ASOLO REPERTORY THEATRE FSU/ASOLO CONSERVATORY FOR ACTOR TR AINING PRODUCTION ASOLO REP

A SO LO RE P EDUCATION & OUTREACH
STU DY GU IDE 2013–2014 NEW STAGES TOUR
A SO LO REPERTORY TH EATRE PRESENTS AN
FSU/A SOLO CO NSERVATO RY FO R ACTO R TR AININ G
PRO DU CTION
by William Shakesp eare
a d a p t e d by
Laur yn E. S asso &
Dmit r y Troyanovsk y
dire c t e d by
Dmit r y Troyanovsk y
TOU RIN G SC HOOL S
OCTOBER 1 - NOVEMBER 15, 2013
asolo rep leadership
Producing Artistic Director
Michael Donald Edwards
Managing Director
Linda DiGabriele
FSU/Asolo Conservatory Director,
Associate Director of Asolo Rep
Greg Leaming
romeo & juliet CASTS:
in order of appearance
Team Montague
Benvolio/Capulet
Tybalt, Nurse, Balthasar
Montague, Mercutio,
Friar Laurence, Apothecary
Romeo
romeo & Juliet creative team
Juliet
Director
DMITRY TROYANOVSKY
Adapted by
LAURYN E. SASSO
& DMITRY TROYANOVSKY
Resident Dramaturg
LAURYN E. SASSO
Cale Haupert
Maxey Whitehead
Zlatomir Moldovanski
Jefferson McDonald
Lucy Lavely
Team capulet
Benvolio, Friar Laurence
Tori Grace Hines
Tybalt, Nurse, Balthasar
Brian Nemiroff+
Montague, Mercutio, Apothecary
Romeo
Assistant to the Director
daniel kelly
Capulet
Juliet
Literary Apprentice
Austen Anderson
Reginald Robinson
Ben Williamson
Amanda lynn Mullen
Kristen Lynne Blossom
Costume Design
June Elisabeth Taylor
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Sound Design
MATTHEW PARKER
o v e r v i e w..................................................... 2
Props Master
Marlenn Marotte Whitney
WHY romeo & Juliet ?.........................................3
E xplore the Adap tati o n: Char ac ters.............4
Voice & Dialect Coach
PATRICIA DELOREY
E xplore the Adap tati o n: Lan guage................5
Stage Managers
Lauren Baston & Janell Williams
Spe ak the Speech (Ia mbic Penta me ter)...........5
Stage Management Consultant
Erin MacDonald
Fight Director
BRUCE LECURE
asolo rep education
& outreach staff
Education & Outreach Director
Kathryn Moroney
Education & Outreach Specialist
Tiffany Ford
Education & Outreach Apprentice
Kimberly Wiczer-Haupert
+ Appears courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association
Love & Vi olence.................................................6
Passi o n o r O bsessi o n.....................................7
Fate & free will..................................................8
STUDY GUIDE HOW-TO
Each discussion and activity has been selected to explore the
content and themes of Romeo & Juliet. This guide may be used
in its entirety or discussions and activities may be selected
to enhance specific lessons. In this packet, there are activities
for Theatre, Language Arts, and Social Studies classrooms.
Activities correspond with Common Core Standards.
Curriculum Key
TH: Theatre
SS: Social Studies
LA: Language Arts
VA: Visual Arts
Study Guide Written by:
Tiffany Ford and Kimberly Wiczer-Haupert
P H OTOS BY daniel kelly and danica killelea
EXTRA GOODIES
When you see this logo, additional activities are available online
at asolorep.org/education/resources.
3
overview
You will be seeing an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet performed by
actors in the FSU MFA Conservatory Acting Program. It is their 3rd and final year in
this professional training program, housed at Asolo Repertory Theatre in Sarasota, FL.
Director Dmitry Troyanovsky and Asolo Rep Literary Manager Lauryn E. Sasso have adapted
the play with a fresh perspective to connect with a young, modern audience. This is a fastpaced version of Romeo & Juliet that sharply focuses on the journeys of the younger characters. You will experience the full story in 45 minutes of action, humor, and drama that
maintains the integrity and depth of the original text.
There will be a 15 minute post-show discussion (“talk-back”) after each performance during which the audience will be
encouraged to ask the actors questions about the play, their characters, professional acting, and other elements of the
production. Please equip your students to prepare talk-back questions.
This study guide suggests important ideas, discussions, and activities that are consistent with the adaptation they will
be seeing. It can be used for lessons leading up to the performance, and after the performance.
Also included in the experience
• 1 Opening Night comp ticket for each teacher who is bringing a class to see the performance at their school.
Contact [email protected]
• Download the Opening Night program with extended essays from the artists.
• Download additional Activity Descriptions at asolorep.org/education/resources.
• Follow the casts on Facebook: www.facebook.com/randjteammontague and www.facebook.com/randjteamcapulet.
why romeo & juliet?
(LA,SS)
Director (and co-adapter) Dmitry Troyanovsky explains why he feels
Romeo & Juliet is a story relevant to audiences today:
The first half of Shakespeare’s play runs as a slightly sardonic comedy about
teenagers who are not overly graceful, nor especially idealistic. Sophisticated
lovers or heroes these kids are not. But neither are they naïve victims of the
cruel world of adults. Romeo and Juliet do what normal teenagers do: fall
head over heels for each other. And they make choices that get them into
trouble because the universe does not come with a set of guarantees.
The fatal events, which give Romeo and Juliet their tragic halo, sneak up on
the audience abruptly and heart-wrenchingly. Shakespeare masterfully shows
us how two ordinary adolescents, surrounded by inept adults and hapless
caregivers, can self-destruct due to a series of disastrous, if understandable,
choices. There is no single, obvious explanation for what happens – what
leads to the tragic end. This production won’t comfort us with a tidy lesson
learned at the end. But it may show us we’re not alone when we deal with
inexplicable loss. Maybe this play reminds us that we are all vulnerable —
that we can’t always be protected, emotionally or physically.”
DISCUSSION:
• Is this play a tragedy? Why? What is your
personal definition of tragedy? What is the
classical definition of tragedy? What are some
examples from real life that you consider tragic?
• Why do you think tragedy encourages us to
place blame or point fingers? Do you think there
can always be a “lesson learned” from tragedy?
Why or why not?
4
Explore the Adaptation:
Characters
(LA, TH, VA)
M
C
montague family
royal family
capulet family
lord & lady montague
prince escalus
Banished Romeo from Verona
lord & lady capulet
count paris
Cousin to Prince Escalus
Wishes to marry Juliet
balthasar
Servant
Trusted friend
romeo
Son
benvolio
Cousin
mercutio
Best friend to Romeo
Cousin to Royal Family
Slain by Tybalt
tybalt
Cousin
Slays Mercutio
Slain by Romeo
nurse
Advisor
Caretaker
rosaline
Loved by Romeo
apothecary
Sells poison to Romeo
juliet
Daughter
= family
friar laurence
Romeo’s Advisor
Marries Romeo & Juliet
Creates Juliet’s death plan
things to know & note
= other connection
DISCUSSION:
In the original text, the character list includes over 30 characters. It is extremely
AFTER THE PLAY:
rare now, and was even rare in Shakespeare’s time, for a theatre company
• What was your reaction to actors
playing characters of different
genders? How did this affect your perspective on the character or relationships?
to use so many actors in a production. More often, actors play multiple roles.
Directors may even choose to combine characters to simplify staging or casting.
In Shakespeare’s time, female characters were most often played by male actors.
In this adaptation of Romeo & Juliet certain roles will be played by the opposite
gender actor from what you might expect.
This character map separates the characters who are represented in this adaptation, and those who are only represented in the original text.
THINK LIKE a Designer:
• Look at the character map, and pick two characters. How would you represent
a transition from one character to another using only one costume adjustment?
Think like a costume designer, and consider the director’s choice of moderntime period, and the minimalistic requirements of a touring production.
• What costume choices did you see
that helped to portray the differences between characters played
by the same actor? Did you notice vocal or physical choices the actors used for different characters?
• What elements of the production
demonstrated the separation
between the families?
5
Explore the Adaptation:
language
(LA, SS)
In this version of Romeo & Juliet, the co-adapters highlight and clarify what they agree are the important moments of the story.
This means that some of the language has been altered, while still maintaining the rhythm of the text. While the dialogue in this
version is not considered “modernized”, there are some grammatical updates that help to clarify the intent of the characters.
Some lines were kept as the original text either because they are recognizable, or because of the intense emotion in that moment.
• Example of altered text: Juliet: Dost thou Do you love me?
• Example of unaltered text: Romeo: Deny thy father, and refuse thy name.
DISCUSSION:
• If you were adapting a version of
your favorite Shakespeare play,
would you choose to maintain or
modernize the language? Why?
speak the
speech (iambic pantameter)
(LA, TH)
What makes Shakespearean plays sound so different than other plays? Did people really talk that way? Shakespeare and
his contemporaries wrote in verse, a form of poetry used in playwriting to give the characters a structured speech pattern.
Shakespeare wrote in a specific style of verse called iambic pentameter.
What Is iambic pentameter?
try it!
A line in iambic pentameter has 10 syllables, five pairs
of unstressed then stressed syllables.
speak the quote
Speak this quote from Romeo & Juliet aloud, and listen
to the rhythm:
The rhythm in each line of iambic pentameter sounds like:
da-DUM / da-DUM / da-DUM / da-DUM / da-DUM
Romeo:
For example:
this pie / looks good / enough / for me / to eat !
You’ll notice that the rhythm comes very close to the natural rhythm of
the English language and 10 syllables is usually enough time to form
a complete thought.
solo ACTIVITY:
listen for the rhythm
Listen for a heartbeat rhythm as you watch the production. When
do you notice this rhythm? When do you notice that this rhythm is
broken? Consider the mood and action in each of these moments.
But, soft! What light through yonder window breaks?*
*Hint: If you are having trouble counting syllables, try
drumming them out on your chest like a heartbeat as
you speak the text aloud.
Wait a Second!
Juliet:
O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower.
These lines from Romeo & Juliet have 11 syllables
in the wrong rhythm!
This is an example of Shakespeare breaking from
form, or breaking the rules. Shakespeare often did
this to emphasize a character’s uncertainty, distress,
or excitement.
Love & Violence
6
(LA, TH, SS)
Listen to how each of these characters speak about love. Notice how much violent language and imagery Shakespeare
uses. Director and Co-adapter, Dmitry Troyanovsky, observes: “Love, it turns out, may be just as perilous as hatred.”
MERCUTIO:
(referring to Romeo’s state of mind since
his relationship with Rosaline has ended)
Alas poor Romeo! he is already dead;
stabbed with a white wench’s black eye;
shot through the ear with a love-song;
and is he a man to encounter Tybalt?
TYBALT:
(realizing that an enemy is at his family’s party)
This, by his voice, should be a Montague.
What, dares the slave come hither?
Now, by the stock and honor of my kin,
To strike him dead, I hold it not a sin.
ROMEO:
(asking Mercutio to empathize with his broken heart)
Is love a tender thing? it is too rough,
Too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn.
CAPULET:
(ordering Juliet to marry Paris)
Disobedient wretch!
I tell you what: get you to church o’ Thursday,
Or never after look me in the face:
Speak not, reply not, do not answer me;
My fingers itch.
If you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend;
And you be not, hang, beg, starve,
die in the streets,
For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee.
Juliet:
(realizing that Romeo is banished)
I’ll to the friar, to know his remedy:
If all else fails, myself have power to die.
Discussion:
• Can you tell why each character uses violent images?
Who do you suspect will take violent action?
• Do you agree that love can be as dangerous as hate?
Why or why not? What are some examples you see in real life?
solo activity:
Choose one of the below scenarios, and write a letter from that character’s perspective. Consider what they might feel,
and how they might react to the situation.
1. As he is dying, Mercutio says “A plague o’ both your houses.” What do you think he is trying to say in this moment?
Write a letter expressing what you think Mercutio would say if he had the chance to speak to both families before his death.
2. How might Tybalt react if he were to see Romeo speaking to Juliet at the Capulet’s party? Is there something specific he would want to say to Juliet if he had the chance? Write a letter to Juliet from his perspective.
3. Consider how Juliet might feel when she discovers that Romeo killed Tybalt. Consider how Romeo feels when he realizes what
he’s done. Choose to write a letter either as Romeo to Juliet, or as Juliet to Romeo, that expresses what he/she would want to
say to the other in this moment.
Going Further:
• Why do you think the young people in Romeo & Juliet are taking action without consulting their families?
When do you act alone, and when do you seek guidance?
• How do the choices and opinions of the adults around you affect your choices?
passion or
obsession?
(LA, TH, SS)
Co-adapter Lauryn E. Sasso explains her take on the instincts of the characters in the play:
“The hyperbole and passionate actions and language in Romeo & Juliet call to mind the way we speak today in social media
– reactive, dramatic, often jarring, and sometimes borderline disturbing.”
pre show discussion:
• How would you define passion? How would you define obsession? What is the difference?
• Consider the way you use social media to comm- unicate and express your passions. How do you choose what you keep private versus what you choose to share?
post show discussion:
• Which characters’ passions became obsessions
or showed signs of obsession? How could you tell?
• When is obsession helpful? When is it harmful? Think of examples from Romeo & Juliet, your own life, history, and current events.
Solo ACTIVITY:
in the eyes of the characters
Pick a character you relate to from Romeo & Juliet,
and consider how they see themselves. What specific
topics or issues are they passionate about? Do they
have an obsession? Using one blank page, craft what
you think their Facebook page or Tumblr would look
like. Make choices about the topics they would post,
the language they would use, and who they would
communicate with via social media. Feel free to create
imaginary images and comments/discussions.
Variation: Assign pairs to complete this project as
a team. Ask teams to present their work to the class.
7
fate & free will
Actor Six:
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes,
A pair of Star-cross’d lovers take their life…
8
(LA)
JULIET:
O, swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon,
That monthly changes in her circled orb,
Lest that your love prove likewise variable.
Romeo:
O, I am fortune’s fool!
Romeo:
I fear, too early: for my mind misgives
Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
With this night’s revels
discussion:
• Do you believe in fate? Why or why not?
• Do you think Romeo & Juliet communicates a message
or perspective about fate?
• Why do you think fate or destiny is still such an intriguing
and controversial topic today?
NEW STAGES FOUNDATION & INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
The award-winning New Stages tour
is sponsored in part by:
Charles Henry Leach II Foundation; Asolo Repertory Theatre Guild; Cordelia Lee Beattie Foundation;
Mandell and Madeleine Berman Foundation; Linnie E. Dalbeck Memorial Foundation Trust;
Andrew R. Ferrell Foundation; Harold C. and Jacqueline F. Bladel Foundation; Plantation Community Foundation
Major individ ual support provided by:
Anonymous, David and Betty-Jean Bavar, Lisa Carlton, Carole Crosby,
Ruby E. and Carole Crosby Family Foundation, Susan Dweck, Bill and Christine Isaac
Additional Support provided by Bob and Pat Baer, Bob and Beverly Bartner, Deborah and Walton Beacham, Len and Judy Brown,
Christine and John Currie, Wendy and Jerry Feinstein, Debbie and Larry Haspel, Steve and Maureen Horn, Lynne and Robert Huff,
Allen Jelks, Jack Kesler and Maurice Richards, Carolyn Keystone and Jim Meekison, George Kole and Judy Zuckerburg, Beverly L. Koski,
Ashley Kozel, Terrance McKee, Melanie and Sean Natarajan, Jill and Scott Ramsey, Skip and Gail Sack, Ted and Mary Ann Simon
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