2012 Lesson Ideas Printable Templates compiled by Emma Dodge

2012
Lesson Ideas
Printable Templates
compiled by Emma Dodge
2
Dear Teacher
This resource is designed to be used
by you as you plan lessons for your
class following your class attending our
performance of Phone a Friend at your
school.
These are some ideas of how you can
incorporate some of the themes of
this play into various learning areas
(English, Maths, Social Sciences, The Arts,
Technology). Please adopt and adapt the
suggestions given however you see fit to
meet the needs of your students.
Don’t hesitate to contact us if you would
like to know anything more about the play
- we are here to help you get as much out
of the play as you can!
0800 894 500
[email protected]
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
Contents
Years 1-2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
English
Level 1 Writing recount
Health
Level 1 Relationships with other people
The Arts
Level 1 Visual art
Recount writing
Years 1-2 Templates. . . . . . . . . . 6
You’re a good friend because...
Years 3-4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
English
Level 2 Select, form and express ideas
The Arts
Level 2 Communicating and interpreting
Health and Physical Education
Level 2 Healthy communities and environment
Years 3-4 Templates. . . . . . . . . 10
Letter writing framework
Bullying scenarios
Years 5-6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
English
Level 3 Language features (visual features)
The Arts
Level 3 Understand the arts in context
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
Health
Level 3 Interpersonal skills
Technology
Level 3 Technological products
Years 5-6 Templates. . . . . . . . . 14
Static image: design an album cover
Compare and contrast two historical periods of
drama
Extra for experts
Cellphone timeline
Cellphones
Cellphones (with dates)
Years 7-8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
English
Level 4 Writing
The Arts
Level 4 Music
Health
Level 4 Safety management
Social studies
Level 4 Rights and responsibilities for producers
and consumers
Years 7-8 Templates. . . . . . . . . 22
Review
Review examples
Returning faulty goods templates
Years 1-2
English
Level 1 Writing recount
Form and express ideas on a range of topics
• As a class write a recount of the play using the
template provided
• Ask the students to help you fill in the introduction
and what happened in the boxes on the writing
template. Have them copy onto their own sheet
• Have the students draw a picture from the play and
write a sentence about their favourite part. Have
them glue the writing template underneath
Health
Level 1 Relationships with other people
• Share ideas about friendship
• As a class brainstorm what makes a good friend
(like Brick Phone)
• As a class create a profile for each student
explaining why they are a good friend to others in
the class. There is a template provided.
The Arts
Level 1 Visual art
Developing ideas in relation to different stimuli
• As a class talk about the phone dance
• Have children move like other technology (car,
camera, radio, etc)
• If you have the ability you may like to film students
doing this to post on a class blog
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
This page has intentionally been left blank.
Except for this text.
My favourite part was...
Finally...
Next...
Then...
First...
What Happened
Introduction - Who? What? Where?
Name
Phone a Friend
Recount writing
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Phone a Friend
You’re a good friend because...
8
Years 3-4
English
Level 2 Select, form and express ideas
The Arts
Level 2 Communicating and interpreting
• Model to students the correct structure and
language for a letter
• Give small groups of students a scenario about
bullying (attached)
• Have students write a letter to New Zealand
Playhouse expressing their opinions about the play
• Have them improvise small skits about how the
could handle the situation well
• Use the template provided to help students plan
their letters
• You could use this as an opportunity to introduce
your school bullying process
• You could post the letters to New Zealand
Playhouse, PO Box 5115, Christchurch 8542
• Discuss what each group did well and how they
could improve (both acting and ideas)
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
9
Health and Physical
Education
Level 2 Healthy communities and environment
• As a class develop an anti-bullying slogan
• Have students design posters to put up in the class
and around school using this slogan
• Talk to the class about how these posters can make
a difference to bullies or students being bullied
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Yours sincerely,
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What I would have done differently is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I enjoyed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I liked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thank you for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Address
Phone a Friend
Letter writing framework
Jack disagrees with everything Daniel says and yesterday
Daniel got frustrated and shoved Jack. How could they
resolve this?
Kate doesnt like Ben and kicks him under the desk when
the teacher isn’t looking.
The kids in room 15 have started joking and saying
“Randall’s germs, no returns”, Randall thinks they are just
having fun but it still upsets him.
No-one will play with Jane at lunch; she doesn’t know
why.
Johnny sucks his thumb at school and all the kids tease
him for it.
Lilly has just started to wear glasses, some of the other
kids in her class found out and called her four eyes.
Phone a Friend
Bullying scenarios
12
Years 5-6
English
Level 3 Language features (visual features)
The Arts
Level 3 Understand the arts in context
• Challenge the students to design an album cover
for Brick Phone’s debut album
• Investigate the historical purpose of drama using
http://library.thinkquest.org/5291/history.html
This resource allows students to read a short
history of drama online and complete an online
quiz. Alternatively the information and quiz could
be printed for use in your class
• Have them write a statement to go with their cover
explaining why they used each element
• Discuss how Phone A Friend fits into the history of
drama
• Introduce students to the meaning and effect of
visual elements
• Discuss areas where these are used
• Complete a Venn diagram comparing and
contrasting two of the historical periods of drama
• Extra for experts: they could complete a Venn
diagram comparing and contrasting three of the
historical periods of drama
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
13
Health
Level 3 Interpersonal skills
• In a circle time environment introduce the students
to the idea of aggressive, passive and assertive
behaviour. Discuss and model the difference (some
examples are attached)
• Discuss what is wrong with being aggressive back,
and what is wrong with being passive back. Discuss
why assertive behaviour is more likely to stop
bullying
Technology
Level 3 Technological products
• Discuss that technological products can be formed
to enhance fitness for purpose
• Define form and function
• Look at a range of cell phones and plot the change
on a timeline
• Have the students practise
• You could cut the pictures of cell phones out
from the worksheet and stick them onto the
timeline. The class could guess which year each
mobile phone came out, but you can find the
answers at http://www.webdesignerdepot.
com/2009/05/the-evolution-of-cell-phone-designbetween-1983-2009
• Teach the students to be good listeners in conflict
situations eg using good body language and not
talking while the other person is
• Discuss the changes to the form and function of
the phone and discuss why these changes were
made
• Teach the students to explain how they are feeling
in a conflict situation using “I statements” eg “I feel
really angry because I feel excluded”
• Have the students practise
• Give some examples of conflict situations and have
students role play being assertive.
(lesson adapted from www.education.com/reference/article/assertivecommunication-lesson-plan - lesson written by Brenda Melton)
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
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Explain why you chose the design you have. Discuss the aspects
mentioned above (continue over leaf )
Design your CD cover in the box below:
Audience
who are you trying to attract?
Purpose why do you want them to pay attention
Headlines
where will they go?
Lettering font what style of lettering looks best for the type of image?
Size what size lettering and graphics?
Colour what colours will attract your audience?
Space how much white space will you use?
Can you distinguish the name of the artist from the title of the album?
Does the artwork represent the style of music the artist plays?
Remember
Phone a Friend
Static image: design an album cover
Period: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Venn diagram:
Period: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Directions: in the areas of the two circles that do not overlap, list
characteristics of the the theatre periods that are not shared with the
other. In the overlapping part of the circles, list characteristics that are
shared between the two periods.
Compare and contrast two
historical periods of drama
Period: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Period: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Period: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extra for experts
Venn diagram:
Cellphone timeline
2012
2000
1990
1983
Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Photos taken from the evolution of cell phone design 1983 – 2009 from
http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/05/the-evolution-of-cell-phone-design-between-1983-2009
Cellphones
1992
Nokia 1011
1992
Nokia 1011
2007
iPhone
2004
Nokia 6630
2008
Sony Ericsson W760i
2005
Nokia 1110
2002
Sony Ericsson P800
2000
Nokia 3310
Photos taken from the evolution of cell phone design 1983 – 2009 from
http://www.webdesignerdepot.com/2009/05/the-evolution-of-cell-phone-design-between-1983-2009
1999
Nokia 8210
1998
Nokia 5110
1989
Motorola MicroTAC 9800X
1983
Motorola DynaTAC 8000X
Cellphones (with dates)
20
Years 7-8
English
Level 4 Writing
• Provide students with a range of movie reviews
to read. Included is an example from the small
town critic (an American movie critic), and rotten
tomatoes
• Discuss different elements of a review using the
definitions of terms supplied
• Work though the attached review template
• As a class recap parts of the play they will need to
write about
The Arts
Level 4 Music
Apply knowledge of the elements of music
• Investigate hip hop/rap of the 90s
• Discuss the beat, rhyme, tempo, repitition
• Watch a range of 90s rappers on YouTube
eg MC Hammer - Can’t Touch This, Have You Seen
Her, Fresh Prince of Bel Air theme
• Have students write their own rap
• Have students write a review of the play
• A fuller lesson plan for review writing and more
templates are available from the document here:
http://www.smalltowncritic.com/downloads/
• You could post your class’ reviews to NZ Playhouse
at PO Box 5115, Christchurch 8542
Lesson attached is from www.thesmalltowncritic.com
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
21
Health
Level 4 Safety management
• Discuss how students use technology (text, email,
Facebook, online gaming)
• Provide students with a range of safety information
about these eg
• www.thinkuknow.co.uk
• http://library.thinkquest.org/04oct/00451/
textbullies.htm
• Net safe
• Police
• Have students create a resource for themselves and
others on how to protect yourself and others when
using communication technology
Social studies
Level 4 Rights and responsibilities for producers
and consumers
• Pose students the problem how do you deal with
a piece of technology not working as you think it
should?
• Complete the attached worksheet: where can
we go to get consumer information (provided by
Ministry of Consumer Affairs New Zealand)
• Discuss what the Consumer Guarantees Act does
and does not cover. Give the example of the cell
phone struck by lightning and a TV that is now a
different colour in 1 part of the screen
• As a class work though attached worksheet to get
the facts together
• Using this information, have the students role play
the complaint and the shop assistant’s response
• This fuller lesson is available from http://www.
consumeraffairs.govt.nz/pdf-library/for-teachers/
lesson-5---all-documents.pdf/view
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
Set
Sound Effects
Costumes
Acting
Music
Script
Use this template to help plan your review.
Phone a Friend
Review
PG, 1 hr. 34 min.
Animation, Kids & Family
Directed By: Chris Renaud
Written By: Cinco Paul, Ken Daurio
In Theaters: Mar 2, 2012 Wide
US Box Office:$189.3M
Universal Pictures
The 3D-CGI feature Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax is an adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ classic tale of
a forest creature who shares the enduring power of hope. The animated adventure
follows the journey of a boy as he searches for the one thing that will enable him
to win the affection of the girl of his dreams. To find it he must discover the story
of the Lorax, the grumpy yet charming creature who fights to protect his world.
-- (C) Universal
MOVIE INFO
AUDIENCE 69 liked it
Average Rating: 3.7/5
User Ratings: 31,836
TOMATOMETER 58
Average Rating: 6.1/10
Reviews Counted: 111
Fresh: 64 | Rotten: 47
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax is cute and funny enough but the moral simplicity of the
book gets lost with the zany Hollywood production values.
The Lorax (2012)
Review examples
Kevin Bacon and Diane Lane’s characters were strong, but didn’t get
enough screen time to fully develop. Willie’s friendship with a young
black boy was never given a chance to develop either, probably in an
effort by the filmmakers to avoid focusing on the segregation issues
of the time period. The issue is addressed, but I feel that the AfricanAmerican characters should have had bigger, more substantial parts.
The young Morris is outstandingly played by Frankie Muniz, now a
household name due to his success on TV’s “Malcolm in the Middle.” His
acting is very mature and shows shades of emotions very effectively.
Both Kevin Bacon and Diane Lane do decent jobs of portraying caring
and concerned parents. Luke Wilson exceeds his normal comedy
boundaries and pulls off the disgraced town hero with surprising
effectiveness. However it’s the dog that steals the show… or should I
say dogs. “Moose” (Eddie from TV’s Frasier) and his son “Enzo” play the
older and younger Skip respectively. Look for them in more movies,
commercials and TV shows to come. I guarantee you’ll see them.
Set in the backdrop of the war-torn world of the 1940’s, young Willie
(Frankie Muniz) is on the verge of his ninth birthday. His only real friend,
neighbor and high school sports hero Dink Jenkins (Luke Wilson) goes
off and fight in WWII, leaving Willie feeling alone in the world. To lift
Willie’s spirits, his mother (Diane Lane) decides to defy the wishes of his
stern father (Kevin Bacon) and buy Willie a Jack Russell terrier puppy.
The unusually smart and charismatic dog Skip quickly becomes a local
institution and helps Willie gain respect, make friends and even win over
his first girlfriend.
Everyone remembers their childhood dogs and the impact they’ve had
on their life. Perhaps one dog in particular sticks out in your mind…
a special dog that was there for you in the toughest or best years of
your life. That is what this screen adaptation of Willie Morris’ “My Dog
Skip” conveys in a fun, nostalgic and heartbreaking kind of way. Morris
recounts the autobiographical memoir of his childhood in Yazoo City,
Mississippi and the four-legged friend that accompanied him on his
journey into manhood.
By Coop Cooper, A.K.A. “The Small Town Critic”
“My Dog Skip” will have you skipping
to the theater
Review examples
Coop Cooper is an independently syndicated film critic, living in Los
Angeles. He is originally from Clarksdale, Mississippi and a Southerner
at heart. He graduated from Southern Methodist University with a B.F.A
in Cinema, and received his Masters in Screenwriting from the American
Film Institute in Hollywood. You can read his past reviews at http://www.
thesmalltowncritic.com/.
Scale of 1-5: 4 ½
This movie is PG, a rating which might run off some of the older crowd,
but it’s truly a movie for everyone. Most films geared for children these
days depend on lame, pop-culture references and gas-passing jokes in a
patronizing attempt to entertain the younger masses. This movie rises above
all of that to become one of the most watchable non-Disney film for children
since 1993’s “Searching for Bobby Fischer.” Your date might resist going, but
try to talk them into it. They won’t regret it and neither will you.
The message of this film is very clear and invokes plenty of nostalgia to
anyone who can identify growing up in a rural town. It’s about passing into
adulthood, remembering old friends long gone, and the desire to remember
or relive happy moments in our lives that may be fading from our memory.
Morris is certainly a master at preserving his own memories by writing it
down for others to enjoy. I truly believe that this story is his gift, not only to
the people of Mississippi, but to all who want to remember their past, and
the friends they left behind.
Also, I didn’t get the whole subplot with the evil moonshine dealers and
why they tormented little Willie and Skip. It seemed like a fictional part that
was slapped on to cause more conflict. Despite these objections, the entire
production was shot so effectively that it seemed that it genuinely conveyed
feeling of growing up in rural Mississippi. The attention to detail and the
accuracy of the time period are phenomenal. I felt completely immersed
in this world and felt the full effect of this moving story. Even the southern
accents were much better than average.
ACE Consumer
Education
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I BROUGHT THIS
SPORTS BAG HERE
LAST WEEK, BUT
THE STRAP HAS
BROKEN.
I WOULD LIKE THE
STRAP FIXED BUT I
NEED TO BE SURE
IT WON’T BREAK
AGAIN.
WEBSITE: www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/education
Speak first to the sales assistant. Many shops have a policy
of quickly sorting out complaints and the sales assistant may
be able to resolve it for you. However, the sales assistant
may need to call the manager. If you do not have a successful
conversation with the sales assistant, you can ask to speak
with the manager.
Stay calm and be polite.
Explain the problem. ‘I bought this sports bag here last week, but the strap has broken.’
Tell the retailer what you want done about the problem, eg, ‘I would like the strap fixed if it
will be strong enough for me to carry my sports gear.’
Remember your legal rights.
Don’t enter into arguments about whose fault the problem is.
Don’t let the retailer say the goods must go back to the manufacturer. The retailer must fix
the problem.
Keep repeating what is wrong with the goods and or service and what you want done about it.
If you are not making progress, thank the manager and leave the store and plan what to do next.
5. Practice what you are going to say. Consider whether you want
to take a friend or adult for support. If you do want support
then arrange for them to come with you.
4. Plan what you are going to say:
• Keep it simple.
• Explain the facts. ‘I bought this sports bag here last
week, but the strap has broken.’
• Tell the trader what you want done about the problem.
‘I would like the strap fixed please, but I need to be sure
it won’t break again when I carry my sports gear in it.’
3. Collect anything in writing that can help prove your case, eg, sales receipt, advertisement.
2. Find out your legal rights under the Consumer Guarantees Act. Remember if the fault is minor,
the shop can decide whether to repair the goods, replace the goods or give you a refund.
If the fault is serious, you are entitled to choose a solution.
1. Write down:
• the problem
• any information you can remember about the purchase if you do not have the sales receipt
including:
– the date of the purchase
– what you paid for it
– who served you.
Before you go to the shop ... get organised ... get the facts together
Making a complaint about faulty goods
SECTION 5: HOW DO I GET THIS SORTED?
INFORMATION SHEET
ACE Consumer
Education
WEBSITE: www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/education
1. Your role in the role-play is to silently support your friend, the consumer.
2. You are also the observer of the role-play and can stop it at any time and discuss what is
happening with the two characters.
3. You are responsible for following the instructions your teacher gives you to de-role the
characters in the role-play.
4. When the role-play has finished you can lead a discussion with your group members on how
it went. You can tell them what you observed happening in the role-play.
The support person
1. Prepare what you are going to say to the consumer when they
make a complaint about faulty goods. Decide which of these
two approaches you will take:
1. Use the Making a
complaint about faulty
goods sheet to help
you prepare what
you are going to say
to get your problem
with the faulty goods
fixed.
2. Practice what you are
going to say before
you start the role-play.
a) agree to fix the problem once it is well-explained to you, or
b) make it harder for the consumer to explain the problem but
not get angry. You eventually agree to fix the problem once
it is well explained to you.
2. If the fault is minor, decide what you think is the appropriate
solution or remedy for the problem – a repair, a replacement
or a refund. Think about why you would respond in a particular
way, eg, the repair may be more expensive than a replacement.
The shop assistant or manager
The consumer
Roles
Joe’s friend Tim bought a cellphone. After one week of use it stops working. Tim has explained the
problem to the shop assistant who has called the manager. Tim needs to explain the problem to the
manager. The manager will want to know that Tim has not done anything to damage the cellphone
and will want to check that he has not taken it apart and explored or modified how it works.
Role-play 3 The faulty cell-phone
Aroha buys a new T-shirt but when she gets it home she sees the stitching is coming undone
around the shoulder. She is returning the faulty T-shirt and speaking to the shop assistant.
Role-play 2 The faulty T-shirt
Sam is returning the faulty CD player to the shop assistant.
Role-play 1 The Fair play? scenario
Scenarios
Returning faulty
goods role-play sheet
SECTION 5: HOW DO I GET THIS SORTED?
RETURNING FAULTY GOODS – ROLE-PLAY SHEET
www.newzealandplayhouse.co.nz
PO Box 5115, Christchurch 8542
`