2013-14 | Teaching Manual Tompkins Cortland Community College 1

Tompkins Cortland Community College
2013-14 | Teaching Manual
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Directory of Assistance ................................................................................................................................. 6
FORWARD ..................................................................................................................................................... 9
ACADEMICS ................................................................................................................................................. 10
About the College ................................................................................................................................... 10
Absenteeism (Students) .......................................................................................................................... 10
Academic Alerts ...................................................................................................................................... 10
Academic Calendar ................................................................................................................................. 10
Academic Calendar – Additional Details ................................................................................................. 11
Academic Integrity .................................................................................................................................. 11
Admissions .............................................................................................................................................. 11
The Adult Learner ................................................................................................................................... 11
Administrative Withdrawal ..................................................................................................................... 12
Assessment ............................................................................................................................................. 12
Attendance Reporting Procedures.......................................................................................................... 13
Book Orders and Text Books ................................................................................................................... 13
Change of Grade ..................................................................................................................................... 14
Class Lists ................................................................................................................................................ 14
Classroom Behavior ................................................................................................................................ 15
College Catalog ....................................................................................................................................... 15
Credit Hour.............................................................................................................................................. 15
Curriculum- Master Course Syllabus and Course Outline....................................................................... 15
Curriculum – New Course Proposal Procedures ..................................................................................... 23
Demographics ......................................................................................................................................... 24
Directed Study Course ............................................................................................................................ 24
Policy Against Discrimination and Harassment ...................................................................................... 24
Enrollment Services Center..................................................................................................................... 24
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ................................................................................ 26
Field Trips ................................................................................................................................................ 27
Final Examinations .................................................................................................................................. 27
Forms – Academic Records ..................................................................................................................... 27
General Education Requirements ........................................................................................................... 27
Global Connections ................................................................................................................................. 28
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Grades ..................................................................................................................................................... 28
Grade and Attendance Records .......................................................................................................... 30
How to Access myINFO (Self-Service) ................................................................................................. 30
Daily Attendance Function .................................................................................................................. 35
Grading System ....................................................................................................................................... 40
Grade Appeals ......................................................................................................................................... 40
Guest Speakers in Classes ....................................................................................................................... 41
Honors College ........................................................................................................................................ 41
Hybrid Course Development ................................................................................................................... 41
Independent Study Courses .................................................................................................................... 41
Internships .............................................................................................................................................. 42
Instructor’s Checklist............................................................................................................................... 42
Liberal Arts and Sciences Disciplines/Courses ........................................................................................ 43
Make-Up Tests and Assignments ............................................................................................................ 43
myTC3 – myINFO .................................................................................................................................... 43
Office Hours ............................................................................................................................................ 43
Online Courses – ANGEL ......................................................................................................................... 44
Online Courses – Attendance ................................................................................................................. 44
Outlines................................................................................................................................................... 44
Performance Evaluation.......................................................................................................................... 44
Placement Testing................................................................................................................................... 49
Plagiarism ............................................................................................................................................... 49
Retention of Records .............................................................................................................................. 49
Selected Topics Course ........................................................................................................................... 49
Special Topic Course ............................................................................................................................... 49
Student Code of Conduct ........................................................................................................................ 49
Study Abroad .......................................................................................................................................... 50
Sustainability Designation ....................................................................................................................... 50
ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS ........................................................................................................................ 51
Building Use ............................................................................................................................................ 51
Certificate of Residence .......................................................................................................................... 52
Class Cancellation ................................................................................................................................... 52
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Classrooms .............................................................................................................................................. 55
Campus Technology Policy and Procedures ........................................................................................... 55
Confidential Records ............................................................................................................................... 55
E-Mail ...................................................................................................................................................... 55
Emergencies – What is an Emergency? .................................................................................................. 56
Field Trip Insurance ................................................................................................................................. 57
Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................................ 57
Hazardous Chemicals on Campus ........................................................................................................... 57
Human Resources Department............................................................................................................... 58
Guidelines for Research Involving Human Subjects ............................................................................... 58
Off-Campus Activity Control Policy ......................................................................................................... 58
Off-Campus Activity Notification Questions/Answers............................................................................ 60
Overload Compensation Salary Formula – Full Time Faculty ................................................................. 60
Campus Police ......................................................................................................................................... 60
Portal ....................................................................................................................................................... 60
Purchasing Supplies ................................................................................................................................ 61
Textbook Desk Copies ............................................................................................................................. 61
Tuition Refunds ....................................................................................................................................... 61
College Vehicle Use ................................................................................................................................. 62
SERVICES ..................................................................................................................................................... 63
Dr. Lucille S. Baker Commons ................................................................................................................. 63
Library Services ................................................................................................................................... 63
Tutoring Services ................................................................................................................................. 63
Technology Support ............................................................................................................................ 63
Disability Services for Students ........................................................................................................... 64
Emergency Evacuation Procedures for Persons with Disabilities ....................................................... 64
Working with Non-Native Speakers of English ................................................................................... 64
College Teaching Center (CTC) ................................................................................................................ 68
Communications ..................................................................................................................................... 68
Copy Center ............................................................................................................................................ 69
Developmental Education Program ........................................................................................................ 71
Educational Technology Services ............................................................................................................ 71
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External Relations Group ........................................................................................................................ 72
Student Health Services .......................................................................................................................... 72
Off-Campus Services ............................................................................................................................... 72
Ithaca Extension Center at TC3 Tioga Place ........................................................................................ 73
TC3 Cortland Extension Center ........................................................................................................... 74
The PACE Program .................................................................................................................................. 75
Pathways Program .................................................................................................................................. 75
Students of Concern................................................................................................................................ 75
Student Success and Advisement Services ............................................................................................. 76
ADJUNCT FACULTY ...................................................................................................................................... 76
Clerical Support Services ......................................................................................................................... 76
Credit Course Instruction ........................................................................................................................ 76
Fringe Benefits for Adjunct Faculty......................................................................................................... 77
Pay Periods.............................................................................................................................................. 79
Adjunct Instructor Personnel File ........................................................................................................... 80
Getting Started as an Adjunct Faculty Member ..................................................................................... 80
Professional Development Program for Adjunct Faculty ....................................................................... 80
Salary Formula for Adjunct Instructors ................................................................................................... 81
Teaching Assignments for Adjunct Instructors ....................................................................................... 82
Typing and Copying Services ................................................................................................................... 82
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Directory of Assistance
Teaching faculty with questions related to the topics below should direct them to the following
individuals. A comprehensive directory is available on the college website.
http://www.tc3.edu/about_tc3/directory.asp
Topic
Office
General College Policies & Affairs
Carl E. Haynes, President
General College Policies & Affairs
John Conners, Provost and
Vice President of the College
Academic Affairs
Carl Penziul, Dean of Instruction
Advisement
Assessment/Placement Testing
Katrina Campbell, Coordinator of
Advisement Services
Michelle Nightingale, Coordinator of
Student Success Services
Brandy Williams-DeBottis, Student
Success Advisor
Building Security, Medical
Beau Saul, Director, Campus Police
Business and Financial Affairs of the College
Blixy Taetzsch, Dean of Operations
and Enrollment Management
Clerical Assistance
Secretaries in Faculty Suites 220/241
College Teaching Center
Darlene Gold, CTC Coordinator
Patricia Buchanan, Adjunct
Services Coordinator
Contracts
Teresa Mix, Administrative Assistant to
Dean of Instruction
Course Outlines, Master Schedule,
Textbook Selection, Faculty Evaluation,
and Instructional Techniques
Carl Penziul, Dean of Instruction
Copy Services
Dan Paolangeli, Copy Center Supervisor
Curriculum Assistance,
Master Course Syllabus development
Program Chair or Jane Hammond,
Associate Dean for Curriculum and
Academic Records
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Distance Learning and Educational
Technology
Tony DeFranco, Coordinator of Learning
Technology Services
Bob Yavits, Instructional Software
Specialist
Extension Centers
Martha Hubbard, Director of
Adult Learning and Training
Financial Aid
Sharon Karwowski,
Director of Financial Aid
Full-time Student Admission & Matriculation
Sandy Drumluk, Director of Admissions
Global Connections, International Student Services
and Study Abroad
Walter Poland, Vice President for
Global Initiatives
Information Desk Services
Mellora Paucke, Campus Technology
Information Technology:
communications including switchboard,
mailroom, information desk, and administrative
computer support including Outlook, MyTC3,
internet, PowerCampus, PowerFaids, etc.
Marty Christofferson,
Dean of Campus Technology
Library
Gregg Kiehl, Library Director
One Card
Tova Sturmer
Payroll
Sunday Earle, Payroll Specialist
Personal and Career Counseling
Counseling Staff, Room 216 Ext. 4260
Purchasing
Kevin Caveney, Purchasing Assistant
Records Retention
Olivia Hersey, Campus Technology
Residence Life
Darese Doskal-Scaffido, Director of
Residence Life and Judicial Affairs
Room Changes
Lauren Wright, Academic Records
Coordinator
Services for Students with Disabilities
of Access & Equity Services
Carolyn Boone, Coordinator
Staff Benefits, Equal Opportunity Plan,
Affirmative Action
Sharon Dovi, HR Administrator
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Student Life
Amy Trueman, Dean of Student Life
Student Payments, Certificates of Residence,
Details of Registration
Michelle Doe, Student
Enrollment Coordinator
Student Records (Grades, Attendance)
Lauren Wright, Academic Records
Coordinator
Student Success
Michelle Nightingale, Student
Success Coordinator
Student Withdrawals or Absences,
Transcripts, Class Rosters, Grade Rosters,
Lauren Wright, Academic Records
Coordinator
Technology Support in the Classroom
Brian Ackley, Director of Technology
Support
Dino Leopardi, Manager of Academic
Computer Services
Janice Lawrence (classroom technology
set-up) Sr. Library Clerk
Patricia VandeBogart, A/V Aide
Textbooks
Christopher Byrne, Bookstore Manager
Tutorial Services
Marilyn Webb, Coordinator
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FORWARD
This manual has been compiled as a reference for both full-time and part-time faculty members at
Tompkins Cortland Community College. As such, we’re always interested in updating and augmenting
our current compilation, and we encourage you to contact us with any changes or additions you feel
would improve this collection.
Thank you for all you continue to provide our students, and please allow us to assist you throughout
your teaching career at TC3. Best wishes,
Office of the Dean of Instruction
Carl Penziul
[email protected]
607-844-8222, ext. 4410
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Teresa Mix
[email protected]
607-844-8222, ext. 4349
ACADEMICS
About the College
Tompkins Cortland Community College offers a multipurpose program for full-time and part-time
students. It is designed to meet the needs of persons who wish to complete the first two years of a fouryear college program, those who wish to complete two years or fewer of college work in a career field,
and those who wish to take courses for cultural, career, or personal enrichment purposes. Please refer
to the college catalog for admission information. http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ss_admissions.asp.
All credits from certificate programs may be applied toward an Associate of Applied Science degree in
the respective program area. Several A.A.S. programs include variable electives so that students may
build an area of specialization within the degree to meet their employment objectives. Please refer to
the college catalog for a complete listing of available degrees and certificates.
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ap_degrees.asp
Absenteeism (Students)
If a student is absent from your class for several sessions, please make some effort to contact that
student. If the student is having academic difficulties, please make a referral to the Baker Center for
Learning. If the student is having personal difficulties, a referral to the Counseling, Career and Transfer
Services Office may be made. If the student is experiencing financial problems, they should contact
Sharon Karwowski, Director of Financial Aid. If a student ceases attending, you should consider an
Administrative Withdrawal.
Academic Alerts
Faculty may make a referral to Student Success and Advisement Services via myINFO from the class list
function. Click the student’s name and choose the “Academic Alert” option. Simply click the appropriate
options. Comments listed in the “additional information” section are always welcome. Following a
referral, SSAS staff will reach out to the student to offer support and help the student to connect with
various campus resources. In many cases, a referral provides a student the opportunity to recognize
potential problems before they lead to academic failure.
Academic Calendar
TC3 offers courses in the fall, spring, winter and summer of each calendar year. The College offers
traditional full-semester courses in the fall and spring, as well as three iterations of five-week courses
and two iterations of 7½-week courses in the fall and spring. The winter session offers one session of
five-week online courses between the fall and spring semesters. The summer session offers two fiveweek sessions, one eight-week evening session, and a 10-week session. NOTE: Summer session
offerings often overlap.
In addition to important session dates, the TC3 Academic Calendar also lists official College breaks and
significant ceremonies.
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ac_default.asp
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Academic Calendar – Additional Details
The general consensus of our faculty is to provide an academic calendar that includes the equivalent of
fourteen 150-minute class sessions plus a class meeting during the final exam period. This needs to be
accomplished with the faculty contract (i.e., 82 contract days in the fall and 83 contract days in the
spring, holidays, etc.). The following notes illustrate how the 2013-2014 calendar achieves that goal
(with only one exception each semester):
Fall 2013 Semester
For all day classes each fall, there are 13 Mondays, 14 Wednesdays, and 14 Fridays plus a class meeting
during the final exam period; hence Monday/Wednesday/Friday day classes are short one 50-minute
class.
For Tuesday/Thursday day classes, there are 14 Tuesdays and 14 Thursdays plus a class meeting time
during the final exam period.
For evening classes, there are 14 Monday classes, 15 Tuesday classes, 15 Wednesday classes, and 16
Thursday classes including the final exam period.
Spring 2014 Semester
For all day classes each spring, there are 14 Mondays, 14 Wednesdays, and 14 Fridays plus a class
meeting during the final exam period.
For Tuesday/Thursday day classes, there are 14 Tuesdays and 14 Thursdays for the equivalent of
fourteen 150-minute class sessions plus a class meeting during the final exam period.
For evening classes, there are 15 Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 16 Thursday classes including the
final exam period.
Academic Integrity
If you find that a student has violated the policy on academic integrity, you should report the incident to
the Office of the Provost. Please see the grades section for further information on this process.
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_ac_statement.asp
Admissions
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ss_admissions.asp
The Adult Learner
How to Get Adults to Ask Questions
When discussing suggestions to help new instructors get started effectively, adult education
professionals often agree on the need to overcome the difficulty of getting adult class participants to ask
questions.
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Many new instructors make the common mistake of asking “Does everybody understand?” or “Do you
have any questions?” and feel that when no participant raises his or her hand to announce to the class
that they didn’t get the message (when everybody else obviously did), that the instruction has been
effective.
Many adults feel threatened by the classroom environment because their early schooling was a negative
experience. Many are convinced to some degree that they can’t learn what it is you have to offer. Don’t
contribute to this by asking them to announce that they aren’t learning.
The responsibility for the success of the learning environment should be on the instructor, not the
student. What you’re trying to find out before you leave the subject or dismiss the session is whether or
not all the students understood the message you intended. This can be best asked by phrasing the
question,
“May I give you another example to make it more clear?”
“Would you like another demonstration of this?” or
“Have I completely confused you?”
It is much easier for the adult student to answer “yes” to one of these questions, which suggest that the
learning has not occurred, than it is for the student to answer the earlier questions, which indicate the
student is deficient and unable to gain the understanding needed.
The message back from the student will be the same-an indication that he or she needs more-but you’ll
get that message more readily using the latter questions, and your participants won’t leave the
classroom without the learning for which they came.
Course Trends ∙Learning Resources Network (LERN)∙1550 Hayes Drive∙Manhattan, Kansas 66502
Administrative Withdrawal
Students who stop attending/engaging in academically related activities before the semester withdrawal
date may be administratively withdrawn from the course by a faculty member. Students who are
administratively withdrawn will receive a grade of AW on their transcripts. A student may be
administratively withdrawn through the ninth week of the semester. This option may not be used for
disciplinary or poor academic performance reasons. All faculty members have the option of assigning an
AW, which is not included in GPA calculations, but it does affect the earned/attempted ratio in
determining academic status. It is suggested that if you wish to utilize the AW, you specify this
consequence in your course outline. Please consult the Dean of Instruction for further clarification.
Assessment
The College’s assessment policy is designed to give students guidance in selecting courses at an
appropriate skill level. All students must be assessed prior to course registration. Generally, placement
tests in English, reading and mathematics are required as part of the admissions process for all students.
All assessment takes place through the offices of Admissions and Student Success and Advisement
Services within the Enrollment Services Center (Room 215). Placement testing is waived only in cases
where a review of a student’s prior college transcript(s) indicates that testing is not necessary due to an
award of particular transfer coursework. [Note: Transfer credits may also be awarded through
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alternative methods such as AP or CLEP testing.] For more information about academic assessment,
contact the Admissions office.
Attendance Reporting Procedures
All “no show” students must be reported at the end of the second week of the semester, before the
drop deadline for the semester. This information is reported by faculty through myTC3/myINFO.
A student logging into a fully online class without active participation does not constitute attendance;
rather, there must be participation in an online discussion about academic matters. Also “initiating
contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course”
constitutes attendance.
Daily attendance rosters are available through myTC3 in printable and downloadable formats. Although
faculty will not be required to report any additional attendance data for their students throughout the
remainder of the semester, it is strongly recommended that all teaching faculty maintain personal
attendance records for your classes, most particularly in situations where students have been informed
through course outlines that attendance comprises part of how the final course grade is assigned.
Please keep in mind that many of our colleagues, including counselors, coaches, advisors, financial aid
staff, residence hall staff, and student success/advisement coordinators, will continue to rely on
attendance information from faculty to sustain efforts that help our students succeed at TC3. Please
consider submitting an “Academic Alert” via your myINFO account if a student is experience problems
with attendance and/or academics.
Book Orders and Text Books
The TC3 Bookstore is managed by Follett Corporation and is located on-campus for the convenience of
our students. Students with the appropriate financial aid may be eligible for a book deferral, where they
may charge their books against financial aid.
The College contract with Follett states “Follett shall have the exclusive right, free from any alternate
source endorsed, licensed or otherwise approved or supported on campus, by catalog or through
electronic commerce, including hyperlinks to alternate sources.” Due to this clause in the contract, TC3
faculty and staff are not permitted to include alternate sources for purchasing books in course outlines,
emails or correspondence to students.
Federal legislation requires that each institution of higher education receiving Federal financial
assistance must disclose textbook information for each course (Including ISBN and retail price) listed on
the TC3 course schedule as students register for these courses. To verify that a book order has been
placed for your course, you may check online.
https://myINFO.tc3.edu/SelfService/Search/SectionSearch.aspx
You will search for the appropriate course (ie ENGL101) and period (ie Fall 2011). Once you locate the
section you are teaching, click on the blue course code, and then “View Book Information”.
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Some disciplines require that a standard book be used for certain classes. Please consult with your
program chair regarding your course requirements. If possible, instructors should place a copy of their
textbook on reserve in the library. Contact your program chair to see if funds are available for this
expenditure.
The bookstore has experienced a shortage of books for courses in which the instructor has not ordered
materials in writing. Do not assume that if a book was used in the past or in a previous semester, the
bookstore will automatically place the order for the same book. An order must be submitted for each
course, each semester.
Books will be available at the Bookstore on the main campus or through the web site at
www.TC3.bkstr.com. If students are unable to get to the main campus to purchase their books, they
should order them via this website, and/or contact the store manager, Christopher Byrne. The
bookstore also offers purchasing class supplies over the Internet as well. For special arrangements call
844-8211, ext. 4489. Some texts are now available for rental. Students should contact the store manager
for more information.
Payment can be made by cash, check, American Express, MasterCard, Visa, Discover, Panther Dollars or
Financial Aid. Students must visit the main campus Bookstore to arrange for special charges. The
Bookstore offers students a mailing service, where the cost of shipping is based on the value of the
order rather than the number of books.
Follett Refund Policy
http://www.bkstr.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/HelpPoliciesView?langId=1&catalogId=10001&storeId=10382&demoKey=d#returnpolicy
The Bookstore is open from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm Monday through Thursday and 8:30 am to 2:00 pm
Friday, with extended hours during the start of each semester (fall and spring). The summer session
schedule will be abbreviated.
Change of Grade
If a grading error should occur, the change of grade form should be used to make an official change in
the student’s records. Change of grade forms are available on the portal, Academic Records Office, from
the faculty suite secretaries, or extension center ESS. Instructors cannot change grades through MyTC3
once a grade has been posted for a student.
Class Lists
Class rosters containing students’ names and contact information (address, phone numbers and E-mail
address) are available through myTC3. Instructors who are unable to access myTC3 may request class
lists from the faculty suite secretaries, the adjunct office staff member, the ESSs at the extension
centers, or from the Academic Records Office, All student contact information is to be kept confidential
and used for educational purposes only. Please contact the Help Desk if you are unable to access your
myINFO account.
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Classroom Behavior
TC3 values every student’s right to learn and each faculty member’s right to teach in an uninterrupted
environment. To foster that environment, proper etiquette in the classroom is essential. The instructor
has the right and responsibility to take appropriate action when a student’s behavior interrupts another
student’s right to learn. Each individual course outline will establish both the classroom behavioral and
academic integrity expectations from the instructor.
Disruptions to classroom behavioral expectations may include, but are not limited to, interruptions
through use of cell phones or other electronic devices, unnecessary or boisterous talking during lecture
and exam sessions, arriving to class late or leaving class early, and inappropriate language and tone.
Instructors may remove a student for the class session in which such disruptive behavior becomes
continuous or serious, and may begin disciplinary proceedings in accordance with the TC3 Student Code
of Conduct. http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_nonacademic_code.asp
College Catalog
The college catalog is now completely online. http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/default.asp
Credit Hour
A semester credit hour is defined as the satisfactory completion of 15, fifty-minute hours of classroom
instruction. As an additional guideline, each hour requires approximately two hours of outside
preparation by the student. Courses involving lab components require more student contact hours
depending on the type of lab activity. Please see your Program Chair if you have questions.
Curriculum- Master Course Syllabus and Course Outline
The Master Course Syllabus is the curricular blueprint for a course. It covers the subject matter
including course goals, learning objectives/topics, general education emphasis, instructional methods
and related principles/procedures that must be incorporated into all sections of the course, grading
policy, textbook, bibliography and other non-print learning resources.
Electronic versions of the master course syllabi of active credit courses can be accessed using MyTC3
Self-Service. For more information contact Jane F. Hammond, Associate Dean for Curriculum and
Academic Records, 844-8211, ext. 4459 or [email protected]
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Select myTC3 from the main TC3 web page, then myINFO
Select “Find Courses”
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Select “Course Catalog”
Search for the course by entering the course number (ie. ENGL101) in the course field, and click the
Search button. There are no spaces between the ENGL and 101. If the course prefix is only three
characters, leave a space (for example: ART 101, FSS 131).
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Click the course you wish to view (blue course number)
Scroll to the bottom of the page and select “Master Course Syllabus”
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The course outline is an essential part of the educational process here at TC3, and the Academic
Standards Policy at the College states: “Each instructor must deliver a course outline to each student
no later than the end of the first week of classes. This outline will contain specific information about
the topics to be covered as well as the expectations of that instructor, and will be consistent with the
official syllabus.” This outline must address certain topics important to student success. In addition, it
should be consistent with official master course syllabi on file; contact your department chair if you are
unfamiliar with the requirements for the syllabus. In order to facilitate the preparation of these outlines,
we suggest the format for the required topics as shown on the following two pages.
You should be aware that these outlines have a reading audience much wider than just your students.
Colleagues and administrative staff, both within and outside of the college, read these documents, often
in critical academic situations. Transfer evaluations, reviews of course content, and decisions on student
grievances are all made through reference to these outlines. Therefore, your style should be somewhat
formal, and your information both accurate and complete.
In summary, the course outline is an essential part of our academic practices at the College. By using the
suggested format beginning on the next page and being aware of your audience, you can consistently
ensure the accuracy, completeness and professional quality of this information.
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TOMPKINS CORTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SUGGESTED COURSE OUTLINE
COURSE NO.
____________________
INSTRUCTOR
_____________________
TITLE
____________________
OFFICE HOURS
_____________________
CREDIT HOURS ____________________
OFFICE LOCATION
_____________________
SEMESTER
PHONE NO.
_____________________
____________________
INSTRUCTOR E-MAIL AND/OR ADDITIONAL CONTACT INFORMATION _____________________
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COURSE DESCRIPTION
Include the course description as shown in the online course catalog at:
https://myINFO.tc3.edu/SelfService/Search/CatalogSearch.aspx
COURSE PREREQUISITES
The master course syllabus will list any course prerequisites. These prerequisites should be stated on the course
outline.
MINIMAL BASIC SKILLS NEEDED TO COMPLETE COURSE SUCCESSFULLY
For many courses it is recommended that specific basic skill requirements be indicated, i.e. math, reading, writing.
Contact your department chair for further information and refer to the master course syllabus.
COURSE GOALS
There are usually four to six general goals for each course outlined in the master course syllabus. These objectives
should be included in the course outline for the students' benefit.
REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS: OPTIONAL MATERIALS AS APPROPRIATE
Distinguish between those materials that will be required, recommended, and/or on reserve in the library.
The College contract with Follett states “Follett shall have the exclusive right, free from any alternate source
endorsed, licensed or otherwise approved or supported on campus, by catalog or through electronic
commerce, including hyperlinks to alternate sources.” Due to this clause in the contract, TC3 faculty and
staff are not permitted to include alternate sources for purchasing books in course outlines, emails or
correspondence to students.
CLASS MODALITIES/ALTERNATIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES
You should describe briefly the teaching methods you intend to use during the semester, i.e., lectures, field trips,
discussion, audio-visual aids available, labs, clinics, etc.
REQUIRED READINGS, PRESENTATIONS, WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS, ETC.
This section should include an explanation of each of the requirements for the course (i.e., homework assignments,
term papers, term projects, quizzes, hourly exams, midterm exams, final exams, case problems, class participation,
etc.). For each particular requirement for the semester you should detail your expectations.
COURSE CONTENT PRESENTED IN UNITS OR SEGMENTS
This section should include a listing by either week or class session of the respective topic(s) that will be covered
during that time frame. If there are particular readings or homework assignments required each week, these should
also be listed.
EVALUATION/GRADING SYSTEM
A summary should be provided of how the final grade will be determined. This would include a list of the course
requirements and their respective weighing in the course. Either a point or a percentage system is typically utilized.
The TC3 grading system is explained in the College catalog http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_grading_policies.asp
The master course syllabus may specify the grading criteria that must be followed by all instructors of an individual
course. If, as a prerequisite, this course carries a minimum grade necessary to be earned (for example, a grade of ‘C’
or better), students may benefit from a detailed explanation of how that minimum requirement may be achieved.
STATEMENT OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Refer your students to the college catalog http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_ac_statement.asp and delineate clearly
how you address first-time and subsequent academic infractions within your course (including, but not limited to,
reduction in grade, elimination of grade, failure for the course).
Note to faculty: Additional language has been included (listed below) to address the need for professional
conduct in academic situations outside of the classroom. If appropriate, emphasize and include relevant
assessment requirements as needed:
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Several degree programs offer student learning opportunities (such as internships, field work, and clinical
experiences) outside the standard classroom setting. As part of the learning process, students must
understand and engage in conduct that adheres to principles guiding employment within the professional
workplace. These behaviors include, but are not limited to, academic integrity, accountability, reliability,
respect, use of appropriate language and dress, civility, professional ethics, honesty, and trustworthiness.
Disciplinary action may be initiated for inappropriate conduct occurring while participating in any courserelated project or event.
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MAKE-UP POLICY / LATE WORK
Your policy for submission of any late work and whether you provide make-up examinations should be spelled out
completely. Here are some suggestions to consider:
Make-up examinations will ONLY be allowed for those students who can provide:
(a) Documented evidence of a death in the family;
(b) A doctor’s note indicating serious illness or hospitalization of you or a family member in your care;
(c) Evidence of participation in a job interview or closely-related employment pursuit; or
(d) Evidence of involvement in a university-sponsored extracurricular trip and/or event.
Late work will receive NO credit (but the make-up exam policy applies). Assignments/test not turned in
DURING CLASS/taken on time will be considered late. I do not accept assignments by e-mail, through
ANGEL, or at my office unless authorized in advance.
□
ATTENDANCE POLICY
College Attendance Policy (use/apply as necessary)
To maintain good grades, regular attendance in class is necessary. Absence from class is considered a serious
matter and absence never excuses a student from class work.
It is the responsibility of all instructors to distribute reasonable attendance policies in writing during the first
week of class. Students are required to comply with the attendance policy set by each of their instructors.
Unless otherwise provided for by the instructor, all students are expected to promptly attend, on time, every
class session for which they are registered. If absence from class is anticipated, it is the student's responsibility
to inform the instructor as far in advance as possible. If the student is absent on the day of an examination or
the day an assignment is due, the instructor will decide whether the exam or assignment may be submitted
late. In all cases, it is the student's responsibility to find out what happened in class.
Students are not penalized if they are unable to attend classes or participate in exams on particular days because
of religious beliefs, in accordance with Chapter 161, Section 224-a of the Education Law of the State of New York.
Students who plan to be absent from classroom activity for religious reasons should discuss the absence in
advance with their instructors. A copy of this law can be found in the Office of the Provost and Vice President of
the College.
The College reserves the right to schedule additional class time to compensate for time lost because of weather,
road conditions, or other reasons.
Any student who wishes to challenge the application of the attendance portion of a course grade should refer to
the student grievance process outlined in the student handbook.
Note to faculty: You may wish to include a statement about how you determine
whether a grade of “AW” (Administrative Withdrawal) is warranted. Please refer to the
College catalog at http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ss_tuition_fees.asp
Instructors may administratively withdraw students if they have ceased to attend
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classes prior to the end of the withdrawal period (usually the end of the 9 week of a
15-week semester).
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□
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES
Your expectations about the involvement of students in the learning experience should be positively and specifically
stated here. You may also wish to include a statement regarding classroom citizenship, as follows:
You are expected to (1) be on time; (2) refrain from talking to one another in class; (3) turn off your cell
phone (or keep in quiet mode for emergencies); (4) refrain from texting, surfing the web on your laptop,
etc.; (5) be mature and responsible; (6) show respect for your peers and your professor; and (7) otherwise
act in a manner consistent with TC3’s Student Code of Conduct.
Here’s the statement that will be included in the TC3 student handbook, which may be worth paraphrasing or
integrating within your outline as appropriate:
TC3 values every student’s right to learn and each faculty member’s right to teach in an uninterrupted
environment. To foster that environment, proper etiquette in the classroom is essential. The instructor has
the right and responsibility to take appropriate action when a student’s behavior interrupts another
student’s right to learn. Each individual course outline will establish both the classroom behavioral and
academic integrity expectations from the instructor. Disruptions to classroom behavioral expectations may
include, but are not limited to, interruptions through use of cell phones or other electronic devices,
unnecessary or boisterous talking during lecture and exam sessions, arriving to class late or leaving a class
early, and inappropriate language and tone. Instructors may remove a student for the class session in which
such disruptive behavior becomes continuous or serious, and may begin disciplinary proceedings in
accordance with the TC3 Student Code of Conduct.
□
E-MAIL USE
TC3 recognizes the value and efficiency of communication between faculty/staff and students through electronic
mail. At the same time, email raises some issues concerning security and the identity of each individual in an email
exchange. The College encourages all official student email correspondence be sent only to a student’s TC3 email
address and that faculty and staff consider email from students official only if it originates from a TC3 student
account. This allows the College to maintain a high degree of confidence in the identity of all individuals
corresponding and the security of the transmitted information.
□
ADDITIONAL RESOURCE ASSISTANCE
For several courses there are various types of tutorial lab support available to students. If this is true for your course,
you should indicate this as well as the location of the lab and available hours for tutoring.
□
ACCOMMODATION POLICY
It is the College’s policy to provide, on an individual basis, reasonable accommodations to
students with disabilities that may affect their ability to fully participate in program or
course activities, or to meet course requirements. Students with disabilities should contact
Carolyn Boone, Coordinator of Access and Equity Services at (607) 844-8222 (ext. 4283)
or [email protected] to discuss their particular need for accommodations.
This material is available in alternative formats upon request.
Note to faculty: All publications, instructional and otherwise, must be provided in
alternative formats upon request. Formats may include Braille, large print, audiotape
and/or electronic forms. Options and assistance with conversion can be obtained from
the Baker Commons.
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Curriculum – New Course Proposal Procedures
Step 1
The course developer contacts and discusses the course concept with the program chair or department
coordinator of the program/discipline that the course will be listed under.
Step 2
The program chair or department coordinator consults with other program or department faculty and
then notifies Jane Hammond, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Academic Records that the
development of a formal course proposal has been endorsed.
Step 3
The associate dean contacts the course developer and provides information about the development and
review process. This will include an explanation of the master course syllabus template, the library
resource review form, the curriculum committee proposal form and the faculty and curriculum
committee review processes.
Step 4
The course developer sets up a meeting with a librarian to discuss the course content and the library
resources that may be needed to support the course.
Step 5
The developer completes and sends electronic copies of the proposed master course syllabus and a
completed curriculum proposal form to the program chair or department coordinator, Jane Hammond,
and a Library Representative.
Step 6
The program chair or department coordinator distributes the syllabus and proposal form to program or
department faculty with a request for feedback. Upon approval by the program/department faculty, the
proposal materials are distributed, with a request for feedback and/or suggestions, to faculty in the
Department the proposal falls under, i.e., Business or English/Humanities or METS or Social Science.
Step 7
After the groups listed under step six have reviewed and had an opportunity to provide feedback, the
proposed course is scheduled for review by the Curriculum Committee, which will subsequently vote on
the course. Approval requires a “Yes”: vote by a majority of the voting members present at the
Curriculum Committee meeting.
For more information, contact:
Jane F. Hammond
Associate Dean for Curriculum and Academic Records
[email protected]
(607) 844-8211 Extension 4459
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Demographics
Demographic information may be found on the College’s Institutional Research website.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/ir/research.asp
Directed Study Course
A directed (independent) study course is designed to substitute for a traditional course that is needed
for the student’s program of study but it is not available in a particular semester. The Directed Study
option should be utilized only in unusual circumstances rather than an alternative to inadequate
planning or inconvenient timing. It is expected that only instructors who normally teach the course will
teach a directed study course. Regular tuition and fees will be charged for each directed study credit.
Approval for including the directed study course during any semester must be granted by the Dean of
Instruction.
Note: See Independent Study for a description of expanded learning options beyond the regular
curriculum.
Policy Against Discrimination and Harassment
Unlawful discrimination or harassment based on race, color, creed or religion, sex, sexual orientation,
national origin, age, marital status, military status, genetic predisposition or carrier status, disability, or
any other protected status is strictly prohibited by Tompkins Cortland Community College. The College is
committed to maintaining an education and work environment that is free of any discrimination or
harassment and to fostering positive business and personal conduct so that everyone, including
students, employees, and invitees, is treated with respect and dignity in a non-discriminatory
environment. Please refer to the college website for the college policies and procedures.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/hr/p_harassment.asp
Enrollment Services Center
The Enrollment Services Center, located in Room 215, combines functions of admissions, student
success and advisement, financial aid, registration and billing into an area that provides services to
students from the first time they contact the College until they realize their educational goals. The
Enrollment Services Specialists, advisors, and staff can provide students and staff useful information
regarding courses, programs, and College procedures related to academic planning and registration.
Stop in or call 844-6580 for information or assistance.
Course Enrollment: Instructor signatures are required if a class is full or if the class has already begun (or
once the first full week of classes begins). It is the instructor’s decision to add a student at this time. The
instructor should verify that the student has met course pre-requisites and basic skills for the course
before granting permission to add the course. College Administration reserves the right to over-enroll
classes by three-percent if necessary. A copy of the registration form can be found online
www.tc3.edu/docs/enroll_svc/reg_form.pdf and schedule change form follows this section. Students
may also obtain these forms from the Enrollment Services Center, Room 215.
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25
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (see catalog for more details). To withhold disclosure, written
notification must be received in the Academic Records Office within the first two weeks of a semester,
and re-filed annually. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available online.
http://www.tc3.edu/student/forms.asp
Tompkins Cortland Community College assumes that failure on the part of any students to specifically
request the withholding of categories of directory information indicates the individual approval for
disclosure.
The primary purpose of directory information is to allow TC3 to include this type of information in
certain college publications. Examples include:
Dean’s List, President’s Citation or other recognition lists;
Graduation programs; and
News releases
Directory information, which is information that is generally not considered harmful or an invasion of
privacy if released, can also be disclosed to outside organizations without the student’s prior written
consent. TC3 has designated the following information as directory information:
Name
Participation in officially recognized activities and sports
Address
Telephone listing
Weight and height of members on athletic teams
Electronic mail address
Photograph
Degrees, honors, and awards received
Date and place of birth
Major field of study
Dates of attendance
Class level, i.e., Freshman, Sophomore
The most recent educational agency or institution attended
The student also must make the request in writing in order for you to release any information regarding
a student’s education. Please see the following list for examples of such confidential information:
o Student Schedule (i.e., courses, meeting times, rooms)
o GPA
o Grades
o Credits (i.e., attempted, earned, GPA)
o Quality Points
o Courses
o Emergency contact
o Advisor
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o
o
High school or previous college information
Academic information other than major (degree program)
Parents: If the parent pays for the student’s tuition, they may request to see the student’s
educational record. This request should be processed through the Associate Dean for
Curriculum and Academic Records.
Please refer to the Confidential Records section of this manual for information on maintaining
confidential records.
Field Trips
Please feel free to take your class on a relevant field trip. File the required forms (Notice of Off-Campus
Activity and Volunteer Driver Information) including a current class list indication which students will be
transported in which vehicle at least two weeks in advance through the Dean of Instruction’s Office. This
information will be shared with the Campus Police in the event that any lost students need to catch up
with the class. Also, please refer to the notes on insurance in this handbook. Required forms can be
downloaded from the TC3 website at http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/forms.asp (see transportation
section).
Final Examinations
Instructors may not administer a final exam prior to the last week of classes. You may give a test that
is one of several, but you may not give a comprehensive final exam. You may neither require nor allow
students to use additional time outside the regular class period to complete a test during that week. To
do so would put many students in the uncomfortable position of missing another class, and it would be
disrespectful and unfair to faculty colleagues. You must meet with your class during the exam period to
which it has been assigned. In most cases, you will give a final exam. In those instances in which a faculty
member does not give a final, he or she must hold class. Not meeting at all is not an option. The
Academic Records Office has scheduled the period of your final exam; in almost every case, this time will
not coincide with the time when a given class has met all semester. Please check the schedule and act
accordingly. If you have any questions about the schedule, please contact the Academic Records Office.
Fall 2013 Final Exams are scheduled for the week of December 9 – December 13, 2013.
Spring 2014 Final Exams are scheduled for the week of May 12 – May 16, 2014.
Forms – Academic Records
Academic Records forms (Classroom Request, Change of Grade, Administrative Withdrawal, Incomplete,
etc.) may be found on the portal.
https://my.tc3.edu/Portal/Forms
General Education Requirements
Please refer to the college catalog for information regarding SUNY General Education requirements and
approved courses as well as the TC3 General Education requirement.
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Global Connections
Global Connections is an international partnership program with over 60 signed partnership
agreements. This program is most active in the summer intensive 10-week semester, yet students from
France, Spain, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Honduras, Peru and many more, utilize transfer courses
from their home institution to shorten the time needed to complete and associates degree at TC3. For
more information, please contact [email protected]
http://www.tc3.edu/global/connections_default.asp
Grades
Final grades must be entered online through myTC3. To obtain access to myTC3, complete an
Administrative Network/Data Access form (FERPA form) available in the Academic Records Office. Once
the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Academic Records has approved the request, Campus
Technology will provide you with your login information through TC3 e-mail.
For instructors who are unable to submit grades online, preprinted grade rosters should be requested
from the Academic Records Office no later than two weeks before the end of the semester and must be
completed according to instructions provided with the roster and returned in person to the Academic
Records Office by noon on the published due date. Grades are generally due 72 hours after the final
exam or last class meeting. Submission due dates will be emailed to your TC3 email account each
semester.
Mid-semester Performance Indicators
At the end of the 7th week of classes, instructors must submit Mid-semester performance indicators. The
performance indicators are posted in the grades section of “myINFO” and students will be able to access
them through myTC3. Instructors may request a preprinted mid-semester performance indicator roster
from the Academic Records Office if they cannot enter the students’ performance indicator on-line. The
following scale will be used:
S+
S
SU
Good to High Achievement
Satisfactory Achievement
Below Satisfactory Achievement
Failing
Students can access their mid-semester progress performance indicators through myTC3 .
Retention of Records
You should maintain a grade book or listing including class number and title, location, date and time
class meets, student attendance, test grades, and final grade. This information must be kept for two
years. Examinations, test papers and answer sheets must be kept for one year. If you leave the
employment of the college, you must submit these records to the Office of the Dean of Instruction.
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Statement of Academic Integrity
Every student at Tompkins Cortland Community College is expected to act in an academically honest
fashion in all aspects of his or her academic work: in writing papers and reports, in taking examinations,
in performing laboratory experiments and reporting the results, in clinical and cooperative learning
experiences, and in attending to paperwork such as registration forms.
Any written work submitted by a student must be his or her own. If the student uses to words or ideas
of someone else, he or she must cite the source by such means as a footnote. Our guiding principle is
that any honest evaluation of a student’s performance must be based on that student’s work. Any
action taken by a student that would result in misrepresentation of someone else’s work or actions as
the student’s own - such as cheating on a test, submitting for credit a paper written by another person,
or forging an advisor’s signature – is intellectually dishonest and deserving of censure.
If students have additional questions, you may wish to refer them to this site for more information:
http://www.tc3.edu/library/g_plagiarism.asp
Procedures for Handling Academic Infractions
1. The faculty member who discovers an instance of academic dishonesty shall be responsible for
determining and administering sanctions. Potential sanctions for a violation of the College’s
policy on academic integrity include, but are not limited to: reduction in grade, elimination of
grade, and failure for the course. The faculty member shall discuss the incident with the student
prior to any formal action.
2. The faculty member shall notify the Provost within five class days regarding all instances of
academic dishonesty where a penalty has been administered to a student. The Provost of the
College may recommend additional sanctions relative to the student’s status, depending on the
severity of the infraction. These recommendations and a report of the violation shall be
maintained by the Provost’s Office. Flagrant violations (violating computer security, submitting
false information about a student’s condition, etc.) may result in probation, suspension, or
expulsion from a program or the College.
3. The Provost may impose further sanctions for repeated offenses; these may include probation,
suspension, or expulsion from the College. In addition, a permanent or temporary notation that
the student has violated the Policy on Academic Integrity may be made on the official academic
records of the student. Extenuating circumstances will be considered for each individual case.
Counseling may be recommended.
The student shall have the right to appeal a penalty for academic dishonesty if the student considers the
penalty to be unjust or unwarranted. Grounds for appeal include claims of bias, procedural infractions,
and/or new evidence.
Assistance in Fostering Academic Integrity at TC3
Barbara Kobritz, Librarian at the TC3 Library, manages the College’s account with Turnitin, a software
program that identifies unoriginal work in research papers and other work. Contact her to obtain your
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unique Turnitin account or simply to chat about academic integrity. She also maintains two
informational pages on academic integrity on the Library Gateway for teaching faculty
(http://www.tc3.edu/library/f_academic_integrity.asp)
and for students (http://www.tc3.edu/library/g_plagiarism.asp). Barbara is also delighted to visit classes
to discuss academic integrity issues with students. Contact her at [email protected] or at ext. 4362.
Grade and Attendance Records
Grades must be turned in to the Academic Records Office at the end of each session using myTC3 within
72 hours after completion of the course. Contact the Academic Records Office to request a
Network/Data Access form which must be completed and approved by the Associate Dean for
Curriculum and Academic Records prior to receiving access to myTC3 at the College’s website.
Timely submission of grades is extremely important. Repeated failure to comply with the regulation
deadlines may lead to a non re-hire decision for adjunct faculty in future semesters.
How to Access myINFO (Self-Service)
At the home page, www.tc3.edu, select myTC3 (upper right of initial screen).
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Sign in using your User ID and Password; these are provided by Campus Technology.
Click the CLASSES tab.
(Please note that your screen will not display all of the tabs in the sample, it will display only the
functions you need.)
31
Click Schedule  Faculty Schedule to view your schedule for the semester selected.
Select the Year/Term from the drop-down box and click the submit button.
Click View Class List to reach your class list. All students who are officially registered for your course will
appear on the list. If a student is in your class but is not on this list, the student is not officially registered
and should go to the Enrollment Services Center to register.
The class list shows information about each student enrolled in your section: name, TC3 ID, major and
attendance as reported by you.
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A student’s contact information, including mailing address and phone numbers, can be found by clicking
a student’s name. You can email your students from this screen either by clicking the box beside an
individual student or clicking Totals at the bottom of the page. All students are provided a TC3 email
address. Official communications from the college are sent to the students’ TC3 email addresses so
students should check their TC3 email account often.
For Attendance and Grades, click Grading.
Click Attendance in left hand column. Then click on the course.
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You can download an attendance roster in several formats including HTML, Word, and Excel.
The attendance roster shows only those days your class is scheduled to meet.
You will see several options. For submission purposes, log in to myINFO/Self-Service, Classes 
Grading  Attendance  your course View Overall Section Attendance.
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There is a drop down box to enter “Never Attended” for no show students.
See below for Daily Attendance explanation.
Daily Attendance Function
One of the course management features will allow you to record daily attendance for your personal
needs throughout the semester. Grading  Attendance  your course  Daily Attendance
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You will see the dates your class is scheduled to meet and only those dates. Click on the appropriate
date and an alphabetical list of registered students will appear.
You can enter that day’s attendance status from the drop-down box: Absent, Absent-Unexcused,
Present, Tardy, Tardy-Unexcused. You can select a status and apply it to all students by selecting a status
from the drop-down box in the upper right of the page and click in Apply Status. Click on Save at the
bottom of the page.
To enter your grades, log into myINFO/Self-Service,  Classes  Grading  Overall Grades  your
course.
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Mid-term grades (mid-semester performance indicators) should be entered at the end of the seventh
week of classes. Mid-semester performance indicators are unnecessary for courses that run for less than
the full semester. Mid-semester progress performance indicators should be rated S+ for above
satisfactory, S for satisfactory, S- for below satisfactory, and U for unsatisfactory. For further information
or clarification, consult your program chair for guidance on theses definitions for your course.
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Final Grades should be entered by the published due date. The final grade entry module will be made
available approximately one week before the end of the session.
A drop down box will display all the grades available to instructors. Audits, Withdrawals (W, AW, WP,
WF) and Incomplete may be input only by the Academic Records Office upon student request.
You may not enter an I (incomplete) grade through myTC3. Students should complete the Incomplete
Request form and the Instructor must also sign. This form is available from the Enrollment Services
Center or the Academic Records Office; students may also email such a request to the instructor who
should forward the approval to Academic Records ([email protected]) through your TC3 email account. The
Academic Records Office will enter the incomplete grade upon receipt of this written request. Grading
information will not be accepted from other email domains.
Incomplete grades are intended for situations where a student may have experienced difficulties which
prohibited them from completing the course (such as illness or injury, family crisis, etc.) This option
should only be considered if the student is in good standing in the class and could easily complete the
assignments within a reasonable amount of time.
You may enter the final grades for a class at different times; grades may be left blank while others are
completed if you wish to enter only some of the grades at a given time. Use the Save button to record
your interim grades in your myINFO account.
*Note the grade is saved, but not submitted.
Once grades are entered, click the Submit button at the bottom of the page. You can save your grades in
myINFO without submitting them, however you must click SUBMIT FINAL to upload your grades into
the college’s computer system. You can change a grade until the grade submission deadline. Once the
grade submission deadline has passed, you must submit any additional grade changes to the Academic
38
Records Office in writing, either through your @tc3.edu email account or using a Change of Grade form
available from the secretaries.
Once grades are entered and the Submit button is clicked, you will see the grades successfully submitted
under the “Actual Grade” column.
If there is a problem with your grade submission, you will receive an error message in red. Click on the
red message and it will show you which student’s record needs attention. See below:
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Enter the appropriate grade.
S+, S, S-, and U are mid-semester ratings only; they may not be assigned as a final grade.
Grading System
Grades will be available to students through myTC3. Students may request grades be mailed to them
through the Enrollment Services Center. Grades posted to the computer system are immediately
available to students through myTC3. Mid-semester progress reports are issued to assist students in
identifying and correcting academic deficiencies. The instructor’s assessment of each student’s
achievement should be in accordance with the grading system outlined in the college catalog.
(http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_grading_policies.asp)
The most recent grade earned in a repeated course will be included in the final GPA.
All grades earned will be included on the student’s permanent record.
Please note: only the Academic Records Office may assign “W/WP/WF”. Only students who officially
withdraw may receive “W”, “WP” or “WF”.
Grade Appeals
Any student who wishes to challenge a course grade should do so within two weeks of the beginning of
the following semester for 10 or 15 week courses. For all courses meeting less than 10 weeks, within
two weeks after the grade is posted in MyTC3. Please refer to the College catalog for further
information.
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_grade_challenge.asp
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Guest Speakers in Classes
You are welcome to invite experts in your field to visit your class. If a particular speaker would be of
interest to the public, they may be invited for the lecture also. In any event, please advise the
Information Desk if you are expecting a guest so that he/she can be welcomed properly and directed to
the appropriate class location. The College has no funding available to reimburse guest speakers.
Honors College
The TC3 Honors College provides a challenging curriculum for highly motivated students who have
demonstrated their academic ability. Honors students work in a community of scholars, engaging in
academic discussion and projects that require a high level of participation and independent
investigation. Please refer to the college website for further information.
https://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ap_honors_college.asp
Hybrid Course Development
TC3 Campus Technology
Precepts and Guidelines
http://www.tc3.edu/docs/campus_tech/TC3_Hybrid_Course_Guidelines.pdf
What is independent study?
Independent Study Courses
a. Intended to expand a student’s learning experience beyond the normal program curriculum
b. Not intended as a substitute for an existing course
c. Provides the student with an opportunity to pursue/research a subject in more depth, and
in a more independent manner than would be possible in a traditional course
d. Each hour of credit should reflect a minimum of 45 hours of work
e. Can be sponsored by all programs and disciplines and listed under the relevant discipline
and a 280 course number, e.g., BIOL 280, ENGL 280
How is an independent study developed?
a. Eligibility Criteria – The student must demonstrate the ability to undertake independent
work in the specified area.
b. Specific prerequisites, role in curriculum, i.e., program, liberal arts or unrestricted elective,
minimum completed credits, GPA, or other requirements may be established by individual
programs/disciplines.
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c. The student consults with a faculty member in the semester before the independent study.
If the faculty member agrees to supervise the study, a proposal/learning contract is
prepared.
d. The learning contract should include a title, description of the project, credits to be
awarded, learning objectives, content (topics, learning and research activities, etc.),
required student/instructor meetings, bibliography/reading list, outcomes (presentation(s),
paper(s), journal, etc.), and grading criteria.
e. The learning contract must be signed by the student and the instructor, and then submitted
by review and approval by the Dean of Instruction or his designee. Independent studies
supervised by an adjunct faculty member must be approved by the program/department
chair.
Note: See Directed Study for sections of regular courses in independent study format.
Internships
Internships are an opportunity for students to gain work experience directly related to their field of
study. A discipline offering this course type must have an approved course syllabus that has been
formally reviewed and approved by the department or program the discipline offering falls under, and
the Curriculum Committee.
Instructor’s Checklist
The following questions can serve as a checklist for teachers to determine if they have been providing
necessary help for students. The list is not exhaustive, but it will encourage instructors to generate other
questions to determine if they are creating the classroom scenario necessary for students to become
really involved with their questions.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Did I provide an atmosphere which was non-threatening and which encouraged students to
“blue sky” about the questions they wished to ask?
Did I schedule opportunities for students to discuss their questions with fellow classmates, with
me?
Did I encourage student discussion of the consequences of the questions they asked?
Did I offer specific suggestions to students about how to plan, recognize and implement
particular question types into certain strategies for processing information?
Did I provide students with opportunities to test their questions in role-playing or simulation?
Did I, as the teacher, serve as an effective exemplar of the good questioner?
Did I sit down with particular students or the class and discuss dimensions of particular
strategies and the place of the question in these strategies?
Did I assign opportunities for students to analyze the questions of resource persons?
Did I discuss with students the task of analyzing questions they encountered in written
materials?
Did I provide situations in which students planned games of recognizing certain types of
questions and generating questions from materials encountered?
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Did I give students time to try out their questions in mini-investigations to get “input” on the
effectiveness of their questions?
Did I schedule opportunities for students to react cognitively and effectively to questions
encountered or planned?
Did I give guidance to students in judging their questions on cognitive and affective levels?
Did I encourage and assist students in engaging in self-analysis relating to their questions?
Did I provide students with opportunities to learn about the criteria of effective questions and
situations in which to apply these criteria to their own questions?
Did I schedule opportunities or allow students to schedule their own opportunities to analyze
their questions and questioning techniques to determine if any problems existed?
Hunkins, Francis, P. Involving Students in Questioning. Allyn and Bacon, Inc.: Boston, Mass., 1976, p.
11-12.
Liberal Arts and Sciences Disciplines/Courses
Based on New York State Education Department (NYSED) guidelines about liberal arts and sciences
disciplines, the TC3 categories were revised.
For degree purposes, there are three Liberal Arts categories: Humanities, Math/Natural Sciences,
and Social Sciences. The disciplines/courses under each category are listed in the college catalog.
http://www.tc3.edu/docs/academic/tc3_las_disciplines.pdf
Make-Up Tests and Assignments
Please try to be as helpful as possible to students who wish to make up tests and/or assignments
when they have been absent for valid reasons. Make-up tests should be scheduled during your
office hour(s). You can increase scheduling flexibility for yourself and for your students by making
arrangements with other teaching faculty to help assist during respective office hours or class times.
Each semester, the Office of the Dean of Instruction will provide a daily 1-2 hour proctoring
opportunity. The specific schedule of this service will be shared with the teaching community by the
end of the third week of each semester.
myTC3 – myINFO
https://my.tc3.edu/Pages/Default.aspx
The TC3 Wiki provides answers to frequently asked questions.
https://my.tc3.edu/Portal/Wiki/myTC3%20FAQ%20WIKI/Home.aspx
Office Hours
You should schedule at least one office hour per week for each section you teach in order to be
available to students for extra assistance. At the first class session, please make your students aware
43
of when and where they will find you for help. Shared office space is available for adjunct instructors
in Room 122. Keys to cabinets assigned will be issued through Facilities office as needed. Adjunct
faculty should post office hours with the secretary in the adjunct office. Full time faculty should give
their schedule to the secretaries in the faculty office suites by the first day of classes.
Online Courses – ANGEL
If you are interested in creating an online presence for your course(s), you will find helpful training
materials and tutorials on your ANGEL home page in the “Faculty Resources” area. Campus
Technology (or Tony DeFranco and Bob Yavits) also provide individual and group training on ANGEL.
Contact Tony DeFranco at ext. 4399 or Bob Yavits at ext. 4357
Online Courses – Attendance
Logging into an online class without active participation will not constitute attendance; rather, there
must be participation in an online discussion about academic matters. Also, initiating contact with a
faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course constitutes
attendance (courtesy the SUNY Registrar’s Association).
Outlines
The course outline is an essential part of the education process here at TC3, and the Academic
Standards Policy at the College states: “Each instructor must deliver a course outline to each
student no later than the end of the first week of classes. This outline will contain specific
information about the topics to be covered as well as the expectations of that instructor, and will
be consistent with the official syllabus.” Please refer to the curriculum section of this publication
for details regarding the creation of your course outline. A copy of this document must also be
submitted to the Office of the Dean of Instruction by the end of the first week of classes. Please
email this document to Teresa Mix, [email protected] or drop off a paper copy in room 229.
Performance Evaluation
Student evaluations are conducted online through OnlineCourseEvaluations.com (OCE). Following
this section is an image of the student evaluation form as well as a link to the OCE training website
where you can become familiar with this process. These evaluations are completed each semester
for adjunct instructors (fall and spring semesters only) as part of the ongoing evaluation of both
classroom and online instruction. Full-time teaching faculty should refer to Article XI of the current
faculty association contract for frequency and number of student evaluations and observations
visits.
The student evaluations are processed in the Office of the Provost and will be available to
instructors after the completion of the semester. These evaluations will now be accessed online by
students through the myINFO interface, and will contain the questions as shown on the following
page. Students will be expected to complete and submit the evaluation with a reasonable window of
access during weeks 11-13 of a 15-week course; courses running for shorter periods of time will
have different access dates published as necessary. With prior arrangement through the Dean of
44
Instruction’s office and based on availability, faculty may schedule their classes to use a computer
classroom for purposes of completing the evaluation.
OnlineCourseEvaluations.com Training website:
https://demo.onlinecourseevaluations.com/training/instructors.aspx
The “Supervisor’s Observation Report” is used when a scheduled class observation occurs. Adjunct
instructors will be observed during their first semester of instruction, and may be observed
periodically thereafter. Full-time teaching faculty will be observed in accordance with the current
faculty association contract.
45
46
TOMPKINS CORTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SUPERVISOR’S OBSERVATION REPORT
INSTRUCTIONAL PROFESSIONALS
Employee:
Title:
Observer:
Title:
Course being observed:
Number of Students:
Date of observation:
Room/location:
Time observer arrived:
Time observer left:
Number of times you have formally observed this employee:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------Instructions: Using the scale below each question, check the number which is appropriate for the
professional employee you are rating.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------I.
Illustrates knowledge of the subject:
1
2
3
4
5
Poor
Satisfactory
Excellent
Comments:
II.
Class/module preparation:
A. Objective(s) of observed class/module:
B. Were the objectives for the class session/module made clear to the students?
1
2
3
4
5
Poor
Satisfactory
Excellent
Comments:
C. Organizational plan clearly demonstrated:
1
2
3
Poor
Satisfactory
Comments:
47
4
5
Excellent
III.
Presentation:
A. Modes of presentation (describe, e.g., use of chalkboard, lecture, films, discussions,
mini-lecture, links, video/audio clips, etc.):
Comments:
B. Effectiveness of modes of presentation as noted above:
1
2
3
4
Poor
Satisfactory
5
Excellent
Comments:
C. Instructor communicated clearly:
1
2
Poor
3
4
Satisfactory
5
Excellent
Comments:
D. Accomplishment of objectives for this class:
1
2
3
Poor
Satisfactory
4
5
Excellent
Comments:
E. Student involvement in class (i.e. questions, responses, attentiveness, note-taking, etc.)
as appropriate:
1
2
3
4
5
Poor
Satisfactory
Comments:
IV.
Additional comments:
48
Excellent
Placement Testing
Information concerning placement testing is located on the college website. For further information
about placement test scores and course placements based on testing, please contact the Student
Success & Advisement Services office.
http://www.tc3.edu/success/a_placement.asp
Plagiarism
If you find that a student has violated the policy on academic integrity, you should report the incident to
the Office of the Provost. Please see the grades section for further information on this process.
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_ac_statement.asp
Retention of Records
You should maintain a grade book or listing including class number and title, location, date and time
class meets, student attendance, test grades, and final grade. This information must be kept for two
years. Examinations, test papers and answer sheets must be kept for one year. If you leave the
employment of the college, you must submit these records to the Office of the Dean of Instruction.
Selected Topics Course
Identified by discipline and a 239 course number
A selected topics course covers discipline-specific subject matter that is not presented in a regularly
offered course. The program faculty develops a general course description about the subject matter that
such a course could cover based on the academic discipline, individual faculty expertise and student
interest. The course description is included on the college catalog. 1-4 Cr.
Special Topic Course
Identified by discipline and a 249 course number
Offered on an experimental or temporary basis, a special topic course focuses on an issue or topic that is
not covered in the formally approved college curriculum. A given topic may be offered under the special
topic designation no more than three times. A student may receive credit for multiple special topic
courses provided that the subject matter of each is unique. For information about special topic course
offerings, consult the semester course schedules. 1-4 Cr.
Student Code of Conduct
http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/pp_rights_responsibilities.asp
49
Study Abroad
Student opportunities: http://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ap_sa_default.asp
Faculty information: http://www.tc3.edu/docs/global/study_abroad/sa_faculty_handbook.pdf
Sustainability Designation
The very nature of environmental issues demands an interdisciplinary approach when seeking
sustainable solutions. TC3’s sustainability designation is designed to expose a student to the broad topic
of sustainability through an interdisciplinary exploration of interrelated subjects. The designation will
provide evidence that the student has completed a coherent course of study in the emerging field of
sustainability. Students who complete this course of study will receive a designation on their TC3
diplomas and transcripts.
Implementation
An interdisciplinary faculty advisory committee will be formed to establish criteria for a course to be
approved for this designation. The committee will also consider proposals for alternative ways to earn
this designation. For example, an individual program might propose that students in the program could
receive this designation by completing specific sustainability projects for their required courses. The
committee will also consider whether there should be a minimum grade or grade point average for the
15-17 required credits. In addition, the committee will discuss the addition of an out-of-class
requirement such as participation in a community event, arranging a campus event/speaker, or
attending an off-campus presentation(s), etc.
For more information, see the college catalog and/or contact Kelly Wessel, Environmental Studies
Program Chair. https://www.tc3.edu/catalog/ap_sustainability_designation.asp
50
ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS
Building Use
Beverages: Beverages including coffee, tea, milk, soft drinks, etc., are prohibited in all spaces except for
the dining area, vending areas, staff-work stations, and those areas wherein a special catered function
has been scheduled and approved on the appropriate Building Use Form. Beverages that are being
transported from space to space shall have sealed lids or be in an enclosed container.
Food: Food is prohibited in any space other than the dining area, vending area and those areas wherein
a special catered function has been scheduled and approved on the appropriate Building Use Form.
Furniture: Faculty are asked not to rearrange classrooms. If furniture is moved, you need to put the
room back into its original configuration at the end of the class. To change to a different classroom you
should submit a Classroom Request form to Lauren Wright ([email protected]) in the Academic Records
Office. If you need additional furniture, contact the Facilities Department.
Keys: Adjunct Faculty needing keys to classrooms may sign them out from the Assistant to the Director
of Facilities. Authorization from the Office of the Dean of Instruction is required before a key will be
issued. Keys must be returned at the end of each semester.
Posting: Nothing should be attached to the walls with any kind of tape. If there is a need for posting in
the room, the boards are usually magnetic and the Facilities Department can provide magnets. If there is
a need for more posting areas, you should work with the Facilities Department to meet your
requirements.
Recycling and compost: Stations are located as follows:
• Athletic facility main door
• Student Center
• First Floor of Main Building
• Near dining hall
• Across from the Adjunct office area
• Outside the fireside café
• Near the Vending machines in the front entry area
• Second Floor of Main Building: near rooms 212, 220, 241, 244, 285, 288, upstairs yellow vending
machines.
For details on how to recycle, instructions are posted near each bin or you may visit the TC3 website
http://www.tc3.edu/about_tc3/sustainability_recycle.asp.
Smoking Policy: Smoking is prohibited in all areas inside of the College, and is restricted to designated
outdoor smoking areas.
51
Certificate of Residence
A certificate of residence is required to qualify for the New York state resident tuition rate. Certificates
of Residence are valid for a period of one year. Students may apply for a certificate no sooner than 60
days before the beginning of classes. Students will be responsible to pay the non-resident tuition charge
if a certificate is not on file at the college at the start of classes.
Information concerning eligibility and instructions for applying please refer to the college website
http://www.tc3.edu/enroll_svc/st_certificate.asp.
Class Cancellation
Cancellation of Classes by Instructor:
State University regulations require a specified number of class contact hours for all credit courses. Since
classes are scheduled very closely, instructors should encourage students to attend all class meetings
during the semester. If it is necessary for you to be absent during the semester, please follow the
procedures outlined below:
A. Day Classes:
1.
If you need to cancel a class at any time during the semester, please contact any of the suite
secretaries or the Dean of Instruction’s Office. If you send e-mail, please e-mail more than one
individual in the event that someone is out that particular day.
Suites 214 & 220
Chrissie Askew, ext. 4200
[email protected] or [email protected]
Dean of Instruction’s Office
Teresa Mix, ext. 4349
[email protected] or [email protected]
Sandy Eldred, ext. 4250
(arrives by 7:30)
[email protected] or [email protected]
Renee Hollenbeck, ext. 4371
[email protected] or [email protected]
Suite 241
Bev Carey, ext. 4241
[email protected] or [email protected]
Carl Penziul, ext. 4410
(arrives by 7:30 am)
[email protected] or [email protected]
Lolly Carpenter, ext. 4221
(arrives by 7:30 am)
[email protected] or [email protected]
TC3 Cortland Extension Center, 756-5275
Gail Munson or April Byers
[email protected] ([email protected]) or [email protected]
TC3 Ithaca Extension Center, 272-3025
Maureen Maus or Sharon Sanford
[email protected] or [email protected]
[email protected] or [email protected]
If you’re unable to speak in person, please leave your name, class schedule for that day and the reason
for cancellation (sick, personal, family, etc). We’ll post a sign on the classroom door, the cancellation
52
information will be posted on the web site, a text message will be sent out automatically to the students
in your class that have signed up for this service, and an e-mail will be sent to the students.
2.
When possible, arrangements for another instructor to meet the class will be made in
conjunction with your Program Chair. Please inform the Dean of Instruction of your
arrangements.
3.
If the class must be canceled, arrangements to cover missed work should be settled with the
students as soon as possible. You may want to discuss alternatives through the Dean of
Instruction’s Office.
4.
If you have announced your absence in class to your students, please be sure to inform the Dean
of Instruction’s Office as well. We often have students who have missed the message contact
the college to inquire as to the whereabouts of the class.
B. Evening Classes:
1.
If you find that you cannot hold a scheduled class, please contact the Dean of Instruction’s
Office as early as possible. If you call before 4:00 pm, an e-mail and text message (to students
enrolled in the text message system) will be sent, and a cancellation notice is posted on the
college website and classroom door. If the office is closed, or in the case of an emergency,
contact the Campus Police (ext. 6511).
2.
If you know about a necessary absence ahead of time, you may arrange for a guest speaker or
another instructor to meet the class.
3.
If the class must be canceled, any alternative arrangements (such as a make-up class) should be
settled with the students as soon as possible; please notify the Dean of Instruction’s Office of
your arrangements.
4.
It is recommended that, when the semester begins, you survey your class to determine a day
and time on which the group could meet in the event of a class cancellation due either to bad
weather or instructor absence.
If a substitute instructor teaches a class for you, you must make your own arrangements for
reimbursement or other reciprocity; the College will not pay for short-term substitution instruction.
Cancellation of Classes Due to Bad Weather:
A.
Notice of cancellation will be given to local television and radio stations and posted on the
college website by 6:30 a.m. for day classes and by 3:00 p.m. for evening classes. Please do not
call the college. Campus Police personnel will not be able to answer general information
telephone calls made to the college on mornings when the college is closed for a snow
emergency.
B.
Be aware that extension centers may be open even though the main campus is closed. The
reverse is also true. Call the Center for an up-to-date message on closing. Ithaca: 272-3025
Cortland: 756-5275
The following policies will apply if major snow storms occur:
If courses are cancelled on the Dryden campus, courses will normally be cancelled at all off-campus
locations during the same time period. For Saturday classes at Extension Centers, the decision on
cancellation will be the option of the instructor in consultation with the Dean of Instruction. The
instructor must inform students of the need to check the message on the Extension Center phone at
either 272-3025 or 756-5275. A closing message will be put on the extension center phone if the class is
cancelled.
53
If emergency closings force cancellations of the equivalent of one week’s worth of instruction or less,
instructors will have the option of arranging for special make-up classes. It will be the instructor’s
discretion to determine whether or not it is necessary to make up time missed for one week’s worth of
equivalent instruction. If the instructor schedules such a make-up class, it must be at the convenience of
all students in that particular class unless an alternative is arranged. Such arrangements must be cleared
with the Academic Records Office in order to allow for room and facility scheduling. The appropriate
Program Chair should also be made aware of the arrangement.
If emergency closings force cancellations of the equivalent of one week’s worth of classes in any given
semester, the College may act to formally schedule special make up dates for classes. Such
arrangements may include scheduling of Saturday classes and/or, if necessary, the extension of the
semester beyond its scheduled termination dates. This will be the prerogative of the Dean of Instruction
with the approval of the Provost and the President. Notification of extension of classes and make up
dates will be made to students and staff within an adequate amount of time to arrange for personal
schedules.
Weekend Closing Procedures:
The college will remain open on Saturdays and Sundays unless either Tompkins County or Cortland
County declares a state of emergency and close the roads in their county. It is expected that classes and
services provided at the College will be available until the college officially closes.
Credit Courses – Faculty members have the authority to cancel class due to inclement weather/road
conditions. The faculty member must contact the students in their class and the Campus Police. An
announcement will not be placed on the radio/television stations.
Offices/Services Available – Departments that maintain Saturday hours should make their own decisions
about whether to close due to inclement weather/road conditions. If a decision is made to close, the
individual in charge must notify the Campus Police. An announcement will not be placed on the
radio/television stations.
Workshops – Workshop coordinators have the authority to cancel their events due to inclement
weather/road conditions. Workshop coordinators should contact all participants if a workshop is
cancelled. The local media may be used if unable to contact everyone. The workshop coordinator must
contact the Campus Police as well.
Special Events – Event coordinators have the authority to cancel their event due to inclement
weather/road conditions. Each department that sponsors weekend events will clearly identify who has
the authority to cancel the event. The Office of Student Activities, through the room reservation system,
coordinates the scheduling of activities. The individual responsible for making a decision regarding
cancellation of the event should be stated on the reservation form. A copy of the reservation form will
then be forwarded to the Campus Police. Event coordinators must notify the Campus Police if an event
is cancelled and the local media to announce the cancelation.
54
Classrooms
The college will try to accommodate instructor preferences for classrooms as needed. If you would like
to request a room change, please submit a Classroom Request form (available on the portal) to Lauren
Wright in the Academic Records Office, Room 223, email her at [email protected]
https://my.tc3.edu/Portal/Forms
Six (6) computer classrooms have computers for each student and an instructor computer that is
connected to a digital projector. Each computer also has internet access. These rooms are 163B, 163C,
206, 209, 281A and 289A.
Smart classrooms have an instructor’s computer (or provision to connect a personal laptop) with
internet access, and is connected to a ceiling mounted digital projector, document camera, DVD/VHS
player, SmartTech Sympodium and a gyro mouse.
Semi-Smart classrooms have a DVD/VCR and a laptop with internet access and a ceiling mounted digital
projector.
Campus Technology Policy and Procedures
Information concerning Campus Technology services and policies such as Information Security Protocol
may be found on the college website.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/campus_tech/default.asp
Confidential Records
The college’s Information Security Protocol prohibits any “personally identifiable” information from
being kept on removable media, without working with Campus Technology to encrypt the data (files are
saved with a password). The most critical data which should not be kept on your laptop or memory stick
is SSN, credit card data or ID numbers. Please contact Campus Technology (Help Desk, room 208 or at
ext. 4270) to help you secure this information if you must have this type of info on removable media.
E-Mail
All TC3 teaching faculty must acquire and utilize a TC3 e-mail account. All college correspondence
between instructors and students should be conducted via TC3 email accounts. Completion of the
Network Access/FERPA paperwork is required to receive a TC3 e-mail. E-mail accounts expire and if you
have not used your account for 60 days; you will be notified via college e-mail when your account will be
deleted. Please maintain your mail box on a regular basis, deleting all old email and saving attached
documents on your personal computer. Accounts inactive for a 60-day period may be removed from the
TC3 system.
Outlook Web Access can be accessed whenever you have an internet connection. While logged into your
myTC3 account, select the myMAIL tab. Select MyTC3 from the main web page (www.tc3.edu) and enter
55
your Active Directory ID and password. Your Active Directory ID and password will also be used for
MyTC3 for class lists and to enter grades.
Adjunct Instructors must request e-mail accounts from the following web site:
http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/adjunct/adjunct.asp
Once you access this web site, click the “Request a TC3 E-mail Account” link under the “Obtain an
Outlook E-mail Account” section. In the E-mail request, please include the following information: your
first name, middle initial, last name, your current E-mail address, and a phone number where you can be
reached. After the account is activated, secretary in the adjunct office (ext. 4281) will contact you to
schedule a brief meeting (10 minutes) for training on the e-mail system.
Emergencies – What is an Emergency?
An emergency is any situation that requires an immediate police, fire, or medical response to preserve
life or property. These include:
Serious illness or injury
Assault or immediate danger of assault
Violent or criminal behavior
Chemical spill
Bomb threat
Loss of consciousness
Fires
Situation involving weapons
Fight
Explosions
Choking or drowning
Any serious threat to health and safety
The Tompkins County Department of Emergency Response (911 Center) will contact TC3’s Campus
Police and initiate the proper emergency response. When calling 911, make sure to let the 911
dispatcher know your exact location and try to stay on the line. In an emergency, seconds count. If time
permits after completing the 911 call, please call the Campus Police at 844-6511 or ext. 6511. Use 911
only for emergencies (any campus phone is capable of dialing 911) – misuse of 911 is against the law
because it may delay response to a legitimate emergency. For more information on responding to an
emergency, refer to the Campus Police website at http://www.tc3.edu/student/ops_emergency.asp.
Don’t call 911 to report:
• Minor auto accidents or disabled vehicles
• Road or weather conditions, power outages or directions
• Crimes no longer in progress and not requiring an immediate response to
preserve life or property
• Loud parties
• Missing property
• Telephone, cable, or power outages not requiring an immediate response to
preserve life or property
In cases like these, please dial 844-6511 or 844-8222 ext. 6511 instead.
Refer to the Emergency Evacuation Procedures for persons with disabilities on the college website
http://www.tc3.edu/bcl/d_evacuation.asp.
56
Any student, employee, or visitor on campus can, and should report suspected crime or unusual
incidents to the Campus Police. From any campus phone, simply call 6511. From other phones, please
dial 844-6511.
Field Trip Insurance
On numerous occasions, faculty and staff undertake field trip educational opportunities with and for
students. All College procedures for notification should be followed.
The College does carry liability insurance, which protects staff and volunteers of the College should they
be liable for negligence while supervising, teaching, or acting in an official capacity on a field trip. This
coverage also protects the staff member and the College for any accident occurring while driving a
College-owned vehicle. Students and staff who drive to and from a field trip in private vehicles are
covered by their own automobile insurance, not the College’s. The College’s insurance coverage would
not extend to liability for negligence while operating a private vehicle.
The College strongly recommends that individuals using their personal vehicles for College business have
the following minimum coverage: limits of at least $300,000 combined single limit, or bodily injury per
person of $100,000/$300,000 per occurrence and property damage per accident of $100,000 are
recommended with respect to the motor vehicles to be used for that purpose. It should be kept in mind
that student accident and illness insurance is available and should be suggested to students.
Financial Aid
Changes to student schedules (drop, withdrawal, etc.) could impact financial aid. Students should be
directed to make an appointment with the financial aid office when making adjustments to their
schedule. To schedule an appointment they should contact the office by emailing [email protected]
http://www.tc3.edu/enroll_svc/financial.asp
Hazardous Chemicals on Campus
The Hazard Communication and Right To Know Act (Article 28 of the NYS Labor Law) requires that
employers develop a comprehensive program to inform and train employees about the hazards
associated with the use of toxic chemicals found in the workplace. The law also requires that employers
obtain Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all chemicals used in the workplace. The College has
adopted strict procedures for the purchase, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous chemicals used
on campus. If a product constitutes a hazard (flammable, explosive, reactive, etc.) or has the potential to
cause adverse health effects, it is considered hazardous. Hazardous Chemicals will not be brought onto
campus unless first approved by the department supervisor.
All chemicals used on campus must be accompanied by a Material Data Safety Sheet. A copy of the
MSDS must be maintained in the Security Office and the department where the chemical is used. Each
department must inventory chemicals in stock on an annual basis. Disposal of waste or surplus
57
chemicals is strictly regulated under NYSDEC and USEPA laws. You are responsible for the safe handling,
use and disposal of chemicals in you possession.
For further information, please contact James Mawson, Campus Safety Officer at ext. 4291.
Human Resources Department
The Human Resources Department is located in Room 219 on the second floor at the north end of the
building in the green section by the railing. Although its normal hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
we can be available at other times upon request.
If you have any questions concerning employment or other personnel-related matters, please visit or
call the Human Resources Department 844-8211, ext. 4440 or 4228.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/hr/
Guidelines for Research Involving Human Subjects
Prior to initiating research or sponsoring student research that involves human subjects, instructors
must contact the Department of Institutional Research to ensure they are following College guidelines.
The guidelines are listed on the Institutional Research website.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/ir/guidelines.asp
Students wishing to conduct surveys or other research must obtain approval from Institutional Research
staff, located in room 229. For more information see the college website http://www.tc3.edu/dept/ir/
or contact Kris Altucher, [email protected], 844-8222, ext. 4392.
Off-Campus Activity Control Policy
The following statement of procedures and regulations for the off-campus activity control policy became
effective October 1, 1986.
The Board of Trustees has approved the following off-campus activity control policy:
It is the policy of the College that only responsible and competent individuals shall be permitted
to organize and conduct off-campus activities, or transport people to and from them.
Additionally, any student-related activity conducted off campus in connection with or under the
auspices of the College or any academic course offered thereby shall be subject to the review of
the individual so designated in the regulations. Further, no such activity shall be scheduled or
conducted unless the organizer thereof complies with the regulations and procedures as
approved by the President of the College.
The following shall outline the procedures and regulations for implementing the above policy of the
Board of Trustees.
58
A. Definitions:
The following definitions shall apply:
1. “Student-related” shall mean an event requiring or involving attendance or
participation by any duly enrolled part-time or full-time student of the College.
2. “Off-campus activity” shall mean and include, without limitation, any studentrelated trips, seminars, visits, tours, competitions, exercises, or other like
expeditions or events, which either occur off campus and/or require travel to an offcampus activity.
3. “Campus” shall mean the buildings compromising Tompkins Cortland Community
College and their immediate environs located in the Town of Dryden, and the
extension centers currently located in Ithaca and Cortland, New York.
4. “Motor vehicle” shall mean any and every vehicle that can be operated or driven on
a public highway.
B. Procedure:
1. Completion of Form
At least two (2) weeks before scheduling any off-campus activity, the individual planning
it shall prepare and submit to the appropriate person a completed “Notification of OffCampus Activity” form, including a class list of students participating in the activity and
the “Volunteer Driver Information” form if applicable.
www.tc3.edu/docs/faculty/forms/transportation/off_campus_activity.pdf
www.tc3.edu/docs/faculty/forms/transportation/volunteer_driver.pdf
For any activities related to the academic curriculum offerings of the college the form
shall be forwarded to the Dean of Instruction’s Office. For any activities related to
student clubs, extracurricular activities or FSA-sponsored events, the forms shall be
forwarded to the Director of Student Activities. The Dean of Instruction’s Office or
Director of Student Activities will forward the form to the appropriate Dean or Campus
Police at least one week prior to the scheduled activity.
2. Review and Standards
a. No individual will be permitted to transport anyone attending, enrolled at,
associated or affiliated with the College to or from an off-campus activity if the
information provided by that individual indicates that he or she may not do so
safely.
b. No individual will be permitted to transport anyone attending, enrolled at,
associated or affiliated with the College to and from an off-campus activity unless
he/she first satisfactorily demonstrates that he/she maintains a valid, existing
liability insurance coverage. Limits of at least $300,000 combined single limit, or
bodily injury per person of $100,000/$300,000 per occurrence and property damage
per accident of $100,000 are recommended, with respect to the motor vehicle to be
used for that purpose.
c. No motor vehicle shall be used to transport anyone attending, enrolled at, or
affiliated with the College to or from an off-campus activity if the information
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provided as herein prescribed indicates that the motor vehicle may not be used for
that purpose.
d. All individuals involved in the transportation of anyone attending, enrolled at,
associated or affiliated with the College to or from any off-campus activity shall
abide by any and all pertinent laws, rules and regulations governing the use and
operation of motor vehicles in the state of New York and any other jurisdiction
within which such a vehicle is operated.
3. Accidents
All accidents must be reported immediately to the nearest police agency. Accidents
involving injury to students, staff or any member of the College community, in addition
to those involving damage to College vehicles, must also be reported promptly to the
Campus Police at 844-8211, ext. 6511.
4. No Exceptions
There shall be no exceptions to these regulations unless otherwise specified in writing
by the Dean of Operations and Enrollment Management.
Off-Campus Activity Notification Questions/Answers
www.tc3.edu/docs/faculty/forms/transportation/off_campus_activity_questions.pdf
Overload Compensation Salary Formula – Full Time Faculty
Schedule for Overload Salary Rates (per C.H.E. Basis)
Fall 2013/Winter 2014/Spring 2014/Summer 2014
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
$870
$925
$990
$1060
$1135
Campus Police
For emergencies, please see page 56 of this document, the TC3 OPS website:
http://www.tc3.edu/student/ops_staff.asp or by obtaining a copy of the OPS “Safety and
Security Information and Emergency Response Guide.”
Portal
You may obtain access from your myTC3 account to the TC3 Portal to view discussions and share
documents and information. The “College Corner” section of the portal allows an area for college and
non-college related postings or discussions. Please use this venue for any non-college related
advertisements (ie. personal items for sale, hobbies, etc.)
https://my.tc3.edu/Portal/SitePages/Home.aspx
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Purchasing Supplies
Please refer to the TC3 website for purchasing information.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/finance/purchasing.asp
Textbook Desk Copies
If you need a desk copy of a text, see your Program Chair or Teresa Mix, Dean of Instruction Office
(Room 229) to order it from the publisher directly.
See “Book Orders and Textbooks” for information regarding the College Bookstore.
Tuition Refunds
Tuition refunds for withdrawal from school or for dropping courses will be granted only if a written
request is made to the Enrollment Services Center of the College prior to 4:00 p.m. on the last day of the
drop period. Consult the College Calendar for the specific date each semester.
Refund:
If a student drops a course or withdraws from college, they will be charged non-refundable tuition and
fees according to the following schedule for 15 week courses:
Fall/Spring Non-Refundable Charges
Prior to the start of classes
During the first week of classes
During the second week of classes
During the third week of classes
After the third week of classes
0%
25%
50%
75%
100%
Failure to attend class or notification of instructor does not constitute official withdrawal. Students must
withdraw officially through the Enrollment Services Center.
*Non-Refundable charges for courses that run less than 15 weeks are prorated on a similar schedule.
Summer Non-Refundable Charges
Prior to the drop deadline
After the drop deadline
0%
100%
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College Vehicle Use
In view of safety considerations, people who drive the College/FSA vans for sporting events, field trips,
etc., are now required to complete a five hour safety program.
The program will consist of a:
- Five hour classroom program that will have one hour dedicated to a laboratory exercise
- Individual driver evaluation that must be scheduled at a later date
- Completion certificate for those who successfully complete the program
The program is open to college/FSA employees and students who as part of their job or leadership
responsibility have a need to drive the vans. Participants must possess a valid New York State driver’s
license and be cleared via a motor vehicle record check.
Van driver workshops are offered once a semester. College wide e-mail is used to announce the date
and time of the workshop. For more information, contact The Student Activities Office.
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SERVICES
Dr. Lucille S. Baker Commons
The Baker Commons brings together services that support students in all aspects of their academic
experience. In addition, we provide expertise and resources for faculty and staff to support and enhance
learning in their courses and across the curricula. The learning commons concept is based on a
partnership model designed to support and enhance student learning.
http://www.tc3.edu/bakercommons/
Library Services
http://www.tc3.edu/library/
You may reserve recording equipment as well as request a video by sending an e-mail to
[email protected] Include your course name & section, start & end dates for viewing, and any special
considerations (close-capturing, subtitles, etc.) needed.
Tutoring Services
http://www.tc3.edu/bcl/tutoring.asp
Technology Support
Technology Support installs, maintains and supports a wide variety of technology for use by staff and
students in all areas of the College including:
• Computer Classrooms
• Smart Classrooms
• Adjunct Offices
• Extension Center
• Baker Commons
The Baker Commons provides computers to support all computer classes and to provide
support for students in a variety of other courses. Internet access is available on most
student-use computers and on computers located in the first floor hallway across from the
pool. The hallway computing (including printing) is available whenever the main building is
open.
Should you need assistance with technology please contact Technology Learning and Support Services. If
you are in a classroom without a computer, projector, etc., you can request equipment to be delivered.
Wireless Internet access is available from many points on campus including the Baker Commons,
Fireside Café and cafeteria.
General Contact Information
Phone: ext. 6566
Email: [email protected]
Room: 258
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Disability Services for Students
Any student who identifies as being a person with a disability is invited to meet with the Coordinator of
Access and Equity Services, Carolyn Boone. Using the information contained in the student’s
documentation, Carolyn works individually with each student to develop and recommend an
accommodation plan. Students who desire to use their accommodations must deliver a memo of
academic accommodations (created by the Baker Center for Learning (BCL)) to you each semester. The
BCL assists the faculty by providing testing accommodations when possible. The BCL also provides
adaptive equipment and software. More information is provided on the college website; for additional
procedures and information, contact the BCL at 607-844-8222, ext. 4415.
http://www.tc3.edu/bcl/disabilities.asp
Emergency Evacuation Procedures for Persons with Disabilities
It is the goal of Tompkins Cortland Community College to plan for the safe and orderly evacuation of
persons with disabilities during an emergency. This section provides advice for assisting with some of
the more common disabilities that may impair a person’s ability to respond to an emergency situation.
Certain medical situations and cognitive impairments may also create a risk. If you observe someone
whom you believe may need assistance, ask if and how you can be of help. Members of the College
community should prepare for emergencies ahead of time by learning the locations of accessible exit
routes, exit stairwells, and procedures for assisted evacuation. Those in supervisory positions, including
faculty, should discuss emergency procedures with all individuals they supervise or teach. ALWAYS ASK
someone with a disability how you can help before giving assistance or attempting any recue technique.
Ask how he or she can best be assisted or moved and whether there are any special considerations or
items that need to come with the person, such as respirators, mobility aids, or other equipment. For
more information, please see the college website.
http://www.tc3.edu/bcl/d_evacuation.asp
Working with Non-Native Speakers of English
Working with non-native speakers of English can be delightfully challenging. It is delightful, first of all,
because the students are generally highly motivated, intelligent, and respectful. They contribute to the
learning environment of a classroom by sharing their knowledge and life experience in other cultures.
It can be challenging because these students often cannot express themselves in ways that truly reflect
their abilities. It may be difficult to know that they understand class discussions. They may be
suffering from culture shock, loneliness or homesickness, which can have an impact on their work, and
they may not have the ability to express what they are going through.
Following are some suggestions and tips to help you as you work with these students.
Diversity
Non-native students at TC3 are can be characterized most accurately by noting their diversity. We
generally have around 150 non-native students during our regular semesters. They come from a wide
variety of countries. They range in age from “typical” to older and in background from just out of high
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school to fully professional in their own countries. Some come just to improve their English; others are
here while their spouses are at Cornell. Some will spend only one semester with us, others will transfer
to four-year institutions. Many plan to spend the rest of their lives in the United States.
International Students
About half of these students are here on F-1 (student) visas, which mean they are on an international
student visa. These students must be full-time and must maintain both good attendance and academic
records.
Some may be here on J-1 (also a student visa category, usually scholarship or other
sponsorship) and may need to return home for at least two years at the end of their TC3 program for
the purpose of allowing their education to benefit their home country.
Permanent Residents
The largest portion of the other half of our non-native speakers is permanent residents. Immigrationwise, these students are treated as if they were regular American students: they are eligible for
financial aid and they may or may not be full-time matriculated students. They may not, however,
have full proficiency in English nor do they always have a full comfort level with U.S. culture. Typically,
though, they are more likely to have lived in the U.S. longer upon entering college and plan to stay.
Others
Other non-native speakers may be here with a variety of visa types.
English Proficiency -- Make No Assumptions
What you see is not necessarily what you get when you are working with non-native speakers of English.
Some may speak quite fluently but write poorly; others may write very well but be very difficult to
understand and/or have trouble understanding others. Some may have been learning English for a long
time, but are hindered by “fossilized” or impractical English. You may find that some students have
acquired what amounts to a theoretical foundation of English, which is to say they have been studying
for many years but cannot produce speech or writing that meets their actual communicative needs in
and out of the classroom. Such students may have gotten good grades and come to the U.S. confident in
their abilities. Thus, they become disappointed or upset when the results are not what they expect.
Placement and Levels
Determining if non-native speaking students need ESL classes is challenging. If you have questions
about a student’s placement in your class, check with the ESL Program Chair, to learn more about the
individual student.
Accommodations of non-native speakers
Speaking English as a second language is not considered a learning disability. Therefore, it has been our
policy at TC3 that non-native speakers do not need special accommodations. However, it is true that
non-native speakers may process information more slowly than native speakers. (It may be helpful to
remember that these students speak our language better than we speak theirs!) If a teacher wishes to
provide longer time limits on exams or the use of a bi-lingual dictionary, he or she may do so, but is not
obligated to do so. If you have questions, contact Robin Hinchcliff, ext. 4382, room 220.
Tips for working with Non-Native Speakers
Adjust your communication style in order to be understood, if necessary.
• Avoid speaking through someone else.
• Try to learn and pronounce names correctly.
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•
•
•
•
•
Use literal or “straightforward” language as much as possible.
Avoid the use of irony and figurative language, but if you must do so then make sure to provide
the appropriate context and explanation
If comprehension is a problem, use slower speech and enunciate clearly
Emphasize key words and phrases through gestures.
Make an effort to avoid slang, idioms, and relaxed speech patterns (Whaddaya wanna do?)
Encourage students to make connections to their culture
• Prompt your students (non-native and native speakers alike) to draw examples from their own
experiences.
• Allow your students to choose their topics for their reports and their writing or research
assignments.
• Open the discussions of lesson material to include different perspectives. Don’t be let any
unfamiliarity with other cultures on your part prevent you from letting international students
share their perspective.
• Diversify your use of illustrations and examples and avoid exclusively drawing from an American
context.
• Use text and other lesson material that have a global or multi-cultural theme.
• No matter what you teach, read the newspaper; get more familiar with world events. For the
good of all students -- not just internationals --actively foster a global perspective.
Build redundancy into your verbal language.
• Simplify: The government’s funds were depleted. It was almost out of money.
• Expand: The government’s funds were depleted. It had spent a lot of money on
weapons, equipment, and help for the poor and could no longer afford certain programs.
• Define: The government’s funds were depleted. This means that the government spent all
of its money.
Check frequently to see that you have been understood.
• Master the “CCQ” or “comprehension-checking question”. Ask open-ended questions of the
group that go over what you have been discussing to ensure that an overall level of
understanding has been achieved. Example: “What are the main principles of a communist
society?” See what they have understood.
• “Yes/no” questions do not effectively ensure that understanding has been achieved.
• Similarly, do not assume nods or smiles indicate understanding. Non-native speakers will go to
great lengths to avoid the embarrassment of admitting they haven’t understood.
• Build understanding of concepts and encourage interaction buy having students to do in-class
tasks and small group discussion. Don’t just lecture.
Prepare the student for the learning task or assignment.
• Provide context or background information, especially when talking about things that are
familiar to Americans.
• Call attention to specialized vocabulary. Write it on the blackboard or provide a key word list.
• Over-explain assignments rather than under-explain them.
• Write out or email details of assignments, rather than giving only verbal instructions.
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•
•
•
Clarify expectations. Help the student to develop an organized approach to the task. Break large
assignments down into smaller parts. (For instance, assign separately: topic, research,
outline/notes, first draft, second draft, final paper.)
Understand that education has a culture of their own that varies greatly from culture to culture.
For example, in certain other countries, citing sources of information is not nearly as
underscored as it is here. Approaches to writing -- styles and ways of reasoning and reaching a
conclusion -- vary wildly. Encourage frequent tutoring at the Baker Center.
Working in assigned groups on a presentation or other assignment is uncommon in other
countries, which can result in the international student failing to play a sufficiently active role in
her group. It may help to take her an aside to insure she clearly understands expectations. Also,
make sure students have the phone numbers of others in the group.
Enhance learning.
• Model procedures step by step. Provide models of completed assignments and explain how
they are successful or where they fail.
• Add a greater variety of contextual support: visuals, graphic organizers such as charts or
diagrams, hands on activities, role-playing, and, cognitive maps. Preview reading assignments
and provide study aids. Provide lecture outlines for note taking.
• Build on students’ prior knowledge and experiences to make the material accessible.
• Encourage risk-taking and higher order thinking. Both are difficult to do in a foreign language.
Don’t assume that non-native speakers aren’t taking risks or thinking critically just because they
are having difficulty expressing those ideas.
• Help students to see patterns, to analyze, categorize and synthesize information.
• Reinforce key concepts in a variety of ways.
• Summarize and review frequently.
• Provide time-limits for small group work that require specific outcomes.
• Emphasize the importance of process rather than product. Remember that simply
• correcting errors or providing the correct answer is of little help.
• Encourage students during in-class tasks; follow-up with individuals who may be struggling.
Allow sufficient wait time.
• Non-native speakers might need more time to process questions and answers.
• When students engage in group work, encourage the group members to share the
floor with non-native speakers.
Be sure you understand what the individual is trying to say.
• Be aware of your non-verbal language so that you don’t communicate impatience when a
non-native speaker is trying to express difficult ideas or concepts.
• Ask the individual to repeat, speak slowly, or rephrase if necessary.
• Repeat back to the student what you understood and ask for verification.
Demonstrate sensitivity and caring.
• Try to build confidence and encourage independence.
• Be aware of possible cultural differences. For example, in some cultures…
o direct eye contact shows disrespect. Avoiding eye contact doesn’t necessarily signal
dishonesty.
o nodding the head only indicates listening politely, not agreement or disagreement.
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o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
lack of facial expression is a taught behavior. Displaying emotion is often punished.
compliments are a cause for shame or embarrassment.
physical contact, such as touching the arms or shoulders, is offensive.
creative thinking is not desired; formulaic or memorized answers are expected.
asking questions of a teacher is rude and critical of a teacher.
answering teacher questions may be seen as boastful displays.
answering teacher questions incorrectly may be a cause of humiliation.
quick responses are not desirable; silence or a long pause in conversation is not a cause
of discomfort as in the US
it is not at all “the norm” to visit with instructors during office hours or to casually
interact with them; thus international students who may need help the most may be the
least likely to voluntarily seek it. Remind them that it’s okay and even expected here.
direct “yes” or “no” responses are considered impolite or too harsh
licking fingers when passing out papers is offensive.
teachers are not allowed to sit on the desk or interact casually with students.
the “thumbs up” and/or the thumb-index finger gesture for “ok” or “good” has an
offensive meaning.
it is not plagiarism to use other people’s work or to share assignments. To the contrary –
students are actually expected to help each succeed many in high-context cultures.
Ask students to share their own experiences tactfully. Some may not wish to talk about their own
countries because of unpleasant experiences or bad memories. But do provide opportunities for
students to share if they are willing. International students have much life experience to offer to
our classes.
If a student has persistent problems with language, refer that student to the ESL Program Chair for
help.
College Teaching Center (CTC)
Located in Room 252 on the second floor of the Baker Commons. The College Teaching Center enhances
student learning by promoting the profession of teaching. The CTC provides information and
opportunities for professional development as well as a space where faculty can get together to talk
informally about issues of teaching and learning and make use of various resources. The CTC runs a
number of programs during the school year. More information can be found on the college website.
http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/ctc/ctc.asp
Communications
Operating Hours for services will be as follows during the regular academic year:
Information Desk
Mail Operations
Switchboard
Auto Attendant
7:45 am – 5:00 pm (M-F)
9:30 am – 3:00 pm (M-F)
8:00 am – 4:00 pm (M-F)
24 hours 7 days per week, (607)844-8222
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To reach the Main Campus operators, call (607)844-8211. For college auto attendant call (607)844-8222.
If it is a toll call, you can reach the Main Campus at (888)567-8211.
Voicemail: The College’s voicemail system is available to adjunct faculty. If you would like to use this
service, please contact the Sr. Systems Administrator by calling ext. 4314. This service is limited, so apply
early.
Mail: Adjunct Instructors will be assigned a mail folder at the Adjunct Office (Room 122). As this is a
primary means of communication, please check your folder weekly. If you are teaching off-campus, you
may request that all material from your folder be mailed or delivered to you. Materials will be picked up
by a courier.
Copy Center
The Copy Center is open Monday – Friday, 7:30 am – 4:00 pm during spring and fall semesters, 8:00 am
– 4:00 pm during the summer.
Forms: Forms for requesting typing and Copy Center Services are from your Program Chair or the suite
secretaries in Rooms 220 or 241. Please secure your department budget code (from your Program
Chair). Please give a completion date and allow adequate time for processing your requests (NOT ASAP).
An example of this form follows this section.
Test Scoring Machine: Scantron machines are available in each of the faculty areas (rooms 220 and 241)
as well in the Adjunct Faculty area (Room 122).
Copyright Information: All copyright materials are the responsibility of the person copying them.
Exams: To ensure secure and prompt handling of examination materials, the suite secretaries and the
Copy Center have developed the following guidelines:
1. Place the exam/quiz in an interoffice envelope.
2. Fill out a work order being sure to include all pertinent information. A copy of this form is
included following this section.
3. Attach the work order to the outside of the envelope.
4. If the test is already typed and just needs copies, take it directly to the Copy Center (240).
Please do not submit tests which need typing to the Copy Center.
5. If you copy the test yourself, please be sure to check the machine for your original prior to
leaving.
Once an exam has been duplicated, it can be returned in one of the following ways:
1. It is held secure in the Copy Center (must be logged in and out).
2. Picked up by suite secretary (must be logged in and out).
3. Deliver to Extension Center (Cortland and Ithaca Extension Centers only).
Electronic Services: The Copy Center has full electronic services, you can send an attachment in your email for copying or you can store it on flash drive or other storage medium. This includes both black and
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white and full color services. [email protected] or [email protected] are the email addresses to assure
prompt service. The Electronic Submission order form is located on the college website.
http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/forms.asp
Copiers and Locations: Large quantity copiers are located just outside The Copy Center office room 240,
the green area near room 201 and in the Adjunct Faculty office, room 122.
Beginning with the Fall 2011 semester, all copy orders and copy card refills must be approved by the
Dean of Instruction Office, room 229. We ask that you consider the environment and expense when
copying materials for class. Our college has a great deal of technology available to instructors that can
assist in lowering our use of paper and copying budget.
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Developmental Education Program
TC3 offers four pre-college level courses that provide our academically under prepared students
with the skills necessary to succeed in the college level courses and programs they wish to take to earn a
degree or enter the workforce with greater competence and confidence. The developmental courses
include ENGL099 (Basic Writing Skills), MATH090 (Developmental Mathematics), MATH095 (Beginning
Algebra), and RDNG099 (Active Literacy).
The co-chairs for each discipline area are:
• Susan Cerretani – Co-Chair, English, 844-8222, ext. 4286 [email protected]
• Sophia Georgiakaki – Co-Chair, Math, 844-8222, ext. 4277 [email protected]
• Anna Regula – Co-Chair, Reading, 844-8222, ext. 4447 [email protected]
The College has a number of professional development opportunities and organizations that
developmental instructors may want to participate in and journals that they may find useful. There is a
Developmental Education budget to provide all developmental instructors with the resources they need
to help their students succeed. Please see the appropriate developmental co-chair for more
information.
Additionally, there is a new initiative associated with the developmental courses called Synergy that
faculty and staff can recommend to students. Synergy is a place to study and prepare for assignments in
ENGL099, RDNG099, MATH090, and MATH095. It is busy, diverse, and fun. The staff provide
supplemental instruction, academic coaching, study skills, tutoring, and an environment that embraces a
variety of learning styles. Synergy staff consists of Peer Guides (students who have graduated from
developmental courses at TC3) and Professional Staff (instructors currently teaching the developmental
courses), as well as the three developmental coordinators. All students in any of the developmental
courses are invited to attend. Synergy is open Monday-Thursday from 3 pm - 7 pm and most Sundays 5
pm – 7 pm. It opens the first week of classes and closes at the end of the last week of classes.
Educational Technology Services
•
•
Bob Yavits, Instructional Software Specialist, [email protected] (ext. 4357)
Tony DeFranco, Coordinator of Learning Technology Services, [email protected], (ext. 4399)
Educational Technology provides a variety of services to assist college staff in integrating instructional
technologies in teaching and learning. Specific services include selection and evaluation of computer
software; development of instructional materials; training in the use of presentation hardware and
software; assistance with Web-based course development including the SUNY Learning Network’s
ANGEL Course Management System; and training in the use of Internet resources and navigational tools.
The College offers distance learning courses primarily via the World Wide Web. These involve the use of
personal computers connected to the Internet to deliver course content and to provide interaction
between instructor and students among students. These courses are sometimes referred to as
asynchronous distance learning courses in that the students access course resources at their own
chosen time and location, using such things as e-mail or electronic discussion groups. These
technologies may also be used to supplement learning in traditional courses or can be used to teach
hybrid courses (courses that meet online and in the classroom). The SUNY Learning Network (SLN),
through the ANGEL Learning Management System, provides support for the College’s asynchronous
web-based courses, hybrid courses, and web-enhanced courses. If you would like to learn more about
web-based instruction contact either Tony or Bob.
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External Relations Group
The external relations group manages a wide range of the college’s external relationships and programs.
The overall mission of the group is to create and support learning by managing mutually beneficial
relationships, cultivating resources and friends, and communicating effectively with college
constituents. The functions in the external relations group include development, alumni, concurrent
enrollment, customized training for employers, non-credit courses, printing and duplicating, marketing
communications, public relations, and the college web site. The external relations group also manages
the college’s extension centers in Ithaca and Cortland.
Student Health Services
The TC3 Student Health Services offers students:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Health counseling and care of acute illnesses
Personal wellness care to promote positive lifestyle changes
Referrals to community agencies and services
Assistance with maintenance of chronic health problems
Health promotion education
Substance abuse risk reduction education and counseling
Common, single dose over the counter medications
Dispensary for TC3 provider prescribed medications
Immunizations, including Free Flu Vaccine
Contraception
HIV testing
If you have an emergency, call 911.
Campus Police: Ext. 6511
TC3 Health Services DOES NOT provide excuses for routine illnesses, injuries, and mental health
problems that may lead to missed classes, labs, exams, or deadlines.
To find out more about this policy and what assistance is possible with serious and ongoing illness or
injury please visit our website.
http://www.tc3.edu/student/health_center.asp
Please note: the Student Health Center will be closed if the Campus is closed due to inclement weather.
Off-Campus Services
Various off-campus services will be available, depending on site.
1. Student Advisement is available once per month during the regular semester and at specified
times (usually pre-registration). See staff for schedule.
2. Financial Aid assistance available once per month. See staff for schedule.
3. Student Registration and Add/Drop at appropriate times during the semester.
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4. Smart Classroom equipment in most classrooms. Contact the center for specific requests prior
to your class beginning.
5. Delivery of prepared materials to adjuncts at least twice per week via courier from main
campus.
6. The Bookstore does not sell books at the Center, but will deliver them to the Center for students
who cannot get to main campus.
7. For assistance in needs assessment of off-campus students, contact Carolyn Boone, ext. 4283.
8. Martha Hubbard, Director of the Center of Adult Learning and Training oversees both Extension
Centers, and should be contacted if you have any concerns about the Center facilities, staffing or
students.
Nancy S. Lieberman
Ithaca Extension Center at TC3 Tioga Place
118 North Tioga Street
Ithaca Commons
Ithaca, NY 14850
(607) 272-3025
An Enrollment Services Specialist is on duty at the IEC Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. – 9:30
p.m. when classes are in session. When classes are not in session, or during the summer, the schedule
may change. Students can arrange for advisement including program planning, course selection, and
other academic concerns by appointment at the main campus.
Advisement and Financial Aid appointments are available periodically at the Center and students can
schedule appointments with the Enrollment Services Specialist.
Classroom Technology: All classrooms on the 6th floor are smart classrooms; the classrooms on the 5th
floor are semi-smart but have an overhead projector. Each classroom is equipped with a LCD projector,
computer and TV/VCR. Most rooms have white boards and black boards available. Special equipment
or use of a computer lab may be arranged for by contacting one of the Enrollment Services Specialists.
Make all requests for films, film projectors, slide projectors, cassette players, videotape playback, and
similar services through Technology Support at 844-6566, or email [email protected] Please
provide at least forty-eight hours’ notice since equipment may need to be delivered. Remember that
advance notice is required for the use of any software.
Classroom Furniture: If you move any desks or chairs around, please return them to their original
places before you leave.
Copy Services: You may use the IEC copier to do your own copying, but will need a card for billing to
your department. Staff cannot do copying for you due to other responsibilities. If you choose to have
your copying done in Dryden, leave materials to be copied with the staff on scheduled evenings. He/she
will deliver the materials to campus, and will return the requested copies to you the following week. You
can also use the U.S. Mail. Please note that there is a lead time of 10 days for materials sent for
processing via U.S. Mail. The College does not pay postage when you mail materials to be prepared.
Faculty Bay Area: A faculty office is available in a designated area on the 6th floor where you can prepare
for class, enter grades, check email, use computers, etc. These are shared by all faculty members so
please do not leave your materials in this area, and limit your use to allow all faculty to use as needed.
Faculty mailboxes and a telephone are also located in this area.
Holidays: College classes will meet according to the College Academic calendar. The building will
normally be opened for scheduled classes. Exceptions include employee holidays and any emergency
closings. The schedule also changes during the summer and when classes are not in session. Should you
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need to use a classroom for a make-up session at a time other than when your class has been scheduled,
please contact the staff at the center to make arrangements.
Library: College students who have a valid I.D. card may check books out of the Mann and Catherwood
Libraries at Cornell. If you plan to make extensive library assignments, please remind your students to
come to the campus in Dryden to have an I.D. card picture taken during the first weeks of the semester.
This service is available during day and evening hours. College librarians will be eager to visit your class
to conduct a library orientation and bibliographic instruction session to prepare students for research
papers and speeches. Please make your request early for such a visit. If you would like to place materials
on reserve in Ithaca, please ask one of the College librarians to assist you. Arrangements can probably
be made. For articles and notes, consider placing the items on the web using the Library’s Electronic
Reserves Service.
Parking: Please see the center staff for appropriate procedure and other information.
Reserve Readings: You may arrange for a book/item to be put on reserve through the Enrollment
Services Specialists.
Smoking: There is to be absolutely no smoking in the building. Students, staff and faculty must also obey
the smoking regulations on the Commons.
Testing/Study: Space is available for small group study and testing. Please have the student(s) make
arrangements through the Enrollment Services Specialists.
Vending Machines: A vending machine is available on the 6th floor for both faculty and student use.
TC3 Cortland Extension Center
157 Main Street
Cortland, NY 13045 (607) 756-5275
An Enrollment Services Specialist is on duty during the day and a Center for Adult Learning & Traning
Secretary in the evening. The hours are Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. when
classes are in session. They can assist students with all registration, schedule changes, etc. Advisement
and financial aid will be available periodically at the Center. Students may schedule appointments with
the staff at the front desk.
Classroom Furniture: If you move any desks or chairs around, please return them to their original
places before you leave.
Classroom Technology: All classrooms are smart classrooms and are equipped with a LCD projector,
computer, overhead projector, document camera, TV and DVD/VHS player. Use of a computer lab may
be arranged by contacting one of the Enrollment Services Specialists at the extension center. Requests
for special AV services, ES videotaping, AV software needs should be directed to Technology Support at
844-6566, or email [email protected] Please provide at least forty-eight hours’ notice since
equipment may need to be delivered. Remember that advance notice is required for use of any
software.
Copy Services: You may use the center copier but will need a card for billing to your department. Staff
cannot do copying for you due to other responsibilities. You can also use the U.S. Mail. Please note that
there is a lead time of 10 days for materials sent for processing via U.S. Mail. The College does not pay
postage when you mail materials to be prepared.
Faculty Bay Area: A faculty office is available off the Commons where you can prepare for class, enter
grades, check email, use computers, etc. These are shared by all faculty members so please do not leave
your materials in this area, and limit your use to allow all faculty to use as needed. Faculty mailboxes
and a telephone are also located in this area.
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Holidays: College classes will meet according to the College Academic calendar. The building will
normally be opened for scheduled classes. Exceptions include employee holidays and any emergency
closings. The schedule also changes during the summer and when classes are not in session. Should you
need to use a classroom for a make-up session at a time other than when your class has been scheduled,
you must contact the staff at the center to make arrangements.
Library: College students who have a valid I.D. card may check books out of the SUNY-Cortland library, if
you wish to send them there. If you plan to make extensive library assignments, please remind your
students to come to the campus in Dryden to have an I.D. card picture taken during the first weeks of
the semester. This service is available during day and evening hours.
College librarians will be eager to visit your class to conduct a library orientation and bibliographic
instruction session to prepare students for research papers and speeches. Please make your request
early for such a visit. If you would like to place materials on reserve in Cortland, please ask one of the
College librarians to assist you. Arrangements can probably be made. For articles and notes, consider
placing the items on the web using the Library’s Electronic Reserves Service.
Parking: You may park in the building parking lot behind the building.
Smoking: There is to be absolutely no smoking in the building.
The PACE Program
Room 216, ext. 4422
The PACE Program helps low-income parents working toward their Associates Degrees who receive cash
assistance from Tompkins County Department of Social Services. We provide supportive services,
including money for childcare, transportation as well as school-related expenses that aren’t covered by
TAP or PELL. Moreover, clients have an advocate to help them negotiate the complexities of school and
parenting while living with the stresses that poverty brings. The less tangible yet equally important goal
of the program is to empower students to advocate for themselves as they slowly move toward degrees
and ultimately, financial self-sufficiency. For more information, please contact Alexis Dengel,
[email protected]
Pathways Program
Room 216
The Pathways scholarship is for either first-time college students or for students who’ve attempted or
earned up to 12 credits in the past four years or have been away from college and never earned a
degree. Potential recipients must be 24 years or older, applied for TC3 admission, demonstrated
financial need and have completed the FAFSA process along with completing a Pathways application.
Deadlines are July 1st for fall applicants and November 1st for spring applicants. Scholars are picked by a
committee. For more information, please contact Patricia Tvaroha, [email protected] or Alexis Dengal,
[email protected] .
Students of Concern
http://www.tc3.edu/student/dos_soc.asp
The SOC is an interdisciplinary group made up of:
• Coordinator of Counseling Services
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Director of Campus Police and his Assistant Director
Director Residence Life and Judicial Affairs
Director of the Health Center
Coordinator of Access and Equity Services
Dean of Student Life and her Administrative Assistant
Anyone in the community can express a concern about a student to the SOC group by emailing
[email protected] . A process will be initiated to gather information, assess needs and plan
interventions when needed. Our goal is to support student success by assisting students who
are not currently accessing all the supportive services they need to be successful. The concerns
may be of an emotional, behavioral, motivational or unclear nature.
For students who are having primarily academic concerns, use the academic intervention form
to alert the Student Success and Advisement team.
Student Success and Advisement Services
Room 215, ext. 4521, [email protected]
The office of Student Success and Advisement Services (SSAS) supports students during all stages of
their academic journey. SSAS coordinates new student placement testing and advisement, and leads
orientation and transition programming for new students. SSAS also provides ongoing advisement for all
part-time and non-matriculated students, and supports faculty advisors in the advisement of students.
In addition, SSAS provides a variety of intervention services for students in academic jeopardy. Faculty
and staff who are concerned about a student’s academic progress are encouraged to refer the student
to SSAS for assistance and support. Faculty may make a referral to SSAS via myINFO from the class list
function. Click on the student’s name and choose the “Academic Alert” option. Simply click the
appropriate options. Comments listed in the “additional information” section are always welcome.
Following a referral, SSAS staff will reach out to the student to offer support and help the student to
connect with various campus resources. In many cases, a referral gives the student the opportunity to
see potential problems before they lead to academic failure.
ADJUNCT FACULTY
Clerical Support Services
The secretaries in the faculty suites 220 and 241 are available to assist you with clerical needs.
Unfortunately, the secretary in the adjunct office is shared with the Academic Records Department and
does not allow time for clerical assistance to the adjunct faculty.
Credit Course Instruction
Each adjunct faculty member is hired to teach a specific number of College courses. Every course is
assigned a number of credit hours by the College. Each credit hour normally represents one lecture hour
(i.e., “contact hour”) per week (see exceptions discussed below). The College pays a fixed fee for each
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credit hour. That fee is based on the assumption that each faculty member may spend an average of
approximately two hours per week in preparation and activities related to the work done during each
class hour including a minimum of one to two office hours per week working with students as necessary.
Unless specified to the contrary, each adjunct faculty member is expected to work for the entire fifteen
weeks of the school semester, as well as the week of finals.
A modification of this calculation is necessary for adjunct faculty who teach courses involving “lab
hours.” If a class hour taught by the instructor is considered a “lab hour” by the College, then a factor of
three-fourths is applied to that class hour. Thus adjunct faculty teaching one lab hour per week would
be paid three-fourths of the credit hour fee normally paid. Implicit in this factor is the College’s
assumption that only 1.5 hours will be spent per week in preparation and activities related to each “lab
hour” taught by adjunct faculty. If a course involved some “lab hours” and some lecture hours, then
each hour is calculated separately at the respective rate.
A minimum per credit hour is set for adjunct faculty. The College pays slightly higher rates per credit
hour if an adjunct faculty member has additional qualifications meeting guidelines developed by the
Administration of the College. To see if you qualify for a higher rate, refer to the next page.
Some of the illustrations of the College formula may be helpful:
Professor Jones is teaching a three credit hour business course with three lecture hours per
week. She would be paid three times $805 ($2,415); expected to prepare and perform activities
related to those three class hours for an average of six hours per week including a minimum of
one to two office hours per week working with students; and expected to work for fifteen
weeks, plus a week of finals, if applicable.
Professor Smith teaches a four credit hour science course involving three lecture hours and two
lab hours per week. He would be paid three times $805 ($2,415) plus two times 3/4’s of $805
($1,207.50) for a total of $3,622.50. He would be expected to spend 7 hours per week in
preparation and performance of activities related to those class hours including one to two
hours per week with students. He would also be expected to teach for fifteen weeks, plus a
week of finals, if applicable.
Fringe Benefits for Adjunct Faculty
A. Retirement/Social Security
As an adjunct instructor, membership in one of the State Retirement Systems (New York State
Employees’ Retirement System or New York State Teachers’ Retirement System) is optional.
Membership in the Optional Retirement Program is only available to full-time employees.
If you choose to join one of the State Retirement Systems, the College will withhold your employee
contribution from your salary as required by state law. In addition, a contribution is made on your behalf
by the College.
As a member of one of the State Retirement Systems, you are also covered by Social Security and would
be subject to Social Security tax withholding of 7.65 percent. If you choose not to join one of the state
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programs, you will be covered by Social Security, and a Social Security tax of 7.65 percent will be
withheld.
For additional information on enrollment, please contact the Department of Human Resources at (607)
844-8222, ext. 4440 or 4228.
If you have a current membership in one of the State Systems, it is vital that you give your contract
identification number(s) and the date of the membership to the Department of Human Resources. If you
are a current TIAA-CREF member through another SUNY unit, please report your contract ID# and your
date of membership to the Department of Human Resources. If your TIAA-CREF membership is not
through another SUNY unit, you are ineligible to participate.
B. Worker’s Compensation
You are eligible for and covered by N.Y.S. Workers’ Compensation benefits. You should notify the
Campus Police immediately if an injury is incurred while working for the College.
C. Income Tax Deductions and Change of Address
If you wish to revise the number of dependents claimed and/or have a change of address, please contact
the Department of Human Resources to complete a new W-4 form and Employee Data Sheet.
D. Health, Dental and Vision Insurance
Adjunct faculty and staff who have a minimum appointment of three months earning at least $2,000
annually, may enroll in the health, dental, and/or vision insurance programs so long as they agree to pay
100 percent of the premium for individual or for family coverage. Individuals who qualify for enrollment
must visit the Department of Human Resources to make arrangements for their premium payments
during semester breaks.
E. Grievances or Complaints
If you encounter any practices or policies while employed by the College which violate your
understanding of the contract with the adjunct faculty, you should bring those grievances or complaints
to the attention of the Dean of Instruction, the Provost and Vice President of the College, or the Human
Resources Administrator at the earliest opportunity.
F. Equal Opportunity, Title IX, Section 504
Tompkins Cortland Community College is committed to equal opportunity in employment, admission
and treatment for all qualified individuals without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, sex, age,
marital status, disability, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any other basis as prohibited by federal or
New York State law.
Any questions concerning the implementation of these policies should be directed to the following
people: Sharon Dovi, Affirmative Action Officer/Human Resources Administrator, Room 219 for Equal
Opportunity and Title IX; Khaki Wunderlich, Dean of Organizational Success and Learning, Room 248 for
Section 504.
Discounts for TC3 Faculty and Staff
AT&T/Verizon – Both companies offer a discount (19%-20%) as a NYS employee for wireless services.
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TC3 has partnered with the e-academy to offer students, faculty and staff great discounts on software
products from Microsoft, Adobe, and others.
http://www.tc3.edu/dept/campus_tech/purchase_discounts.asp
TC3.biz - College Employees, including Foundation and FSA employees can attend TC3.biz workshops for
15% of course fee plus cost of text or flash drive if applicable. Exception: All employees pay full course
fee for our online UGotClass, ED2Go, GATLIN and CCI programs. Contact TC3.biz Office for more
information, ext. 6586.
Pay Periods
Adjunct instructors (teaching credit courses) who have approved and electronically returned their
contracts promptly will receive payroll checks according to the following schedule. When a payment
date falls on a College holiday, checks will be disbursed on the last work day prior to the holiday. Dates
may be subject to change.
Fall 2013 (8 payments)
Spring 2014 (8 payments)
Summer 2014**
September 6, 2013
September 20, 2013
October 4, 2013
October 18, 2013
November 1, 2013
November 15, 2013
November 29, 2013
December 13, 2013
February 7, 2014
February 21, 2014
March 7, 2014
March 21, 2014
April 4, 2014
April 18, 2014
May 2, 2014
May 16, 2014
June 13, 2014
June 27, 2014
July 11, 2014
July 25, 2014
August 8, 2014
August 22, 2014
**Summer pay dates will vary depending on session being taught.
Note: Adjunct employees who are required to invoice hours worked may not be paid in the first payroll
listed due to processing time. For example, hours worked for the week ending 8/24/13 must be
submitted no later than the following Thursday, 8/29/13 by 4 pm to be paid on 9/6/13. To submit
hours, please send one email to [email protected] and [email protected]
Direct deposit of payroll checks is available through area banks. Deposit is guaranteed to be in your bank
the morning of payday. This eliminates delays in the mail and lost checks. For more information on this
service, please consult the Department of Human Resources.
Electronic Pay Stubs: Employees who take advantage of payroll direct deposit will receive their bi-weekly
pay stubs via email. The pay stub is emailed to you the day the payroll company processes the payroll,
anywhere from Monday to Wednesday of pay week, but the funds will not be available until Friday. A
form will need to be signed to opt out of receiving the stub electronically and continue to receive the
hard copy. This form is available in Payroll, Room 248C. To view pay stub sent electronically by the
payroll company:
• Email will be sent FROM: [email protected]
• SUBJECT: “Your payroll information has arrived.”
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•
Click on the PDF file attachment. A password will be required to open the document to view.
Information regarding the password and directions on how to change it will be emailed to you
by Sunday Earle, Payroll Specialist prior to the first pay date of the semester.
Any questions regarding the electronic pay stubs should be directed to Sunday Earle, ext. 4340.
Checks may be picked up Thursday of pay week, in the Budget & Finance Office between the hours of
2:00 and 4:00 p.m. and Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and approximately 2:00 p.m. Any checks
not picked up prior to 2:00 p.m. on Friday will be mailed. Please contact the Payroll Specialist at ext.
4340 if you have any questions regarding your paycheck. Instructors teaching short-term noncredit,
credit equivalent courses will be paid on the first College payroll date after the completion of the course.
Adjunct Instructor Personnel File
A confidential personnel file is maintained in the Department of Human Resources for each adjunct
faculty member. Faculty members may access this file upon written request. Each adjunct faculty
member must have official transcripts on file and should keep the records current by reporting any
changes in address, degrees attained, etc. to the Department of Human Resources.
Getting Started as an Adjunct Faculty Member
Please refer to the college website for a set of checklists that will assist you in getting set to work at TC3
as an adjunct instructor.
http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/adjunct/adjunct.asp
You may also refer to the Adjunct Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document at
http://www.tc3.edu/faculty/adjunct/adjunct_faq.asp
Professional Development Program for Adjunct Faculty
Any adjunct faculty member who has taught at least nine credit hours (including summer) may register
for one credit-bearing course at TC3 (for a maximum of four credits) or for up to three one-credit
courses, and receive a full tuition waiver, according to the following guidelines:
a. The adjunct faculty member must be scheduled to teach in the same semester that the
tuition waiver is requested.
b. Registration may occur no earlier than the final day of registration before the first day of
classes.
c. Registration will be on a space-available basis.
d. The adjunct faculty member must pay all course fees and is responsible for the cost of all
course materials.
After an adjunct faculty member has taken advantage of the opportunity described above, he or she
may register for an additional course (or up to three one-credit courses). The adjunct must have taught
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at least nine more credit hours, as of one month or less before the first day of classes and be scheduled
to teach in that semester.
Adjunct faculty members do not have to teach consecutive semesters in order to be eligible. Whenever
an adjunct takes advantage of this opportunity, the total accumulated credit hours will revert to zero
plus whatever credits the adjunct teaches during the semester when he or she takes a course. Courses
may be taken for credit or on an audit basis. Tuition waiver forms are available in the Department of
Human Resources. The completed tuition waiver form should be submitted to the Dean of Instruction’s
Office for approval.
Salary Formula for Adjunct Instructors
These are guidelines for placement of adjunct staff on the Tompkins Cortland Community College salary
schedule.
Placement on this scale is determined on a case-by-case basis after consideration of an individual’s
experience and credentials.
Schedule for Adjunct Salary Rates (per C.H.E. Basis)
Fall 2013/Winter 2014/Spring 2014/Summer 2014
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
$870
$925
$990
$1060
$1135
1) Generally, all first time faculty will be placed at the Level 1 rate. However, any adjunct faculty
who has, or had in the past, academic rank at another institution of higher education will be
placed at the appropriate rate corresponding to their rank as follows:
Level 1 to equate to Instructor
Level 2 to equate to Assistant Professor
Level 3 to equate to Associate Professor
Level 4 to equate to Professor
2) Placement at the Level 2 rate may also be made if one of the following conditions exists:
a. Possession of any unusual or terminal degree in the field (i.e., J.D., D.C., M.D., C.P.A., Ph.D.,
Master’s Degree in Nursing, or M.F.A.).
b. For those in vocational courses, fifteen or more years of experience in a job which is directly
related to the subject matter being taught.
c. High executive office in business or industry if that position relates to the subject matter
being taught.
3) Placement at Level 3 rate may be made if the individual enjoys status as a nationally recognized
consultant or expert in the field to be taught. (This status should be documented by the
candidate as having been income-producing, with the consultant services having been provided
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to various agencies, several times annually, over a period of at least two years, and at several
locations throughout the country.)
4) After six semesters (10 semesters between Level 4 and 5), of successful employment as an
adjunct faculty member at Tompkins Cortland Community College, an individual is eligible to be
moved to the next higher adjunct pay rate. “Successful” is defined as “average or better”
performance as indicated through evaluations conducted and fulfillment of all responsibilities
assigned. Advancement on the scale will be the decision of the Provost in consultation with the
appropriate Dean and Human Resources Administrator.
Teaching Assignments for Adjunct Instructors
Scheduling for the following semester begins shortly after the current semester begins. Program
Chairpersons are responsible to submit course offerings to The Dean of Instruction. Scheduling of
adjunct teaching will begin once full-time faculty loads are determined. Contact your Program Chair
regarding your availability and teaching preferences.
Typing and Copying Services
Clerical support is supplied by the faculty suite secretaries (room 220 or 241) who can assist you in filling
out work orders and who will let you know when the work will be completed. If you wish to do your own
photocopying, a card will be issued to you for copying purposes. (Please see Teresa Mix in Room 229).
To limit the amount of paper used throughout the semester you might wish to investigate the use of our
ANGEL (online learning) platform as an enhancement to your courses and a repository for documents
you plan to share with your students. Any additional copies charged to your copy card must be approved
by the Dean of Instruction Office, Room 229.
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