreadsheet
Vintage =
Building age as indicated in DEER savings database
EER =
Energy efficiency ratio = 12 × kW/ton cooling
SEER =
Seasonal energy efficiency ratio – Weighted average of part load efficiencies of an
HVAC unit for a specified set of loads and outdoor air temperatures
HSPF =
Heating seasonal performance factor ‒ air source heat pumps
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Determine if new unit will be replacing a functional unit or a failed unit.
If new unit is replacing existing functional unit and RUL savings will be applied, record age, make, model, size,
and type of unit to be replaced.
Verify that new unit meets the minimum efficiency requirements.
Verify that new unit is properly installed and commissioned.
Important Notes
N/A
1
Base cost data from internet research
2
DOE/EERE Report, Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers, March 2012
3
IOU work paper, SCE13HC033
4
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
9-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Residential
9.1.1
Section 9
Code Baseline Efficiency Table
This table lists both the current and 2015 state and federal code requirements for residential air
conditioners (ACs) and heat pumps (HPs). The TRM200 spreadsheet provides natural
replacement savings estimates based on each code baseline.
Current
Unit Type
Effective January 1,2015
1
SEER
EER
HSPF
SEER
EER
HSPF
Split system HP
13
11.07
7.7
14
11.07
8.2
Single package HP
13
11.07
7.7
14
11.07
8
Split system AC, < 45 kBtu/h
13
11.09
N/A
14
12.2
N/A
Split system AC, > 45 kBtu/h
13
11.09
N/A
14
11.7
N/A
Single package AC
13
11.09
N/A
14
11.09
N/A
1
Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 432)
9.2
ENERGY STAR Room Air Conditioner
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
New ENERGY STAR-qualified room air conditioner
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
Unit meets ENERGY STAR qualifications
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table. Savings vary based on unit capacity and climate zone
Measure cost
$50 per AC unit
EUL
9 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline
types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Through-the-window (with louvers) standard efficiency unit with minimum efficiency rating
2
as established by federal standards in effect, June 1, 2014
Efficient case
description
ENERGY STAR-qualified unit
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
Definitions
Btu/havg=
EERstan=
kW stan=
EEReff=
kW eff=
EFLH=
ENERGY STAR calculator used to estimate savings
ℎ = ( −  )()
/ℎ
 = (
)/1000

Average cooling capacity of a room AC unit
Energy efficiency ratio for a standard unit with side louvers in kW/ton
Demand for a standard efficiency AC unit
Energy efficiency ratio for an ENERGY STAR unit with side louvers in kW/ton
Demand for an ENERGY STAR unit
Effective full load hours, varies by climate zone, 224–2,092 hours
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
9-3
Section 9
HVAC Measures – Residential
Key Parameters
EER and EFLH
ENERGY STAR criteria are used for baseline, efficient case, and EFLH.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the new room air conditioner is ENERGY STAR qualified.
Important Notes
1.
2.
Savings for all California climate zones are not available through the ENERGY STAR calculator. The missing
climate zones were assigned as follows: climate zones 4 and 5 assigned to climate zone 3, climate zones 11
and 14 assigned to 12, and climate zone 16 assigned to 15.
Savings are estimated based on through the window installations (units with side louvers). Through-the-wall
units (without louvers) have lower efficiency ratings, but the differential between code and ENERGY STAR
ratings is similar to the window units. As such, the savings estimates provided can be used for both window and
through-the-wall units.
1
ENERGY STAR calculator, www.energystar.gov.
2
Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Ch. II, Section 430.32
9.2.1
Energy Savings Table
This table provides energy savings for each capacity range for each climate zone.
Unit Capacity Range (Btu/h)
9-4
Climate Zone
Energy Savings (kWh)
6,000 – 7,999
3,4,5
3
8,000 – 13,999
3,4,5
8
14,000 – 19,999
3,4,5
16
20,000 – 27,999
3,4,5
23
6,000 – 7,999
8
13
8,000 – 13,999
8
42
14,000 – 19,999
8
83
20,000 – 27,999
8
122
6,000 – 7,999
9
17
8,000 – 13,999
9
55
14,000 – 19,999
9
109
20,000 – 27,999
9
159
6,000 – 7,999
10
15
8,000 – 13,999
10
48
14,000 – 19,999
10
96
20,000 – 27,999
10
140
6,000 – 7,999
11,12,14
13
8,000 – 13,999
11,12,14
41
14,000 – 19,999
11,12,14
82
20,000 – 27,999
11,12,14
121
6,000 – 7,999
15,16
24
8,000 – 13,999
15,16
75
14,000 – 19,999
15,16
148
20,000 – 27,999
15,16
218
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Residential
9.3
Section 9
Whole-House Ventilation Fan
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a whole-house ventilation fan. Whole-house fans exhaust air out of a home’s
living area into the home’s attic space. Air enters through open windows or doors and is
exhausted through the attic’s gable or soffit vents.
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
Home is air-conditioned and has attic ventilation openings sufficient for exhausting fan’s
rated airflow.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Savings and Cost Table.
Measure cost
See Savings and Cost Table.
EUL
20 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline
types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
1.
2.
3.
Efficient case
description
Whole-house fan permanently installed in the upper-floor ceiling.
Air-conditioned home
No central whole-house fan
No other automated source of fresh air (i.e., economizer)
Savings Calculation
2
Annual energy savings
formula
CEC CASE study savings estimates were determined through building simulation models
based on a prototypical 2,700 square foot house.
Peak demand reduction
See Savings and Cost Table.
Key Parameters
User operation
1.
2.
3.
Whole-house fan operation and energy use is highly dependent upon the user.
Manual or twist-timer is the typical type of control.
Outside-air intake is through manually opened windows and doors.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the fan is installed, operational, and has insulated backdraft dampers.
Important Notes
Whole-house fans are a prescriptive requirement in 2013 Title 24 building energy efficiency standards. This measure
is for retrofits that do not invoke code requirements.
1
DEER Summary of EUL-RUL Analysis, 2008
CEC CASE study: “Night Ventilation Cooling Compliance Option” September 2011
2
9.3.1
Savings and Cost Table
This table provides the energy savings and installation cost for each climate zone. Costs vary
due to assumptions regarding regional labor rates. Note that the negative savings for climate
zones 2 and 4 represent the use of the whole-house fan for ventilation purposes in mild climates
where little space cooling is replaced.
Savings are listed per fan, with a fan airflow of 2,000 cfm. Savings correlate to fan airflow;
therefore, the savings can be normalized per cfm and extrapolated to estimate savings for
different fan sizes.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
9-5
Section 9
HVAC Measures – Residential
Climate
Zone
Energy Savings
1
(kWh)
Cost
2
55
$721
3
-142
$861
4
161
$821
5
-63
$652
8
388
$691
9
451
$728
10
522
$672
11
496
$711
12
567
$706
14
353
$647
15
174
$685
16
171
$712
2
1
Per fan (2,000 cfm)
2
9-6
CEC CASE study
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
HVAC Measures – Residential
9.4
Section 9
Duct Sealing
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Test and sealing of existing AC duct systems that reduce the overall leakage rate of
conditioned air into unconditioned spaces.
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
Sealing of duct systems when not required by code. 2013 Title 24 code requirements are
in effect when any of the following are true:
1. The HVAC system is new (T24,§150.2(b)1C)
2. Any of the major system components (evaporator coil, condensing unit, furnace) are
replaced (T24,§150.2(b)1E)
3. Duct system is added or extended, where more than 40 feet of duct is in
unconditioned space (T24,§150.2(b)1D)
4. Duct system is modified, where more than 75% of the duct is new (T24,§150.2(b)1D)
Savings type
Semi-custom
Unit energy savings
The savings per duct system are determined using the TRM403 residential duct sealing
savings calculator. Entering the building type (single-family or multifamily) and duct
leakage reduction in percent will provide energy savings and peak demand reduction
estimates for each climate zone.
Measure cost
Varies depending upon the work required to seal the system. Typical cost range is $285–
1
$580 per duct system
EUL
10 years
Applicable baseline
types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Existing duct system with excessive leakage of conditioned air into unconditioned
space
Efficient case
description
Sealed and repaired duct system
1
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM403 savings calculator.
1. Savings data for two reduction rates obtained from DEER 2014. Savings estimates
between 12% and 25% are interpolated. Savings estimates outside of this range are
extrapolated and may be less precise estimates.
2. Savings are for homes with electric cooling and gas heating. Heat pump savings data
is not available.
Peak demand reduction
See TRM403 savings calculator
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Obtain both pre- and post-sealing test results to verify the duct system overall reduction in air leakage to
unconditioned space.
Important Notes
N/A
1 DEER
Summary of EUL-RUL Analysis, 2008
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
9-7
Section 9
9.4.1
HVAC Measures – Residential
Energy Savings Table – at 20% Duct Leakage Reduction
This table provides the calculator annual energy savings results for a duct leakage reduction of
20% at a single-family home. Other leakage rates can be estimated using the calculator.
Climate Zone
9-8
kWh
KW
Therms
CZ02
62
0.159
27.3
CZ03
32
0.051
24.2
CZ04
73
0.173
19.9
CZ05
29
0.067
27.0
CZ08
123
0.247
12.6
CZ09
172
0.274
15.3
CZ10
164
0.449
18.4
CZ11
198
0.283
24.8
CZ12
124
0.307
23.6
CZ14
375
0.588
27.6
CZ15
488
0.463
9.9
CZ16
118
0.278
56.9
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Residential
10
10.LIGHTING MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL
10.1 LED Lights
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency LED lamps & fixtures in single-family, multifamily, &
mobile homes.
End use
Lighting
Project eligibility
Fixture replacements, lamp replacements, and fixture retrofits.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See TRM204 spreadsheet. With thirty measures for each climate zone, a total of 360
measure savings estimates are provided.
Measure cost
See TRM204 spreadsheet
EUL
15 years, rated fixture/lamp life divided by annual operating hours for each building type
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types Natural replacement – preexisting conditions and code
Baseline description
Baseline wattages indicated in measure name
1
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR -qualified LED lamps and fixtures for both interior and exterior
applications. The measure list includes:
1. LED 7 – 9 W replacing 35 W halogen downlight
2. LED 10 – 13 W replacing 50 W halogen downlight
3. LED 14 – 18 W replacing 75 W halogen downlight
4. LED 19 – 21 W replacing 90 W halogen downlight
5. LED 6 – 9 W replacing 29 W halogen (40 W equivalent)
6. LED 10 – 13 W replacing 43 W halogen (60 W equivalent)
7. LED 15 – 21 W replacing 53 W halogen (75 W equivalent)
8. LED 22 W replacing 72 W halogen (100 W equivalent)
9. LED 6 – 9 W replacing 9 – 13 W CFL
10. LED 10 – 13 W replacing 13 – 15 W CFL
11. LED 22 W replacing 23 W – 30 W CFL
12. LED 4 W replacing 20 W MR16
13.LED 6 W replacing 20 W replacing 35 W MR16
14. LED 7 W replacing 50 W MR16
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
ℎ =  ()()
Definitions
 =
hrs =
IE =
IEd =
CDF=
 =  ()( )
Average kW reduction of typical retrofits
2
Default operating hours by building type
3
HVAC interactive effects, energy
3
HVAC interactive effects, demand
3
Coincident demand factor
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
10-1
Section 10
Lighting Measures – Residential
Key Parameters
Operating hours
541 annual hours for interior lights, 1,249 annual hours for exterior lights
3
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify new fixture or lamp is listed on ENERGY STAR-qualified products list.
Important Notes
Measures are not applicable when 2013 Title 24 high-efficacy lighting requirements apply (primarily new construction
and major renovation)
1
ENERGY STAR list of qualified LED fixtures and qualified screw-in LED lamps
2
DEER 2011 Update, Appendix A-1, May 2012
3
DEER 2013
10.2 LED Holiday Lights
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of incandescent decorative lights –mini, C7 and C9 lamps – with LED lights.
End use
Exterior lighting
Project eligibility
Existing decorative lights, usually traded in as part of a utility-sponsored program, must
be functional.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
6.9 kWh per string
Measure cost
$13
EUL
5 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – existing conditions
Baseline description
A string of incandescent holiday lights with mini lamps, C7 lamps or C9 lamps
Efficient case description
A string of LED holiday lights, 24 ft long and containing 70 LED lamps
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mini light strings were assumed to be 23 ft long and contain 50 lamps.
C7 and C9 light strings were assumed to be 25 ft long and contain 25 lamps.
For baseline strings, lamp wattages were multiplied by the number of lamps per
string to determine the string wattage.
LED wattage from manufacturer.
Savings is a weighted value, based on the majority of lamps being replaced being
mini-lamps (based on utility trade-in program observations).
210 operating hours.
See TRM205 LED holiday lights spreadsheet for savings calculation.
Peak demand reduction
0.033 kW per string
Key Parameters
N/A
10-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Lighting Measures – Residential
Section 10
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that existing incandescent strings are functional.
Important Notes
N/A
1
Utility program purchase price in 2012
2
Although rated lamp life indicates a longer useful life, the lights are not permanently installed, and due to potential damage from
repeated removal and installation, the useful life is estimated to be 5 years.
3
DEER Measure Database Updates, Appendix A-1,May 2012
10.3 ENERGY STAR Ceiling Fan
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
ENERGY STAR-qualified ceiling fan
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
ENERGY STAR qualified
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
178 kWh per year
Incremental measure
cost
$86 per ceiling fan
EUL
10 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline
types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Standard efficiency unit
Efficient case
description
ENERGY STAR-qualified unit
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
3.
Peak demand reduction
The energy savings were determined using the ENERGY STAR savings calculator.
Calculator assumes demand wattages for low, medium, and high fan speeds for
standard and efficient units. It also gives lighting wattages for standard and efficient
units.
ENERGY STAR assumes average daily operating hours for the fan and lighting in
different regions of the country and gives a percentage of time at each speed setting.
The Pacific region was used to determine operating hours.
The demand savings were calculated by multiplying the demand savings at each fan
speed by a weighting factor that corresponds to the percentage of the total operating
hours the fan spends at that speed. These three numbers were summed and then added
to the demand savings of the lighting to determine the total demand savings of 0.123 kW.
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that fan is ENERGY STAR qualified.
Important Notes
Lighting accounts for 98% of the total measure savings.
1ENERGY
STAR Savings Calculator, www.energystar.gov .
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
10-3
Appliances – Residential
11
11.APPLIANCES – RESIDENTIAL
11.1 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Purchase of an energy efficient refrigerator
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
1.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on size, freezer location and presence of
an ice maker.
Measure cost
$40
EUL
14 years
2.
Refrigerators 7.75 cu ft and larger (mid- and full-size) meet or exceed the CEE
Tier I (ENERGY STAR), Tier II, or Tier III efficiency requirements.
Refrigerators smaller than 7.75 cu ft (compact) are ENERGY STAR qualified.
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Refrigerator meeting California Appliance Standards (Title 20) and Federal DOE
regulations (National Appliance Energy Conservation Act/NAECA)
Efficient case description
1.
2.
3.
ENERGY STAR (20% more efficient than code)
CEE Tier II (25% more efficient than code)
CEE Tier III (30% more efficient than code)
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
See TRM208 spreadsheet
1. Refrigerator energy use was estimated using the ENERGY STAR savings
calculator
2. Average refrigerator volumes used in estimates were determined from CEE list
3
of refrigerators
Peak demand reduction
Not available
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
Determine size, freezer location, and whether the unit has an ice maker.
Verify the refrigerator meets the applicable ENERGY STAR or CEE efficiency levels
Important Notes
N/A
1
ENERGY STAR Savings Calculator, www.energystar.gov
2
DEER 2011
3
CEE - December 2013 List of Residential Refrigerators
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
11-1
Section 11
Appliances – Residential
11.1.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings by refrigerator type, size, and efficiency level.
Energy Savings (kWh)
Refrigerator Type and Size
ENERGY STAR
CEE Tier II
CEE Tier III
Bottom freezer without ice>=16.5 cu ft
131
164
196
Bottom freezer with ice >=16.5 cu ft
116
145
173
Bottom freezer without ice <16.5 cu ft
158
198
238
Side freezer without ice >=23 cu ft
150
187
225
Side freezer with ice >=23 cu ft
171
215
257
Side freezer without ice <23 cu ft
130
161
194
Side freezer with ice <23 cu ft
128
159
191
Top freezer without ice >20 cu ft
121
152
182
Top freezer without ice 15-20 cu ft
106
133
159
Top freezer without ice <15 cu ft
90
112
135
Compact refrigerator, <7.75 cu ft
92
N/A
N/A
Average savings, excluding compact refrigerator
130
162
195
11.2 Refrigerator and Freezer Recycling
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Permanent removal and recycling of refrigerators and freezers
End use
Refrigeration
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
Measure cost
$100 per unit recycled
EUL
Refrigerators – 5 years; freezers – 4 years
Units must be permanently disabled.
Units may be located in either conditioned or unconditioned space.
Applies to all refrigerator/freezer combination types (e.g., side by side, top-mount).
Applies to refrigerator and freezer sizes from 10 cu ft up to 31 cu ft.
Applies to a unit replaced by a new unit.
Applies to a unit not replaced by a new unit (e.g., removal of a secondary refrig.).
616 kWh per refrigerator recycled
643 kWh per freezer recycled
1
2
3
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Customer continues to use unit or does not recycle unit.
Efficient case description
Unit dismantled and recycled.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Energy savings are taken directly from the DEER database. Unit savings are
weighted values based on a combination of different unit sizes and types, whether
the unit was removed from conditioned or unconditioned space, and whether the unit
was replaced/recycled or removed/recycled.
Peak demand reduction
Refrigerator – 0.124 kW; freezer – 0.129 kW
11-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Appliances – Residential
Section 11
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Record age, make, model, size, and type of unit recycled.
Verify that units are operational at time of disposal.
Verify that units are properly recycled and no longer functional.
Important Notes
Unit energy savings for a new ENERGY STAR refrigerator/freezer are not included in the measure savings.
1
DEER 2011 unit energy savings for refrigerators and freezers
2
Customer measure costs range from zero (free pickup) up to $150. Since free pickup does not guarantee the units are recycled
and taken out of the secondary market, only the cost for recycling was considered. Based on secondary research and recycling
vendor costs associated with utility programs, the cost range was determined to be $50–$150. The average ($100) is used for
measure cost.
3
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
11.3 Heat Pump Water Heater
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of standard electric domestic hot water (DHW) heater with an ENERGY
STAR heat pump water heater
End use
DHW
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
Qualifying units are listed on ENERGY STAR Qualifying Product List for heat
pump water heaters.
Units have an energy factor (EF) equal to or greater than 2.2.
Current available unit sizes: 40–80 gallons.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
308–1,628 kWh per water heater. See Energy Savings Table.
Measure cost
$905– $1,279 per water heater
EUL
10 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Electric resistance hot water heater, EF = 0.89
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR-qualified heat pump water heater, EF = 2.35
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
Peak demand reduction
Savings were derived from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) study
3
and analysis on hot water heat pumps (HWHPs). Energy modeling software
(TRNSYS) was used to estimate savings for a prototypical home. For HWHP
installed in the conditioned space of the home, the additional heating load for home’s
HVAC system is included in the savings results. NREL’s analysis concluded that a
HWHP’s overall operating performance is less efficient than indicated by standard
test procedures used to develop unit energy factor (EF) ratings.
NA – based on typical energy use profiles, a DHW heater does not contribute to peak
demand
Key Parameters
Average daily use
EF
Gallons per day
Energy factor – efficiency rating
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Verify that the unit is ENERGY STAR qualified.
2. If HPWP has an exhaust duct, verify that the duct is adequately sized.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
11-3
Section 11
Appliances – Residential
Important Notes
1. HPWHs use the surrounding air as a heat source. If the HWHP is installed within the home, it imposes a heating
load on the home’s air conditioning system.
2. Unit efficiency decreases as the ambient temperature falls below 68°F. If ambient space temperature falls below
45°F, the unit’s electrical resistance heaters are enabled, significantly lowering the heater’s energy performance.
1
2
3
RTF hot water heat pump analysis, internet research (Dec-2013)
Equal to average tank warranty of an ENERGY STAR unit
NREL Technical Report # NREL/TP-5500-58594, July 2013
11.3.1 Energy Savings Tables
The tables present the energy savings for a two typical HWHP sizes. Savings are dependent
upon the location of the HPWP and its interactive effects with the home’s AC system. California
climate zones are mapped to the more general climate zone types used in the NREL analysis.
The analysis site-to-source energy conversation factor (3.365) was used to convert source results
into estimated savings per installed heater.
Energy
Savings
(kWh)
1,266
Energy
Savings
(Therms)
0
Climate Zone
2,3,4,5
Measure Name
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – heat pump
2,3,4,5
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – gas
1,725
-72.2
2,3,4,5
2,3,4,5
2,3,4,5
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – elec
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., located in garage/basement
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – heat pump
343
1,504
1,504
0
0
0
2,3,4,5
2,3,4,5
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – gas
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – elec
1,964
308
-90.6
0
2,3,4,5
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., located in garage/basement
1,628
0
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – heat pump
1,339
0
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – gas
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – elec
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., located in garage/basement
1,582
800
1,175
- 39.5
0
0
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – heat pump
1,464
0
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – gas
1,707
-48.8
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – elec
785
0
8,9,10,11,12,14,15
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., located in garage/basement
1,330
0
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – heat pump
1,279
0
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – gas
1,816
-60.3
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., space heating – elec
668
0
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 50 gal., located in garage/basement
839
0
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – heat pump
1,603
0
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – gas
2,139
-80.8
16
16
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., space heating – elec
ENERGY STAR HPWH, 80 gal., located in garage/basement
758
1,278
0
0
11-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Appliances – Residential
Section 11
11.4 ENERGY STAR Dishwasher, Compact and Standard Size
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
ENERGY STAR-qualified dishwasher, both standard and compact size
End use
Appliance
Project eligibility
Installation of an ENERGY STAR-qualified dishwasher. A standard size dishwasher
holds eight or more place settings; compact size holds fewer than eight.
Meets CEE Tier efficiency standards:
Standard size unit minimum Energy Factor (EF) = 0.75
Compact size unit minimum Energy Factor (EF) = 1.0
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Water source: natural gas water heater:
Standard size unit: 26 kWh/yr, 1.5 therms/yr, 468 gallons/yr
Compact size unit: 16 kWh/yr, 0.9 therms/yr, 208 gallons/yr
Water source: electric water heater:
Standard size unit: 58 kWh/yr, 468 gallons/yr
Compact size unit: 129 kWh/yr, 208 gallons/yr
Incremental measure cost
$10
EUL
10 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Standard efficiency unit
Efficient case description
ENERGY STAR-qualified unit
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
3.
4.
Peak demand reduction
The energy savings were determined using the ENERGY STAR appliance
calculator.
Calculation assumes the annual energy use of a standard efficiency and an
efficient standard size dishwasher. The standard efficiency dishwasher is
assumed to use 355 kWh per year, which is the maximum allowed by federal
code. The efficient dishwasher is assumed to use 295 kWh per year, which is the
maximum allowed by ENERGY STAR.
Calculation assumes the annual energy use of a standard efficiency compact
dishwasher is 260 kWh per year, which is the maximum allowed by federal code.
The efficient compact unit is assumed to use 222 kWh per year, which is the
maximum allowed by ENERGY STAR.
Calculation assumes 215 loads per year for both the standard size and compact
dishwashers.
0 kW – assumes dishwasher is not running during peak demand time period
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the dishwasher is ENERGY STAR qualified and meets CEE Tier 1 efficiency specifications.
Important Notes
Therm savings are due to reduced water consumption
1
ENERGY STAR appliance calculator. Current 2012 version can be found in TRM spreadsheet. Also available at:
www.energystar.gov.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
11-5
Section 11
Appliances – Residential
11.5 High Efficiency Residential Clothes Washer
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a high efficiency clothes washer in a residential application
End use
Appliance
Project eligibility
ENERGY STAR clothes washer meeting applicable CEE efficiency levels
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table
Incremental measure cost
Incremental cost
1. ENERGY STAR, CEE Tier 1: $165
2. CEE Tier 2, $195
3. CEE Tier 3, $277
EUL
11 years
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
Federal standard:
MEF = 1.26
WF = 9.5
Efficient case description
Clothes washer meeting applicable efficiency level:
ENERGY STAR (CEE Tier 1): MEF 2.0; WF 6.0
CEE Tier 2: MEF 2.2; WF 4.5
CEE Tier 3: MEF 2.4; WF 4.0
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
ENERGY STAR calculator used to estimate savings .
Peak demand reduction
N/A
3
Definitions
MEF=
WF=
Modified energy factor – takes into account the amount of dryer energy used to
remove the remaining moisture content in washed items, in addition to the machine
energy and water heating energy of the washer.
Water factor ‒ The number of gallons per cycle per cubic foot that the clothes washer
uses. The lower the water factor, the more efficient the washer.
Key Parameters
Washer load
312 washer cycles per year
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that clothes washer meets applicable efficiency requirements.
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work paper, PGECOAPP114 Clothes Washers Residential Revision 3 – August 24, 2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
3
Savings Calculator for ENERGY STAR Qualified Appliances
11-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Appliances – Residential
Section 11
11.5.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings based on the energy source types for the hot water
supply and clothes dryer. Clothes dryer savings (less dry time) are included.
Energy Source
Savings by Efficiency Level
Hot
Water
Electric
Dryer
Electric
CEE Tier I
(kWh)
284
CEE Tier I
(Therms)
0.0
CEE Tier II
(kWh)
328
CEE Tier II
(Therms)
0.0
CEE Tier III
(kWh)
365
CEE Tier III
(Therms)
0.0
Electric
Gas
184
3.4
184
4.9
184
6.2
Gas
Electric
137
6.7
181
6.7
218
6.7
Gas
Gas
37
10.1
37
11.6
37
12.9
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
11-7
Building Envelope – Residential
12
12.BUILDING ENVELOPE – RESIDENTIAL
12.1 Ceiling Insulation
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
1.
End use
Project eligibility
Savings type
Unit energy savings
Measure cost
Increasing ceiling insulation levels to R-30 or R-38 by adding additional insulation
to the ceiling (in attics or crawl spaces) or to the roof (non-vented attics).
2. Add R-11 insulation in residential dwellings in attics or crawl spaces with
limited space availability (R-30 cannot be achieved).
3. Add R-19 insulation to the ceiling (in attic or crawl spaces) or to the roof (nonvented attics).
HVAC
1. Applicable to air conditioned or heated residential single and multifamily dwellings.
2. Not eligible if increase in insulation is required by code.
UES
See Energy Savings Table
1
Costs are per sq ft of insulation installed:
1. Ceiling insulation, increase to R-30: $0.54
2. Ceiling insulation, increase to R-38: $0.54
3. Ceiling insulation, R-11 addition: $0.42
4. Ceiling insulation, R-19 addition: $0.54
5. Ceiling insulation, R-30 addition: $0.86
2
EUL
20 years
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
1. For all measures: preexisting ceiling insulation, or no ceiling insulation.
2. For R-30 measures, the preexisting insulation resistance value is R-19 or less.
3. For R-38 measures, the preexisting insulation resistance value is R-25 or less.
Efficient case description
1. The insulation R-value for preexisting and additional insulation equals or
exceeds R-19, R-30, or R-38.
2. For restricted spaces, additional insulation of at least R-11 is added.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
Peak demand reduction
Measure savings values from DEER 2014 are weighted by building vintage and by
HVAC system type.
See Energy Savings Table
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Determine preexisting insulation levels.
2. Determine if dwelling has mechanical cooling and/or natural gas, heat pump, or electrical resistance heating.
Important Notes
N/A
1Measure
cost data was derived from retail market research.
2DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
12-1
Section 12
Building Envelope – Residential
12.1.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction for each climate zone.
Savings data is per square foot of installed insulation. Savings are applicable to both singlefamily and multifamily homes.
CZ02
CZ03
CZ04
Measure Name
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-30
kW
0.000
kWh
0.541
Therms
0.198
kW
0.000
kWh
0.518
Therms
0.197
kW
0.000
kWh
0.505
Therms
0.161
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-38
0.000
0.554
0.203
0.000
0.531
0.203
0.000
0.517
0.166
Ceiling insulation, R-11 addition
0.000
0.024
0.009
0.000
0.019
0.009
0.000
0.018
0.007
Ceiling insulation, R-19 addition
0.000
0.034
0.013
0.000
0.028
0.012
0.000
0.026
0.010
Ceiling insulation, R-30 addition
0.000
0.043
0.016
0.000
0.036
0.016
0.000
0.033
0.013
CZ05
Measure Name
CZ08
CZ09
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-30
0.000
0.489
0.222
0.000
0.510
0.123
0.001
0.785
0.154
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-38
0.000
0.502
0.228
0.000
0.522
0.126
0.001
0.803
0.158
Ceiling insulation, R-11 addition
0.000
0.019
0.009
0.000
0.037
0.010
0.000
0.033
0.007
Ceiling insulation, R-19 addition
0.000
0.028
0.013
0.000
0.049
0.014
0.000
0.046
0.011
Ceiling insulation, R-30 addition
0.000
0.035
0.017
0.000
0.060
0.017
0.000
0.059
0.013
CZ10
Measure Name
CZ11
CZ12
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-30
0.001
0.860
0.163
0.001
0.953
0.180
0.001
0.874
0.199
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-38
0.001
0.883
0.167
0.001
0.977
0.185
0.001
0.895
0.204
Ceiling insulation, R-11 addition
0.000
0.033
0.007
0.000
0.042
0.008
0.000
0.028
0.007
Ceiling insulation, R-19 addition
0.000
0.047
0.010
0.000
0.061
0.011
0.000
0.041
0.010
Ceiling insulation, R-30 addition
0.000
0.058
0.013
0.000
0.078
0.014
0.000
0.053
0.013
CZ14
Measure Name
CZ15
CZ16
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
kW
kWh
Therms
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-30
0.001
1.520
0.203
0.001
1.640
0.106
0.000
0.660
0.222
Ceiling insulation, increase to R-38
0.001
1.560
0.207
0.001
1.680
0.109
0.000
0.678
0.228
Ceiling insulation, R-11 addition
0.000
0.047
0.007
0.000
0.093
0.007
0.000
0.035
0.014
Ceiling insulation, R-19 addition
0.000
0.068
0.010
0.000
0.129
0.009
0.000
0.050
0.020
Ceiling insulation, R-30 addition
0.000
0.088
0.013
0.000
0.161
0.012
0.000
0.063
0.024
12-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Building Envelope – Residential
Section 12
12.2 Wall Insulation
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Adding insulation of a minimum of R-13 to previously uninsulated walls separating
conditioned and unconditioned spaces.
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
Applicable to air-conditioned or heated residential single-family and multifamily
dwellings.
Installed as a retrofit to an existing uninsulated wall connecting conditioned and
unconditioned living areas.
Measure covers a minimum of 75% of the living area.
Measure is not applicable if installed as part of a retrofit that requires the building
envelope be upgraded to meet Title 24 code requirements.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
See Energy Savings Table.
Savings unit values are per square foot of insulation installed.
Incremental measure cost
1.
$0.94 per square foot of insulation installed
EUL
20 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
No insulation
Efficient case description
Insulation of R-13 or greater
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Saving values obtained from DEER are weighted based on building vintage and
HVAC type.
Peak demand reduction
Not applicable. Insulation saves energy by reducing the duty cycle of HVAC
equipment, resulting in no appreciable demand reduction.
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ensure that installed insulation meets minimum requirements.
Ensure that preexisting walls have no insulation.
Verify that installation of insulation is not required to meet Title 24 code requirements.
Verify that wall has conditioned space on one side and unconditioned space on the other side.
Important Notes
N/A
1DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
12-3
Section 12
Building Envelope – Residential
12.2.1 Energy Savings Table
The following table provides the energy savings for single-family and multifamily dwellings.
Savings are per square feet of installed insulation.
Climate
Zone
Single-Family
Savings (kWh)
Single-Family
Savings (Therms)
Multifamily
Savings (kWh)
Multifamily Savings
(Therms)
CZ02
0.241
0.139
0.223
0.076
CZ03
0.197
0.153
0.245
0.087
CZ04
0.210
0.126
0.193
0.071
CZ05
0.216
0.162
0.192
0.089
CZ08
0.224
0.099
0.140
0.057
CZ09
0.297
0.106
0.145
0.054
CZ10
0.326
0.111
0.164
0.056
CZ11
0.331
0.133
0.225
0.074
CZ12
0.273
0.133
0.228
0.790
CZ14
0.493
0.131
0.230
0.065
CZ15
0.574
0.074
0.232
0.036
CZ16
0.403
0.226
0.319
0.105
12.2.2 Measure Cost Table
The table provides insulation material costs1. Labor costs are not included.
Unit Size and Type
Wall insulation – R-13 – single family
Wall insulation – R-13 – multifamily
1SCE
Measure Cost,
per sq ft
$0.32
$0.32
work paper, SCE13BS010, Revision, 0, June 1, 2012
12.3 Solar Attic Fan
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a solar attic fan to replace an electric-powered attic fan
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
All sizes of solar-powered attic fans
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table
Measure cost
$300 per 1,000 cfm fan or $0.30 per cfm
EUL
10 years
12-4
ers
1
Savings Estimation TRM
Building Envelope – Residential
Section 12
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline
types
Natural replacement – existing conditions
Baseline description
Electric-powered fan with equivalent annual cooling capacity as solar-powered fan
Efficient case
description
Solar attic fan
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
1.
2.
3.
Savings based on eliminating the use of electric-powered attic fan.
Assumes a 1,000 cfm solar fan has the same annual cooling effect as a 600 cfm
electric-powered fan. Solar fan cannot always meet ventilation demands (i.e., after
sunset or when PV panel is shaded).
Annual operating hours of the fan vary by climate zone. TMY weather data was
used to determine the operating hours for each climate zone.
See TRM213 residential solar attic fan spreadsheet for savings calculations.
Peak demand reduction
0.0004 kW per cfm
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the fan’s solar panel is optimally positioned to maximize its power output.
Important Notes
N/A
1
Grainger retail pricing
12.3.1 Energy Savings Table
The following table provides the energy savings values for solar attic fan by climate zone.
Savings are presented in per cfm and per 1,000 cfm.
Energy Savings per
cfm (kWh)
Energy Savings per
1,000 cfm (kWh)
CZ02
0.156
156
CZ03
0.019
19
CZ04
0.085
85
CZ05
0.022
22
CZ08
0.130
130
CZ09
0.217
217
CZ10
0.295
295
CZ11
0.295
295
CZ12
0.220
220
CZ14
0.365
365
CZ15
0.766
766
CZ16
0.105
105
Climate Zone
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
12-5
Section 12
Building Envelope – Residential
12.4 Reflective Window Film
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Retrofit of existing single-pane clear glass windows with reflective window film
End use
HVAC
Project eligibility
Applicable to existing air-conditioned or heated residential single-family and
multifamily dwellings. North-facing windows are excluded.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Energy savings varies by climate zone - See Energy Savings Table
Incremental measure cost
$3.32 per sq ft of window glass covered
EUL
10 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Single-pane clear-glass windows with an assumed SHGC of 0.82
Efficient case description
Single-pane tinted glass windows with an assumed SHGC of 0.39
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
2
Savings data is from IOU work paper . Based on multifamily updated savings values
from DEER 2005
See Savings Table
Definitions
SHGC
= Solar heat gain coefficient
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
Verify performance rating of window film.
2. Verify that dwelling space is conditioned.
Important Notes
N/A
1DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2PG&E
work Paper PGECOBLD108, “Reflective Window Film,” Revision 3, June 1, 2012
12.4.1 Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction for reflective window film
by climate zone. Savings are per square feet of window glass covered.
12-6
Climate Zone
Energy
Savings (kWh
per sf)
Demand
Reduction (kW
per sf)
2
1.16
0.001
3
0.43
0.005
4
1.07
0.003
5
0.63
0.004
8
1.48
0.002
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Building Envelope – Residential
Section 12
Climate Zone
9
Energy
Savings (kWh
per sf)
1.56
Demand
Reduction (kW
per sf)
0.001
10
1.32
0.001
11
1.17
0.001
12
1.16
0.001
14
1.50
0.001
15
2.07
0.001
16
0.72
0.003
12.5 Solar Screen
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of an exterior window solar screen
End use
HVAC – residential
Project eligibility
Applicable to existing air-conditioned or heated residential single-family and
multifamily dwellings. North-facing windows are excluded.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Energy savings varies by climate zone – See Energy Savings Table
Incremental measure cost
$3 per sq ft of installed screen
EUL
10 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Single or dual-pane window with bug screen
Efficient case description
Dark colored solar screen with ≤ 5% openness factor
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
See TRM219 spreadsheet. The savings analysis is based on the CEC solar heat gain
2
coefficient worksheet .
To estimate savings, the solar screen SHGC reduction is compared to the SHGC
reduction for the reflective window film measure (81.2%). An adjustment factor
(86.5%) is also applied to account for the difference in total installed screen area
compared to the total window glass area. The solar screen savings is the product of
the overall adjustment factor (70.2%) multiplied by the reflective window film savings.
See Savings Table.
Definitions
SHGC
Openness factor
= Solar heat gain coefficient
= Measure of the tightness of the solar screen weave
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that space is conditioned.
Important Notes
N/A
1
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2
CEC CF10WKS-03-E SHGC
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
12-7
Section 12
Building Envelope – Residential
12.5.1 Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction for solar screens by climate
zone. Savings are per square feet of installed screen.
Climate Zone
Energy Savings
(kWh per sf)
Demand Reduction (kW
per sf)
2
0.81
0.001
3
0.30
0.003
4
0.75
0.002
5
0.44
0.003
8
1.04
0.001
9
1.10
0.001
10
0.93
0.001
11
0.82
0.001
12
0.81
0.001
14
1.05
0.001
15
1.45
0.001
16
0.51
0.002
12.6 Reduced Building Leakage
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Blower door test and seal of building envelope air leaks, resulting in either a 15% or
30% reduction in building leakage.
End use
HVAC – residential
Project eligibility
Existing single-family home with an infiltration rate of 0.350 air changes per hour
(ACH) or higher.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table. Savings estimates are per home.
1
Incremental measure cost
$350 for a 15% reduction and $500 for a 30% reduction
EUL
11 years
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Air conditioned single-family home, with an infiltration rate of 0.350 ACH
Efficient case description
Building air gaps sealed with an overall building leakage reduction of either 15% or
30%
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
1
Savings estimates from IOU work paper are based on building energy simulation
models of existing single-family homes (vintages 1978 – 2001). The home prototype
is developed from CEC Residential Appliance Saturation Survey (RASS) data. The
AC is an electric cooling/gas heating system.
See Savings Table
Definitions
Blower door test
12-8
A blower door is a diagnostic tool for determining the airtightness of a whole
building. The blower door is mounted to the frame of an exterior door. The house is
de-pressurized and the infiltration rate is measured with an airflow manometer.
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Building Envelope – Residential
Section 12
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that the pre- and post-air sealing test results indicate the building air leakage was effectively reduced.
Important Notes
N/A
1
SCE13MI005, March 2013
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
12.6.1 Savings Table
This table provides the energy savings and peak demand reduction per home for each climate
zone. Savings estimates are provided for a 15% and 30% building leakage reduction in both a
single story and two-story home.
Single-Story, 15%
Reduction
Climate
Zone
Single-Story, 30%
Reduction
Two -Story, 15%
Reduction
Two-Story, 30%
Reduction
kWh
Savings
Therm
Savings
kWh
Savings
Therm
Savings
kWh
Savings
Therm
Savings
kWh
Savings
Therm
Savings
CZ02
7.2
13.5
14.6
27.0
10.4
26.5
21.3
52.9
CZ03
7.2
15.1
14.5
30.3
10.5
29.2
20.4
58.1
CZ04
7.5
13.1
15.1
26.2
8.2
25.4
17.6
50.7
CZ05
7.5
16.3
15.3
32.8
11.5
30.6
21.2
61.7
CZ08
5.4
8.8
11.4
17.3
3.2
17.7
5.9
35.3
CZ09
7.7
9.5
15.7
18.9
8.3
20.1
17.1
40.3
CZ10
9.2
10.0
17.3
19.8
10.3
20.7
20.2
41.5
CZ11
13.9
12.7
27.5
25.4
19.6
25.9
39.1
52.0
CZ12
10.8
13.3
21.2
26.5
14.0
27.2
30.4
54.4
CZ14
23.6
14.7
47.6
29.4
31.7
28.6
60.6
57.4
CZ15
33.9
8.0
68.6
16.0
65.5
15.9
131.8
31.8
CZ16
10.8
18.0
20.8
36.0
13.6
33.7
29.2
67.6
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
12-9
13
All Other – Residential
13.ALL OTHER – RESIDENTIAL
13.1 Smart Power Strip
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replacement of standard electric power strips with smart strips in home offices and
home entertainment centers
Smart power strips have one outlet that controls the power supplied to a number of
other related devices attached to the same power strip. Smart power strips can
automatically eliminate the electrical load of peripheral devices (computer printer,
scanner, DVD player, etc.) when an electronic control device (personal computer or
television) is in standby or off mode.
End use
Plug load – consumer electronics
Project eligibility
Applicable to smart power strips installed in both single-family and multifamily
residential buildings
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
24 kWh per smart strip installed
Measure cost
$37.29 per smart strip
EUL
8 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Preexisting standard power strips without any control mechanism and which are
controlled with a single manual switch
Efficient case description
A smart power strip with the capability to sense the drop in current that occurs
when the control device enters a low-power mode. A current-sensing transformer
attached to an outlet on the plug strip monitors the current draw of the
designated device. When the current draw of this device drops below a certain
threshold, power is disconnected from the controlled outlets on the plug strip.
Savings Calculation
2
Annual energy savings
1.
2.
Peak demand reduction
No peak demand reduction for this measure.
Calculations are based on the SCE smart power strip work paper
Calculation methodology is based on a 2008 California home electronics
3
survey which provides installation percentage of a variety of common home
theatre equipment. This information was combined with data from a
4
NYSERDA study that detailed total standby loads of these various pieces of
equipment as well as average standby time percentages.
Key Parameters
N/A
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
13-1
Section 13
All Other – Residential
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Ensure that the master electronic device, TV, or computer, is connected to the appropriate master outlet on the power strip.
Important Notes
N/A
1
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls, assumed equivalent to occupancy sensor control.
2
SCE work paper SCE13CS002, Revised May 8, 2012
3
California Energy Commission’s Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief. “Energy Use of Household Electronics:
Taming the Wild Growth,” September 2008.
4
New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA). Advanced Power Strip Research Report. August 2011
13.2 Variable Speed Residential Pool Pump
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replace existing pool pump with a variable speed pool pump and variable speed
pump control.
End use
Other – residential pool pump.
Project eligibility
Single-family residential pool pumps greater or equal to 1 hp.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
674 kWh ‒ Natural replacement
1,711 kWh ‒ Early retirement period
Measure cost
$455 per VSD pump
EUL
10 years
RUL: 3.3 years or EUL minus preexisting pump age
1
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1.
2.
Natural replacement – code
Dual baseline ‒ early retirement
Baseline description
1.
Natural replacement: two speed pump, as required by Title 20 Appliance
Standards for pumps 1 hp and larger
Early retirement: single speed pump
2.
Efficient case description
VSD pump with programmable VSD control
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
See TRM214 variable speed residential pool pump spreadsheet.
Peak demand reduction
No peak demand reduction for this measure
Key Parameters
Average pump size
Energy factors
Average pool size
% time at low speed
1.73 kW
2.06 – 4.68 gallons/watt-hour
20,000 gallons
83%
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Pool pump should be properly sized and VSD controls should be programmed for: default operation at lowest optimal
speed (less than 50% of full speed), pump speed ramp up as filter pressure increases, and minimal use at high
speed pump operation.
Important Notes
N/A
1
SCE work paper, SCE13WP001, Revision 1, Aug. 2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
13-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
All Other – Residential
Section 13
13.3 Electric Domestic Hot Water Storage Heater
Savings for this measure are included with gas domestic hot water (DHW) heaters. See
Section 15.3.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
13-3
Gas Measures ‒Nonresidential
14
14.GAS MEASURES - NONRESIDENTIAL
14.1 Tank Insulation
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of insulation of either 1” thick or 2” thick on an existing tank containing hot
liquid between 120°F – 170°F or 170°F – 200°F.
End use
Heating – hot fluid for process uses
Project eligibility
Existing tanks that heat or store hot liquid. Tanks that must be insulated to meet
building codes or occupancy safety codes are not eligible. Tanks with existing
insulation are also not eligible. Cellular glass insulation or foam insulation are allowed.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table. Range of savings is 13.4 – 25.2 therms per sq ft per
year, depending on the liquid temperature and insulation thickness.
Incremental measure cost
See Measure Cost Table. Materials and labor for 1” thick insulation is $8 per sq ft and
2” thick insulation is $9 per sq ft.
EUL
15 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Hot liquid heating or storage tanks with no insulation
Efficient case description
Installation of insulation of either 1” or 2” thick
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
  (ℎ/) =
NA
 × ( −  )
100,000 × 
Definitions
t=
Qp=
Qi=
Eb =
100,000=
Annual operating hours assumed to be 8,760 hours per year
Heat loss from uninsulated pipe in Btu/h per sq ft of tank surface area
Heat loss from insulated pipe in Btu/h per sq ft of tank surface area
Efficiency of the boiler, assumed to be 82.5%
Number of Btu per therm
Key Parameters
Liquid temperature
For liquids between 120°F – 170°F, 145°F is used for the liquid temperature. For
liquids between 170°F – 200°F, 185°F is used for the liquid temperature.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1
PGECOPRO103 R4 Tank Insulation, June 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
14-1
Section 14
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
14.1.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the ranges of savings values for1” and 2” insulation for tanks that are
heating or storing liquid at temperatures between 120°F – 170°F and 170°F – 200°F.
1
Measure Name
°
°
1" tank insulation, 120 F – 170 F liquid
Gas Savings
(Therms per sq ft
of insulation)
13.4
°
°
23.9
°
°
14.2
°
°
25.2
1" tank insulation, 170 F – 200 F liquid
2" tank insulation, 120 F – 120 F liquid
2" tank insulation, 170 F – 200 F liquid
1
PGECOPRO103 R4 Tank Insulation, June 2012
14.1.2 Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure cost.
Measure Name
Cost
°
°
$8
°
°
$8
°
°
$9
°
°
$9
1" tank insulation, 120 F – 170 F liquid
1" tank insulation, 170 F – 200 F liquid
2" tank insulation, 120 F – 120 F liquid
2" tank insulation, 170 F – 200 F liquid
1
1
PGECOPRO103 R4 Tank Insulation, June 2012
14.2 Hot Water and Steam Pipe Insulation
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of insulation at least 1” thick on existing hot water or low pressure (<15
psig) steam pipe.
End use
Heating – steam and hot water for process, HVAC, and domestic uses.
Project eligibility
Existing hot water or steam piping is uninsulated. Piping that must be insulated to
meet building codes or occupancy safety codes are not eligible. For hot water
systems, rigid polyurethane, rigid polystyrene, and rigid foam rubber insulation are
allowed. For low pressure steam systems, mineral fiber, cellular glass, and calcium
silicate are allowed.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
See Energy Savings Table. Range of savings is 1 to 15 therms per linear foot per
year depending on boiler type, pipe diameter, and building type.
Incremental measure cost
See Measure Cost Table. Range of savings is $6 to $13 per linear foot based on
boiler type.
EUL
15 years
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Hot water or steam piping system with no insulation
Efficient case description
Installation of insulation of at least 1” thick
14-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
Section 14
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
From PG&E work paper:
Peak demand reduction
NA
  (ℎ/) =
 × ( −  )
100,000 × 
Definitions
t=
Qp=
Qi=
Eb =
100,000=
Annual operating hours
Heat loss from uninsulated pipe in Btu/h per foot of pipe
Heat loss from insulated pipe in Btu/h per foot of pipe
Efficiency of the boiler, assumed to be 83%
Number of Btu per therm
Key Parameters
Annual operating hours
Annual operating hours were modeled for three building types; small commercial,
large commercial and industrial. Small commercial facilities operate 7.5 to 9 hours
per day, 6 days per week year-round for an average of 2,425 hours per year. This
number is based on a survey of dry cleaners performed in southern California. Large
commercial facilities such as hotels, schools, office buildings are assumed to operate
4,380 hours per year. Industrial facilities are assumed to operate 24 hours per day, 7
days per week for 46 weeks per year for a total of 7,752 hours per year.
Pipe parameters
Hot water and steam pipes were assumed to be Schedule 40 steel. For pipes with an
inside diameter (I.D.) of ≤1”, an I.D. of 0.75” was used. For pipes with an I.D. >1”, an
I.D. of 1.7” was used.
Fluid temperature
Hot water is assumed to be 150°F. Low pressure steam is assumed to be 241°F.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1
PG&E work paper PGECOHVC104 Pipe Insulation R5, June 2012
14.2.1 Energy Savings Table
The following table provides the ranges of savings values for how water and low-pressure
steam in pipes with diameter of ≤1” and >1” in small commercial, large commercial, and
industrial facilities.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
14-3
Section 14
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
1
Building Type
Gas Savings
(Therms per linear
foot of pipe)
Hot water pipe insulation, ≤1"
diameter pipe
Small retail
1.2
Hot water pipe insulation, ≤1"
diameter pipe
Large office
2.2
Hot water pipe insulation, ≤1"
diameter pipe
Light industrial mfg.
3.7
Hot water pipe insulation, >1"
diameter pipe
Small retail
2.2
Hot water pipe insulation, >1"
diameter pipe
Large office
4.0
Hot water pipe insulation, >1"
diameter pipe
Light industrial mfg.
7.2
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, ≤1" diameter pipe
Small retail
2.6
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, ≤1" diameter pipe
Large office
4.7
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, ≤1" diameter pipe
Light industrial mfg.
8.2
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, >1" diameter pipe
Small retail
4.7
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, >1" diameter pipe
Large office
8.6
Low pressure steam pipe
insulation, >1" diameter pipe
Light industrial mfg.
15.1
Measure Name
1
PG&E work paper PGECOHVC104 Pipe Insulation R5, June 2012
14.2.2 Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure cost for hot water and steam pipes with an inside
diameter of ≤1” and >1”. The cost is listed in dollars per linear foot of pipe.
Measure Name
Cost
Hot water ≤1" pipe
$6
Hot water >1" pipe
$9
Low pressure steam ≤1" pipe
$11
Low pressure steam >1" pipe
$13
1
1
PG&E work paper PGECOHVC104 Pipe Insulation R5, June 2012
14-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
Section 14
14.3 High Efficiency Commercial Gas Hot Water Heaters
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency hot water heater in a commercial application
End use
Domestic hot water
Project eligibility
Applicable to both retrofit and new construction. See Unit Efficiency Ratings Table for
minimum efficiency requirements.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size.
All savings are listed as therms per MBtu/h of capacity.
Incremental measure cost
1.
2.
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size.
All costs are listed as total costs.
EUL
1.
Instantaneous water heaters – 20 years
2.
Storage tank water heaters – 15 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
1.
2.
Natural replacement – code
Dual baseline – early retirement
Baseline description
The baselines are the same as those listed in the DEER database. Baseline
efficiency is determined by new 2013/2014 Title 24 standards which are 0.62 energy
factor (EF) for instantaneous water heaters and 0.53 to 0.61 EF for storage water
heaters, depending on size.
For 2015 DEER standards will be raised to 0.82 EF for instantaneous water heaters
and 0.60 to 0.74 EF for storage water heaters.
Efficient case description
1.
2.
Instantaneous water heaters with EF of 0.80, 0.82 and 0.85
Gas storage water heaters ranging in size from 30 to 75 gallons with EF of 0.65
and 0.70
1.
2.
See TRM304 DHW Spreadsheet
Savings for this measure were derived from figures contained within the 2011
DEER database. The DEER database contains savings for six building vintage
categories (ranges of buildings by age) for every measure and building use type.
For RUL values, the TRM spreadsheet combines the building vintage weights by
2
total installed square footage (California building stock data ) to produce a
single weighted savings value for each water heater type. Savings are not split
out by individual building type.
RUL savings are calculated in the same manner as EUL savings using the
DEER 2011 savings figures for the RUL period.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
3.
Peak demand reduction
N/A for gas measures
Definitions
Vintage =
EF =
Building age as indicated in DEER savings database.
Energy factor – total annual energy efficiency of a unit including recovery efficiency,
standby losses and cycling losses.
Key Parameters
Building type
Determines the average hours of operation and internal building loads.
Hot water heater unit size
Total full-load heating capacity in MBtu/hr. Units are assumed to be properly sized
with regards to capacity.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
14-5
Section 14
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Determine if new unit will be replacing a functional unit or a failed unit.
Verify that new unit meets minimum efficiency requirements.
Verify that new unit is properly installed and commissioned.
Important Notes
New federal appliance standards raise the required hot water heater efficiency rating in April of 2015. Once the
standards are in effect, the measure savings estimates are no longer applicable
1
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2
Measure Quantification Methodology Statewide Savings and Cost, KEMA, December 6, 2009
14.3.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the ranges of savings values for each furnace type.
Unit Size and Type
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.80 EF
Natural
Replacement
Therms/MBtu/h
0.44
Dual Baseline
– Early
Retirement
Therms/MBtu/h
2.42
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
0.89
2.88
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.85 EF
1.57
3.55
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.65 EF
1.19
1.57
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
1.55
1.93
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
1.42
1.58
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
1.57
1.73
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
1.37
1.40
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
1.50
1.52
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
1.43
1.43
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
1.57
1.57
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
1.48
1.71
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
1.59
1.82
14.3.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings
The following table shows the efficiency ratings1 used in the DEER analysis, the minimum
federal baseline efficiencies, and measure furnace efficiencies. New federal appliance standards,
which go into effect on April 16, 2015, are also listed in the table.
14-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
Section 14
Current
Federal Stds
(EF)
Minimum
Replacement
Unit Efficiency
(EF)
2015 Federal
Stds (EF)
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.80 EF
0.62 EF
0.80 EF
0.82 EF
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
0.62 EF
0.85 EF
0.82 EF
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.85 EF
0.62 EF
0.90 EF
0.82 EF
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.65 EF
0.61 EF
0.65 EF
0.63 EF
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
0.61 EF
0.70 EF
0.63 EF
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
0.59 EF
0.67 EF
0.62 EF
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
0.59 EF
0.70 EF
0.62 EF
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
0.58 EF
0.67 EF
0.60 EF
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
0.58 EF
0.70 EF
0.60 EF
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
0.56 EF
0.66 EF
0.59 EF
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
0.56 EF
0.70 EF
0.59 EF
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
0.53 EF
0.66 EF
0.56 EF
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
0.53 EF
0.70 EF
0.56 EF
Unit Size and Type
14.3.3 Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure cost3.
Unit Size and Type
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.80 EF
Incremental
Cost ($/MBtu/h)
$77
Full Replacement
Costs ($/MBtu/h)
$122
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
$77
$122
Hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.85 EF
$77
$122
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.65 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 30-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 40-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.67 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 50-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 60-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.66 EF
$209
$330
Hot water heater, 75-gallon storage, 0.70 EF
$209
$330
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
14-7
Section 14
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
14.4 Ozone Laundry
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of an ozone generator on an existing or new nonresidential laundry
facility. The addition of the ozone generator eliminates the need for bleach or
detergents that require hot water during the washing process. The reduction in hot
water usage results in less thermal load on the site’s boiler and reduces total site gas
consumption.
End use
Heating – commercial laundry
Project eligibility
Applicable to both retrofit and new construction in the following facility types
1. Hotels with less than 250 rooms
2. Fitness or recreational sports centers
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
39.3 therms per lbs of laundry capacity
Incremental measure cost
$75 per lbs of laundry capacity
EUL
10 years
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Commercial laundry systems based on bleach and detergent cleaning requiring hot
water supplied by a natural gas boiler.
Natural gas boiler is assumed to operate at 80% efficiency. Laundry is assumed to be
washed using hot water.
Efficient case description
Ozone generator which removes the need for the majority of hot water in the washing
process. Hot water usage is assumed to be reduced by 86%.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Peak demand reduction
1
Savings estimates from IOU work paper based on the following inputs:
1. City water temperature = 60ºF
2. Hot water washing temperature = 135ºF
3. Boiler efficiency = 80%
4. Hot water reduction due to ozone system = 86%
5. Water heating energy = 0.00781 therms/gallon
6. Washer utilization factor = 4380 lbs laundry/unit
7. Hot water usage factor = 1.34 gallons
N/A
  = [( ℎ ) × (ℎ  )
× (  )] × [1 − (  ]
Key Parameters
Washer utilization factor
Average total lbs of laundry cleaned per unit (based on survey results)
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1. Verify that existing hot water is supplied by a natural gas boiler.
2. Ozone laundry system must transfer ozone into the water through venture injection or bubble diffusion.
Important Notes
N/A
1
PGE work paper PGECOAPP123 Ozone Laundry Nonresidential Revision #3 – 6/21/12
14-8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Nonresidential
Section 14
14.5 Steam Traps
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Replace a failed steam trap with a new steam trap.
End use
Heating – steam boiler, steam distribution system.
Project eligibility
Existing system retrofit. Applies to steam traps of any size.
Savings type
UES, semi-custom measure.
Unit energy savings
119 therms per trap, or custom-calculated using the TRM402 steam trap savings
calculator.
Incremental measure cost
$233 per trap
EUL
6 years
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Efficient case description
A new or rebuilt (new steam capsule) steam trap. The new steam trap can be
thermostatic, mechanical, thermodynamic, or fixed orifice.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1
Savings estimates obtained from SCG work paper , and is based on the following
assumptions:
1. 25% of the steam traps are line pressure traps and 75% are load (reduced
pressure) traps.
2. Traps leak steam less often than system operates.
3. A number of traps will fail in the closed position (therefore no energy loss).
4. An 81% factor is used to account for traps failed in the closed position.
5. Heat exchanger load factor reduces stream trap losses.
6. The combined load factor/pressure factor is 21.4%.
The TRM402 steam trap savings calculator can be used to determine more accurate,
project-specific savings estimates. The calculator is designed to estimate savings for
both replacement and repair of steam straps. Calculations are based on site steam
system characteristics and steam trap size and type.
Peak demand reduction
N/A
Definitions
N/A
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Obtain a copy of any ultrasonic testing and mapping of failed steam traps, including information on steam trap
pressure, steam trap type, location, and load/end use served.
Verify the quantity of steam traps failed in the closed position.
Verify quantity and type of new steam traps installed.
Important Notes
N/A
1
SCG work paper SCWP100310A, Revision 9, Deemed Program for Commercial Steam Traps, Aug. 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
14-9
Gas Measures ‒Residential
15
15.GAS MEASURES – RESIDENTIAL
15.1 High Efficiency Residential Furnace & Boiler
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency furnaces or boilers (85 – 96 AFUE) in either single- or
multifamily homes. Not applicable for central boilers serving a multifamily dwelling.
End use
HVAC – CZ04
Project eligibility
Furnaces must meet either CEE Tier 2 (92 AFUE) or Tier 3 (94 AFUE) requirements.
Hot water boilers must meet ENERGY STAR requirements (85 AFUE).
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
Incremental measure cost
1.
2.
EUL
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size as well as
1.
building type
All savings are listed as therms per kBtu/h of heating capacity (kBtu/h output).
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size as well as building
type.
2
All costs are per kBtu/h of heating capacity.
20 years
3
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
1.
2.
3.
Efficient case description
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
1.
2.
3.
Peak demand reduction
The baselines are adjusted from those listed in the DEER database. Baseline
furnace efficiency is determined by federal standards of 80% AFUE for units of
less than 225,000 Btu/h.
Baseline efficiency for boilers is 82% AFUE, per federal regulations.
A summary of the baseline unit efficiency assumptions has been listed in the
Savings Adjustment Table.
Furnaces with AFUE (annual fuel utilization efficiency) between 92% to 96%
Boiler AFUE efficiency of at least 85%
See TRM305 residential furnace spreadsheet.
Savings for this measure were derived from figures contained within the 2011 DEER
database. The DEER database contains savings for six building vintage categories
(ranges of buildings by age) for every measure and building use type. Only
multifamily and single-family types were used in the analysis. For RUL values, the
TRM spreadsheet combines the building vintage weights by total installed square
2
footage (California building stock data from IOU work paper ) to produce a single
weighted savings value.
Specific DEER savings figures were not available for the boiler measure. The
savings calculations assume that the heating load for the furnace and the boiler
are the same for this measure. Savings are determined using heating loads and
efficiency improvements from baseline to efficient case conditions.
N/A for gas measures
Definitions
Vintage =
AFUE =
Savings Estimation TRM
Building age as indicated in DEER savings database
Annual fuel utilization efficiency
ers
15-1
Section 15
Gas Measures – Residential
Key Parameters
Building type
Determines the average hours of operation and internal building loads.
HVAC unit size
Total full-load heating capacity in kBtu/h. Units are assumed to be properly sized.
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Determine if new unit will be replacing a functional unit or a failed unit.
Verify that new unit meets minimum efficiency requirements.
Verify that new unit is properly installed and commissioned.
Important Notes
Unit savings are for CZ04.
1
PGECOHVC145 R0 execsumm.xls, PGE, June 16, 2012
2
PGECOHVC145 R0 execsumm.xls, PGE, November 15, 2012; Boiler pricing based on Internet research. Crown Boiler, 82% and
85% AFUE, 91,000 Btu/h
3
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
15.1.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the ranges of savings values for each furnace type.
Energy Savings
Therms per kBtu/h
Output
Unit Size and Type
Residential furnace – 90% AFUE – single family
0.386
Residential furnace – 90% AFUE – multifamily
0.329
Residential furnace – 92% AFUE – single family
0.477
Residential furnace – 92% AFUE – multifamily
0.406
Residential furnace – 94% AFUE – single family
0.568
Residential furnace – 94% AFUE – multifamily
0.483
Residential furnace – 96% AFUE – single family
0.658
Residential furnace – 96% AFUE – multifamily
0.560
Residential hot water boiler – 85% AFUE – single family
0.069
Residential hot water boiler – 85% AFUE – multifamily
0.059
15.1.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings
This table shows the efficiency ratings used in the DEER analysis, the minimum federal baseline
efficiencies, and measure furnace efficiencies.
Unit Size and Type
DEER Baseline ‒ Federal Baseline –
(AFUE)
(AFUE)
TRM Replacement
Unit Efficiency
(AFUE)
Residential furnace – 92% AFUE
78
80
92
Residential furnace – 94% AFUE
78
80
94
Residential furnace – 96% AFUE
78
80
96
Residential hot water boiler – 80% AFUE
N/A
82
85
15-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Residential
Section 15
15.1.3 Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure cost.
Measure Cost (per
kBtu/h output)
Unit Size and Type
Residential furnace – 90% AFUE – single family
$3.44
Residential furnace – 90% AFUE – multifamily
$3.44
Residential furnace – 92% AFUE – single family
$5.11
Residential furnace – 92% AFUE – multifamily
$5.11
Residential furnace – 94% AFUE – single family
$6.91
Residential furnace – 94% AFUE – multifamily
$6.91
Residential furnace – 96% AFUE – single family
$8.85
Residential furnace – 96% AFUE – multifamily
$8.85
Residential hot water boiler – 85% AFUE – single family
$6.59
Residential hot water boiler – 85% AFUE – multifamily
$6.59
15.2 Domestic Hot Water Piping Insulation – Multifamily Recirculating System
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of insulation at least of ½ – ¾ inches thick on existing hot water pipes
End use
DHW
Project eligibility
Existing hot water pipes are uninsulated in multifamily central hot water systems with
recirculation pumps.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
0.54 therms per year per linear foot of pipe
Incremental measure cost
$1 per linear foot
EUL
11 years
1
1
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
Hot water pipe with no insulation
Efficient case description
Installation of insulation of ½ – ¾ inches thick
Savings Calculation
1
Annual energy savings
formula
IOU work paper . The energy savings were calculated using the NAIMA’s 3E Plus
V4.0 software.
Peak demand reduction
N/A
Key Parameters
Annual EFLH
2,641 hours per year
Pipe parameters
The pipe is assumed to be copper with a 1-inch pipe diameter
Fluid temperature
Hot water is assumed to be 120°F
Insulation parameters
Polyethylene foam insulation of ½ inch thickness or greater
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
N/A
Important Notes
N/A
1
SDG&E work paper WPSDGEREWH1203 Rev0 MF Multi-Family Pipe Wrap Central Recirculation Systems, June 2012
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
15-3
Section 15
Gas Measures – Residential
15.3 Domestic Hot Water Heater Meeting CEE Efficiency Requirements
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a new high efficiency domestic hot water (DHW) heater in a residential
application
End use
DHW – CZ04
Project eligibility
1.
2.
3.
4.
Applicable for new construction or EUL replacement.
Tank storage water heaters must be greater than 30 gallons in capacity.
Gas storage and tankless water heaters must meet CEE Tier 1 or Tier 2
specifications and be ENERGY STAR certified.
Electric storage water heaters must be greater than 30 gallons and have an EF
of 0.93 or greater.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
1.
2.
Incremental measure cost
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size. Total measure cost
as well as incremental cost is listed.
EUL
15 years
See Energy Savings Table – varies based on unit type and size.
All savings are listed as therms or kWh per year.
1
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – code
Baseline description
1.
2.
3.
4.
2012 California Appliance Efficiency Standards (Title 20)
Gas storage – 40 gallon storage tank, 0.594 EF
Electric storage – 0.86 to 0.92 EF depending on size
Gas instantaneous – 0.62 EF
Efficient case description
1.
2.
3.
Instantaneous water heaters with EF of 0.82
Gas storage water heaters with EF of 0.67, 0.80 & 0.90 EF
Electric storage water heaters with EF ≥ 0.93
Annual energy savings
formula
1.
2.
See TRM209 residential hot water heater spreadsheet.
Savings for this measure were derived using median daily water usage statistics
2
from LBNL studies as well as the DOE test procedures.
Peak demand reduction
Electric storage tank demand savings calculated using the appropriate CEC peak
2
demand correction factor.
Savings Calculation
Definitions
Vintage =
EF =
Building age as indicated in DEER savings database.
Energy factor – total annual energy efficiency of a unit including recovery efficiency,
standby losses, and cycling losses.
Key Parameters
Median daily water use
Average hot water usage for single-family homes
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
Verify that new unit meets minimum efficiency requirements.
Important Notes
Unit savings are for CZ04.
1
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
2
Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies, LBNL, June 2012
15-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Residential
Section 15
15.3.1 Energy Savings Table
This table provides the savings values for each heater type.
Energy Savings,
Therms per Year
Unit Size and Type
Gas hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
47
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.67 EF
23
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.80 EF
52
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.90 EF
68
Electric hot water heater, storage tank, 0.93 EF
165
15.3.2 Unit Efficiency Ratings
The following table provides the energy factor (EF) efficiency ratings used for code baseline and
replacement units.
Code Baseline
(EF)
Unit Size and Type
Replacement Unit
(EF)
Gas hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
0.62 EF
0.82 EF
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.67 EF
0.59 EF
0.67 EF
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.80 EF
0.59 EF
0.80 EF
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.90 EF
0.59 EF
0.90 EF
Electric hot water heater, storage tank, 0.93 EF
0.89 EF
0.93 EF
15.3.3 Measure Cost Table
This table provides the incremental measure costs1 by heater type and efficiency rating.
Unit Size and Type
Incremental Cost
Full Replacement Costs
$1,807
$2,235
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.67 EF
$93
$521
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.80 EF
$93
$521
Gas hot water heater, storage tank, 0.90 EF
$93
$521
Electric hot water heater, storage tank, 0.93 EF
$72
$323
Gas hot water heater, instantaneous, 0.82 EF
1PGECODHW104
Gas Storage Water Heater work paper, Revision #3, July 2012, provides the weighted average cost for high
efficiency water heaters based on DEER 2008 data.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
15-5
Section 15
Gas Measures – Residential
15.4 Low-Flow Showerheads
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a low-flow showerhead which reduces total water flow by introducing
air into the stream. This reduction in flow reduces the load on a home’s hot water
heating system.
End use
DHW
Project eligibility
1.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Electric water heater savings
Single-family homes
2.0 gpm showerhead – 124.5 kWh
Multifamily homes
2.0 gpm showerhead – 64.4 kWh
2.
This measure is applicable to all residential households’ showerheads with a
flow of 2.5 gpm or higher. Low-flow showerheads must reduce flow to 2.0 gpm or
below.
Showerhead must be supplied with hot water.
1
1
Gas water heater savings
Single-family homes
2.0 gpm showerhead – 7.6 therms
Multifamily homes
2.0 gpm showerhead – 7.1 therms
Incremental measure cost
Total measure cost – $45.96
EUL
DEER 2011 – 10 years
2
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions.
Baseline description
The Federal Energy Policy Act of 1992 requires that showerheads must use no more
than 2.5 gpm.
Efficient case description
1.
2.
Showerheads with a total flow of 2.0 gpm.
Low-flow showerhead must pass test procedure ANSI/ASME A112.18.1-2000,
Section 5.5.
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
DEER deemed savings values which are based on non-weather sensitive
3
engineering calculations performed by the DEER team . Savings were calculated for
the reduction from 2.5 gpm to 2.0 gpm.
Peak demand reduction
Electric water heater savings
Single-family homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 0.027 kW
Multifamily homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 0.014 kW
Definitions
N/A
1
Key Parameters
N/A
15-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Gas Measures – Residential
Section 15
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Ensure that existing faucets do not have an aerator installed or that the baseline faucet has a flow rate of 2.2
gpm or higher.
Verify that faucet is attached to a hot water supply.
Determine if home has gas or electric hot water heater.
Important Notes
There are studies that have indicated that, due to health concerns, manufacturers are moving away from low-flow
devices that introduce air into the stream. The viability of this measure should be vetted in future updates.
1
PGE3PDHW116 Faucet Aerators Revision 0 – August 29, 2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
3
Database for Energy Efficiency Resources: 2011 Update. Itron, November 8, 2011
http://www.deeresources.com/DEER2011/download/2011_DEER_Documentation.pdf
15.5 Faucet Aerators
Measure Summary Information
Measure description
Installation of a faucet flow aerator that reduces total water flow by introducing air into the
stream. This reduction in flow reduces the load on a home’s hot water heating
system.
End use
DHW
Project eligibility
1.
2.
This measure is applicable to all residential households who have faucets with a
flow of 2.2 gpm or higher. Aerators must reduce flow to 1.5 gpm or below.
Faucet must be supplied with hot water.
Savings type
UES
Unit energy savings
Electric water heater savings
Single-family homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 93.4 kWh
1.0 gpm aerator – 65.9 kWh
1.5 gpm aerator – 38.5 kWh
Multifamily homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 48.3 kWh
1.0 gpm aerator – 34.1 kWh
1.5 gpm aerator – 19.9 kWh
1
Gas water heater savings
Single-family homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 5.7 therms
1.0 gpm aerator – 4.0 therms
1.5 gpm aerator – 2.3 therms
Multifamily homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 5.4 therms
1.0 gpm aerator – 3.8 therms
1.5 gpm aerator – 2.2 therms
Incremental measure cost
Total measure cost – $13.24
EUL
DEER 2011 – 10 years
Savings Estimation TRM
1
2
ers
15-7
Section 15
Gas Measures – Residential
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Applicable baseline types
Natural replacement – preexisting conditions
Baseline description
The Federal Energy Policy Act of 1992 requires that all faucet fixtures manufactured
in the United States restrict maximum water flow at or below 2.5 gallons per minute
(gpm) at 80 pounds per square inch (psi) of water pressure or 2.2 gpm at 60 psi.
Efficient case description
Faucet aerators reducing flow to 0.5 gpm to 1.5 gpm
Savings Calculation
Annual energy savings
formula
Savings figures are based upon DEER deemed savings values which were formulated
3
using non-weather sensitive engineering calculations performed by the DEER team .
Savings were calculated for a reduction from 2.2 gpm to 0.5 gpm. A linear regression
was used to determine the savings for the 1.0 and 1.5 gpm aerator measures.
Peak demand reduction
Electric water heater savings
Single-family homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 0.0205 kW
1.0 gpm aerator – 0.0145 kW
1.5 gpm aerator – 0.0085 kW
Multifamily homes
0.5 gpm aerator – 0.0106 kW
1.0 gpm aerator – 0.0075 kW
1.5 gpm aerator – 0.0044 kW
Definitions
N/A
1
Key Parameters
N/A
Quality Assurance: Design, Installation, Commissioning, and Operation
1.
2.
3.
Verify that existing faucets do not have an aerator installed or that the baseline faucet has a flow rate of 2.2 gpm
or higher.
Verify that faucet is attached to a hot water supply.
Determine if home has gas or electric hot water heater.
Important Notes
Applicable to all climate zones
1
PGE3PDHW116 Faucet Aerators Revision 0 – August 29, 2012
2
DEER_EUL_Summary_10-1-2008.xls
3
Database for Energy Efficiency Resources: 2011 Update. Itron, November 8, 2011
http://www.deeresources.com/DEER2011/download/2011_DEER_Documentation.pdf
15-8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Custom Measure Protocol
16
16.CUSTOM MEASURE PROTOCOL
This section describes how program administrators can reliably estimate and document energy
savings for custom measures.
A custom measure is any measure not defined by this manual as either a unit energy savings
measure or a semi-custom measure. In more general terms, a custom measure is defined as an
energy-related project, action, equipment change, or system improvements that reduce energy
consumption.
16.1 Baseline Use in Estimating Energy Savings
In order to estimate energy savings, energy usage must be determined for both a baseline and
an efficient-case condition. The baseline condition is an estimate of the future energy use that
would have occurred in the absence of the installed measure. It is constrained by the available
alternatives to installing the measure. Alternatives are often project-specific and may include
“do nothing” or be limited by minimum code requirements or product availability. In practice,
the pre-retrofit energy use is adjusted 3 to account for the alternative constraints and normalized
for comparison to the efficient-case condition. The efficient-case condition is the energy
consumption after the measure has been implemented. Energy savings are the difference
between the baseline and efficient-case energy use.
Often referred to as the adjusted baseline. In the context presented in this manual, adjusted baseline and
baseline have the same meaning.
3
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
16-1
Section 16
Custom Measure Protocol
Figure 16-1
Baseline and Efficient Case Energy Use
16.1.1 Baseline Examples
The following are examples of how pre-retrofit conditions are adjusted to determine the
baseline energy use:
Energy code baseline adjustment – The lighting fixtures in a warehouse are to be completely
replaced with new energy efficient high-bay fixtures. Energy code requires fixture replacements
to meet current code lighting power densities. Therefore, the baseline energy use is based on the
existing fixtures or on the energy code requirements, whichever uses less energy.
Federal regulations baseline adjustment – Lighting fixtures with T12 lamps will be retrofitted
with high performance T8 lamps and new ballasts. Recent federal regulations have ceased the
manufacturing of standard T12 lamps, such as the ones in the fixtures to be retrofitted. If the
existing stock of T12 replacement lamps has been depleted, then T12 lamps are not a viable
option. Therefore, the baseline energy use is based on a fixture lamp that meets federal
regulations. The lamp choices would be either first-generation T8 lamps or code-compliant T12
lamps (high-efficacy T12 lamps made with rare-earth elements that meet federal regulations).
Production rate baseline adjustment – An electric boiler at a manufacturing plant will be
replaced with a new, energy efficient boiler with heat recovery. The existing boiler energy use is
driven by the amount of product produced at the plant, which varies based on market demand.
The baseline energy use is based on the existing boiler energy use per unit of product produced,
which allows the projected baseline energy use to be compared to the efficient-case energy use.
Current practice baseline adjustment – A plant is expanding and needs to replace a heat
exchanger to meet its new capacity requirements. The existing two-stage heat exchanger is
considered obsolete. The least-efficient heat exchanger available for purchase is a four-stage
16-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Custom Measure Protocol
Section 16
heat exchanger. Therefore, the baseline energy use is based on the use of a four-stage heat
exchanger to meet the expanded capacity requirements.
16.1.2 Dual Baseline
A dual baseline is used to properly assess a measure’s cost-effectiveness when more than one
baseline is applicable over the life of the measure. In this scenario, the baseline energy use for
the first baseline time period may be the preexisting conditions and is limited to the remaining
useful life (RUL) of the preexisting equipment. The second baseline energy use is based on code
or current practice, and its time period starts after the RUL time period ends and continues up
to the effective useful life (EUL) of the measure. The energy savings benefit of the measure
(used in cost-effectiveness tests) is based on the sum of the annual savings over the life of the
measure. Note that annual energy savings in this context is not the same as first-year savings,
which may be used for tracking program energy savings goals.
For example, consider that a packaged AC unit is replaced with a more energy-efficient unit.
The existing AC unit is 8 years old at the time of replacement, and its EUL is 15 years. The first
baseline energy use is based on the existing AC unit’s efficiency and the calculated annual
energy savings for this baseline is appropriate for the first 7 years (EUL minus the age of the
unit) of lifecycle energy savings. The second baseline energy use is based on the current energy
code efficiency requirements, and the calculated energy savings for the second baseline is
appropriate for the last 8 years of life cycle energy savings 4.
Figure 16-2
Dual Baseline Example
It should be noted that the current version of the POU compliance reporting tool uses these two streams
of energy savings values to determine an equivalent uniform annual energy savings value for reporting
annual energy savings and not the first-year savings.
4
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
16-3
Section 16
Custom Measure Protocol
16.2 Energy Savings Estimate Approach
Custom measure energy savings can be estimated by using one of the three following
approaches:
1. Modified unit energy savings – The program administrator uses the analysis methodology
provided for a UES (or semi-custom) measure and adjusts project-specific parameters that
differ from those specified for the measure. This is often the simplest approach, because the
savings estimate methodology, assumptions, and key operating parameters are already
documented. Only the project-specific changes need to be documented.
2. Unit energy savings from other credible sources – Credible sources of reliable savings
estimate are those documented and vetted through peer engineering review or regulatory
process. Examples of credible sources include: California DEER database, CPUCapproved IOU work papers 5, Regional Technical Forum (RTF) approved and provisional
savings estimates and protocols, Efficiency Maine Technical Reference Manual, and the
New York Department of Public Service Technical Reference Manual. Use of savings
values from other credible sources should be confirmed to be current and the bestavailable source of savings estimation. The underlying assumptions, conditions, or other
factors on which the savings estimates are based on should be verified as applicable for its
intended use. Note that weather-sensitive measures from other regions may need to be
adjusted for local climatic conditions.
3. Project-specific savings calculations – The program administrator estimates energy
savings using generally accepted engineering calculations and methodologies. Or, the
program administrator sets guidelines for program participants to provide energy savings
estimates. In either case, the energy savings estimates should be consistent with the
approach described in this section of the manual and fully documented.
16.3 Measure Description
The custom measure description should be described in terms of what systems or equipment is
affected, how the measure will be implemented, and how energy will be saved. Key
assumptions or operating parameters should also be described. The description is summary in
nature, and it is written so it clearly conveys all key aspects of the measure. The level of detail is
contingent upon the measure’s complexity or its uniqueness.
 What systems or equipment are affected – Identify the system or equipment that will
reduce its energy consumption after the measure is implemented. For example, the
building’s central cooling plant utilizes two 25 hp chilled water supply pumps to deliver a
constant flow of chilled water to multiple air handlers. Another example: The open office
area is illuminated by recessed 4-foot, four-lamp T12 lighting fixtures. The lights are
controlled by time clocks.
Note that older versions (pre-2012) of IOU work papers or DEER data (pre-2011) may be obsolete and
not representative of the best available energy savings information.
5
16-4
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Custom Measure Protocol
Section 16
 How the measure will be implemented – Describe what actions are taken, what
equipment is removed or installed, or what changes are made to the affected system. For
the previous two examples: VFDs will be installed to control the speed of the two chilled
water pumps, the air handlers’ three-way valves will be replaced by two-way valves, and
new control algorithms will be programmed into the existing building automation system
to vary chilled water flow based on zone cooling load. Or, for the lighting system
example, the existing fixture T12 lamps and ballasts will be retrofitted with high
performance T8 lamps and premium electronic ballasts. Two T8 lamps will replace four
T12 lamps in each fixture. Occupancy sensors will be installed in the private offices.
 How the measure saves energy – Explain how implementing the measure brings about a
reduction in energy use. For the HVAC example: By converting the chilled water flow
from constant to variable flow, the chiller water pump speed will vary and therefore use
less energy. For the lighting example: The new lamps and ballast require less power while
maintaining space lighting levels. The private office occupancy sensors will reduce the
lighting on-time by turning off lights when the office is unoccupied.
 Key assumptions and operating parameters – Identify the key assumptions or operating
parameters that significantly affect the estimated energy savings. Often, these parameters
are the focus of post-project evaluation efforts to verify reported energy savings. For the
HVAC example: System trend data indicates the cooling system operates most of the time
at part load, with the majority of operating hours at or near 50% of full load. For the
lighting example: The building is occupied for more than 16 hours per day, resulting in
more than 3,000 annual lighting operating hours. Although the private office lights have
manual switches, building staff reported that the lights are never turned off. Occupancy
light loggers were deployed and they confirmed that the lights are operating for extended
periods when the offices are unoccupied.
 Examples of operating parameters – Examples include: hours of operation, occupancy
schedules, production rates, variable or constant loads, automated control sequences (i.e.,
the boilers are shut off when the outside temperature is above 60°F), conditioned or
unconditioned space, human interaction and behavioral influences, interactive effects, and
equipment efficiency at full and part load.
16.4 Savings Calculation Methods
To estimate energy savings, the baseline and efficient case energy use are estimated. The
difference between the two is the measure energy savings. Annual energy savings are estimated
using an engineering model or estimated/validated through measurement and verification.
16.4.1 Engineering Model
Engineering models are generally one of two types: a spreadsheet model or a computer
software model. The engineering model can be as simple a single equation utilizing applicable
input parameters (i.e., difference in pre- and post-equipment efficiency multiplied by equivalent
full load hours) or a more complex analysis that accounts for dynamic operating parameters
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
16-5
Section 16
Custom Measure Protocol
and system interactions that affect energy use. A spreadsheet HVAC bin analysis, for example,
can be constructed to account for variable cooling and heating equipment loads that correlate to
outside weather conditions, production schedules, occupancy schedules, and/or operating
schedules. Computer software simulation models are effective at modeling complex and
dynamic building, equipment, or system interactions that affect energy use.
16.4.2 Model Transparency
Engineering models are subject to review. For models submitted by the program participant,
the program administrator must be able to review the savings estimates to ensure its validity.
Models used by a program administrator to estimate program or project-specific measure
savings are often subject to third-party review for the purposes of validating energy savings.
To assure an engineering model’s savings estimate is valid and reliable, the model should be
transparent and accessible to the reviewer. The savings algorithms for all calculations should be
completely described and sufficient enough so that the reviewer can reproduce the saving
estimate results. Equations in spreadsheet cells should be summarized (for each applicable
group or category) and each equation constant or variable defined. Any values derived from
external references or sources should be described. For complex models, a narrative should
accompany the model to guide the reviewer through the analysis.
Spreadsheet mega-formulas should be sufficiently described so that any reviewer can follow
and confirm the formula logic. A mega-formula is a complex formula created by combining
multiple formulas into a single formula, and it is characterized by the use of multiple embedded
functions. Mega-formulas are very difficult, if not impossible, to decipher, so it is essential that a
step-by-step breakdown of the formula be fully explained.
16.4.3 Measurement and Verification
Where savings estimates are highly variable or uncertain, post-project M&V can be used to
either validate energy savings or be the source of reported energy savings. Measurement and
verification (M&V), as defined by the IPMVP 6, is the process of using measurements to reliably
determine actual savings. There are a variety of methods defined by IPMVP for using measured
data to estimate savings. They generally involve using measured data as input for engineering
models (the measured data calibrates the engineering model to site-specific conditions) or as the
basis of statistical models, such as a whole-building utility bill analysis. Statistical models can be
used to estimate energy savings based on measured data that is correlated to key parameters
that affect energy use, such as weather or production. In addition to the IPMVP, there are a
variety of available resources that provide guidance on statistical modeling techniques. 7 M&V
costs can quickly escalate, so use of M&V to validate energy savings should be used sparingly.
6
International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol
For example, BPA regression guidelines, CPUC evaluation protocols, ASHRAE Guideline 14, CEC
commissioning guidelines. See Section 14 – References.
7
16-6
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
Custom Measure Protocol
Section 16
And where used, M&V costs should be minimized through the use of statistical sampling
techniques.
16.5 Quality Assurance and Savings Validation
Whether or not a custom measure will realize its savings potential is dependent upon the
measure being properly installed, commissioned, and operating as predicted (in the savings
analysis). The following approaches are used to ensure the measure is achieving, or is capable
of achieving, energy savings.
Pre-Implementation
 Documentation review – The measure should be properly documented, as described in
the following section. The documentation should be examined to ensure that it is complete
and that it provides all essential information for verifying savings estimates.
 Site pre-inspection and interviews – Site inspections may be conducted to verify
preexisting conditions, quantities of measures, key operating parameters, equipment
performance, and baseline assumptions in the measure documentation.
 Measured data collection – To address uncertainties regarding the performance of the
measure or to confirm the validity of assumptions used in the baseline analysis, spot
measurements, data trending (via data loggers or building control systems), or other
performance tests may be conducted before the measure is implemented. Preimplementation measured data is also collected if required as part of an M&V approach to
estimating savings.
Post-Implementation
 Documentation retention – All program-required documents should be reviewed to
ensure they are accurate and complete. All energy savings-related documentation should
be retained for future savings validation or evaluation efforts.
 Site post-inspection and interviews – Site inspections and interviews may be conducted
to verify that the measure was installed, commissioned, and operating as intended.
 Measured data collection – Spot measurements or data trending may be conducted to
verify measure key operating parameters, or to meet the requirements of an M&V plan.
 Third-party evaluation – The measure may be evaluated as part of a program evaluation
to verify energy savings.
16.6 Documentation
Proper documentation of custom measures is essential for demonstrating the reliability of
reported measure energy savings. A fully documented measure helps to ensure the measure is
installed and operating as intended. It will also help optimize program evaluation efforts by
providing evaluators with the necessary information that is needed to verify savings estimates.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
16-7
Section 16
Custom Measure Protocol
A fully documented measure consists of a measure description, energy savings summary,
baseline description, savings calculations, and a summary of quality assurance activities.
Table 16-1 provides a template for guiding program administrators through the
documentation process.
Table 16-1
Custom Energy Savings Measure Template
Custom Energy Savings Measure Description
Measure name
Provide brief, but descriptive name.
What systems or equipment are affected?
Identify the systems or equipment that will use less
energy.
How will the measure be implemented?
Describe what actions are taken, what equipment is
removed or installed, or what changes are made to the
affected system.
How does the measure save energy?
Explain how implementing the measure brings about a
reduction in energy use.
List of key assumptions and operating parameters
Identify factors that significantly affect energy saving
estimates.
Energy Savings Summary
kWh/yr savings
Estimated annual energy savings
kW peak demand reduction
Demand reduction at the time of utility or CA grid peak
demand.
Therms/yr savings
Natural gas measures.
Measure EUL
Cite source of EUL.
Incremental measure cost
Report only costs associated with measure
implementation, or additional costs of more efficient unit
compared to baseline unit.
Baseline and Efficient Case Conditions
Baseline type
Natural replacement – code, current practice or
preexisting, or dual baseline – early retirement
Baseline description
Pre-retrofit condition or adjusted baseline condition
Efficient case description
Post-retrofit condition
Savings Calculations
Approach
Modified UES, reference to other credible source,
engineering model, measured data (M&V)
Savings equation(s)
Savings formulas used in model, including a description
of each equation parameter
Quality Assurance and Savings Validation
Pre-implementation activities
Document as needed.
Post-implementation activities
Document as needed.
M&V plan
If M&V is required, all reports, data, and supporting
information should be considered part of the measure
documentation.
16-8
ers
Savings Estimation TRM
17
References
17.REFERENCES
The following resources were used in the development of this technical reference manual.
ACEE Emerging Hot Water Technologies and Practices for Energy Efficiency as of 2011, Feb
2012.
A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings, Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory, 2011.
Advanced Power Strip Research Report, New York State Energy Research and Development
Authority (NYSERDA), August 2011.
ASD Calculator for Fan & Pump Applications, BPA – summary of information provided in
"Flow Control," a Westinghouse publication, Bulletin B-851, F/86/Rev-CMS 8121.
ASHRAE Guideline 14-2002 – Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings.
California Energy Commission’s Public Interest Energy Research Program Technical Brief,
“Energy Use of Household Electronics: Taming the Wild Growth,” September 2008.
California Energy Commission CASE study: “Night Ventilation Cooling Compliance Option”
September 2011
California Public Utilities Commission evaluation policy, reports, and protocols,
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/energy/Energy+Efficiency/.
Consortium for Energy Efficiency, various specifications.
Consortium for Energy Efficiency, High Efficiency Residential Gas Water Heating Initiative,
Mar 2008.
Consortium for Energy Efficiency, High Efficiency Residential Gas Heating Initiative, Feb 2010.
CL&P and UI Program Savings Documentation for 2008 Program Year, Connecticut Light &
Power Company, September 2007.
Database for Energy Efficient Resources, www.deeresources.com.
DesignLights™ Consortium Qualified Products List, www.designlights.org/.
Efficiency Maine Commercial Technical Reference Manual, December 2011.
ENERGY STAR lists qualified LED fixtures and qualified screw-in LED lamps:
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=find_a_product.showProductGroup&pgw_code=LU.
ENERGY STAR room air conditioner calculator, www.energystar.gov.
Savings Estimation TRM
ers
17-1
Section 17
References
ENERGY STAR Room Air Conditioners Key Product Criteria, November 2012.
ENERGY STAR Automatic Commercial Ice Maker Specifications, Version 2, Feb 2013.
ENERGY STAR commercial equipment kitchen calculator, July 2011.
ENERGY STAR appliance calculator, April 2013.
Guidelines for the Development and Maintenance of RTF Savings Estimation Methods, July 2012,
Regional Technical Forum.
Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies, LBNL, June 2012.
International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol, January 2012, Efficiency Valuation
Organization, www.evo-world.org.
Lighting Research Program Project 5.1 Bi-Level Stairwell Fixture Performance, California
Energy Commission, 2011.
Massachusetts Technical Reference Manual for Estimating Savings from Energy Efficiency
Measures, Massachusetts Electric and Gas Energy, October 2010.
Measure Quantification Methodology Statewide Savings and Cost, prepared for Northern California
Power Agency and Southern California Public Power Authority, KEMA, December 2009.
National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis of Hot Water Heat Pumps, Technical Report #
NREL/TP-5500-58594, July 2013.
New York Standard Approach for Estimating Energy Savings from Energy Efficiency Programs,
New York Department of Public Service, December 2008.
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Advanced Power
Strip Research Report. August 2011
Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Regional Technical Forum,
http://www.nwcouncil.org/energy/rtf/Default.htm.
PG&E Food Service Technology Center.
Regression for M&V: Reference Guide, Version 1, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA),
September 2011.
Uniform Methods Project for Determining Energy Efficiency Program Savings, Office of the
Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy,
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/office_eere/de_ump.html.
17-2
ers
Savings Estimation TRM