Document 2799

PAGE SIXTEEN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1973
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
Hawks bow to league co-champs Vassar
CASS CITY CHRONICLE
VOl.UMK 07, MJMHKH 28
It was Vassar's first
chance to share in a Thumb
B Conference title since the
league was formed and
there was no way that the
Vulcan gridders would be
denied Friday as they
measured the Cass City Red
Hawks, 37-0.
It was obvious that the
players were sky-high for
the game and they showed
early that this was the year
they had been waiting for.
While the Vassar offense
was doing its job. the
defense was even more
effective for the co-champions.
It was the defense thai
picked off seven of Quarterback Jerry Toner's passes.
In the Junior quarterback's
defense, four of them went
through the hands of the
receiver before being intercepted on the rainy, wet
field Friday.
Still, the best Cass City
was able to do was a total of
109 yards in 40 offensive
plays. Vassar piled up 256
yards rushing.
Vassar started the scoring early in the first quarter
when Larry Martin cashed a
32-yard field goal.
Later in the period Jim
Baranski scored on a six-
yard spurt and a two-point
conversion was good.
Baranski scored t w i c e
more in the second quarter
to remove any doubt remaining about who was
going to win the final league
game of the season for both
clubs.
He scored on runs of four
and one yards for a 23-0
halftime lead.
In the third quarter a
costly Cass City fumble
resulted in another Vulcan
TD Wade picked up the
loose ball and rambled 29
yards to paydirt.
Toby Proffer picked off a
Cass City pass in the fourth
quarter to complete the
touchdown parade. Martin's
successful convetsion completed the scoring for the
night.
It was the final game for
1 1 Cass C i t y Senior s
Among t h e m were t w o
standouts who played three
years lot the v a r s i t y Fnd
Scott Hartel and All stater
Chet Sier.idzki.
Also completing careers
were Dave Brooks. Charles
Tuckey. Paul Becker. Kevin
Coryell. Gary Eisinger. Steve
Izydorek. Mike Frederick.
Scott Guinther and D.ale
Laminn.
THUMBS LEAGUE
FINAL STANDINGS
Vassar
Caro
Bad Axe
Frankenmuth
Laker s
M.sr lotto
CassC-tv
SCOTT HARTEL
catches another pass
for Cass City Friday.
The Senior end finished
a brilliant
three-year varsity
career against Vassar.
Girls sweep two;
JV's split games
A BRIGHT SPOT in a dismal season was provided by
Ed Stoutenburg, a halfback who steadily improved all season. He'll be back next year. Number 45 is Scott Guinther
who completed his grid career.
Michigan Mirror
Cass City High School's
girls' basketball team took
two easy victories last week
against Marlette and OwenGage and rolled up 104
points in the two contests
against 64 allowed by the
opposition
Tuesday. Oct 30. the girls
easily took care of Marlette
57-31. Melody Bacon scored
eight points in the contest.
while Cathy Kerbyson made
six and Kelly Gee tallied for
five points.
Against Owen-Gage the
following night, the girls
disposed of their rivals
47-33. Elaine Stoutenburg
scored eight points for the
Hawks, while Nancy Koepf-
gen and Karen Martin each
made six points. Melody
Bacon chipped in with five
more points.
The JV girls split their
decisions
in
contests
auamst the same rivals,
winnmi' from Marlette by ,-i
39 16 tally, while bowing, to
Owen Gage 2621
In the Marlette contest.
Chris Krueger scored 12
points for the Hawks JV's
while Lisa Zimba scored six
and Patty Goshn scored five.
In the Owen-Gage game.
Chris Krueger topped Hawk
scorers with nine points,
with Lisa Zimba and Patty
Goslin each scoring four for
the losers.
w
JV's lose to
IMarklte 30-8
Thursday
C.iss C i t y ' s Junior V a r s i t y
pl;iyt"i the strongest te.ni
in tt'.o rhumb R Conference
List Thur^-d.'iv and '.vci!'
dofc.itec). 30 R
The loss brought t h e
to.im's season's record
down to four wins and thief
losses
Marlette finished the ye.'ii
undefeated. The Red RrmJ
eis scored fiibt on a s u j
tamed drive.
Cass City charged back to
even the fame with a
touchdown of its own anc
then forced briefly in front
on the strength of a twopoint conversion
That was the last bright
spot of the mght for the
Hawks Marlette took complete control of the game
after the Cass City score
Showing a
bruising
ground game the Red Raiders moved steadily through
the Cass City defense to
score four more times be;fore the final whistle.
smiles to State Fair board
gate, up 27 per cent:
midway revenue to the Fair,
up 49 per cent; parking
revenue, up 28 per cent:
and total daily revenue, up
36 per cent.
Why was attendance up at
the Fair this year?
"Each year the Fair becomes more centrally located," comes the suggestion from one closely connected with the Fair. "We're
not moving the Fair--the
people are moving to the
Fair."
He points out that the
Fair location, in the Woodward and Seven Mile Rd.
area of Detroit, is "really IN
town now. and that's a big
plus factor."
BUZZING MICHIGAN
"THE PEOPLE OF THE
STATE OF
MICHIGAN
ENACT (Proposed):
"Sec. l. The honey bee is
designated as the official
insect ot the state."
Such is the goal of Rep. R.
D. Young, a Republican from
Saginaw.
The honey bee? Why not?
The fuzzy buzzing little
creature helps pollinate
Michigan crops and put food
on many tables
The "rent-a-bee" business is a relatively modern
one. especially for blueberry
plantations Not so many
years ago. it was thought
that the bumble bee could
not effectively pollinate
blueberry bushes, that
honey bees didn't do the job
effectively because their
tongues were too short to
reach far enough into the
flower.
But research at Michigan
State University disproved
that theory, and honey bees
were in a business other
than making honey.
Rep. Young figures the
busy bee should |om the
ranks of official Michigan
symbols, like the robin and
the Petoskey stone
IN THIS SCENE from the Owen-Gage Senior play, ''Turn
Back the Clock," Robin McCallum, (left), Dave Pinkoski,
Rod Gettel and Kathy Gremel recall the year 1928 and the
Charlston.
Performance times are 8:00 p.m., Nov. 9-10, at the
Gagetown gym. Tickets for adults are $1.50 and students
$1.00, according to John Rinke, play director.
Fifteen Cents
THIRTY-TWO PAGES
Intermediate school faces fiiel crisis as
supplier terminates heating oil deliveries
6
6
4
4
Increased attendance brings
Red ink on the books of
Michigan State Fair accounts turned to black this
year, reversing a downward
trend that began in 1970.
"It looks like happy days
are here again for the
Michigan State Fair," says
Ralph Morrow, deputy
director of the Agriculture
Department and acting
State Fair manager.
Gross receipts for 1973
were down from the previous year's figures, but those
numbers don't tell the story.
For one thing, the '73 Fair
ran for 12 days, while the
'72 Fair lasted 17. And
another important matter to
consider: the Fair finished
in the red last year, but Dr.
Morrow says "estimates
show the 1973 Fair finished
solidly in the black."
The Department reports
average daily paid admissions this year were 30,495,
up 22 per cent from the
1972 daily average. Other
things were up too: daily
average amount oaid at the
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1973
FIRE DESTROYED much of the Caro Farmers Co-op
Elevator Sunday night, causing an estimated $90,000 damage.
Elkland Township Firemen assisted Caro and Mayville fire
departments in battling the flames for over seven hours
before bringing the fire under control.
Sunday fire destroys
Caro grain elevator
Elkland Township Fire
Department assisted Caro
and Mayville Fire Departments in containing a huge
fire which destroyed much
of the Caro Farmers Co-op
Elevator in Caro Sunday
mght. Elkland firefighters
stayed on the scene until
approximately 2:00 a.m.
fighting the blaze being fed
with gram and natural gas
from a ruptured line
According to Ralph Hartman. Supt. of Public Works
for Caro who acted as
spokesman for the Caro Fire
Dept.. the fire was discovered around 7:30 p.m. by
two unidentified youths who
spotted smoke coming from
the top of the elevator.
Hartman said the youths
turned in the alarm and
stayed at the post until
firemen a r r i v e d on the
scene.
Hartman said Monday a
cause h.iH not vet been
determined.
Damage was estimated ot
590.000
He said the elevator and
grain dryer was a total loss.
Also destroyed was a storage bin.
The office area of the
complex escaped serious
damage, according to Hartman.
Mayville Fire Department
also assisted Caro and Cass
City fire fighters in confining the blaze to the elevator
area.
Two Caro firemen were
injured when a timber fell.
They were taken to Caro
Community Hospital where
they were treated and
released.
The tire
reportedly
started in the north find of
the elevator in an upper
section. H a r t m a n said.
Wheat and corn fed the fire,
along with natural gas from
a I'.-i inch gas line which
ruptured at the height of
the blaze.
Consumers Power Co.
workmen had previously
shut off gas to the building
itself, but the line running
from the main to the
building apparently ruptured and fed the flames
before workers could shut
the gas off.
Hartman said the fire
fighters' largest concern was
to keep the fire from
spreading to a nearby Detroit Edison pole storage
area, to the Walbro plant
and to natural gas storage
tanks.
Sparks, fanned by stiff
winds, flew over much of the
area. Hartman said the fact
that the grass and most
other vegetation was wet at
the time helped firemen
keep the blaze contained to
»ho pipvator complex.
At one point, the three fire
departments were pumping
as much as 1,400 gallons of
water per minute on the
raging inferno.
Caro tiremen were still on
the scene Monday, hosing
down burning debris, primarily burning timbers and
smoldering grain.
Fire officials are continuing their investigation into
the cause of the fire.
There is enough fuel oil
left at the Cass City \ Intermediate School to heat the
building until Dec. L and
after that there will be no
more available from the
school's present supplier.
The dilemma was revealed this week byj Supt.
Donald Grouse after Enterprise Oil Co. revealed that
there would be no more oil
for its 250 industrial customers following th^ embargo that cut the flow of an
estimated half million gallons of Canadian oiil that
was imported in Detroit
every day.
!
Al Cytacki. president of
Enterprise, said thai once
present customers run out
of fuel they're done, j
Fortunately, the supply
problem concerns only the
Intermediate School;. The
elementary schools irji Cass
City. Deford and Evergreen
are furnished oil by Standard Oil -which apparently
has oil now. These schools
burn a different grade| of oil.
Supt. Grouse reported
Wednesday that he has
contacted the governor's
task force on fuel supply for
hardship cases in Lapsing.
What the result will be is
not yet known. However,
according to the guidelines
established, schools aire not
at the top of the priority list.
According to a letter
dated Nov. 1 from Dr; John
Porter, State Superintendent of Public Instruction,
schools will rank afteir hospitals, institutions, private
homes and, in some fcases,
deer season, DNR says
There is a large number
of deer in the Deford and
Tuscola game areas, Jarvis
reports, with the Minden
City state game area a
particularly "hot spot" for
deer. With a good portion of
the corn harvest out of the
way Jarvis adds, prospects
sources. The school burns a
number four fuel oil and in
cold weather burns about
8.000 gallons every 21 days.
Grouse said that" there is
also no chance that the
estimated 600 students in
the Intermediate "School
could be shifted temporarily
to other schools in the
system.
Provincial House
denies pullout
While Provincial House,
Inc., no longer owns the
recently-completed nursing
home complex in Cass City,
it will continue to lease the
structure and operate the
business for at least the
next 20 years.
"Provincial House has no
intention of pulling, out of
Cass City," Richard Palm,
Provincial House director,
said Monday. "We like it
there and we're definitely
going to stay."
Rumors had been circulating earlier that the organization had sold the
117-bed nursing home and
would soon leave the community. Palm sought to
clarify the situation and
explained that the transfer
of the property to an
investment group was
strictly procedural.
"What happens is a
simple change of ownership
of the bricks and mortar,"
Palm explained. "What we
do is hire our contracting
firm to build the building.
Then, when it's completed,
we sell it to an investment
group and immediately take
Concluded on page 4.
The embargo has affected
other area institutions and
industry. Apparently ijiomes
and local industry arb in a
better position. (See! story
page 15, section two.|)
Michigan Sugar officials
report that there is ehough
oil to last until Dec. 1 and
then the plant will close.
The Caro Retardation
Center was nearly out of
fuel last week end. temperatures were cut drastically. Some rooms were in
*he 60's instead of the
normal 74.
j
Patients remained ih bed
to keep warm. An ejnergency shipment of fuel at the
Center arrived Monday and
should last 10 days, j
There is no more injsight
for the facility at the present
Area prospects good for
Deer hunting prospects
for Tuscola county and the
Thumb area look good this
year with a herd as good or
better than last year's,
according to Carlton R.
(Bud) Jarvis. Department
->f Natural Resources wildlife biologist from Caro
time.
Detroit Edison said that
oil accounts for about 20
per cent of fuel it uses to
supply electricity. The company is making emergency
plans, but at the present
time has enough to meet
demands.
There is virtually no
chance for aid from local
for hunters bagging an
elusive whitetail look promising.
Jarvis also reports a large
amount of poaching iniboth
the Deford and Tuscola
game areas. He indicated 19
cases of either shiningldeer
Concluded on page 4.
HUNTER BOB WATSON of rural Cass
City put his bow and arrow to good use
late Saturday when he bagged this 10point buck on land he owns east of Cass
City. He explained that the deer, the first
he ever shot with a bow and arrow, came
into sight around 5:00 p.m. After hitting
the animal, it ran about half..a mile.
Watson explained he recovered the buck
the following morning.
"It was a real thrill," Watson said after
the kill.
PAGE TWO
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8.
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
1973
Cass City Social and Personal Items
Mrs. Reva Little
and Mrs. Lenard
Rickwood of Flint and Mrs.
Flbyd Ottaway were in
Saginaw Nov. 1 when Mrs.
Oljtaway entered St. Luke':
Hospital and was slated for
surgery Nov. 5.
Mrs. Charles Anderson of
Flint was a guest of Mrs.
Floyd Ottaway Wednesday.
Elgin Wills of Ubly was a
caller Thursday at the home
ofj Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur
Morrison.
i
Mark McClorey, serving in
the Navy and assigned to
the USS Whitney of the 6th
fleet, is on the Island of
Crete in the Mediterranean.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Van Erp
St. Columbkille Catholic
Church was the setting for
the wedding of Susan McRae and Robert Van Erp
Saturday, Oct. 27. Rev. Fr.
George Klimas officiated at
the double-ring ceremony.
The bride is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
McRae of Cass City. The
bridegroom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Fritz Van Erp of
Bad Axe.
The bride was escorted to
the altar by her father and
wore a gown of polyester
double knit, trimmed at the
neckline and at the Empire
waist with chantilly lace. A
finger-tip veil and a bouquet
of white mums with yellow
sweetheart roses complemented her attire.
Maid of honor was Laurie
McRae,. sister of the bride.
She wore a gown featuring
a bodice of white lace with
Victorian sleeves with
straight line taffeta skirts
bordered with deep flounce
in emerald green. She carried a bouquet of bronze,
orange and gold mums
surrounded by lace.
Bridesmaid was Kay Van
Erp, sister-in-law of the
groom. Her gown matched
that of the maid of-honor.
Bridal attendants wore
large picture hats to match
the taffeta skirts and featured long white streamers
and bands encircling the
crown of each hat.
Best man was Bill Van
Erp, brother of the groom.
Groomsman was Dennis
Sweeney, friend of the
groom. Ushers were Randy
Rayl, cousin of the bride,and
John Cieslinski, friend of the
groom.
The bride's mother wore a
gown featuring a bodice of
silver metallic on a white
background, with a long
skirt of'hunter green. She
wore a corsage of yellow
sweetheart roses.
The bridegroom's mother
wore a floor-length light
blue gown trimmed with
white lace on collar and
cuffs. She wore a corsage of
pink sweetheart roses.
The church was decorated with vases of yellow
gladioli.
Organ music was provided by Mrs. Homar Pickering and songs were sung
by Tom Wolschlager.
A reception for 475 persons was held following the
ceremony at the Pigeon
VFW Hall.
Following a wedding trip
' in northern Michigan, the
couple will reside in the Bad
Axe area.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Morrison had as guests Sunday
for} a potluck dinner, Mr. and
Mrjs. Howard King of Troy,
Mn. and Mrs. Larry Morrison
ofjPontiac and the latter's
mother, Mrs. Mae Ham of
Phioenix, Ariz., Mr. and Mrs.
William Morrison and
grandson, Troy Parent, of
Saginaw ana Mrs. Frank
Hajrbec.
1
United Methodist women
ofjSalem church will be in
ch&rge of the worship service- Nov. 11 when the annual
"thank offering" will be
received. Guest speaker for
the service will be Mrs.
Flqyd Wilfong of Sandusky.
fj/lrs. Harold Perry is
spending this week with her
daughter, Miss Janet Perry,
in (Grand Rapids.
Mrs.Alvah Hillman had as
weiek-end guests,
her
daiughter and family, Mr.
and Mrs. Irwin Herbst and
children of Algonac.
j
Week-end guests of Mrs.
Hakel Barnes were her
daughter and husband, Mr.
and Mrs. Al McKay of
Porttiac.
Saturday evening guests
in j the Roger Root home
were Miss Karen Holm and
Frank Maxa of Lincoln Park
ancl Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Holm.
CHILDREN'S RALLY
SUNDAY
I NOV. 11 — 10 a.m.
Featuring:
MARGE RANDALL
And Her Gospel Puppets
Phone 872-3698
The American Legion
Auxiliary will meet Monday
evening, Nov. 12. at the
Cultural Center. The committee on arrangements for
the meeting is Mrs. Lawrence Buehrly, Ms. Esther
Dinkmeier and Mrs. Lillian
Kendall.
Echo chapter OES will
meet Wednesday evening,
Nov. 14, at 8 p.m. Mrs. Grant
Hutchinson heads the refreshment committee and
will be assisted by Mrs.
Gladys Fort, Mrs. Robert
Hoadley. Mrs. Elmer Fuester
and Mrs. John West. A
practice for officers has
been slated for Monday
evening, Nov. 12.
Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Pierson and sons. Scott and
Brad, of Westland spent the
week end with Mrs. Pierson's parents. Mr. and Mrs.
Andrew Barnes Jr.
Mrs. George Jetta. Mrs.
AlexGreenleaf. Mr. and Mrs.
Clayton Hartwick. Mrs.
Charles Holm. Mrs. John
West and Mrs. Gertrude
Falkenhagen attended
Eastern Star installation of
officers Friday evening at
Gagetown.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
6420" Houghton
:
EVERYONE WELCOME! |
Cass City
Mrs. Alex Greenleaf. Mrs.
George Jetta. Mrs. Avis
Youngs and Mrs. Harold
Murphy attended Eastern
Star officers installation at
Kingston Saturday evening.
Bruce A. Little, who had
spent two weeks here and
at Center Line, left from
Metropolitan airport Thursday to return to Miami
Springs. Fla.
Sunday guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Dale Buehrly and
children were Mrs.Buehrly's
mother, Mrs. Esther Sutherland of Rochester, and her
brother and family, the Carl
Sutherlandsfrom Sandusky.
The Buehrlys and their
guests were Sunday supper
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gene
Wilson.
PATIENTS LISTED MONNOV. 5, WERE:
CASS CITY CHRONICLE
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
AT CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
6552 Main Street
John Haire, publisher.
National Advertising Representative
Michigan Weekly Newspapers. Inc.. 257
Michigan Avenue. East Lansing. Michigan
Second Class postage paid at Casr
City. Michigan. 48726.
Subscription Price: To post offices irt
Tuscola, Huron and Santlac Counties.
S5 00 a year or 2 years lor S9 00. 3 years
for $13 50. S3.00 for six months
In other parts of the United States. $6.00
a year. 50 cents extra charged for part
year order Payable in advance
For information regarding newspaper
advertising and commercial and job
printing, telephone 872-2010
WOULD LIKE babysitting. New
Greenleaf area. Phone 8723317. D. Garety.
11-1-3
ROOMS FOR RENT - Girls
only. Cooking in rooms. $10
a. week and up. References
required. 872-2400. 4391 S.
Seeger.
5-3-tf
FOR SALE or Rent - 4 homes,
vacant now! 3 in Cass City
School District, 1 in Dad Axe.
You must be employed and
have good credit rating. No
pets. First and last 2 months
rent in advance required. McCormick Realty, Inc., Cass
City, Mich. Phone 517-8722715.
11-8-2
and Commercial
Wiring
Joyce Marie Talaski became the bride of Gary John
Susalla Saturday, Oct. 27 at
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church in Bad Axe.
Rev. Fr. Raymond Oswald
officiated at the 2:00 p.m.
ceremony.
The bride is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Victor
Talaski of Bad Axe. The
bridegroom is the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur Susalla of
Ubly.
The bride wore an ivory
polysheer gown with Venice
lace accents, styled with an
Empire waistline, lace
tucked bodice ancl full Victorian sleeves. The semi-full
skirt fell to a full lace
bonded flounce hemline
matched by the lace edged
chapel tram. She wore a
matching wide-brimmed
wedding hat trimmed in
lace.
Maid of honor was Mrs.
Ruth Ann Peruski. sister of
the bride. Bridesmaids were
Mrs. Mary Gilbert of Bad
Axe, cousin of the bride.
Mrs. Jo Ann McCarty of
Cass City, friend of the
bride. Mrs. Sharon Maurer
of Pontiac. friend of the
bride and Miss Vicki Talaski
of Bad Axe. sister of the
bride.
All attendants
wore
matching gowns of blue and
green print chiffon, styled
with solid tone ivory bodices, full bishop sleeves and
print flounce skirts. Each
wore matchine blue ripple
brim wedding hats.
Flower girl was Rene Lyn
Peruski of Bad Axe, niece of
the bride. She wore a formal
gown of aqua blue with an
Empire waist and long
chiffon sleeves with blue
and green flower trim on the
waist and at the end of the
sleeves She also wore a
small rim; of strawflowers in
her hair with ribbon
streamers.
Best man was Eugene
Peruski of Bad Axe. broth
ei in Lr,v of the bride
Groomsmen included Rick
Wasierski of Royal Oak.
friend of the yroom. Gre>j,
McCarty of Cass City, friend
of the groom. Alan Maui ei of
Pontiac. fnend of the p,room
and Kenny Ross of Filion,
cousin of the bride.
Ring bearer was Richard
Gundlach Jr. of Bad Axe.
friend of the bride.
The church was decorated with yellow and white
mums and a large fireside
basket filled with assorted
colors of strawflowers and
wheat.
A reception for 210 families was held following the
ceremony at the Ubly Fox
Hunter's Club.
The bride is employed at
Photography by Richards in
Bad Axe. The bridegroom is
self-employed.
A f t e r a wedding trip
through Kentucky and Tennessee, the couple will
reside on Wadsworth Road
near Ubly
Permanent
Anti-freeze
$1.69
gal.
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass City
10-18-tf
I WILL babysit at my home.
Huntsville Trailer Park. Call
after 6 p.m. 872-2489.
10-25-3
AUCTIONEERING - Sea Lorr
•Slim* Hillaker. Top dollar
for your property. Phone 8723019. Cass Citv.
10-3-tf
THERE WILL be no hunting or
trespassing on my farm day
or night. Larry Cooper, 6433
Ritter Rd.
10-11-6
-1180 Hurds Corner Road
10-1-tf
For Sale - Beef and Pork,
whole or half. Wrapped In the
new clear shrink film.
Erla's Packing Co.
Cass City, Mich.
Dick Erla
Phone 872-2191
11-2-tf
W H Y PAY MORk, when you can
buy antenna supplies, rotor
and antenna, for as much as
50 per cent off when you buy
from Schneeberger TV, Furniture and Appliance, Cass
City. Phone 872-2696.
11-27-tf
FULL TIME or High School
part time girl wanted. Be able
to take care of business phone
and help with cleaning. Live
In. Box A, care of Chronicle,
Cass City.
lo-25-tf
FOR SALE - 5 tires and wheels
for Chevrolet 7.75, good condition. Phone Owendale 6784103. Harold Day. 11-8-3
FOR SALE - Schwinn super
sport 10-speed bike, good condition, $95. Call after 4, 8722404.
11-1-2
Check Fred's
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass City
10-18-tf
rtuC'l lUNKtKING .- Farm and
general.
Harold
Copeland,
Cass City. Phone 872-2592.
5-18-tf
before you buy those snow tires.
All sizes available.
Fred's Service
Garage
5589 E. Cass CityRd.
Phone 872-2235
10-23-3
FOR SALE - 2 piece plain
rod hunting suit, large size,
water repellent. Call 8722-171. 4437 Maple St. 11-1-2
REAL ESTATE
na YOU I.IVK IN Tin-: CITY, HUT WOULD I.IKK TO n-: IN
Til:. COUNTRY" DO YOU H A V E A I.ARCK FAM'I.Y AN.) N O T
KNOl'GH ROOM'' I!-' SO THIS IS JUST '.(>'.< YOU'!! 3 bedroom
Victorian style Country Homo. This homo has a total of 13
rooms, k i t c h u n , dining room l i v i n g room, screened ixirches
on front air! sido, b r e a k f a s t nook w i t h l i u i l t - m china cabinet,
•.va!k-in closet.'-, modern baths, carpeting in nearly nil rooms,
garage.
H2-CY-375
G K I T I N G M A R R I E D IN r\V.) W'-:EKS HUT STIL!. HAVI-: N 3
HOME-: \V-.-:I.L, w'-: HAVE THE i'KRFi-:c:T ON;-. FO;< YOU:::
2 bedroom homo, bath, kitchen and dining area, living room,
panelin;: in kitchen, nicely landscaped, partial basement,
living room has carpeting, drapes and curtains stay with
house. H-TO-003
A very good building site with frontage on Cass River. Good
farm land. About 5 miles from Ca.s.s City. M3-A-103
V E R Y HOMEY AND COZY AND WOV'T LAST LONG!! 3 bedroom .'iome, lots of kitchen cabinets, carpet in living room
ami hallway, lots of closets and additional storage in home,
high and dry location with nice view, large two car garage,
1.6 acres more or less.
U2-CV-399
Sl'ICEY AS PUMPKIN PIE. 4 bedroom 2 story older home,
completely remodeled, carpeting throughout up and down,
new kitchen cabinets, large kitchen with sliding glass door
leading to back yard, home has open stairway in dining area,
modern bath with shower and tub, large living room, new
furnace, new wiring, partial basement could be deepened
for possible recreation room, liomu has new aluminum siding, shutters, one car garage. Home is situated in nice r»---i_
dential area.
B2-TO-OII
J. McLEOD REALTY
63U N. State Street, Caro
REP. IN CASS CITY A R E A , DALE BROWN 872-3158
Day or Night Phone 673-GI06 or 673-6107
FREE Kittens - litter trained.
2 black, 1 tortoise-shell. Call
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. 872-2894.
or 872-3739.
H-l-3 ;
FOR PERSONAL SERVICE
Beef - Pork - Veal - Lamb.
Lay-away now for Xmas
FOR SALE - New Perfection
one-burner kerosene heater,
like new, $15. Bruce Holcomb,
4413 West St. Phone 872-3385.
11-8-3
GROSS
MEAT MARKET
PHONE 872-4114
Check our selection and our
low prices. One of the largest
selections in the area.
Gary J. Susalla
WANTED - Used hand guns,
shotguns and rifles in working condition. Lee Armbruster
Sales, Unionville, phone 6742311.
11-8-2
Custom Slaughtering - curing
- smoking and processing.
Toys
Mrs.
FOR SALE - 4-room size gas
space heater with thermostat
and blower, used one year.
Call 872-3853.
10-23-3
Free Estimates
FOR -SALE - 1972 Moto Ski
Capri, 340cc, low mileage.
6654 Seed St. R. Ridenour,
phone 872-2666.
11-8-tf
Born Nov. 1 to Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Eremia of
Unionville, a girl, Melissa
Ann.
Mrs. LeRoy Kilbourn, Mrs.
Wallace Grassman, Mrs.
G e r t r u d e Falkenhagen,
Scott MacAlpine, Mrs.
Wayne Anderson, Robert
Hunter Sr.. Mrs. Dewey
LaPeer, Mrs. Kenneth Maharg, Gerald Prieskorn and
Perry Sadler of Cass City;
E. Carl Thane, Mrs. Edward Mihacsi, Mrs. Laura
DeLand, Mrs. Theresa Kurtansky of Caro;
Mrs. Elizabeth Lehner,
Mrs.
Raymond Sharp,
Wendy Salgot and Mrs.
Romaine VanHoost of
Unionville:
Donald Lynch of Otisville;
Raymond Rice and Mrs.
Ruth Poosch of Detroit:
Mrs. Lawrence Strace of
Decker:
Richard Mihacsi, Orval
Sweetman of Akron:
Mrs. L. D. Abbe and Levi
Heberly of Owendale:
Mrs. Don Heator of Caseville;
Mrs. Lavara Laming of
Ubly:
Gene Dandron of Kingston;
William Hartz of Elkton;
Edward Hessler of Sebewaing.
EXPERIENCED
Waitresses.
Sherwood Forest, Gagetown.
Call 665-9971.
9-G-tf
State Licensed
General Hospital
PAGE FIFTEEN
TURN DISCARDS INTO CASH-USE PROFITABLE, LOW COST CHRONICLE LINERS
Transit 'iiniihu.sitic.ssi r;itc:
L'n words or tc.ss. ?:, cents i-;ii-h
i n s e r t i o n : a d d i t i o n a l uords :',
cents carl) Three weeks lor the
price of ( u o cash rate Save
money by enclosiim cash w i t h
mail orders. Kates lor display
want ad on application
Residential
Hi 11 s and Dales
DAY,
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1973
MARTIN ELECTRIC
Mr. and Mrs. Carmack
Smith of Westland spent
from Sunday until Wednesday with her mother, Mrs.
Herman Stine.
IN THE
FELLOWSHIP HALL
Mr. and Mrs. Garrison
Stine and sons, Scott and
Randy, were in Detroit
Saturday and Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Bishop
left Thursday for Marshall to
visit Mr. and Mrs. Jim
Bishop and daughter until
Sunday and then left to
spend the winter at Lakeland. Fla
CASS CITY MICHIGAN
11-1-2
And the Best in Meats
Our Own Make of Fine
Sausages and Smoked Meats
Freezer Meats Always
Available
9-23-tf
WILL DO sewing and alterations. Adding daily to stock
of clothes already made. Also
doll clothes - any size, by
piece or package. 3409 N.
Dodge Rd., phone 872-4157.
11-8-3
DOES
YOUR
PIANO need
tuning? call Duane Johnston,
409 Cleveland St., Bad Axe,
269-7364. Thirteen years' experience on all makes of
pianos, registered craftsman
member of the Piano Technician's Guild.
7-30-tf
'67 PONTIAC Catalina, 4 door,
excellent motor, good body.
$175.00. 7 east and 2 south
of Cass City.
11-8-1
Now
Homelite Chain Saws
NORM COATES TV Sales and
Service
still servicing the
Cass City area. Call Reese
868-4071. 9671 Saginaw St.
10-25-4
Attention Hunters
Now In Stock:
A complete line of guns, Including Browning.
Automatics - pumps - bolt
action - single shots.
Also gun cases - shells and
hunting accessories.
Make
FOR SALE - Snowmobile suit,
size 14. Call 872-3767 after
3:30. Helen Easton. 11-8-3
USED APPLIANCES --8 used
refrigerators, starting $19.95;
6 gas and electric ranges,
starting $29.95; 30 used color
TVs, starting at $79.95;
Schneeberger TV, Appliances,
Furniture. Phone 872-2696.
5-17-H
FOR SALE - One yellow dropleaf table, 36x72, one rollaway bed with mattress; one
antique rocker - needs fixIng; bike baby carrier. Call
Elmer Sherman, 872-3268.
10-25-3
Albee True Value
Hardware
your Hunting headquarters.
Hunting licenses now available.
8-30-tf
FOR SALE - 1972 3-bedroom
mobile home and one acre of
land. Also, 1966 Calaxie 500,
tudor hardtop, all new exhaust
system. Call 872-3857.
10-25-3
CAKPENTfcK contracioi wnh
builder's license. Anything In
construction and home remodeling. Chester Kulinskt,
phone 872-2512. Satisfaction
is my business.
11-30-tf
FOR SALE - 1973 GTO 400,
four months old, power steerIng and power brakes. Mag
wheels, automatic. Phone 6784124 after 4.
11-8-1
CANDY flavoring oils - 25 different flavors. Coach Light
Pharmacy, Cass City. 10-11-9
DEERESTG PACKING
Fresh counter meats
Open 7 days - weekdays till
5. Open Friday till 9. Sundays
1 - 5 p. m.
Albee True Value
Sales & Service
Cass City
10-4-tf
FOR SALE - 1970 Klngswood
Chevrolet V-8 station wagon.
With lots of extras, in good
condition. Inquire 678-4370,
Owendale. Cliff O'Connell.
11-1-3
CUSTOM BUTCHERING -Monday and by noon Tuesday. By
appointment only. Cutting and
wrapping for deepfreeze. 1 1/2miles south. Carl Reed, Cass
City. Phone 872-2085.10-27-tf
KOSTANKO's Auto Service All gas an! diesel engines,
automatic transmissions, rebuilds, tune-up.s, welding and
fabricating. Our policy is customer satisfaction. Phone 8722210.
10-4-tf
E A R N Substantial hourly earnings in your spare time. If
you qualify, we'll show you
how. Agency. Box 1B2, Cass
City, Mich. 48726. 10-23-3
T>I:-:R-: win bo a puwic moetiii(i of The Grtonlenf To-.v.isliip zoninsr hoard at G823 Cass
C i t v Rd. on Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m.
11-8-1
SAVE GAS
TURBO VAPOR
INJECTOR
30,000 operators report 23'"better gas mileage.
Ask these dealers about their
results:
Cass City Gulf
7-26-tf
FOR SALE - one iarge unice
desk with chair; one full size
bed; two dressers; one chord
organ; 3 wheelchairs. Phone
872-3737. Call after 6 p.m.
4409 Brooker St.
11-1-3
PAPER NAPKINS
imprinted
with names and dates for weddings, receptions, showers,
anniversaries and other occasions. The Cass City Chronicle.
1-12-tf
FOR -a job well done feelingclean carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
$1. Ben Franklin Store. Cass
C«y.
6-11-tf.
FOR SALE - 1971 Dodge Challenger RT 383 magnum, AMFM radio, Fenton wheels, vinyl
top, only 27,000 original miles.
See at 5859 Reed St., Deford,
Mich.
11-8-1
Machinist
6 1/2 miles east of Mayville
on E. Mayville Rd.
3-5-tf
FOR SALE - 3 Holstein heifers. Vaccinated. Call Kingston 683-2221 after 4:30.
11-8-3
Eaton Foundry Division
Vassar, Mich.
11-1-3
Halves and quarters for sale.
We wrap and freeze.
For
7073.
trucking, phone 761-
FOR SALE - 5 2-year-old Holstein heifers due first week
in December. Calfhcod vaccinated. Your choice of 15
Phone 683-2497. 2 north 1
east of Kingston.
11-8-1
SPECIALS ! ! !
.
Mobile Home: 12x60' - New Moon - LIKE NEW — all new
furniture and appliances - air conditioner - wall to wall
carpeting - comes with skirting, porch and expando. To SETTLE
ESTATE $6,000.00. All set up in Mobile Home Court - Cass
City, Michigan.
Eaton Corp.
HELP WANTED - cook, full
time. WUdwood Farms, Van
Dyke Rd. Phone 872-2720.
11-8-tf
WATCH -Day By Day- on
Delta's Channel 19, week days
at 3:00 and 7:30 p.m.
10-25-4
CORN PICKER for sale - Minneapolis Mollne, working order, $150. Call before 10:00
a.m. 3 miles west, 3 1/2sooth
and 1 1/2 west of Cass City.
Phone 872-4031.
10-25-3
LISTINGS WANTED ON ALL TYPES OF PROPERTY!!!!
RIVER PROPERTY!!!!
168 ACRES - with over 1 mile of RIVER FRONTAGE - land
Is rolling; scenic - high elevated building sites - woods
1 1/2 miles off M-46 highway — $80,000.00 terms.
~ETINGS WANTED ON HOMES, FARMS, BUSINESSES, LOTS,
RIVER PROPERTY. PASTURE LAND - RECREATIONAL LAND
WE HAVE BUYERS WAITING!!!!!
JUST LISTED!!!' Very neat 4 bedroom home with 1 1/2 bathrooms; wall to wall carpeting in living room 12x24'; dining room;
new kitchen cabinets with china cabinet and snack bar; upstairs
newly carpeted; breezeway and patio attached to garage - basement; oil furnace; very desirable location - lots of flowers
shrubs, trees - corner lot — $21,500.00 terms.
FN CASS CITY; Immediate Possession
BRICK HOME with
4 bedrooms; formal dining room; all modern kitchen with
built-ins; 1 1/2 BATHROOMS: lots of Oak trim — laundry
room off- kitchen; wall to wall carpeting living room, dining
room; bedrooms and hallway —many other features; $26,500.00
easy terms. MOVE RIGHT IN!!!
MOBILE HOME: 1971 - 12x60' - very good condition - asking
$4,200.00. Hurry!!!
$1500.00 DOWN - balance $137.56 per month including 7%
interest
Ranch type horns only 2 years old - 3 bedrooms;
natural gas heating system; full basement; aluminum siding;
very desirable location --- $23,500. Immediate Possession
Hurry! Only 1 like it!!!!!
D^-ZR HUNTERS!!!:! We have a 1960 LaSalle mobile home
8x34' in very good condition - completely furnished — first
$1430.00 takes it.
WiC HAVE A XUM 3ER OF 3 to 10 acre parcels - some with
woods - MAKK YOUR SELECTION NOW::.'!
GOOD INVESTMENT HERE:.'!!
79 ACRES: 3 1,2 m:les from Cass City - hardsurface road —
Stately 2 story home with gas furnace; attractive setting lots of trees, shrubs, flowers; 9 room home with 4 bedrooms;
has to be seen to be appreciated
40x50' HO33E BARN
— $48,300.00.
Buy a
I NO LONGER teach this year,
will be in my office weekdays 8-5 and 8-12 Saturday.
Stop in and see me for all
your insurance needs. Ed
Doerr Insurance, 6440 Huron,
Cass City.
11-1-2
who can rea'd casting blue print,
set up and operate vertical
milling machines and associated work.
Fringe benefits include pension,
vacation. Insurance, cost of living, paid holidays.
An equal opportunity employer.
MANY OTHER FEATURES!!!!
at
WANTED - RN or LPN with
medication course to work II
to 7 part time. Write Provincial House. 4782 Hospital
Drive, Cass Citv, or call 8722174.
"
11-8-1
HIDEAWAY::;; ~ 1/2 miles from Cass city — i ACRE with
1 bedroom home; room for additional bedroom; drilled well
94' deep - oil furnace 2 years old - near White Creek
poultry house; utility building - comes with refrigerator;
gas range; sofa, bed; table; etc. All this for $6500.00. HUSSY!!!
HURRY'::
BARGAIN!"! 1 1/2 story - 7 room home with 4 bedrooms;
aluminum siding; garage attached; basement; oilheatiiigsystem;
inrge dining room; many kitchen cabinets; insulated; aluminum
storms and screens; all this for $17,500. terms.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT: 3 bedroom apartment with wall to
wall carpeting; 1st floor; $125.00 per month including heat
we have others.
SEE, C A L L OR WHITE TO-
B. A. CALKA REAL ESTATE
B. A. Calka, Realtor
6306 W. Main St., Cass City, Michigan 48726
Telephone: Area Code 517 872-3355 or call:
Fred A. McEachern, Associate
Shirley A. Kappen, Salesman
872-3355
872-3355
SERVING THIS COMMUNITY FO3 OVER 20 YEARS IN REAL
ESTATE.
11-8-1
NOTICK
Re-Roof
Awnings
Re-Side
Insulate
Aluminum Windows and Doors
Call or Write
Bill Sprague, owner
of Elkton Roofing and Siding
Company
Elkton 375-4215
Bad Axe CO 9-746S
Bad Axe CO 9-7158
Terms to 5 years
3-17-tf
THE SIXTH graders ana senior
band are holding concert with
a Band Boosters meeting following, Nov. 13 at Cass City
High School at 7:30 p.m. Refreshments following. 11-8-1
SEPTIC TANK CLEANING For fast, guaranteed work call
Dale Rabideau, Cass City 8723581 or 872-3000.
3-24-tf
FOR SALE or Rent - 4 homes,
vacant now! 3 in Cass City
School District, 1 in Bad Axe.
You must be employed and
have good credit rating. No
pets. First and last 2 months
rent in advance required. McCormick Realty, Inc., Cass
City, Mich. Phone 517-8722715.
11-8-2
Quaker maid
Snowmobile Col
59£ qt.
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass City
10-18-tt
FOR RENT - 60 acres for beans
or corn. Victor Hyatt, 3 west
of Argyle and 1/2 south.
11-8-3
OUR SINCERE thanks to all our
wonderful neighbors, friends
and relatives for flowers, food
and money contributed to the
cancer fund and TB fund we
received during our bereavement. A special thanks to Dr.
Donahue and the nurses at
Hills and Dales Hospital for
the wonderful care they gave
our loved one. Also a thank
you to Little's Funeral Home
. for, all ttelr help. The family,
of Paul James.
11-8-1
PAGE FOURTEEN
CASS CtTY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1973
Sensible, safe
driving saves
Safe, sensible driving not gauge" survey of Michigan
only saves lives but also can service stations.
mean a S232 annual reduc"We used a '71 Chevrolet
tion in gasoline costs for the with a 350 cubic inch, V-8
average motorist, Auto- engine because our remobile Club of Michigan fuel search showed this repreeconomy tests have re- sents the average type of
vealed.
car on the road today,"
The tests, conducted with Gibson said.
a 1971 Chevrolet Impala Another phase of Auto
over a 22,8-mile commuter Club's fuel economy tests
route, showed a maximum
showed a 23 per cent
44 per cent fuel loss when maximum fuel loss due to
the car was operated by a
bad driving habits when the
"poor driver" as compared test car was operated at 70
to a "good driver."
mph expressway speeds.
"Driving habits had a
On the ten-mile expressdramatically larger impact
way
route, 13.93 mpg was
on gas mileage than either
recorded for good driving
an untuned engine or air
conditioner use." Art Gib- habits and 10.7 mpg when
son, Auto Club Safety and poor driving habits were
used.
Traffic Engineering man"Previous tests have
ager, said. "Our tests
showed there was about a established that above a
1O per cent fuel loss due to certain level, higher speeds
do result in fuel losses."
air conditioning and slightly
said Gibson in explaining
less than a seven per cent
that
Auto Club's tests
loss as result of a badly
showed a better maximum
untuned engine."
Good driving techniques gas mileage for its city route
used in the tests included than for the expressway
smooth acceleration, travel route.
"However, since there
at an even rate of speed and
never using brakes more were fewer occasions to
than required to make stop and start than in city
driving, the effects of bad
routine stops.
To demonstrate bad driv- driving habits on gas mileing habits. Auto Club's test age were less than on the
driver made "jack rabbit" commuter route," he added.
Gibson noted that testing
starts, rapid stops, weaved
in and out of traffic and cars for expressway gas
several times accelerated to mileage performance at 70
the point where he had to mph is an "important facet
apply brakes to avoid hitting of any effort to determine
fuel economy.
the car in front of him.
"The federal EnvironTraveling in mid-aftermental Protection Agency,
noon traffic, the test car got
14.36 mpg with good driving in testing all 1974 car
habits and 8.11 mpg with models recently for gas
bad driving habits for the mileage, limited the signifimaximum 44 per cent fuel cance of its findings by
loss. Morning "rush hour" confining tests only to lowtest runs resulted in 14.38 er-speed urban travel." he
mpg with good driving and said.
8.24 mpg with bad driving.
The Auto Club car used a
The fuel loss was 43 per special two-gallon gas tank
cent.
and a "fifth wheel" device
The tests, supervised for attached to the rear bumpAuto Club by the Detroit er. The tank was measured
Testing Laboratory of Oak
before and after each run.
Park, covered a circular
and mileage was calculated
route which went south into by comparing the amount of
downtown Detroit from the gas consumed with the fifth
Lodge Freeway, north on
wheel's measurement of
Woodward Avenue and then speed and distance travwest on Eight Mile Road.
eled.
In calculating that S232 a
"Our test results add one
year in gasoline costs can be more excellent reason why
saved by safe driving. Auto all motorists should drive
Club estimated that the safely."
Gibson
said.
average motorist drives "Motorists who are feeling
10,000 miles annually. Reg- the pinch of increased gas
ular gas was priced at 43.3 prices should be heartened
cents a gallon-the current by the fact that if they watch
state average, according to how they drive, they can
Auto Club's weekly "fuel significantly cut fuel costs."
RUBBER STAMPS
Use rubber stamps to clearly mark papers, documents,
packages and many items. Stamped impressions have'an.official look, get attention and save time. You can buy
made-to-order rubber stamps in any size with any wording
or any special marks or trademarks. Rubber stamps pay
for themselves many times over.
USE CHRONICLE WANT ADS FOR FASTER SALES
FOR SALE - 6-year-old size
crib, $10; assorted clothing,
reasonable, all In good condition, deluxe electric can
opener, never used, $5. Phone
872-2467.
11-1-3
FOR SALE - three piece winter
white Butte knit suit, size
12. Worn twice. Reasonable.
Ella Cumper. 4182 Maple. 8722377.
11-1-3
GRIM'S DRIVE-IN - Featuring
Moore's Ice Cream andMonsterburgers. M-81 and M-53.
Sunday - Thursday, 11:30-10.
Friday - Saturday, 11:30-11.
6-7-tf
FOR SALE - Harvest gold
range, 2 years old. 6204 Lakeside Dr., Huntsville Park.
11-1-3
We have
lime available
at all times.
Klein's
Fertilizers
Phone 872-2120
8-30-tf
WANTED - Someone to paper
a ceiling. 872-2524. 11-1-3
NOTICE - to all local Legionnaires and interested Veterans. There will be a meeting
at the Farm warehouse office
of William C. O'Dell Thursday
evening, Nov. 8. 3 miles south
and 1 1/2 west of Cass City.
District Commander will meet
with us. Please come. 11-8-1
WANTED - Large self-feeding
pig feeder. Call after 7:00 p.m.
Phone 872-4121.
11-8-1
WILL CARE for elderly person, preferably lady, In my
home. Phone 872-2273.
10-11-6
FOR SALE - 3 bedroom house,
1 1/4 miles out of Cass City,
at 4387 Koepfgen Rd. Full
basement, attached garage,
24x30 workshop. Many extras.
Must be seen to be appreciated. Call after 3:00 p.m. 8722778.
10-25-3
FOR SALE - 1967 Mustang.
Automatic V8, good running
condition. Call 872-2741 after
4.
11-1-3
UH;IIT m:\ini\.vrio\
K<iiic;ilic>M dors nut open ihr
(Iniir to sui'crss. !>ul it clor.s
hirnish ils possessor Ihr kry.
SI-X'OM) T I I O I ' C I I T S
PHONE 87Z-2010
FOR SALE - 1968 two door
hardtop Ambassador. ">1,000
miles. Clean, sharpcar. Phone
683-2555.
10-25-3
REDUCE excess fluids with
Fluidez, $1.89 -- Lose weight
with Dex-A-Diet capsules
$1.98 at Wood Drug. 11-1-",
Great Decorating Ideas Start
Here.
Color coordinate your home
with the latest in carpeting
from Magee and Morcrest.
Add the crowning touch with
today's easy-do wallcovering
and paint.
Visit our decorating department soon.
Free estimates and prompt
service.
Custom Butchering
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass City
9-20-tf
WE STILL have a few things
left at the garage sale: girl's
chubby dresses double knit,
size 10 1/2 0ike new). Also
smaller girl's wool and double
knit jumpers, all in good condition. Ladies' dresses - sizes
7-10, 14-16 and 22 1/2. Shoes
size 8 1/2 AA. 2 long dresses
size 20 1/2, like new, also
baby buggy. Car seat and Sarah
Coventry jewelry, all in real
good condition. Also men's
bowling ball, 2 twin's suits
and one man's everyday jacket.
Can be seen at 6574 Gage St.
Gagetown, or phone 6C5-995G.
FOR RENT - Electric adding
mach'ntt by day or week. Or
rent a new Smith-Corona
portable typewriter. Also new
and used typewriters for sale,
all makes. Leave your typewriters and other office equipment at our store for repair.
McConkey Jewelry and Gift
Shop.
10-6-tf
FOR SALE - 2 bedroom home,
corner of Center and Third
Streets, Gagetown. Call for
appointment after 5 p.m. ,6652553 or 673-7204. 10-25-3
CARPETS gleam when cleaned
by steam. For free estimates
call Thumb Carpet Cleaners
823-8821. 24-hour service. No
job too large or small.
3-8-tf
FOR SALE - Kirby vacuum
sweeper and GE refrigeratorfreezer. Phone 872-2092.
11-8-1
AUCTIONEER
EXPERIENCED
Complete Auctioneering Service Handled Anywhere.
We make All Arrangements
My Experience Is Your
Assurance
IRA AND DAVID
OSENTOSKI
PHONE:
Cass City 872-2352 collect
This lirrd oki \uuld of ours
srrms to !«• in drsprnitr nrril <il
:i littlr clriir ihinkin".
FOR SALE - 19G5 Ford, good
running condition. Sec at Total
gas station.
10-25-3
1970 Chevrolet pickup 1/2 ton]
red, standard transmission,
economy engine, extra clean.
HELP WANTED in Meat Department. Apply In person.
Dick Erla, Erla's Inc., 6233
Church St., Cass City, Mich.
7-26-tf
1972 Gran Torino Ford coupe
V8 engine, vinyl roof, power
steering and brakes. Extra
clean.
1969 Chevrolet 4 door sedan.
Ideal second car. Blue and
white. This week's special at
$895.00.
1971 Pontiac Grand Sport, V8
automatic transmission, vinyl
roof, power. Blue with white
- sharp car.
FOR SALE - 300 bales of green
second cutting alfalfa hay and
1000 bales of first cutting,
75? and 50C. Will deliver.
Phone Elkton 375-2302.
10-25-3
FCR RENT - Bissell and Blue
Lustre rug shampooers. Albee
True Valuu Hardware. Phone
872-2270.
7-lJ-tf
FOR SALE - 1971 396 Snow jet.
Call 872-2748 after 4.
1969 Galaxie 500 sport coupe,
automatic transmission, power steering, red with black
vinyl top. $1095.00.
Do It Now*
1968 Chevrolet Bel Air 2 door
V8 automatic transmission.
Special at $495.00.
2 Bedroom Aluminum Sided
Honr}, fenced lot, garage
$12,500
1S72 Chevrolet Impala custom
coape, V8 automatic transmission, vinyl top, power
[steering and air conditioning.
Extra sharp.
3 Bedroom home on 10 acres
of Good Earth, Woods and Pon'l
All this for or.ly
$32,50'!
OUVRY
CASS CITY CHRONICLE
CASo CITY, MICHIGAN
CHEV.-OLDS INC.
Phonr 872-3830
or 872-27r,0
11-8-3
Don't Wait
Call Us*
«903
=900
^776
2 Bedroom homo on 3/-1 acre
Full Basement, Carport and
Shed. Easy Terms $15,900.
Ken Meyers Realty
Marietta
Phone: 633-7487 or C83-2228
10-4-tf
FOR SALE - Fireplace wood.
Phorie 872-3998.
10-18-tf
Meat cut, wrapped and frozen.
Gainer's
Meat Packing
Bad Axe. Phone 2G9-31G!
1 mile north, 1 mile west of
Had Axe.
11-25-tf
EXPERIENCED dressmaker.
Will do sewing for ladies and
girls in my home. Phone 8722208 after G. Debbie Parrott.
11-8-3
WATER SOFTENERS - Rent or
buy with first 6 months' rental
applying to purchase. 5-cycle
valve. Rental models as low
as $189.95. Special offer free gift with water demonstration in your home. No
obligation. Crystalsoft Division, Fuelpas Co. M-53 and
M-81.
4-29-tf
PUPPIES TO give away - 5
miles south, 2 3, 4 oast of
Cass City. Phone 872--1039
after 5 p.m.
11-8-2
FOR SALE - Homelite chain
saws; Johnson outtoard motors, boats and accessories.
Boyd Shaver's Garage, Caro,
across from Caro Drive-in.
Phone OSborn 3-3039. 1-23-tf
WANTED - used piano, goo:l
condition. Phone 872-224G.
li-8-1
FOR SALE - Living room furniture. Couch and chair $G5,
swivel rocker $35, two end
tables $7, two lamps $15, 13x17
carpet $60, a picture $5. All
clean and In good condition.
Must see to appreciate. Call
375-2506 after 5 p.m. 11-1-3
FEEDER CALVES, sheep and
goats. Call Caro 673-4868.
11-8-3
WANTED - 5000 gallon underground fuel tank. Call Bad
Axe 269-7332 between 10:00
and 3:00.
10-25-3
Looking for no-wax vinyl floor
covering?
Come set our
fine selection of beautiful vinyl
floors from Congoleum.
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass City
Phone 872-2270
7-12-tf
FOR SALE - 19G4 Ford 4door, $05.00. In good running
condition. Phone 313-G729563.
11-8-1
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8,
MINOR PI I'M 3ING repairs faucets, toilets, etc. One
fauc-et SD.OO. Ad litional faucets $2.00 each, ohis parts.
Sackett, 872-2207. Retired.
10-25-3:
TRI-COUNTY Dead stock removal. Phone 375-4088.
7-27-tf
FOR SALE - 444 Marlin rifle.
Call 375-40.12.
10-2f,-H
USED TELEVISION Sets, hlarl.
and white and color - portables and consoles, $29.95 ano1
up. Terms available. Schneeberger's
TV - Furniture,
phone 872-2G!)G.
3-lG-tl
West Bend
Humidifiers
Starting at $-19.95
Albee True Value
Hardware
Cass Citv
n-2o-if
I NO LONGER teach this year,
will be in my office weekdays 8-H and 8-12 Saturday.
Stop in and sue me for all
your insurance needs. Ed
Doerr Insurance, G4-IO Huron,
Cass city.
11-1-2
WEDDING INVITATIONS and
announcements. A complete
line of printing, raised printing or engraving. Dozens to
choose from.
Cass City
Chronicle, Cass City. 1-12-tf
ACREAGE for rent - on Bay
City-Forestvl!le Road. Call
313-757-1444 collect. 11-8-3
Hap's Open Spaces
announces
Dealership for
Stihl Chain Saws
A make for every use.
Hap & Bonnie
Campbell
Kt. 4 Jacob Rd., Caro
Phone 673-4055
9-20-tf
WILL BABYSIT for first shirt
or any time !>efore 3 p.ri;,
Monday through Friday. Phono
872-4157.
' 11-8-1
FOH SALE - Holstein springer
cows and heifers, grade and
registered, some with records. TB tested and vaccinated. !-'ree delivery. Priced
reasonable. Steward Taylor.
Phona (517) 635-5701. 2 mile;t
east,' 1/2 north of Marlette.
3-29-tf
WANTED - Used upright piano
for facility. Call 872-2174, or
write Provincial House, 478:J
Hospital Drive, Cass City.
11-8-1
Cass City Social and Personal Items
Mrs. Reva Little *^
Maynard DeLong ot Port
Huron spent the week end
at the Albert Englehart
home and attended Homecoming services Sunday at
the Novesta Church of
Christ.
Miss Lessel Crawford of
Pontiac spent the week end
with her sister and her
husband, Mr. and Mrs.
Glenn McClorey.
Miss Karen O'Dell, accompanied by Greg Frank,
One hundred attended went Saturday to visit her
the annual turkey harvest aunt, Mrs. Daisy Kerbyson
supper Saturday evening in in Dearborn Hts., and also
Salem United Methodist visited her brothers, Ray at
church. Mrs. LaurenceCarleton and Theo at Milan.
Bartle was chairman of the She returned home Sunday.
food committee.
Saturday evening, she attended the West Baptist
Mrs. Hazel Seeley had as a church in Detroit where the
Sunday guest, her sister, Teen-Missions group, with
Mrs. Audrey Katzenberger which she has been affiliof Hale.
ated, were appearing.
The Progressive class of
Salem United Methodist
church will meet Thursday,
Nov. 8. at 8 p.m. at the
church.
Mrs. A. J. Murray and
daughters, Kathy and Marilyn, of Williamston were
visitors at the home of Mrs.
Howard loomis Saturday.
They came to attend the
Maurice Loomis funeral.
The Elmwood Missionary
Circle will meet Friday, Nov.
9, with Mrs. Vernon Rosenberger.
Around 40 persons were
at the Herman Umpfenbach
home Sunday for a housewarming and to celebrate
Mrs.
Umpfenbach's birthday. Among those present
were eight of the Umpfenbachs' nine children and
friends and neighbors.
Joe Frederick left Tuesday for Florida.
Nineteen were present
Monday evening when the
United Methodist women of
Salem church met at the
home of Mrs. Esther McCullough. The lesson on "Justice and Freedom" was
presented by Mrs. Charles
Tuckey. Plans were made
for the church bazaar to be
held in December. Mrs.
David Loomis is bazaar
chairman.
Sp.4 Ira Lawrence Wood
arrived home Oct. 31 after
completing service in the
Army. He has been at Mons,
Belgium, as a medic in the
hospital. He is spending a
month with his parents,
Rev. and Mrs. Ira L. Wood,
before resuming his work
with Firestone in Akron,
Ohio.
Those from Trinity United
Methodist church who attended the men's rally at
Sandusky Monday evening
were Keith McConkey, William O'Dell, Frank Hutchinson and Noble Jump. Nine
men from Salem church
attended the rally, including
Don Buehrly, Lawrence
Wood, Michael Kirn, Rev. Ira
L. Wood, Eldon Stoutenburg,
Ronald Geiger, Leonard
Damm, Stanley Kirn and
Maurice Joos.
Mrs. Esther McCullough,
Mrs. Alice McAleer, Mrs.
M.B. Auten, Mrs. C.W. Price,
Mrs. Esther Kirn and Mr.
and Mrs. Keith McConkey
were in Bay City Sunday
evening, at Central High
School auditorium to attend
one performance in a concert series.
Mr. and Mrs. Orion Cardew had as a guest Monday
and Tuesday, his sister, Miss
Doris Cardew of Jackson.
Mr. and Mrs. George
Gallaway visited her sister,
Mrs. Rosella Cherry, in
McLaren Hospital in Flint
Saturday. Mrs. Cherry is
recovering from surgery
and expects to be released
Wednesday of this week
from the hospital.
Miss Karen Holm and
friend, Frank Maxa of
Lincoln Park, spent the
week end at the Charles
Holm home. Other Sunday
dinner guests were Mr. and
Mrs. Gaylord Lapeer.
USE IT NOW - PAY
FOR IT NEXT YEAR!
NEW HOLLAND
FORAGE HARVESTERS
880 AND 717 CHOPPERS
REAL ESTATE
Price reduced on this three bedroom homo with full basement,
panelled, natural gas heat, two car garage, and two lots with
corner location. New price $26,000, don't delay.
• 1880 SELF-PROPELLED CHOPPER
• CHOPPER BOXES WITH WAGON
Greenleaf township! 2 & 1/2 acres with mobile home In very
good condition with furniture, all carpeted, deep well and
storage building, septic tank an-J field line.
• FORAGE BLOWERS
We need listings of all kinds of property, so why not give us
a call now.
Edward J. Hahn, Broker
Gertrude A. Gray, saleslady or Clinton L Law, salesman.
G240 W. Main Street
Cass City, Mich.
Phone 872-2155
11-8-1
Used Equipment
IQTi John Deere Sp combine w/corn head
45 John I>eer« '.v-'tican en•1520 John Deere w.'cab i. duals
300 IHC w/wide front
2010 John Deere w/duals
M Farmall
11 rarn-.all
4 - l C - r i 4 5 semi • mounted plow
Laethem Equipment Company
337 Montague St.
Caro, Mich.
Phone 673-3939
PAGE THREE
[
• CHOPPER BOXES
WAIVER OF INTEREST AND
CARRYING CHARGES
UNTIL SEPT. 1,1974
You Can Buy Now And Earn 7% Tax Investment Credit
WE'RE DEALING NOW ! SAVE
„ ,„
1 1 — I *• c.
RABIDEAU MOTORS
PHONE 872-2616
CASS CITY
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Hunt
left Wednesday for jAnn
Arbor to be overnight
guests of Mr. and jMrs.
Gerald Forthun and will go
from there to Clevejand,
Ohio, to stay until Saturday
where Mr. Hunt will attend a
Boy Scout convention. |Mrs.
Garrison Moore of Avon
Lake, Ohio, joined themfor a
day in Cleveland.
\
Mr. and Mrs. Howard jKing
of Troy were Saturday overnight guests in the Wjlbur
Morrison home.
I
I
Miss Pamela Dobbslwas
guest of honor Friday jevening at a miscellaneous
bridal shower given byjMrs.
Harold Craig. Twenty-eight
relatives and friends| attended. Out-of-town guests
were from Westland, Pontiac, East Lansing and Caro.
The wedding of Miss Dbbbs
and Timothy Barnes I will
take place Dec. 1.
j
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Lqunsbury were Sunday dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Janks of rural Caro.
Leslie Peasley of Alpena
came Sunday and spent
until Thursday at the IBud
Peasley home. He came
from Detroit where he!had
undergone heart surgery in
Mt. Sinai hospital Oct. 23.
Mrs. Cecil Barriger jand
Mrs. Lyle Lounsbury spent
Thursday in Royal Oaki
The Cass River WCTU will
meet Wednesday, Novj 14,
at 1:30 p.m. at the home of
Mrs. Mark Tuckey.
A harvest dinner, to be
followed by a program, is
planned for Wednesday,
Nov. 14, at six-thirty p.m. in
the Novesta Church of
Christ. Chairman of ' the
dinner committee is Mrs.
Kenneth Nye. Constituents
and friends of the church
are invited to attend.
Monday visitors at ;the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur
Morrison were Mrs. Arthur
Marshall, Mrs. Sara Campbell and Harry Edwardb of
Ubly.
|
Visitors during the month
of October of Mrs. Laura
Robinson were: Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Eberly and Rev.
and Mrs. Luke Yoder, all of
Pigeon, Mrs. Cletus Morjrell,
Mr. and Mrs. John Stapleton
of Caro, Mr. and Mrs.
Anthony Kolter and Mrs.
Gordon Weiderhold, alj of
Elkton, and Mrs. Robinson's
sister, Mrs. Louise Meredith •
nf Snover.
Local church ji
to participate in
prayer meeting
Members of the Cass^City
Assembly of God, 6455 Sixth
Street, will participate iiji the
"Revivaltime" World Rrayermeeting.at 7:00 p.m. Nov.
18.
|
According to the Rev.
Franklin P. Smith, pastor,
over 100.000 person* in
some 2,000 churches! are
expected to join in prayer in
pre-Thanksgiving services
Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Tate
Cross Lutheran Church,
Pigeon, was the setting for
the wedding ceremony of
Mary Margaret Nicholas and
Richard Lee Tate Saturday,
Oct. 27. Rev. Ernst Henkelman officiated at the
double-ring ceremony.
The bride is the daughter
of Mrs. Martha Nicholas.
The bridegroom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
Tate of Pigeon.
The bride was given away
by her brother, Les Nicholas, and wore a white
Lagando gown featuring an
Empire waistline with a
mandarin neckline, softly
gathered A-line long puffed
sleeves, a chapel train and
featuring trim bands of
Venice lace on the neck,
cuffs, bodice, skirt and train.
A Juliet cap with a
fingertip veil of bridal illusion accented the gown.
She carried a bouquet of
baby's breath and red roses.
Maid of honor was Bonnie
Kappen, friend of the bride.
She wore a light blue gown
featuring an Empire waist
and A-line puffed sleeves
with tight fitted cuffs encircled with lace. Lace also
trimmed the low neck and
bottom ruffle.
Marriage Licenses
Dennis Henry Pent, 22, of
Vassar and Nancy Lynne
Pauley, 21, of Caro.
Alex Lee Kastraba, 21, of
Caro and Naomi Delores
Beyett, 19, of Gagetown.
James Elmer Lee, 53, of
Fostoria and Loretta Marie
Spencer, 37, of Fostoria.
Donald Francis Bilicki, 21,
of Unionville and Jean Ann
Roth, 16, of Unionville.
James Walter Jaruzel, 26,
of Millington and Jeanne
Marie Koch,'22, of Millington.
Dennis Eugene Weber,
21, of Reese and Janet
Elaine Mohr, 19, of Reese.
Robert John Kelsey, 19, of
Reese and Patricia Ann
Schultz, 25, of Reese.
Edward Charles Liebler,
34, of Caro and Sharon Dee
Willis, 31, of Caro.
Lorn Arthur Harneck, 20,
of Kingston and Mary Kathryn Burns, 19, of Kingston
She carried a bouquet
featuring carnations and
baby's breath.
Bridesmaid was Rose
Nicholas, sister of the bride.
She was attired in a gown
matching that of the maid of
honor and carried a similar
bouquet.
Best man was Robert
Tate, brother of the groom.
Groomsman was Tim Tate,
brother of the groom.
The bride's mother wore a
dark green floor-length
gown featuring long sleeves
and an Empire waist and
sequins surrounding pearls.
She wore a white carnation.
The bridegroom's mother
wore a long, burgundy gown
featuring a stand-up collar
with silver trim. She wore a
white carnation.
Flowers at the church
were carnations and roses
covered with baby's breath.
Music included "Perfect
Love", the "Lord's Prayer"
and "One Hand, One
Heart".
A reception for family
members was held following
the ceremony at the Lamp
Lighter in Pigeon.
The bride is a 1969
graduate of Cass City High
School and is now employed
at Walbro Corp. in Caro.
The bridegroom is a 1969
graduate of Laker High
School and is employed at
Saginaw Steering Gear.
After a brief trip through
northern Michigan, the
couple will reside near Caro.
Mr. Former!
READ AND USE
c-c-c
CLASSIFIED ADS
*To sell or Rent a farm
*To sell or buy livestock
*To sell or bay Implements
*To profitably sell• or
buy anything
The Classified Section Is
Where Interested
Prospects Look First
ITHE CASS CITY CHRONICLE
PAGE FOUR
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8, 1973
L
*******
" **
**
'"
'"
.-......»
w
v,
Rabbit tracks 1
Dieer
season
I
FROM
looks good,
help):-:
Crazy quiz: The State's forgotten man, the lieutenant
governor of the State of Michigan, will officiate at the
opening of Artrain in Bad Axe Thursday. Quick, now, what's
his name? James H. Brickley just has to be one of the lesser
known top political figures in decades.
Mrs. Tim Grassman says that the side of their family car
was rammed recently and to tell John and all male
chauvinists that it wasn't a woman that did it.
Let's hear it all you women libbers.
Annual request: Deer season opens Tuesday. Yes, the
Chronicle wants a picture of the first deer shot and any deer
with outstanding racks. We also want to list the details of
every successful hunt. So call and tell us,won't you?
You can tell that deer season is fast approaching. Perhaps
it is the bow and arrow hunters or hunters scouting the
woods for ideal locations that causes it.
But every year about this time there is a sharp upsurge in
the deer-auto accidents. This week four have been reported
in the Cass City area.
The George Jacobys wanted to know if there is a charge
for telling about a new phone number at the Deford post
office.
The paper could have run a Chronicle liner and charged
for this information, but we wort.
What we want to know is who does George Jacoby know to
get this number: 872-4000?
Speaking of telephones, Jim Courtney, customer relations
man at Gen-Tel, says that the reason that local residents will
be forced to ring all seven numbers instead of five that has
been the custom locally is that we're growing, growing,
growing.
Running out of numbers, says Jim.
j.
Continued from page one
Just to set the record
straight before I start: I
or | apprehending hunters
voted for George McGovern
wit^i loaded guns.
in the last presidential
He says the physical
election.
condition of the herd apI didn't think much of
pedrs to be good, adding
King Richard then and I
that the increased highway
don't today.
kill} rising by a greater
But I'm 100 per cent
percentage than the traffic
against impeachment. If the
flow, indicates the deer are
president resigns, well,
there.
okay. Not good, but okay.
bespite poaching, there
We could limp along with
should be a good number of
Jerry Ford.
legal targets for opening
If nothing else all of us
da>j, Thursday, Nov. 15.
could boast that a Michigan
As was done last year,
man finally became presisuccessful hunters are
dent of the United States,
askjed to check their kill at
for whatever that's worth. A
thej Caro field office. In
good many of us could say
addition, Jarvis says, checkthat we met and talked with
ing! stations will be estabthe president.
lished in Sandusky and Bad
More to the point is that
Axe. A possible station in
Ford will be able to carry on
Cas's City is under discusin a patchwork executive
sioti. but nothrng definite
office until the next election.
has! been decided along
The key word is carry on.
these lines.
If the president resigns the
The reason for checking is
work would carry on.
to allow the DNR to evaluIf impeachment talk conate! where the deer are
tinues, this nation will be in
being taken and the cona state of limbo for months,
dition of the animals being
perhaps
years, before
killed.
things are settled.
All hunters reporting to
It's hard to see how a
the! checking station will
successful impeachment
receive a successful hunter
could be sustained.
arm patch.
The roadblocks are conIrj Tuscola county, deer of
siderable.
both sexes may be taken,
Private reservations or
providing the hunter carries
suspicions about the actions
both a regular hunting
of the executive office are
license and a special antlernot proof of offenses that
lessi permit.
make impeachment possible.
If it gets to the Senate it's
hard to see a two-thirds
majority voting to oust the
president.
So it fails. And a year or so
from today -we are in
substantially the same position that we are today.
The St. Pancratius WoMuch of the news media
men's Council met Monday,
and many qualified political
Novi 5. It was decided to
observers fear that the
send monthly checks and
president's ability to run the
worlj; on special projects for
country has been so imSister Jerry Megel to help in
paired that he can't run the
her mission at South Carocounty.
lina.!
I can't buy that. It will run.
Thje Women's Council will
Not as well. But it will run.
also; purchase a share of
Run about as well as it
stock to help the new
would if Jerry Ford were
doctors clinic. Michele
president.
Zdrqjewski spoke on projThis whole mess will be
ects|the council could do to
over quicker with Nixon in
help! the patients in the
than with an attempt to put
Provincial Nursing Home.
Nixon out. We'll start movRefreshments were
ing again sooner with him
served afterwards.
than without him.
Before Watergate I was
more concerned about our
J H A I . A N C K I ) HOOKS
j
government than I am
So jlive t h a t when tin 1 roll is
today. I feel safer now than I
callejl up yonder you won't have
did then.
lo criim for the "finals.
St. Pancrathis
women meet
Monday
For a moment Tuesday I thought that the fuel shortage
was really getting serious, real serious. That's when the
tanks at the Chronicle ran out of fuel oil.
Dave Ware couldn't believe it when I called. But it was
true.
I don't blame Dave for not believing. The way that tank
drains I have trouble believing it myself.
Newspapering is a precarious business. A neighboring
; Thumb paper ran a story about a girl lying in the street nude
in Sebewaing.
'• The problem was that the State Police report said "rude",
not nude.
AFTER THIS DATE
GREENLEAF
TOWNSHIP
BUILD!
PERMITS
WEDDING NAPKINS
Choice of styles
to choose from
WELL BE OBTAINED FROM
CASS BARTNIK
CORNER M-53 AND M-81
Others Get Quick Results With The
Chronicle's Classified Ad
You Will Too!
ALSO SILVER
Provincial
House denies
leaving
THE
Editor's Corner
By John Haire
anyone else he can get to
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
PAGE TH1RTF SH
^
AND
ANNIVERSARY
GOLDEN
NAPKINS
CASS CITY CHRONICLE
when Nixon was trying to
run roughshod over the
press and political opponents. I worried.
When Agnew was castigating the press and a good
many citizens were applauding. I worried.
When reporters were being thrown in j a i l for
protecting the people's
right to know. I worried.
Now there is no way that
King Richard can mount an
unassailable throne. Put
himself above the constitution. Above the people.
That worry is over. Now,
more important than showing the president how we
feel is turning our attention
to the affairs of the nation
that have come to a standstill.
That's why we should
resign ourselves to the
president until his term
ends.
It's not a pleasant prospect, but it's the best choice
that is available.
Continued .from page one
out a 20-year icjse on the
structure."
He added that after 20
years, the contract contains
a renewal clause for up to
20 additional years
Palm said the .croup
which has purchased the
building is an insurance
company which he did not
name, adding that it rp^Hv
makes no difference who
owns the bricks and mortar.
The move was made strict 1 ;,
for financial reasons.
Palm added that such a
move is standard operating
procedure with most Provincial House homes, once
they are opened for busi
ness
"Cass Cityans don't have
to worry about Provincial
House leaving the community." Palm stressed "We are
there to stay."
He added that all but two
of Provincial House's homes
are operated in such a
manner.
CASS CITY VILLAGE
COUNCIL MEETING
The regular meeting of
the Cass City Village Council was held on October 23,
1973, at the Municipal
Building. All Trustees except Trustee Bliss were
present.
Mr. James McCoy representing C. A. T. V., was
present to report on his
progress. He has received
his Federal Communications Commission permit
and hopes to have a tower
up and the system in
operation by the end of the
year.
A motion was made by
Trustee Ware and supported by Trustee Rawson
to accept the recommendation of the Streets and
Parking Committee to purchase the Keith Pobanz
property at an additional
Sl.000.00 for a total amount
of S16.500.00. Disposition
of the house was tabled
until the next meeting.
Ed Karr. Elkland Township Supervisor, and Ferris
Ware. Elkland Township
Clerk, were present to
request the Council to
approve the Village's half of
re-roofing the C u l t u r a l
Center. A motion was made
by Trustee Hampshire and
supported by Trustee Jones
to accept the recommendation of the Elkland Township
Board to repair the Cultural
Center roof at a cost of
S375.00 to the Village, total
5750.00 with a five year
guarantee. Motion carried.
A motion was made by
Trustee Tuttle and supported by Trustee Jones
that the Village not bill the
Elkland Township Fire Department for water services.
Motion carried.
A letter was read from
Daniel Toshach. Architect,
estimating the cost of the
facilities to serve the On
Woods and Orr East parts of
the park at 554,64600 No
further action was taken,
pending final specifications
for public bids
A motion was made by
Trustee Tuttle and sup
ported by Trustee Hampshire to L'ive authorization
to proceed with dif.u>in» of
an addition-.! trench at the
landfill. Motion carried.
A motion was made by
Trustee Jones and supported by Trustee Ware to
accept the following resolution:
"That the Village Council
dedicate Ale Street and
Water Tower Road and the
continuation of Hospital
Drive for public street
uses."
Motion carried.
It was reported that
Edward Anthes had received his license to operate
the Village Water Department.
A letter from the State
Highway Department
acknowledging Village compliance with signing recommendations and agreeing to make Hill Street a
maior street was read.
A motion was made by
Trustee Jones and supported by Trustee Ware to
accept the following resolution:
"That the Village Council
accept the resolution from
the County Road Commission relinquishing 1320' of
North Seeder to Village
jurisdiction."
Motion carried
A motion was made by
Trustee Rawson and sup
ported by Trustee Tuttle
that the bills as examined
be approved for payment
Motion carried
Bill Juhasz was also present since attendance at a
Council meeting was required m order to earn a
Scout badge.
A motion was made by
T r u s t e e Hampshire and
supported by Trustee Jones
that the Village proceed
with the construction of a
crown in the center of Rose
Street in an e f f o r t to control
the run off water. Motion
carried.
There beuu: no further
business a motion was
made by Trustee Tuttle and
supported by Trustee Ware
that the mootuii' be .id
journed Motion carried.
Lawrence Cummings named
mayor of Gagetown Monday
Lawrence Cunirnmgb
Oummmps was
w;i^
named the new mayor of
Gagetown by the village
council at a regularly scheduled meeting Monday night.
Cummings fills the unc-xpired term of the late
James England who died
Oct 1 Cummings has lived
in Gagetown for over 30
years and has served as
mayor previously some 10
years ago. He has also
served on village council.
He is employed in the
circulation department of
"he Bay City Times.
In other business, council
voted to offer Elmwood
township the option of
purchasing the village landfill site, which would then be
used by both the village and
the township
The action was taken
because the
Elmwood
township dump has been
ordered closed within 20
days.
Mayor Cummings said the
council will meet with the
township, probably next
week to work out details,
but would not predict what
would eventually happen.
The Gagetown landfill covers a little over 10 acres
A park memorial fund for
the Gagetown Village Park
was established by council.
Persons may give memorials to the park in the name
of loved ones who have died
or in honor of individuals
For Fast Results
Try
Chronicle
WANT ADS
who may deserve special
recognition. The money will
be used for park improvements.
Three building permits
were approved. Amasa
Anthes was given a permit
to install a 12.000 gallon
gasoline tank underground
on Cleaver Street at a cost
Four area students
graduate from GMU
Four area students were
among 650 to be awarded
degrees from Central Michigan University at the end of
the summer sessions in
August.
Commencement exercises were not held at CMU
during the summer or fall,
but August graduates have
been invited to participate
in the mid-year commencement, to be held this year on
Dec. 15.
Barbara A. Sageman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Carl R. Sageman of McAllister Road, Ubly. received a
bachelor of science degree
in office administration.
She completed her undergraduate work in three
years, having graduated
from Ubly High School in
1970 She graduated Cum
Laude in her class. Students
must begin their final semester with a total cumulative grade point average of
3.15 and must have completed at least 45 hours of
credit m residence
Cum Laude students
must fall between 3.15 and
5th Annual
COUNTRY KITCHEN
BAZAAR
AT
Cass City Trinity
United Methodist Church
Houghton and Seeger Streets
SATURDAY
NOV.
of 520.000.
Charles Parker was given
a permit to improve an
entrance to his home on
State Street. A permit was
also approved for the construction of a 30 by 36 foot
steel building on the Texaco
Service station lot at a cost
of 55.000.
10- STARTS AT 10 A.M
LUNCH SERVED FROM
10 A.M.
HOMEMADE GIFTS
AND NOVELTIES
HOMEMADE BAKED
GOODS AND CANDY
3.39 grade point average in
order to receive the honor.
Ms. Sageman is currently
employed by the Chevrolet
Division of General Motors
in Saginaw.
Gerard N. Miller, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Miller,
6201 Severance Rd., Decker, graduated with a bachelor of science in education.
His major course work was
in the field of social science.
He is a 1969 graduate of
Cass City High School.
Mrs. Linda M. Grifka of
Ubly Road. Ubly, graduated
with a bachelor of science
degree in education with a
major in English.
She is a 1969 graduate of
Ubly High School and plans
to teach in the area.
Joyce M. Frederick of
Jurgess Road. Ubly, received a master of arts
degree in special education.
She has been employed by
Ubly Community Schools
and currently works with
the Special Education Section of Huron county.
She is a former Cass City
resident.
JOB'S
DAUGHTERS
Its poverty and wealth, its shame and glory, its tragedy
and gaiety—all are the buyer's responsibility. So we possess
this great city—with no one to take its problems off our
hands.
Thursday
Proverbs
If we had it to do over, wouldn't we build our cities with
more respect for spiritual values . . . more concern for each
other . . . more attention to the blueprints of the Architect
of life?
4:1-23
Friday
Proverbs
7:1-27
That's what usually happens to man. He tries his own.
way first.
Saturday
I Timothy
On Manhattan Island, as in every village and city,
churches have their doors open to searching souls. Now
that we've tried our own way and lived with the results . . .
isn't it time to try His?
Scriptures selected by
the American Bible Society
4:1-12
Copyright 1973 Keiater Advertising Service, Inc., Strasburg. Virginia
Message Sponsored by These Progressive Firms
VERONICA'S RESTAURANT
FUELGAS CO. OF CASS CITY
Phone 872-2550
BULK—PROPANE SYSTEMS—FURNACES
—RANGES—WATER
SOFTENERS
&
OTHER APPLIANCES
"Good Home Cooked Food"
Junction M-81 & M-53
Phone 872-2161 H
Open 10 till 10 Tdaysaweek
IGA FOODLINER
QUAKER MAID DAIRY
TABLERITE MEATS
CROFT—CLARA LUMBER, INC.
Phone 872-21-11
Cass City. Mich.
RABIDEAU MOTOR, INC.
Groceries — Ice Cream
Take Outs — Party Supplies Phone 872-9196
KLEIN FERTILIZERS, INC.
Phone 872-2120
Cass Cily. Mich.
CASS CITY AUTO SUPPLY
nr>i:!Main
Machine Shop Service
Paint
AT
Phone K72-3000 - 872-2<il(i
MAC& LEO SERVICE
Masonic Temple
TOTAL PRODUCTS
I'assntv.Mich.
SATURDAY
NOV.
10 -- 2 P.M.
Phone H72-3122
ANDERSON'S THUMB APPLIANCE
PHONE 872-2626
CASS CITY STEEL SUPPLY, INC.
I BEAMS—AXGLfcs—CHANNELSPLATES— BARS—RE-STEEL PIPE—
CABLE-SHEETING—CORRUGATED
STEEL PIPE
Phone 872-3770
SOMMERS BAKERY
iilL'2 \\Vsi Main Street. Cass City. Mich.
Phone 872-3305
Home of Irish Bread
HOTIMIINT KKI.YINATOK- GIBSONMAYT.-U:-N()K(;K
DEGREE WORK
and LUNCHEON
SHABBONA RLDS CHURCH
CHRISTMAS BAZAAR
NOV. 9 and 1O at Church Annex
NOV. 9 - 1 P.M. UNTIL ?
Coffee, doughnuts and hot dogs will be served.
NOV. 10 - 11 A.M. -4 P.M.
DINNER AT NOON - PRICE DONATION
S P O N S O K K D I N CXXNUl U N I T Y I N T K K K S T P, Y
D..-putv
Manhattan Island is a case in point. Bought from the
Indians for beads, the problem is now ours.
(U21 Cuss City Hoad. Cass City Phone 872-2645
10th Anniversary
Monday j
Psalms'
119:1-16
Tuesday
Psalms
148:1-13
Wednesday
Proverbs
3:21-29
THE CASS CITY STATE BANK
CASS CITY GULF SERVICE
TIKES-BATTERIES-Y-BELTS—Ti:\Et'l'S Ml'rTLKKS-BKAKK.SEKYtCE
CassCitv. Mich.
Pimm- 872-3850
CASS CITY FLORAL
Phone 872-3577
WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE
STORE
W67 Main St.
Cass City. Mich.
KRITZMAN'S CLOTHING
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Cass City. Mich.
MUTUAL SAVINGS & LOAN
Y i n i r I i ] \ i ' s t i ? ! i ' i > t s Are < lur Mutual Concern
Open Saturday morning
6447 Main
Cass City. Mich.
Phone872-3470
OUVRY CHEVROLET-OLDS, INC.
Cass City. Michigan
(Our aim is to please)
872-2750
GAMBLE STORE
Phone 872-2040
872-3830
J & C TOTAL
TIRES—WHEEL ALIGNMENT
MECIIAXrCOXDLTY
WRECKER SERVICE
Cass City. Mich.
Phone872-2967
TWELVE
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1973
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
Letters
WAREHOUSE PRICES
WE BUY BY THE CARLOAD
THE WAREHOUSE WAY
A HOLIDAY GROUP
OF SPECIALLY PRICED
LA-Z-BOY*
LA-Z-LOUNGERS
Pool can cost less
Draft i>«»«i
than $204,311
reminds men
6742 E. Main St.
Cass City. Mich.
48726
Cass City Chronicle
Cass City. Michigan
Dear Editor.
Your October 25 issue
stated that Prine. Toshack
and Speas estimates that it
I Farm Bureau
thanks area
newspapers
Dear Editor:
At the 1973 annual meeting of the Tuscola County
Farm Bureau members
adopted the following resolution:
At this time when it is
even more important than
ever to get the story of the
family farm to the buying
public, the Tuscola County
Farm Bureau wishes to
thank all the county newspapers for doing an outstanding job this past year.
We hope that this fine
cooperation can continue in
the coming year.
will cost Cass City S204.311
to build an outdoor swimming pool. They estimated
554.646 extra to build a
separate toilet facility. This
is. I suppose, to be built in
our park.
In the Oct. 3. 1973, issue
of the Sanilac County News,
I read that Deckerville is
getting an Olympic-size pool
30x75 feet built by Testolin
Construction Co. of Detroit
for 587,000. Architectural
fees and other costs will be
510,000 extra. This pool will
have work started on it Oct.
10. This low price was no
doubt due partly to competitive bids, as there were
other bids. This price also
includes a fence and bath
house and will be constructed on a site owned by
the school next to the
gymnasium, and will be for
summertime use only.
Did Cass City Village
Council ask for competitive
estimates on this? Why do
we not get Testolin to make
Cass City an offer? Unless
something like this is done. I
see a credibility gap. Why
should Cass City pay two or
two and one half times as
much as Deckerville for the
same facility 7 It is little
wonder that the voters ate
afraid to say yes on a vote
for a bond issue.
Yours truly.
Willard LDodson
Yours very truly,
LeRoy R. Schluckebier
President
!><• in finding ;i place to park
Uncle Tim From Tyre Says:
Dear Mister Editor:
'Tis the season to be giving — and what
better gift than the gift of comfort.
La-Z-Boy style. 'It's pure luxury to he
leaning back in a La-Z-Boy, just your
own body action directs the chair to
the angle of recline you desire. Then,
SERVICE WITH
EVERY SALE
No Payments Til
January 1974
OPEN
All DAY
SATURDAY
bring up the independently operated
foot rest and enjoy the true holiday
spirit. Right now. our best-selling
La-Z-Lounger chair styles are yours —
with special savings of the season.
Come in and choose.
Did you see where a group
of factory workers in Seattle
wants the company 10 put foot
stamps in the plant lunchroom'
Them folks, that makes a average $580 a month, sav they
are eligible fer stamps, but they
can't git off work to go git em
without losing half a day's pay.
Now that's a fix to be in. I)
everybody that holds down a jot
can git food fer free, what
are the pore bums coming to?
It looks like it has got to the
place in this country where
they ain't no advantage to loafing. If folks that work and pay
taxes can git the same benefits as them that don't hit a
lick it knocks the starch out
of them that figger they can
allus go thru the door on somebody else's push.
The subject of working fer a
living come up at the country
store Saturday night, Mister
Editor, and after studying it up
one side and down the other,
the fellers was general agreed
that this country is working
harder and harder to come up
with more and more of less
and less. Clem Webster said
he remembered a song that
went "I got plenty of nothing,"
and he said it looks like we're
coming to the place we got
plenty of money but nothing
to buy.
Josh Clodhopper, that don't
usual have much to say nt these
sessions, was disagreed with
Clem. Josh was of a mind that
money is what's got us in a
bind cause it's going out of
style. Josh said he saw by
the papers where banks was
giving steaks to folks that open
to register
Cass City Chronicle
6550 Main Street
Cass City. Mich. 48726
November 2, 1973
Gentlemen:
We are having a nationwide registration campaign
reminding the young men
they are still required by law
to register with Selective
Service either 30 days
before or 30 days after their
18th birthday.
We have placed our new
posters in the high schools.
Post Offices and other
public establishments reminding the young men.
though the Draft is over the
Local Boards are still alive.
We have a Registrar in
the Cass City High School
and a Registrar at the
Kingston High School assisting us in effecting these
registrations, thereby, saving the young men having to
take the time to travel to
this office
We would appreciate your
publishing the above information as a public service to
the young men in your area.
If you have any questions,
please feel free to call this
office. Our telephone number is (517) 753-0471 and
our office hours are from
8:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Thank you.
Today's lii(!t>rst prohlcm in
Ki'ttiriK ;IM education SITHIS lo
accounts, ar.d who wouldn't part
with cheap money fer meat these
days? And Josh said eating
places are reporting a run on
doggie bags. Folks don't mind
tipping the waiter a dollar If
he'll bring them a bag to take
their leftovers home In, was
Josh's words.
General sneaking, said Clem
Webster, the ways to measure
a man's success In this countryis fast Bitting away from the
number of cars, lx>ats and color
televisions he's got, and it's
coming around to the things
that money can't buy, like food.
Clem said he wouldn't be suprlsed any day to read where
some feller died and left six
T-bones to his wife, seven porkchops to each of his three
younguns and remainder of his
estate to be divided amongst
tne various levels oi government he supported thru the
years.
Actual, Mister Editor, Clem
hit on somepun. I saw a item
In the paper where people in
this country spent S332 billion
in 1971 to buy food, clothes,
housing and cars. The same
year, Americans spent S34C
billion to keep up their local
state and federal guvernmtnts.
And I reckon they ain't nothing more inflated in this country
than government services.
'/eke Grutih put the stopper
in the food and service jug.
He said tils church tins a homecoming picnic Sunday, and that's
one fine service that's short
on sermon and long on groceries.
Yours truly,
Uncle Tim
PAGE F1V
FROM
N T MISS THESE
lo (he Editor
LOW, LOW DIRECT -- TO -- YOU
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 19J73
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
Sagmaw SSS Area
Office.
Virginia M. Melbourne
Supervisory Executive Secretary
IN CASS CITY
MEN'S HOODED
NEEDS FOR
THE DEER
HUNTER
* Gloves
* Boots
* Caps
* Socks
* Hunting Shoes
SWEAT SHIRTS
Thermal^ knit with foam lining. The
warmest of all sweat shirts. Colors:
red, green, navy Sizes: S-M-L-XL
ONLY
All Al Our Own Low Price
PARKA JACKETS
HOODED SNORKEL SIZES
10 to 18. Completely Machine Washable.
Beat the fuel shortage this winter
by staying warm with an electric
blanket. Assorted colors.
THE CASS CITY
CHRONICLE
DOUBLE BED
Single Control -
PERFECT GIFT.
GIFT CARD SENT
WITH EACH
ORDER
PHONE 872-2010
DOUBLE BED
Dual Control-QUEEN SIZE
Dual Control
$6.98
*
'20.95
Red Poplin
Hunting Pants
To Match
Boys Insulated Snowmobile
Suits
Sizes 6 to 16
95
ARE IN VERY SHORT SUPPLY
AND PRICES ARE GOING UP.
OUR SELECTION IS GOOD AND WE
STILL HAVE THE OLD LOW PRICES
*8.95
to
$
Double Knees & Suspender
Buttons -Water Repellent
Our shelves are
loaded with
BATH TOWELS
HAND TOWELS
WASH CLOTHS
18.95
j Size 48-52
Young
Ladies
Wrangler
Jeans
$15
95
...15
...1895
...2395
j
Sizes 36 to 46
Ladies
Long Skirts
TWIN
Single Control
MAKES A
Dalcron Insulation
Hjood Included
New Fall
| ^Styles and Fabrics
• )lt!>rtc ription (<>
*5
Men's Red
PJoplin
Hunting Coats
18.95
ELECTRIC
BLANKETS
98
Sizes 50 to 58
BOYS'
A (Mi
FOR A YEAR
KRITZMANS'
13.95
I
I
Colors Navy-Black-Red
4.4 oz. Insulation of Polyester
Tliis Week
! Only
nnlv
$ "I E OO
• 3«lF 3T
Sizes
S-M-L
| Men's
Snowmobile
I Boots
*6.98
BANK AMtRICARD - MASTER CHARGE
i
Credit Cards Accepted
KRITZMANS'
CASS CITY
PHONE 872-^3470
•AGE six
CASft CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
Arraign
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
FOODLINER
A Christinas card
LOW, LOW DIRECT - TO- YOU
WAREHOUSE PRICES
WE BUY BY THE CARLOAD
THE WAREHOUSE WAY
3 DAY! S
FREE
TOOLS!
$74.95 Retail Value
Deluxe 6-pc. set of cleaning tools is included with
the purchase of this powerful Eureka cleaner.
4-POSITION DIAL-A-NAP
ADJUSTS SUCTfON TO
ANY CARPET NAP!
4 separate settings for maximum
cleaning efficiency on any rug, or
carpet.
•
Triple Care Cleaning Power with
Power-Driven "Disturbulator"
Action.
MODEL
1415
VPosition Handle, Only 6" High,
cleans under low furniture.
IT EVEN CLEANS
PROBLEM SHAGS!
Cleans
SHAG Rugs
JANUARY
1974
Your No-Extra
FRIDAY to 9 p.m.
Stratton is charged with
having stolen a 75-cent tip
from a waitress at the
restaurant.
Stratton was also arraigned on a charge of
breaking and entering a
residence in Wells township
the night before and taking
a quantity of alcoholic beverages.
He stood mute on this
charge and a plea of
innocent was entered in his
behalf. Pre-trial examination in this case was also set
for Nov. 19, and bail was
continued at S500.
Linda Rulka, 26, Tuscola,
was arraigned on a charge
of attempting to pass a bad
check. She stood mute and a
plea of innocent was entered in her behalf. Bond of
S200 was continued.
At a pre-triai examination
also held Monday, she attempted to plead guilty to a
lesser offense of attempting
to pass a bad check under
550. The plea was not
accepted by Judge Baguley.
The offense occurred May
10, in Tuscola.
Ronald Ray Hendrix 17.
no address given, was arraigned on charges of
breaking and entering and
larceny in a building. He
stood mute and a plea of
innocent was entered in his
behalf.
A pre-trial date was not
set "and bond was reduced
to S500.
Hendrix is charged with
breaking into a residence in
Denmark township Oct. 10.
and taking a color television
set.
Large Disposable Dust Bag is
quickly easily changed.
•
Convenient Toe Switch, easy One
Dial adjusts powerful cleaning
action.
OPEN ALL
DAY SATURDAY
Four arraignments were
heard in Tuscola County
Circuit Court Monday before Judge Norman Baguley.
Bernard Stratton Jr., 18,
no address given, was arraigned on a charge of
larceny from Jim's Restaurant, south of Caro Oct.
3. He stood mute and a plea
of innocent was entered in
his behalf.
Pre-trial examination was
set for Nov. 19, and bail was
continued at 5300.
Cost
i
Bonus
Sch|neeberger
SERVICE
WITH
EVERY SALE
when a new "perfect gift
idea" comes shooting be
fore my eyes from the
sunshine of my life.
"Yes, dear, it's fine. Fan
tastic." I will mutter if for no
other reason than to try to
follow the man who put
ground glass in Cannon's
spaghetti and meat balls or
who dumped sand into the
bearings of Ironside's
wheelchair.
It's not that I don't love
the idea of giving gifts or
wanting to be reasonably
pleasant at the most mercantile time of the year. It's
lust that I believe in the
spirit of the thing and not in
size, color or usefulness
The business community
has been attempting to beat
Christmas into submission
for more years than Budweiser has been brewing
suds. Each year, the onslaught starts a little bit
earlier than the year before
and each year, the ads
become more and more
obtrusive.
There isn't enough money
in Fort Knox to buy one of
everything sold during the
Christmas season.
Toy manufacturers really
clean up in December. They
make expenses the other 11
months, drooling as the
October page drops from
the calendar and November
begins the push. It's all
gravy from here on out and
they are all ready.
I. however, have stumbled
onto a solution I will give to
my children, all those toys I
got when I was a kid, with
the expressed instructions
not to break anything because when they tire of the
amusements, they'll go right
back in the closet until
grandkids come along
I'm not being cheap. I just
want to let all my battle
scars heal and hope that the
hearing returns to the ear
that the nice old lady poked
her bony elbow into last
year.
I've thought that when I
have children. I might try
taking a rifle outdoors, firing
one shot, returning to the
house and telling the kids
Santa Claus |ust committed
suicide. It's worth a try.
Ho. ho. ho.
Hand tools, auto equipment
stolen from rural home
luscola County Sheriff's
Deputies are continuing to
investigate an apparent
breaking and entering of a
house located on Rossman
Road near White Creek
sometime last week.
According to Mrs. John
Klein of Detroit, whose
mother owns the house, the
break-in was discovered
Saturday.
Investigation revealed
entry was gained by prying
open a door on the west side
of the house. Detectives
found a one and onequarter inch pry mark on
the door casing.
No tracks were found and
deputiesjound no. clues. -.
A quantity ot nand tools
were reportedly taken from
a tool box in the house, but
the box itself was not taken.
Also missing was a battery
charger and a spark plug
cleaner and testor.
Total value on the missing
items was set at S500. The
case remains open pending
new evidence.
Mam.
Police reported that the
night before, vandals had
broken a window on the
garage near the house and
also broke the windshield in
an auto parked inside.
No clues leading to the
identity of the culprits were
turned up in the investigation.
VILLAGE VANDALISMS
Also Thursday, police reported vandals threw two
stonos through tho front
window o t a buildmp belong
m<> to Jim Johnson at B.T^?
Garfield
The m c i c l o ' i t o c c u ! i oci
sometime duiuu 1 the nir.ht
No clues were found.
Cass City Police report
two incidents of vandalism
during the week. Thursday,
someone t h r e w stones
through two front windows
in a nouse beloiu'ini 1 to
Ervin Thompson of 6274 ',V.
BIB
BB|
NOTE
^B«
A^l
P.,m,nq. QUANTITY RIGHTS R E S E R V F O
No. ,* lp oo.,bl* (or ,,,0,, mode in
^^k B BW
^fe.BB*
BT^AM^^^tfBv B^BBV
..^•BVBB^^
WBBT ^BBBT
.«^B^B^^*^B^BB^.
'^^*^B^BV
«TORE HOURS:
S THURSDAY i FRIDAY TILL 0:
DAILY TILL C:00
By Jim Ketchum
My wife informed me the
other day that it is time to
begin Christmas shopping
again. That is tantamount to
telling a condemned man
the energy crisis won't have
any delaying effects on his
execution.
It seems like we just got
through depleting the
checking account and wearing out three pairs of shoes
in that annual trek to the
shopping malls in search of
the right gift at the right
price. After going through a
number of these campaigns
reminiscent of Guadalcanal
and Iwo Jima, I've determined there is no such thing
as the right gift at the right
price.
Everything is either too
large, too small, too outlandish or too conservative.
And always, always, it's too
expensive.
I greet the Christmas
shopping wars the same
way Atlanta must have
greeted General Sherman
as he marched to the sea.
Pushing, shoving and
crowding becomes more
determined and frantic than
Monty Hall and his Let's
Make a Deal staff ever
imagined.
I look with foreboding at
the coming year. I got lucky
last year and bought my
wife the first dress I saw.
She liked it, surprisingly
enough. Even though we
lived on beans the next
month, she did like the
dress.
I've given up trying to sort
out what to give wife, family
and friends and buy on
impulse, usually late in the
game. My father set the
pace for his son by doing all
his shopping on Christmas
Eve about an hour before all
the stores closed.
I have to start just a little
sooner, because I do not
possess his nerves of steel
or his uncanny ability to find
something. To him. it was
just a matter of course.
Our mailbox has been the
receptacle for numerous
Christmas g i f t catalogs
which my wife eagerly digests and then bombards
me with the suggestions she
has garnered. It makes it
tough to follow the plot of
"Cannon" or "Ironside"
PAGE ELEVEN
For Money-.Saving!
KETCHUM'S KNAPSACK
three
Monday
CASS CITY' CHRONICLE-THURSDAY.
1973
CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER
NOVEMBER 8,
8, 1973
PRICES GOOD NOW thru SAT., NOV. 10, 1973
I G A - T A B L E R I T E BEEF
CHUCK
STEAK
Keep things This week
growing
Vol. 9
CUDAHY
CANNED
HAMS
10
SI A 99
8 lbs for
IGA-TABLERITE
HOT DOG
FRYER
LEGS &
BREASTS
TOMATO
SOUP
«
son*
„*'•
S'.f
FAME SLICED LARGE
HEIP..
Elementary
school Kids
Save
Campbell*
soupubeb
GROUND
CHUCK
OUR FAVORITE CUT
GREEN BEANS
OR
nel
NABISCO
CHOCOLATE
PINWHEELS
BOLOGNA ^
IGA-TABLERITE BEEF
$
PEPSODENT
FAME BASTED YOUNG
TOOTH
iBRUSHESvouR
•ADULT SIZE CHOICE!
8-14-lb
HEN TURKEYS AVG
lb.
FAME BASTED YOUNG
AVG.
TOM TURKEYS
lb.
FLORIDA SWEET
TANGELOS
POTATOES
SAVE6O'
COLD CAPSULES
RED or GOLDEN DELICIOUS
CONTAC $1*9
U S NO 1 IDAHO BAKING
10-lb. Bag
16-oz.
CANS
Doz.
NESTLfc
ALL FLAVORS
HI-C
DRINKS
46-oz.
,Can
29
APPLES
CHOCOLATE .
QUIK ^ c
i
ICOFFEEMATE
APPLEBASEJELLY
IMARSHMALLOW CREME
INSTANT POTATOES
[ C O R N C U R L S or CHIPS
BUSYDAY 5Vir>02
POLAROID
DINNERS
'
68'
42*
37*
67*
69*
SAVE
Pkgs
s
l°°
$
Pkg.
DISPOSABLE DIAPERS
CAT FOOD
DETERGENT
TOMATO J U I C E
CHEER
DOLE P I N E A P P L E
CAT LITTER
;
84-oz. Box
19
SA VE 35<
'
VEGETABLE
SALE
2 Ply
Limit One Coupon Per Family
Coupon Expires Sat; Nov. 10. 1973
With this Coupon & S7.00 Purdou
'
SA VE 22'
Limit One Coupon Per Family
Coupon E.pirci Sot. Mo,. 10, 1973
..*'**'* .c°"^°".&->7;00. .Putch°1*..
Jlmwmmrmmmvm
MAXWELL HOUSE INSTANT
BORDEN'S ELSIE
HMODtS WHITE FROZF\
BREAD CT
DOUGH * >
LIQUID DETERGENT
I
CHOiCi
Bathroom
Tissue
2 Roll
OTEX
COLOR FILM 1O8
FROZEN FOOD VALUES
TISSUES
REGULAR or SUPER
29
PILLSBURY 5 VARIETIES
DELSEY
Pkg.
Pak
NUT TOP
ROLLS
-
HART
SWEET PEAS
BUNS S-ct.
„
BACKS
ATTACHED
lO'/a-OZ.^^ •
Cans
^L
)
i
IGA
HAMBURG &
:
ICE
' OO< 1IJ1:
Les
OZf
CREAM
',3-GAL.
CTN.
DAIRY VALUES
BETTY CROCKER
CAKE
MIXES r^^Pi^T^S
11 VARIETIES
MOUTHWASH
24-oz Btl
SCOPE
SAVE 7O«
Limit One Coupon Per Family
Coupon Expires SotJ J4ov. 10, 1973
il8«/ 2 -oz.
Pkgs.
ORANGE
TOTAL
COUPON
SAVINGS
I
I
PAGE TEN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
Tuscola death toll climbs to
25 as Mayville woman dies
Tuscola county's traffic
death toll rose to 25 late
Monday night when a Mayville woman was killed while
riding in an auto on Snover
Road a half mile east of Leix
road.
Dead is Karen Faye Scott,
25. She died when the car in
which she was a passenger
struck a parked car sitting
partially on the roadway.
The driver of the car which
struck the parked vehicle
was identified as Gary Scott
of Mayville, her husband.
According to Tuscola
County Deputies who investigated the mishap, the
parked vehicle, a truck,
stuck out some six and a
half feet into the path of
oncoming traffic when the
accident occurred. Deputies
said the Scott car was east
bound at the time of the
collision.
Skid marks measuring 23
feet were found at the
scene.
According to the report,
the parked truck had apparently run out of gas and
the driver had been picked
up by another motorist to
get more fuel. As they
returned to the disabled
vehicle, they witnessed the
tragedy.
The driver told deputies
he did not remember
whether he left the lights on
on the pickup or not. The
witness said the lights were
on m tram.
Deputies said that, approaching the truck from
the west, the lights could
not be seen until only a few
feet from the vehicle.
The accident remains
open pending further investigation.
CAR-DEER COLLISIONS
Four area car-deer collisions were reported by the
sheriff's department last
week.
Friday, a car driven by
June Hewens of Bad Axe
struck and killed a deer
while traveling east on M-81
a quarter mile west of Krapf
Road.
She told Cass City Police
who investigated the accident that she attempted to
pass a car and, as she did,
the deer darted in front of
her car.
She escaped serious injury in the mishap which
occurred at 9:45 p.m.
Saturday, a Deford man
struck and killed a deer
while traveling south on
North Kingston Road, about
a half mile south of Deckerville Road.
Danny Ray Whittaker.
1424 N. Kingston Rd.. told
deputies that, as he proceeded south, he spotted a
herd of deer standing in the
roadway. He managed to
avoid all but one of the
animals.
He was not seriously hurt
in the accident which occurred at 6:40 a.m.
Sunday. Helen Rock of
Caro struck and killed a
deer as .she traveled south
on Cemetery Road a half
mile south of Gilford Road.
She, too. escaped serious
injury in the 6:45 a.m.
mishap.
accident.
Saturday, a car driven
by Galen Baker, 8196 Hadley Rd.. collided with a car
driven by Walter Zmierski.
6192 Ritter Rd.
According to police, the
Baker vehicle was traveling
Monday, Leo Talaski of
west on Main. The Zmierski
Ubly also struck and killed a
auto, also on Main, had
deer while traveling west on
stopped at Ale Street to
M-81 near the intersection
make a right turn.
of Greenland Road. He said
Police said the brakes on
the deer appeared suddenly
the Baker car failed and the
in the path of his vehicle
cars collided. Baker was
and he had no time to avoid
ticketed for having defecthe collision.
tive brakes on his auto.
The accident occurred at
The mishap took place at
2:00 a.m.
8:35 p.m.
A Bad Axe man was
CASS CITY ACCIDENTS
injured slightly Saturdaynight after the van in which
Cass City Police reported
he was riding was struck in
two minor accidents in the
the rear by an auto driven
past week.
by Douglas J. Mclntyre of
Wednesday, cars driven
Ubly. on M-142, a half mile
by Ruth Grassman, 5139
east of Bad Axe.
Penny Rd., Gagetown. and
Ernest Walter Bucholz
Elwyn Helwig.6765 Pine St..
told Huron Sheriff's Depcollided near the intersecuties he was headed east
tion of Main and Weaver
when the Mclntyre auto
Streets.
struck the rear of his van.
According to the police
Mclntyre refused comreport. Ms. Grassman was
ment on the mishap.
attempting to make a left
Officers said the Mclntyre
turn from Main Street into a
car, after hitting the van.
driveway while traveling
swerved northward and
east. She was struck in the
struck an unoccupied house
rear by the Helwig vehicle. A
located next to the Huron
third car passed on the
County Sheltered Workright, failing to stop.
shop. The house sustained
Both drivers blamed this
minor damage.
vehicle for causing the
The van. according to
officers, ended up in a small
accident.
ditch.
No ticket was issued and
no serious injuries were
The accident occurred at
caused in the 9:30 a.m. 10:05 p.m.
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
ILK
BREAD
2-5115
MARGARINE
39t
MILK
$1.27
SEE US FOR YOUR PARTY SUPPLIES
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
COLD
10 A.M. TO 10 P.M.
BEER-WINE
TO TAKE OUT
QUAKER MAID DAIRY
CASS CITY
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8,
PAGE SEVEN
NEWS FROM
AT
District Courl
Edward Periso of Kingston in Elkland township was
ticketed for exceeding state
wide speed law (night). 70
mph in an allowed 55 mph
zone. He paid fine and costs
of S30.
John Michael Warren of
Cass City in Novesta township was ticketed for defective exhaust (no muffler).
He paid fine and costs of
S15.
Randy Michael Peters of
Cass City was ticketed by
DNR officers for shining
after midnight and before
sunrise (light). He paid fine
and costs of S25.
Ann Marie Harmer of
Gagetown in Aimer township was ticketed for failure
to maintain equipment in
proper condition. She paid
fine and costs of S15.
Dale Wilson Wendorf of
Decker in Millington township was ticketed for disregarding a stop sign. He
paid fine and costs of 530.
Sharon Sue Curtis of
Deford in Ellington township was ticketed for exceeding night time speed
limit. 70 mph in an allowed
55 mile zone. She paid fine
and costs of S20.
Dale Grothof Cass City in
Deford Game Area was
ticketed by DNR officer for
hunting state game area
land during ciosea period.
He paid fine and costs of
S15.
Dale Charles Rabideau of
Cass City in Dayton township was ticketed for excessive speed. 75 mph in an
allowed 65 mile zone. He
paid fine and costs of S20.
Timothy Pans Walker of
Deford m Tuscola county
was ticketed by DNR for
uncased, unbroke down
firearm in an automobile. He
paid fine and costs of S25.
John Thomas Craig of
Cass City in Wisner township was ticketed for excessive speed. 65 mph'in an
allowed 55 mile zone. He
paid fine and costs of S20.
Theresa Mane Almas of
Gagetown in Elkland township was ticketed for excessive speed. 70 mph in an
allowed 55 mile zone. She
paid fine and costs of S30.
Eugene Andrew Kaake of
Deford in the village of Cass
City was ticketed for no
operators license. He paid
fine and costs of S6. Also
S15 fine and costs for no
proof of insurance.
Kenneth James Terpennmg of Kingston in Fremont
township was ticketed for
speeding 50 mph in an
allowed 40 mile zone. He
paid fine and costs of 520.
Tire studs illegal
in some states
SCHAFER'S
BIG 'C' 2u oz. loaf
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
Motorists whose cars are
equipped with studded
snow tires are advised by
Automobile Club of Michigan that studs are illegal
this winter in Florida. Hawaii. Louisiana. Minnesota,
fc/lississippi and the Canadian province of Ontario.
"Michigan motorists
whose cars have studded
tires should plan to avoid
states with stud bans, or
have studded tires replaced
before leaving home."
Joseph Ratke. Auto Club
touring manager states.
Currently. Minnesota is
the only state in the northern snow-belt region which
does not permit use of
studded snow tires during
winter months. Auto Club
points out.
Minnesota's s t a t u t e s
have been amended to
completely outlaw use of
studded snow tires on any
vehicle traveling the state's
roads, with a 510 fine for
violations.
Until this fall. Minnesota
prohibited the use of
studded snow tires only on
vehicles registered in that
state. Out of-state motorists
were permitted "occasional
use" of up to 30 days.
In Florida. Ratke says,
statutes governing use of
studded snow tires are
being interpreted so strictly
as to have the effect of
prohibiting the use of metal
studs. Rubber studs are
permitted.
"Some motonsts usins;
metal studded tires weie
stopped by the Florida
Highway Patrol during the
past year." Ratke adds
"and were forced to buy
regular tires to replace their
studded tires before they
were permitted to continue
their trips."
In Michigan, use of
studded snow tires will be
permitted this winter hptween Nov. 1 and April 1.
according to Auto Club. A
bill to r e s t r i c t - but not
necessarily ban-their use
has been passed by the
state legislature and sent to
Governor Milliken for his
signature.
Ratke points out that if
the governor signs the bill, it
specifies that next winter
(1974-75). use of studded
tires will be allowed on
Michigan roads between
December 1 and April i.
Thereafter the type of studs
permitted and the time
period they may be used
each winter are to be
determined by the Michigan
Department of State Highways and Transportation.
Elsewhere. 28 states allow studded tires with time
restrictions and 16 states
have no restrictions on the
use of studded tires
TENDER AGED BEEF
ERLA'S HICKORY SMOKED
STEAKS
•' s \
ERLA
Mhftl ADE\
MILD SENSATION
SENSA
Skinless Franks
OR
(SLICED
FREE)
SLAB
BACON
FREE SUBSCRIPTION
with each order.
The Chronicle
PHONE 872-2010
ERLA'S HICKORY SMOKED
96$
FRESH PRODUCE
BANANAS
12<t
39<t
lb.
lb.
NEW WHITE OR PINK
U.S. NO. 1 COOKING
GRAPEFRUIT
ONIONS
3
lb. bag
KKYKOQTRD
_...'.b:?f
OLEO-
McDONAl.n PREMIUM ASST'D.
390
lb.
i
.19
or
KISZKA RINGS
FRESH GROUND
PORK SAUSAGE
RIB STEAKS
GRAPES
LIVER RINGS
lb.
TENDER AGED
RED OR GREEN
89e
lb.
980
lb.
CATSUP
2-lb. pkg.
HUNT'S
14-oz.
TOMATO
SAUCE
Old Style
btls.
OVEN FRESH
f*f*
ICECREAM.....y.2:-890
Bread
LB.
DEL MONTE
GOLDEN AGE ELBOW
MACARONI
89<
ERLA'S HOMEMADE FRESH
PICNICS
REVDLESS BACON
Breakfast Rolls
4/890
LIBBY CREAM or WHOLE
.5/11
CORN
LARSFNS (MIXED VEGETABLES)
TIP TOP FLORIDA
emus BIEM ..'*»
VEG-ALL ________ J
CONTADINA
f\
I f± f^
,
2 9 oz c
FAYGO
TOMATOES _ - ._ _- !f!. O / O V<p
BANQUET FROZ
FLYING JIB FROZEN BREADED
POP or MIXERS
SHRIMP______3-2:°_z:£kfi
DF Pumpk
RICH'S FROZEN
COFFEE RICH -*ts—
qt. btls.
SPECIALS GOOD
QUANTITY
RIGHTS
RESERVED
REAL \VH1P FROZEN
TOPPING
LIQUID (Re<j. $1.40)
MAAlOXob'
CLEAN
TOOTHBRUSHES
DOWNY
"""ERLA'S COUPON
Catalogs loaned
overnight.
89< ib.
(BY THE
CHUNK)
ERLA'S SLICED
(BY THE CHUNK)
ERLA'S HOMEMADE
POLISH SAUSAGE LARGE BOLOGNA
PORK LOINS
HICKORV
SMOKED
U.S. NO 1
HAMS
ERLAJS HOMEMADE SMOKED
FRESH WHOLE OR RIB HALF
Ring Bologna
ERLA'S
(Whole or shank half)
SIRLOIN STEAKS
i«,$1|57
T-BONE STEAKS
lb.1|7
PORTERHOUSE STEAKS.....lb.1J7
TEX Med.-Hard-Reg. (Reg. 39?)
AND
ERLA'S
SAVINGS
_ __
FABRIC SOFTENER...
REGULAR
Tcisters
choice
OR
Tcisters Choice
TIDE FAMILY SIZE
_ __
97% CAFFEIN FREE
BUFFEREV
4-oz.
SIZE
$1.69
Food Center
OPKN MONDAY-THURSDAY TO fi p.m.
FRIDAY TO !l p.m.
SATURDAY S-.Od a.m. to B p.m.
°cp
REG. $ 1.19
GERITOL
^- -~
IN CASS CITY
DETERGENT -it*
DECAFFEINATED
FREEZE-DRIED COFFEE
OFFER EXPIRES SAT NOV ioL
96-oz. btls.
14-ct. pkg.
BEER
WINE
MEMBER T.W. FOOD STORE
PAGE EIGHT
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
Fresh raspberries in November? Maybe in the
-south, but not in Michigan,
-you say.
Well, surprise. E. Wayne
Hackel, 3463 Pine St.,
: Kingston, is still picking
large, luscious berries from
"a 10-by-12 foot patch in
-back of his house. -The
plants still appear as
healthy as they were in the
^summer when they bore for
"the first time.
: Generally, he says, the
^plants bear twice a year,
\ KINGDRAEN
- Notice ol Letting of Drain Contract and
Review of Apportionments
Notice is Hereby Given. That I, Leslie
_ E. Lounsbury, County Drain Commissioner of the County of Tuscola. State of
' Michigan, will, on the 26th day of
November, A.D. 1973, at the Drain office
- in the Court House in the Village of Caro,
in said County of Tuscola at 1:30 o'clock
in the afternoon of that day receive
- sealed Bids until 2:00 o'clock in the
— afternoon of that day, when bids will be
opened and publicly announced for the
_ construction of a certain Drain known
_ and designated as "King Drain," located
~ and established in the Townships of
Columbia, Ellington, and Elmwood in
_ said County.
All stations are 100 feet apart.
=
The total length of the King Drain to be
J7 excavated is 27,900 feet, or 1,691 rods, or
4 58 miles.
From Sta. 0 + 00 to Sta. 30+00, cut
— brush and treat stumps with brush killer.
From Sta. 30+00 to Sta. 87+00 the
_ bottom width is 14 feet.
= From Sta. 87 +00 to Sta. 176+00 the
bottom width is 12 feet.
- From Sta. 176+ 00 to Sta. 190 + 50 the
bottom width is 11 feet.
From Sta. 190+ 50 to Sta. 238+76 the
•= bottom width is 10 feet.
From Sta. 238 +76 to Sta. 279+00 the
" bottom width is 9 feet.
The average hub cut is 9.5 feet and the
average bottom cut is 1.1 ft.
_2 The average cu. yds.per lineal foot !o
- be excavated is 1.49 or a total of 36,867
- cu. yds.
Bottoms of drains entering this drain
shall be graded to match new excavation.
The
1 on 1 1/2 side slopes will be rigidly
=
_ insisted upon.
All excavation is to be, taken from the
field side of the ditch, opposite roadside
- where ditch is parallel and adjacent to a
road and roadside brush on ditch slope is
to be cut and disposed of. Stumps of
bnjsh cut along roadside shall be treated
with a suitable brush killer, dyed red. All
_ old and new spoil is to be leveled to 6
inches and feathered out to average
ground level, except in front of lawns or
— yards, where dirt is to be hauled a-.vay
Said job will be let by sections. The
section at the outlet of said Drain will be
let first, and the remaining sections in
their order up stream, in accordance with
the diagram now on file with the other
papers pertaining to said Drain, in the
off ice of the County Drain Commissioner
of the County of Tuscota to which
reference may be had by all parties
interested, and bids will be made and
received accordingly.
Contracts will be made with the lowest
responsible bidder giving adequate
security for the performance of the work,
in the sum then and there to be fixed by
me, reserving to myself the right to reject
any and all bids, and to adjourn such
letting to such time and place as I shall
publicly announce.
The date for the completion of such
contract shall and will be announced at
the time and place of letting. Any person
desiring to bid on the above mentioned
work will be required to deposit with the
Drain Commissioner a certified check or
cash or bid bond to the amount of Three
hundred and 00/100
- length
15'10"x15'10" SPPA 10 Ga. - 40 ft.
length
—
1Z10"x8'4" SPPA 12 Ga. - 26 ft. length
321 sq. yds. bag riprap
Which is to be placed as follows:
- Sta. 80+ 39
Hedleyfarm
z Remove and salvage existing bridge and
- install twin 128"x83" CMP arch (3x1) 10
Ga. 26 ft. length, and place 66 sq. yds. of
2 bag" riprap.
=
Sta. 138 +52
Kohl farm
= Remove and salvage existing bridge and
-^ install twin 117"x79" CMP arch (3x1) 10
~~ Ga. 26 ft. length, and place 59 sq. yds.
- bag riprap.
_
Sta. 190+ 03
HoppeRoad
Remove and dispose of old concrete
bridge and install 15'x10"x9'10" SPPA, 10
Ga. 40 ft. length and place 76 sq. yds.
Bag
riprap.
^ Sta. 202 + 62
Sbresny farm
Remove and salvage existing bridge and
- install twin 117"x79" CMP arch (3x1) 10
^- Ga. 26 ft. length, and place 59 sq. yds.
— Dag riprap.
" Sta- 266+95
Marker farm
== Remove and salvage existing bridge and
install -I2-10- x 8'4" SPPA 10 Ga. 26 ft.
length and 61 sq. yds. bag riprap.
Commerlcing at center of Section, th E 80
rods, th j-i 80 rods. Ih SWIy on a diagonal
to P O.8.
i
Section 28
'
S Vi,
:
SWViolNEV..
NW '.4 except the E 20 rods ol the N 80
rods.
i
Section 29
i
Section 32
NV 2 ,
SE' > except the S Vz of SW ' i of SE V..
Commerlcing at W V* post of section th S
40 rods tb P.O.B . th N 40 rods, th E 160
rods. th£l20 rods, th W 80 rods, th on a
diagonal; NWly to P.O.B.
:
Section 33
i
All
'•
Section 34
!
NVi.ofNW1..
W 3/4thi ol S Vz of NW <-4.
W 3'4tht ol N '/z of SW '.4.
S '.z of SW ' 4 .
N 30 acres of NW ' 4 of NE ' j ,
W 5 acrss of N ": ol NE '.4 of NE ' » .
NE 1 M of NW 1 /4.
E. 180 acres of S 1/2.
60 acres of N '.i of NE
75 acres of S V; of NE
'.».
'a.
ELMWOOD TOWNSHIP
T14N-R10E
E '. z Of NW ' 4 .
SW ' 4 of NW ' 4.
N W ' 4 oPNW 'i except theSW '4 o! NW
'4 ol NVV '«.
!
N V: of SW • 4.
SE'iofSW'4.
N 40 acres o! E "2 of SE 'i,
N 60 acrbs of W Vz ol SE ' 4 .
,
The moving assembly line
has, been used to produce
automobiles for decades
and. in part, has been
responsible for men leaving
the farm and trading a pitch
fork lor a time clock
Mow the assembly line
has. been put to work on the
John P Graham farm lo
caled at 4188 Jacob Rd.
woiit of Cass City Graham
and his brother. Joseph, like
i t . their father. John R
Griiham,who firbt saw the
id(j;i m action likes it. and
the cows like it
The operation, the only
oni-' of its kind in Michigan.
milks about 100 cows in an
hour and 10 minutes, cut
tinf! by more than half the
normal milking time, which
is the object of the new
syjitem Completed, it will
coiit about S100.000. which
includes a silo that supplies
ground feed for the cows
during milking
The elder Graham explained he got the idea of
installing the circular,
mcwoable platform on an
around the-world trip which
took him to Australia in
1970
"I had originally planned
my trip to South Africa and
hadn't really planned to go
mi,;ch farther." Graham re
liiled. "I ended up going
around the world to see this
now platform milking syv
tern I'd heard about m
Australia I also wanted to
set; my son. Joe. who was
stationed in Vietnam at the
tirrie "
not allowing them to turn
around ancf go back out
doors before they are
milked
A button on the control
panel controls the move-
ment of the gate in the
holding pen and is activated
manually by the herdsman
as the milking operation
progresses
The milk is conveyed by
the system from the parlor
to a 2.500 gallon storage
tank, located in another
room of the complex, where
it is subsequently picked up.
As it travels to the tank, a
PROCEDURE
The operation runs much
like an assembly line and is
designed to feed and milk
the cows with the leas!
number of steps on the part
of the herdsman. Working
inside the circular platform.
Graham's son. John, is able
to control the influx of
cattle, movement of the
platform and milking, time
by pressing a series of
buttons on a control pane!
The operation begins with
the cows being herded into
a holding pen measuring
some 30 feet by 60 feet
which has a slotted floor,
making cleaning up after
the animals easier and less
time consuming. They then
move into one of two prep
Stalls.
In the prep stalls, the
udcfer of the cow is auto
matirally washed with a
deter I'on! ind rinsed, u'll:/
I'Hit neved
iVater
Sections
RASPBERRIES, fresh from the bush and picked Nov. 1.
They belong to E. Wayne Hackel, 3463 Pine St., Kingston.
These plants began from a single stalk planted by Mrs.
Hackel.
THIS MILKING PARLOR was constructed to house an
Australian-built milking turntable. When complete, the investment will total about $100,000.
tin'' 1
Owen-Gage
Commencing at a point 100 rods S of W
'/« post of Section 7, th S 70 rods, th E
100 rods, th NWly on a diagonal to
P.O.B.
Section 18
W Vi.
W 1090 feet of E Vz.
ALSO INCLUDES:
TUSCOLA COUNTY AT LARGE
COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP AT LARGE
ELMWOOD TOWNSHIP AT LARGE
ELLINGTON TOWNSHIP AT LARGE
MICHIGAN STATE HIGHWAY DEPT.
to hold public
Commencing at SE corner of Sec. 18. th
W 94 rods. thNSOrods. thE94 rods. thS
80 rods, to P.O.B.
Now. 'Therefore, All unknown and
non-resiiient persons, owners and per*
sons interested in the above described
lands, aiid you
hearing Nov. 13
Section 19
Elsie Hicks. County Clerk
John H. DeSimpelare. Supervisor of
Columbia Township
Frederick J. Bardwell. Jr . Supervisor of
Ellington Township
Milton ^Hofmeister. Supervisor of
Etmwdod Township
Alton Reavey. Chairman of County
Road Commission Stale Highway
Department
The Owendale-Gagetown
Board of Education will hold
a public meeting Tuesday,
Nov. 13. at the Gagetown
Elementary School to discuss the construction of a
proposed S2.6 million high
school building.
According to Supt. Glenn
Sanford. the meeting will
discuss voter sentiment in
the district toward the
construction of such a building.
District members are invited to attend.
All
SE
'A
Section 23
S 10 acres of E Vz of SW '/«,
S 20 acres of W Vz of SW vi.
Commencing at SW corner of E '/2 of SE
'/«. th 40 rods E. Ih 80 rods N to P.O.B.
Th 80 rods S. th 40 rods W. th 40 rods N,
th NEly on a diagonal to P.O.B.
Section 26
NW 'A, except comm. at NW corner of
section, th E 80 rods, to P.O.B. th W 80
rods, th S 40 rods, th NEIv on a diagonal
to P.O.B., N 40 acres of E Vz of SW '/«,
NW'/« ofSW Vi.
N 15 acres of W Vz of SW V, ol SW Vi.
Commencing at SW corner of Section, th
E 40 rods, thN20rods. to P.O B. th N 60
rods, th E 40 rods, th S 20 rods, th SWIy
on a diagonal to P.O.B.
W Viof NE •/,,
Commencing 60 rods S of NE corner of
section, th S 20 rods, th on a diagonal
SWIy to the SW comer of E V2 of NE v«.
th N 160 rods, th E 40 rods, th SEly on a
diagonal lo P.O.B.
are here&y notified that al the time and
place aforesaid, or al such other time and
place thereafter to which said letting may
be adjourned. I shall proceed to receive
bids lor the construction ol said "King
Drain." in the manner hereinbefore
stated; and also, that al such time and
Place aa stated aforesaid from nine
o'clock ifi the forenoon until five o'clock
in the aflernoon, the apportionment for
benefits and the lands comprised within
Ihe King Drain Special Assessment
Districts :will be subject to review.
And You and Each of You, Owners and
persons interested in the aforesaid lands,
are hereby cited to appear al the time and
place of'such reviewing of apportionments aa aforesaid, and be heard with
respect to such special assessments and
your interests in relation thereto, it you
so desira.
Dated this 31st day ol October A.D. 1973
Leslie 5. Lounsbury. County Dram
Comrjiissioner, County of Tuscota
To
avoid
disappointment
lc:irn to expect the unexpected.
KI-X'OHDKl)
There's little nev. under the
sun- the Ixmk of experience h;is
most of the answers.
State employees
push for pay hike
Petitions for higher pay
are being passed amoni;
members of the Coalition of
Michigan State Employee
Organizations (COMSEO).
The Coalition, which r e p resents some 18.000 members of several employee
groups, wants a minimum
51.000 or 10 per cent pay
hike for the coming fiscal
year. That's in addition to
whatever percentage pay
increase is approved for
state employees next year
If, for instance, a 3.5 per
cent pay hike were recommended. the Coalition
wants that raised to 135
per cent or 3 5 per cent plus
S 1.000. whichever is greater,
thiounh inflation the past
few years." says William
Bii'ham, executive secretary
of COMSEO
Our salaries have larr.eci
further and further behind
until we've reached the
point where only a flat pay
increase will bring us up to
where v/e should be." he
says
Bu'.ham says the petitions
will be presented to the
Civil Service Commission at
its public hearmp, on state
employee pay rates Nov. 20
Rose awl Seeger
A new t h r e e phase t r a f f i c
Mi'.n.il O r c C i O C l Tuoscf.T/
Su:>!
LaPonsie said moton;.ts
should take note of the new
M^fial ,'incl drive '.vi'h caie
m the area
The signal is designed to
cut down on t r a f f i c congestion m the area of the
Intermediate School m the
iriomini", and afternoon and
it is also hoped the lii^ht will
aid youngsters in crossing
the street at that point
SIMULATED
ENGRAVED
ENGRAVED
BUSINESS CARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
OH 2-COl.OK
The Chronicle
<i!
S l ' C intersection o! Roso and
Si:i.':'.t.V Street',. Wi'l r,O into
it|!t>r .1(1011 Monti.iv rtiOMun,'.
SIMULATED
AVAII.AHI.I-: 1-COLOR
State employees need
such an increase "to make
up for the money we've lost
of the cow is. a feed bo*
.vhi'h has been a u t o m a t i
f.allv tilled f r o m ,i !u!/t>
in place a!
,«:cordini! to ViM.h'c
1.on LaPonsie
11 ir h
c f e v c o Immediate!.' i r . f r o : . ?
Traffic signal
AVAIL AIM.!•: 1-COI.O!!
r)U 2-C'Ol <>H
The Chronicle
l o c a t e d m the ceilrn:'
G'ound teed is stored in a
bin hoklinr 12 tons Fvent
ually. i'rouncl feed will be
stored m a lar^e blue silo
lust outside the newlv con
s t r u t t e d milkim; parlor
As the cow eatb. the
youiuiei Graham cleans the
annuals
uciclcr one las!
time before positioning the
mMker While al! this is
haiineniiu'. the plaMor m
continues to Hi<n and an
other cow has entered the
system, awaitmi' her t u r n
The platform can hold up
to 13 cows at one time
However, t h e G r a h a m s
normally have 1 1 slots filled
In seven minutes, the co'.v
has been fed and milked
and has made one rcvolu
tion on the platform At the
end of the revolution, the
milker ib removed as Joe
unlocks the stanchion, ni
lowini; the animal to back
out and leave the parlor bv a
prescribed r o u t e which
sends her either outdoors
or to another part of 'he
barn
The animal cannot -.:c\
back into Ime inadvei tentlv
to be milk-Mi fi.Min A
moveable i>ate in the hold
ni:', pen i'laclu.illv mo'.es
t o w a r d the parlor, keeping
the animals or ram/eel and
special pipe cools the milk
some 30 per cent, using
water as a coolant. Once
used for this (unction, the
water is piped into one of
two electric water heaters
where it is then heated and
piped out to wash the cows
in the prep stall.
"This one cooling pipe for
the milk cost 51.300." the
elder Graham related.
Essentially, two men control the entire milking operation of the herd which the
younger Graham hopes to
increase in the future, now
that the system is operationally successful. He
added that this will depend
on the cattle and milk
markets, however.
AUSTRALIAN ORIGIN
On
in o ,
E 3Mth'3 ol N Vz of NE ' 4 of NE '.4.
Section 7
Section 20
SW '.'«,
acres of W Vi of
SW'/.of NW Vi.
W V2 of NW 'A of NW '.i.
The two talked the idea
over and decided to give it a
try.
"I was too near to quitting
myself to put in the system
alone." the elder Graham
said, "so we waited until Joe
v/asout ol the service and it
gave us time to plan It's
been a total wait of two
years "
The platform operation
began about three weeks
ago on the farm which the
elder Graham sold to his
sons some two and ii half
years ago and which en
compasses some 500 acres
He explained once the men
anr! the cows adjusted to it.
things have moved smooth
ly
By Jim Ketchum
V(!lhou r ne. w h e r e he
t ' >{l V- *>!t' : H in ,K:t n M < H .:'
11') (•:•:•.-.;, m /(} n:iru,r.»,
ELLINGTON TOWNSHIP
TI3N-R1CE
Section 4
Section 13
NE'...
The N 660' of E 1320' ol NW V<,
The E 660' of S 660' of N Vz of NW U.
The N 660' of E 1122' of S ','2 of NW '.i.
60
Assembly-line milking system aids Graham farm
(ii tiham
Commencing at center section, th S 80
rodsloPIO-B.. th SMrods. th E 40 rods,
th N 50 rods, th NWly to P O B
Commencing a! a point 40 rods E ol W ' 4
post of Section, th W 40 rods. Ih N 160
rods. !h B 160 rods, m S 80 'ods. Ih VJ 40
rods, th on a diagonal SWIy lo P.O B
Section 12
S
PAGE NINE
W ': ol ;NW ' 4 ol ME ' 4 .
N 15 acr<3s of W 20 acres o! NW ' -. ol SW
COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP
T14N-R9E
117"x79"CMParch(3xinOGa. -26ft.
= length
117"x79" CMP arch (3x1) 10 Ga. - 26 ft.
Commencing at NE corner section, th S
40 rods jo P.O.B., th S 40 rods, th W 40
rods. th| NEly on a diagonal to P.O.B.
i
NE"«,
The N 36 acres of SE 'A.
KING DRAIN
Tuscola County, Michigan
- length
October, when frost kills
them for the year.
Hackel could not account
for this year's super-abundant crop, but did admit
that he washed two heavy
frosts off the plants after
returning home from work
in the morning. Hackel
works the third shift at
Chevrolet in Saginaw.
"One morning the hose
was frozen up when I came
out to wet the berries
down," he explained. "When
the frost is light, I generally
run the sprinkler. But with a
heavy frost. I just turn the
hose on them before the sun
gets to them."
Hackel's efforts have thus
far met with success. So far
this year, he said, he and his
wife have picked about 50
AM
ADVERTISING DISTRICT
W
W
Section 27
StOOacresolSW '.i,
SE Vt except Ihe S 5 acres ol E '.'2 of SE
',i of S£ '.',,
SE 'i of NE Vi.
Hackel moved it to the
corner of the house, just to
see what would happen.
What happened amounted to an explosion of plants
which are now confined to a
patch some 10 feet by 12
feet, along with another
patch running along the
property line on the north
side of the lot.
The present patch is
about six years old and
yearly sends forth new
plants to replace those
which run their life cycle
and die.
Hackel explained the berries bear first in July for
about six weeks and then
diminish. A second set of
blossoms appears usually in
early to mid-September and
continue until early to mid-
quarts of berries with more
to come.
Mrs. Hackel said she
generally does not have a
chance to preserve many of
the berries because their
two sons love the fruit and
generally polish the tasty
red berries off before she
gets to them. A few do find
their way to the freezer and
into an occasional pie.
How much longer can
the plants keep on bearing7
Probably until snow and
wintry temperatures put an
end to the berries altogether. But if reasonably mild
temperatures hold out. the
Hackels are hoping for fresh
raspberries for Thanksgiving.
Who knows 7 They may
just make it.
Section 30
Notice is Further Hereby Given, that on
Friday the 28th day of December, 1973, at
the Drain office in the Village of Caro,
County of Tuscola, oral such other time
and place thereafter, to which I, the
County Drain Commissioner aforesaid,
may adjourn the same, the apportionment for benefits and the lands
comprised within the "King Drain Special
Assessment District," and the apportionments thereof will be subject to
review for one day. from nine o'clock in
the forenoon until five o'clock in the
afternoon. At said review the compulation of costs for said Drain will also be
open for inspection by any parties
interested.
The following is a description cf the
several tracts or parcels of land
constituting the Special Assessment
District ol said Dram, viz:
All brush, trees, and burnable debris
shall be separated from the dirt and after
leveling is completed the brush, trees,
etc. is to be pushed into suitable piles for
burning by the property owner. Any large
stones or concrete encountered is to be
— buried with a minimum ol 24 inches of
cover if property owners consents.
— otherwise same shall be hauled away.
~~
The excavating contractor shall bid on
excavating and leveling separately. The
excavating contractor shall place and
~ backfill all culverts; road culverts shall
be backfilled with material satisfactory to
_ the Tuscola County Road Commission.
— and farm culverts are to be backfilled
with dry material approved by the Drain
Commissioner.
2. This notice of letting and Engineers
- specifications will be considered a part
- of the contract.
Note: All culverts and other bids must
include all interest charges in the unit
price. Delivery will be accepted 10 days
— after day of letting. If supplier cannot
furnish material within 30 days alter day
- of letting the contract for same will be
awarded to the next higher bidder.
In the construction of said drain the
following quantities and character of
— pipe will be required and contact let for
1 same:
128"xB3" CMP arch (3x1) 10 Ga. - 26 ft.
length
12B"x83"CMParch(3x1|10Ga. -26 ft.
= length
~ 117"x79" CMP arch (3x1) 10 Ga. - 26 ft.
length
- 117"x79" CMP arch (3x1) 10 Ga. - 26 ft.
Commencing at center ol section th E 40
rods to P.O.B., th W 40 rods, th S 40
rods. thiNEly on a diagonal to P.O.B.
Dollars as a
guarantee that he will enter into contract
and furnish the required bond as
prescribed by law. The checks of all
unsuccessful bidders will be returned
after contracts are awarded. The payments for the above mentioned work will
be made as follows: Drain orders to be
due April 15. 1975; April 15. 1976 and
April 15, 1977.
—
_-=
—
_
-
toward a vacant spot at the
end oif his driveway, "and
they grew in back of that. I
tore the garage down and
moved them to the back of
the lot."
He said the new location
proveel nearly fatal for the
plants; because of drainage
problems, making the
ground too wet and rich to
support the raspberries. So
he plowed the patch up.
One; volunteer plant appeared soon after in the
middle of the lawn and Mrs.
with the second picking
usually ending sometime in
the first part of October.
This year, however, Hackel
and his wife are still picking
red raspberries in November, with more green berries about to ripen.
Hackel explained that the
plants have been around
the family home in which he
and his wife reside as long
as he can remember.
"There used to be an old
garage sitting right over
there," he said, pointing
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
Australian turntable
Kingston man gro^vs raspberries in November
:
CASS CITV. MICHIGAN
JOHN P. GRAHAM presses a button on a computer board
to begin the milking operation.
The elder Graham explained the platform itself
came from Australia and
cost in the neighborhood of
S7.000 alone. This does not
include the milking equipment, prep stalls, holding
pen. compressors and holding tank, all of which were
supplied by the Surge Company through the Ed Hoy
dealership in Mayville.
which also handled the
installation of the equipment.
This sophisticated system
replaced a three-stall Utype parlor which took over
twice as long to use each
day as the present operalion takes The elder Graham explained it had originally been designed for only
50 cows.
"We just outgrew our set
up." he said. "We had to
expand."
Graham said there are
only two other units like it in
the United Stales, both
located m the South He said
about a half-do2en similar
units exist in Australia
No major problems have
been encountered since the
system began operation
three weeks ago, other than
merely getting the animals
used to it.
"At first, they probably
thought they were being
shipped to market or something," Graham chuckled.
"The
stanchions are the
biggest shock to the cows."
Visitors have toured the
operation from all parts of
the world. A recent group of
visitors from Japan, in
cooperation with Rotary International, toured the facility and came away impressed.
Some site clean-up remains to be done, along with
an addition to an existing
sdo which will provide grain
to the cattle at milking time.
When all work is completed, the operation will be
one of the most modern of
its kind in the nation.
Farming was never like
this
:*x-:-x-:*:.:*::x:::s:s^
Cass City Chronicle
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-TJCJHSDAY. NCH'^MBtR 8. 1973
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1973
RR/\IM KLI IM
Ask About Our
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STORM STOPPERS
CORDUROY
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SECTION B
SIXTEEN PAGES
SIZES 3-6X
46
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BOYS' SIZES 4-7
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Cass City
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G.t> o/. d.icruM 88 polvt-*5.tt" inMjIation w
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4"
MENS
LADIES
TEENS
YOUTH
on Cemetery Road
Work continued this week
on repaving a fraction over
six miles of Cemetery Road
north and south of Cass
City, with crews striving for
an early completion date.
According to a spokesman
for the Tuscola County Road
Commission, five and onehalf miles of Cemetery Road
from the south village limits
to Deckerville Road will be
Red Ball sticker drive completed
BOOTS
Pj Cowhiilr ItMthrr W i t h /ippcm
nylon r u t f
Pre-regi'stration for
snowmobile classes is now
being conducted by the
Lynwood Lapeers.
j
Those students, 'ages
11-15, interested in the
snowmobile course are to
contact them after 4 p,m. or
evenings.
i SNOW-MOBILE
GLOVES
2688
snowmobilers
Repaying work continues
U-nl
nylon oiitt:r sht;!t
y hip-high ley /ippt'f.
95
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27
95
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23
Elkland Township j Fire
Chief Dick Root reports his
department has completed
its distribution drive orji Red
Ball stickers in conjunction
with Fire Prevention Week.
The stickers are designed
to be placed on windows of
rooms in which young! chil-
dren or invalids might be
trapped in case of a fire to
warn firemen of the situation.
Root said anyone wishing
to obtain stickers should get
in touch with any member of
the fire department. The
stickers are free of charge.
Moto-fSki
Futuira.
resurfaced at a cost of
564,060 00
Also to be resurfaced is
one-half mile of the road
running from the north
village limits to Milligan
Road. Cost of this project
was set at 516,127.00
The two projects were
awarded to Frank Strasberg
and Sons Construction Co.
Completion depends on'
the weather. The road commission has told the firm to
proceed with as much of the
project as possible before
inclement weather sets in.
No binding target date was
set.
The covering being placed
on the road is a bituminous
mat.
Slrikc out on \our own it ••
your rcspnnsibili(\ to ni.ikc
your iii;irk in this \\oild
Perfectly balanced for fast,
easy handling. Built to give you the
smoothest ride on snow The Futura
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USE OUR CHRISTMAS
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BIRCH RUN, CARO, DAVISON,
FENTON
Thumb Cycle Salesr
Cass City
moto-ski
Phone 872-3750
•Trademark o! Moto-Ski Limited
All rights reserved © Moto-Ski Limited 1973
\mm
:LE-THURSDAy. NOVEMBER a 1Q73
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHHOXICI.K-THVKSDAY.
^,>,,,,.,,. NOVEMBER
.>v«tc.MUiiK 8, 1973
By Jim Ketchum
>s Citviins bhoulr) be
to S'L), w.ini1 this
v.'ir''i'r ,'rifl not
sped ••"> of n<>r t'i
olM*!in ml or i' ij if pr osont
prorlirtions hold (Nur (c the
lio>itn'i' sodscn
Concern roi'.i'dirit'
ru.' (•'••.'
ov n'dbilitv of fuel r ;v l,i-)t
v.cek in the /,,ikc.- of ,JM
nounirorncn's fro'ii Wast)
'in ton th.it the n.itionwide
fuo 1 j,hortji'c roiikl Kikp on
dr.jsl r proportions unless
immodMte stops <irc t.ikcn
to .illi?vi.itc the situ.itioii
Administration
officials
MEN'S & WOMENS
Snowmobile
Boots
$698-$14 95
bCi'.ll i w o r k on ,1 in inc'.itory
pros'Mm wh:rh could le.icl to
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oil ond
ond rutur.il
natural cas.
t;cis.
<">'• oil
shnnlH
»t>« winter
•-- prove,- to
•
should the
be a severe one
Locally fuel distributors
e<urev:,f;d c a u t i o u s opti
inibni that the bituation
cuuld be weathered, but
none could guarantee n
pioblotn t r e e wintei Of
those oil distributors con
tacted. all say they have
enough fuel fo? present
c u s t o m e r s but are not
takini: on new Orders
Duane Chippi of Cass City
Oil and Gas Co. said Me still
has enough oil for reiuil.it
customers and does not
anticipate Cutbacks p r e s ent !y. He added that he
could not I'uarantee how
the shortage mii;ht change
the outlook later on
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Zipper Front
2 Pockets with Velero* Flaps
Confer Back (kidney flap)
with Elastic Intern
S' INC. V.
Wide Color Range
XS IHs Boys jnd Women,
alfo available for
' B-c ' Men
Fresh Roasting
CHICKENS
5 to 8 Ibs.
»
•ER INSULATED
WOMEN'S
Large
FRESH TURKEYS
MATCHING HOODS $3.69
SIZE 14 to 20
and
and industrial
industrial customers.
customers.
Consumers serves app r o x i m a t e l y 920.000 gas
customers m 40 counties of
Michigan's lower peninsula.
Of these. 851.000 are resi
dential c u s t o m e r s Consumers serves customers in
Capetown. Bad Axe and
Caro
John B Simpson, senior
vice president for gas operations, said the curtailment
program should be regarded solely as prudent
contingency planning It
establishes six categories of
s:as service, with highest
priority being assigned to
residential customers, and
to customers providing
services essential to public
health and safety
JROSS MEAT MARKET
$7.95-$8.95
10 12
Black Olive
Hunters Red
Navy Blue
On the IMS front. South
" '
eastern Michigan
Gas Co. is
stiii m the midst of a freeze
OP new customers until
further notice The company
has not taken on any new
deliveries since Sept 15.
citing a reduction in the
amount of IMS beim; supplied by Panhandle Eastern
Pipeline Co.
Southeastern serves
50.0OO customers in the
state
Consumers Power Com
pony has filed an application
with the Michigan Public
S e r v i c e Commission for
authority to establish a
system of priorities m the
event it should become
necessary to curtail natural
s;as service to commercial
Men'. L.othyr Snowm.b.l. M ,tl,
Men', g. Women'. V i n f l
FIFTEEN
Fuel crunch pinching Cass City slightly
t Ready For That
Winter Sport....
nowmobiling!
SNOWMOBILE BOOTS
PACE
SPECIALS
THIS
ROASTING
CHICKENS
3-4 Ib. av.
WEEK
Fresh
GROUND BEEF
KOEGEL'S
LARGE
BOLOGNA
KOEGEL'S
VIENNAS
$1.19
r ».
LB.
fj
RESH BULK
A™ •
Everv Day
GROUND FROM
FRESH BEEF DAILY<
NOT FROZEN
FRESH
Box
HERRING
I From Lake Superior - If weather permits
GROSS MEAT MARKET
HOME MADE SAUSAGE - HOME DRESSED INSPECTED MEATS
FRESH DRESSED CHICKENS - FRESH OYSTERS - MEATS FOR FREEZERS
FREE PARKING IN REAR -
LARGE CITY
LOT ALSO
AT BACK DOOR
c.~
--— — - • ••
Simpson added that the
company does not preserr.ly
anticipate that it will be
necessary to impose curtailments during the forthcoming heatmg season. At
the same time, he said, it
cannot predict when a
worsening of its gas supply
situation or an unanticipated increase in demand
may make it necessary to
impose such curtailments.
The present situation has
placed increased demands
on the bottle gas industry,
which is already working
under mandatory propane
allocation program instituted by a branch of the
Department of Interior.
Kenneth Eismger. manager of Fuelgas of Cass City,
said so far the demand has
not been dramatic, but more
customers have been
added, primarily m mobile
homes
He explained that, under
the propane allocation program, priority and non-priority accounts have been
established and the amount
of gas being used by these
accounts must be recorded
and sent to Interior department officials.
Priorities include home
heating at the top. followed
by farming usages and
government buildings, along
with schools.
Non-priority customers
include industries using
over 15.000 gallons per
account and churches.
Eisinger explained that
his firm is currently working
on a yearly allocation broken down into monthly quotas. He said these monthly
amounts may be exceeded if
emergencies arise, but must
be made up at the end of the
season.
"We did have a godsend
when the crop drying season turned out to be so dry."
he said. "This helped us a
lot."
Eismger explained the
biggest factor placing added
pressure on his operation is
the projected pullout of Gulf
Oil from the state, along
with the cut-off of grain drying and milk house accounts
by Standard Oil Co. Thus
far. Fuelgas has been able to
handle these accounts, although the situation is
admittedly tight.
"I look for real tight
supplies for the next five
years." Eisinger added.
He said the fuel industry's
only "salvation", is the
proposed
trans-Alaskan
Pipeline which will move
crude oil from the north
slope some 800 miles to the
port of Valdez and awaiting
tankers
"The biggest determent
to this has been the ecology
people and the government." Eisinger said. "When
the oil depletion allowance
was cut from 27 per cent to
20 per cent, it took away
seven per cent net margin
from the Oil companies.
Most of them said why
bother drilling and simply
stopped."
Eisinger blamed ecological pressures for contributing to a maior part of the
present shortage. He added
that with a loosening of
restrictions and a raise back
to 27 per cent for the oil
depletion allowance, the
condition could ease over a
five-year period.
"It takes just so long to
develop and refine oil," he
said. "It can't be done any
faster."
Area fires plague
Ubly firemen
Fire did an estimated
S2.000 damage to the Clifford Robinson home, located six and a half miles
southwest of Ubly on the
north side of Huron Line
Road in Huron county late
Wednesday afternoon.
Ubly firemen were called
to the scene around 5:30
p.m.
Fire Chief Lambert Jaroch said the fire started in
a dresser in the bedroom,
but said the exact cause of
the blaze is unknown.
He added that arson was
not suspected and said the
fire must have been a "freak
accident". The room was
believed to be empty at the
time, he added.
Most of the damage was
done from smoke and water.
Jaroch added.
Halloween
pranksters
were blamed for setting two
other area fires, which
consumed two barns Ubly
firemen extinguished a fire
at about 10 30 p m
Wednesday in the remains
of a demolished barn located one mile west of Ubly
on the Fred Hagen property.
Fire Chief Jaroch said the
barn had no value and
firemen let the blaze burn
out. He said the fire was
started as a prank. No one
was injured.
Halloween vandals were
also believed to have destroyed a 40 by 90 foot barn
owned by Ryerson Puterbaugh located at 3O70 N.
Wheeler Rd. Sanilac county
sheriff's deputies said the
fire broke around 1:50 a.m.
Thursday, and destroyed
the barn, an adjoining 14 by
40 foot silo and a wagon
stored in the barn and
owned by Merill Kreger of
Snover.
Deputies said the Moore
Township Fire Department
answered the alarm. No
exact cause of the blaze was
determined and the fire is
still under investigation.
FOURTEEN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NO\ EMBL'R 8. 1973
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
PAGE THREE
Sattelbergs look over 20 years of farming
By Jim Ketchum
VINCENT SATTELBERG, (left) and his brother Ray, work
to repair their newest sugar beet harvester before continuing
the harvest.
NEW LOCAL
DIALING SYSTEM
Due to the increase demand for telephone service by our
customers in the Cass City exchange, extensive equipment
additions and revisions have become necessary. These
changes will affect the dialing of local calls by Cass City
customers.
Beginning Nov. 19, 1973 it will be
necessary to dial ALL SEVEN DIGITS
of a telephone number to complete a
local call.
EXAMPLE-Prior to November 19, if you wished to call
the telephone company business office you could dial 2-2151
and your call would go through. After November 19, 1973
it will be necessary to dial 872-2151 to complete all local
calling.
If you have any questions please call the
Cass City business office.
GENERAL TELEPHONE
COMPANY OF MICHIGAN
Vincent Sattelberp. 2777
E Dicker son Rd . and his
brother Ray of rural Union
ville struggled with a balky
sugar beet harvester as the
skies darkened. About 130
acres of beets awaited
harvesting If things didn't
start soon, the entire crop
might be jeopardized
The Sattelbergs owned
about 645 acres jointly,
farming as much of it as
they can Everything is done
within the partnership. They
will tell you that if they each
had to run as independent
farmers todav neither could
survive
Farming has not always
been this way according to
the Sattelbergs. When they
began on their own back in
the early 1950's. you did not
need the land you need
today, they will say.
"Each year it takes just a
little more land." Vince said
as the brothers took a break
from the beet harvester,
now repaired "Your taxes
go up each year, along with
everything else in farming.
You have to like it if you
want to stay at it."
The Sattelbergs obviously
like it Each will say they
wouldn't be happy doing
anything else. Ray tried
working in a shop once for a
month, but gave it up.
"You've got an independence in farming," Ray
explained "You don't punch
a time clock If you want to
go back and work after
supper, you can. If you need
to do something else during
the day. you can do that,
too"
Both Sattelberg brothers
were raised on a farm. Ray
now lives on the family
homestead while Vince lives
about five miles away on
land he put into the partnership in 1966.
Both men agree farming
is better today than when
they began Even in the last
10 years, they say. pricing
has begun to come into line
with actual worth.
"Back when we started,
farmers weren't organized."
Ray said "Mostly, this was
because they didn't want to
be Back then, though,
farming wasn't nearly as
expensive either. But each
year, you needed a little
more land than the year
before to get the same
return "
Part of the reason for this,
according to Vince. was the
fact that the federal government held the large
gram surpluses in existence
as a weapon against higher
prices
"Then we woke up one
day and we didn't have a
surplus anymore." he said.
Rising prices for land and
equipment have been a fact
of farming life for all
farmers, including the Sattelbergs Ray pointed to the
tractor and beet harvester
and stated that the two will
today spoil S25.000.
"I figure it takes about
one thud of a farmer's life
earnings just paying foi
equipment."
lie
said
"People will hear that and
ask if we're cia/y for staying
in it. But we like it You have
to like it."
Vince added that once you
have gone into the farming
business today, it is not easy
to get out.
Vince. at age 44, and Ray.
at age 42. both agree that
today's farmer has as much
responsibility as a corporation executive. He needs
more information than he
did 20 years ago to function,
along with much more
capital.
"Just to operate is a great
investment." Vince said
"By the time you figure
investment for new machinery, debts, labor costs and
the other expenses, you
sometimes get a l i t t l e
scared."
They pointed out that
today's farmer must be
much more knowledgeable
than in the days when they
began operating on their
own. Chemical fertilizers,
insecticides and herbicides
call for a chemistry background the earlier farmer
replaced with natural fertilizers.
"Conditions have to be
just right for us, too," Ray
said. "Before, weather was
not as important as it is
now. If conditions aren't
perfect, you've wasted your
time. It makes farming a
more exacting thing than it
used to be."
The biggest changes the
Sattelbergs point to is in
commodity prices. Today's
S30-plus beans. 55.00
wheat and 52.00 corn go
beyond either of their wildest expectations. But neither of the brothers is necessarily dancing for joy.
"These wild prices are
kind of frightening." Ray
said. "I personally think
most farmers would be
happier with a stable market and wheat at, say
53.00, than with the way
things are now."
He related that they sold
wheat at about the 53.00
level and lost about $2,000.
But there is no bitterness.
"They say you don't rniss
what you never had," Ray
said, "hut still it would be
nice to have that extra two
dollars."
Both agree that the large
wheat deal made with the
Soviet Union in the summer
of 1972 is largely respons
ible for today's skyrocketing
wheat prices and feel as
though
f a r m e r s were
cheated
"The government made
farmers look like fools when
they made that sale." Ray
said "They did it right after
most of them sold and those
that hadn't really made
money ! |ust think they
made most ot us look pretty
stupid "
Exporting, they agree, has
pushed prices upward,
along with increased demand at home These pressures were far less when
they began in the early
'50's All these pressures
have tended to take some of
the enjoyment out of f a r m ing.
"The job would be more
interesting if we didn't car ry
the pressure we do." Ray
said. "Too much pressure
takes the enjoyment o;it of
it."
He recalled how they lost
2.500 bales of hay this
summer
because they
couldn't get it in before ram
spoiled it. Years ago. they
would have hired a couple of
high school kids to come in
and help with the haying.
Now, they are more reluctant because the law now
stipulates that they must
pay workman's compensation on anyone they hire to
help with the harvest.
Added to the increased cost
of labor generally, this puts
more pressure on the Sattelbergs to do more themselves.
This results in numerous
nights in the fields and
some days totaling 20
hours.
In spite of these changes
and the increased pressure
placed on them, the Satteibergs plan to continue their
operation as long as they
can. Both love the land and
look back with pride on the
20 years they have spent on
the land.
"Farming is one of the
biggest gambles today." Ray
said. "And a farmer is one of
the biggest gamblers alive.
But we like it."
SNOWMOBILE
REPAIR
We will continue to service
all makes and models of
Snowmobiles.
Efficient? Friendly Service
CARD HONDA SALES
Caro
Dallas Nichols
Phone 673-2680
Hicks named Farm
Bureau Vice-President
A Deford man has been Rupprecht of Vassar. tihird
chosen vice-president of the member, and Loretta P.
Tuscola County Farm Bur- K i r k p a t r i c k , s e c r e t a r y eau at a recent meeting treasurer of the corporawhich also completed plans tion.
for a delegation to attend
Tuscola county will send
the state wide annual meet- 18 voting delegates plus
ing of the Michigan Farm alternate delegates to I the
Bureau.
state wide meeting to be
Gerald Hicks. 192 Craw- held in Grand Rapids Dec.
ford Rd.. was elected to the 11-14. Business will include
post along with LeRoy R. action on resolutions. | reSchluckebier of Franken- ports and e l e c t i o n l of
muth as president, Marvin directors.
i
HEDLEY HAS THE MACHINES
AND
THE PRICES FOR
INGS!
Full Line Of
Genuine
Baptist Society holds meet
Fourteen women attended the monthly meeting
of the Baptist Missionary
Society Monday evening at
the home of Mrs. Richard
Shaw.
Devotions were given by
Mrs. Rosella Kretzschmer,
who asked each member to
respond by relating something for which she was
"thankful".
Prayer time was under
the direction of Mrs. Vera
Bearss.
Mrs. Shaw presided at the
business meeting in which
members voted a contribution of $30.00 to be sent
to the St. Louis, Mich.,
children's home for Chnot-:
mas.
•
Election of officers will
take place at the December
meeting and the following
nominating committee was
appointed: Mrs. Myrtle McColl. Mrs. Fay McComb and
Mrs. Ella Cumper.
R e f r e s h m e n t s wereserved by the hostess and
Mrs. Cumper.
SKI.F ASSrilAXCK
Wcll-;id justed people <ire
those who can keep their
balance—personally and financially.
HAP & BONNIE CAMPBELL
Invite You To
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a million machines
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I PHONE 872-2688
|__ CASS CITY
Richard Hampshire
HARRIS-HAMPSHIRE INS. AGENCY
6815
E. Cast City Road
HEDLEY EQUIPMENT CO.
CARO, MICH.
PHONE 673-41
"HAP'S
OPEN SPACES"
Rt. 4 Jacob Rd., Caro, Mich.
Phone 673-4055
PAGE FOUR
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
CAES CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
1
vK.;,w,:sfe;:
OU NEED IN
YAMA
SNOWMOBILES
ACCESSORIES
AND
Gage town News
Mrs. Elery Sontag
MOTORCYCLES
• PARTS
• SERVICE
'74 YAMAHA SNOWMOBILE FEATURES
Choice Of Slides or Bogies
j
• Autolube
• Parking Brake
• Disc Brakes
• Hydraulic Torque Converter i
i
• Handle Bar Mounted Dimmer Switch
• Quick Change Gears ;
Someday
• Intake Silencers
You'll own
A
Yamaha
EVENING CALLS JWELCOME
You Can
Depend On
Yamaha
CUMPER YAMAHA SALES
Phone 517-635-2983
4 North & 2 East of Marlette on Decker Rd.
CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT CAT
A DEAL'S
NO DEAL
IF THE DEALER'S
NOT
AROUND
3 NEXT
3
3 YEAR.
s
S
3
B
3
5
The United Methodist
women will meet at the
home of Mrs. Merton Hendershot Wednesday evening, Nov. 14. at 8 p.m. Mrs.
Inez Beach will be in charge
of the program.
Mr. and Mrs. John Zmierski and family of Cass City
were Saturday evening dinner guests of Mrs. Maude
Sarosky.
Mr. and Mrs. William Merz
and family of Saginaw were
Sunday guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Vincent
Wald.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kehoe
were Sunday dinner guests
of her sister and family. Mr.
and Mrs. Wendall Birch at
Bay City. Mr. Birch is
recuperating after undergoing surgery two weeks
ago.
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond
Comment and family of
Rochester were week-end
guests of his brother and
wife. Mr. and Mrs. Eugene
Comment.
Chris and Kelly Munro of
Pontiac spent the week end
here with their grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Leslie
Munro. Saturday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Munro and the
grandchildren were dinner
guests of Mrs. Myrtle Nelson
at Owendale. Mr. and Mrs.
James Munro came after
the children Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. James Dunn
left Monday for their winter
home in El Jobean. Florida.
Phone 665-9956
Mr. and Mrs Elmer Shopc
and family visited hei
brother and family. Mr. and
Mrs. Morris Sontag and sons
at Bach. Friday evening.
Soil District
taking tree
orders now
The Tuscola Soil Conservation District is taking
orders for tree seedlings
that will be available for
planting in the spring of
1974, according to Director
Maynard McConkey.
White pine, red pine.
Scotch pine. Austrian pine,
white spruce. Norway
Spruce and Colorado Blue
Spruce are the species in
supply. A shrub. Autumn
Olive, is also available
These trees may be used
for windbreaks, reforestation. Christmas trees, wildlife cover, erosion control
and beautification
Orders may be placed at
the Tuscola Soil Conservation District Office. 852 S
Hooper Street. Caro. District Conservationist Cyril
M. Jacot and Conservation
Technician William L Siems
will be able to give technical
assistance regarding plant
ing and care
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
I
CASS PITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8, 1073
School Menu
NOV. 12-16
WEDNESDAY
MONDAY
Elarbecueon Bun
Buttered Potatoes
Peach Slices
Milk
Cookie
Turkey in Gravy
Mashed Potatoes
Buttered Vegetable
Bread-butter
Milk
Cranberry Sauce
Ice Cream
TUESDAY
THURSDAY
Hot Dog & Bun
PotatoChips
Buttered Corn
Milk
Cookie
No School
THANKSGIVING
WEEK
(A Touch of
Class)
Gass Tlieatre
5
5
S
3
3
Don't drink iinil drive cvrn
just one for the road may mean
the end of the road for \on.
Richard
Nixon
was
elected president of the
United States, and earned
Tuscola county by 64 per
cent, though he failed to
carry Michigan.
In other local races, Ed
Goldmg Sr.. was elected to
the county Board of Supervisors and Norman Baguley
was elected to a judgeship
of the Tuscola County Circuit Court. Other winners
included State Senator Alvm DeGrow, Congressman
James Harvey. Sheriff Hugh
Marr and Register of Deeds
William Profit.
Tuscola county voters
turned down a proposition
which would have permitted
the sale of liquor on Sunday
by iust over 1.000 votes.
Look A Little
Closer
J I
Once-A-Year
Real Sale
You Get A Lot
More From
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Several Wood Cabinet AM/FM Radios.
Special Low Prices.
TEN YEARS AGO
The struggling Tusco
Products plant in Cass City
will either be sold or closed
within the near future, it
was announced this week by
Herbert J. Siegel, Board
Chairman of the BaldwinMontrose Chemical Co.,
which owns Tusco.
The American Agriculture
Chemical Company's warehouse now under construction in southwest Cass City
will be completed in about a
month. Don LeCruex of
Saginaw, manager of Michigan sales for Agrico, said
this week.
Members of the Band
Boosters of Cass City were
gratified by the help the
organization received in its
first fund-raising effort-an
auction which raised S300
for new uniforms.
Gagetown will vote on
natural gas at a special
election scheduled for
Wednesday. Dec. 18. Asking
for a 30-year franchise is
Consumers Power Co.
A suit to foreclose on tv/o
mortgages totaling S20.313.37 has been filed by
Pinney State Bank against
H. O. Paul Co.. former Cass
City farm implement dealership owned by H. 0. Paul
Jr.
America's Lowest-Priced
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The only liquid-cooled
snowmobile on the block.
And we've got it.
7.088 to 6.080.
Elkland township's drive
for a new fire hall was
boosted Tuesday when voters okayed a one-mill levy
for three years by a vote of
686 to 545.
Chief Nelson Willy estimated damage at about
S2.500 in a fire in a small
building owned by Eugene
Smentek on DeLong Road,
southeast of Cass City.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
25"
See It
Today!
Harry S. Truman was
re-elected president of the
United States in one of the
biggest political upsets in
modern political history.
Truman and his running
mate. Sen. Alben W. Barkley
of Kentucky, defeated
Thomas E. Dewey by some
two million votes.
In Michigan. Governor
Kim Sigler was defeated by
Democrat G. Mennen Williams by over 100,000 votes.
Cass City was scheduled
to meet Pigeon in the
Thumb league champion-
PICTURE TUBE WARRANTY
!
Phone 872-4070
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JERRY'S M-46
SPORT SHOP
2X Miles West of M-24 & M 45
Ph. 673-6969
Cato. Mich.
Frank D. Fitzgerald was
elected Governor of Michigan by over 80,000 votes.
Audley Rawson was elected
State Representative pulling 704 out of 780 votes
cast in Elkland township.
Use of the village library
has grown from 35 volumes
to 130 volumes in circulation per week.
Some 173 local citizens
have enrolled in the Red
Cross, reports Guy W. Landon who is in charge of the
roll call.
A research professor from
St. Petersburg University in
Florida said this week that
the earth will freeze into a
solid ball in 71.799 years.
The 1939 Studebakers
went on sale this week at
Fred H. Morris Motor Sales
in Cass City.
ICHARD'S TV - APPLIANCE
STORE HOURS
I.Vin Thun 8 30 5 30
l-'ndjy 8 30 9 00
•«» DJV Sjfuidjy
'SALES WITH SERVICE
RICHARD JONES
Owner
1972 pace
Elkland-Novesta Community Chest officials reported this week that the
current fund drive has thus
far fallen substantially short
of the level reached at this
time last year.
While declining to'state
exactly how much had been
collected to date, officials
said they hope the drive will
gain momentum scon.
According to J. E. Courtney, vice-president of the
Community Chest Board, a
number of envelopes still
remain to be picked up at
the Cass City State Bank by
canvassers.
The drive has been underway about two weeks.
"We are somewhat disappointed by a lack of a
turnout for the drive,"
Courtney said. "It takes a lot
of cooperation from a lot of
people to make the drive a
success. We'd like our
people to pick up their
envelopes as soon as possible."
Courtney explained funds
collected by the Community
Chest go toward such
causes as scouting. Little
League and providing food
baskets for needy families.
The drive is scheduled to
culminate in a victory dinner tentatively scheduled
for Nov. 14.
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and
informed on drug incompatibilities.
•*• You'll find the lowest
possible prices for
drugs. You can buy
with confidence.
We Accept All PRE-PAID
PRESCRIPTION PLANS
only snowmobile on the block with a block that's
liquid-cooled
I L & S SPORT CENTER, INC.
THIRTY-FIVE YEARS AGO
Pharmacist
sistent power output, and longer engine tile. It's the
liquid-cooled SSX now
ship game Friday night,
highlighted by the crowning
of Cass City's first homecoming queen, Mary Jane
Lessman.
Edward Baker, prominent
Boy Scout leader from Cass
City, was elected Tuscola
District chairman for the
coming year at the annual
district meeting held in
Caro Monday.
Gagetown High School
basketball team has scheduled nine games on the
home floor the coming
season.
MIKE WEAVER
Chaparral s new liquid-cooled SSX It runs cool al
day Thai means improved performance, more con-
Come see the new
6571 Main St.
FIVE YEARS AGO
Menu subject to change.
Bread-butter and peanut
butter daily.
5th ANNUAL
drive behind
FROM THE FILES OF THE CHRONICLE
Spaghetti & Hamburg
Bread-butter
Apple Sauce
Milk
Cookie
GIVE YOUR
Community chest
Down Memory Lane
FRIDAY
3
Don't be surprised if a lot of
dealers fall off the bandwagon
this year. You know, here
today — gone tomorrow.
Point is, Arctic Cat's gonna
be around for a long, long
time. Same with Cat dealers.
Like us. So don't get stuck
with an over-the-hill
snowmobile. With no place
to go for parts and
service. Instead, stick
with the winner.
Somebody who'll be
here today —AND
tomorrow. The one
and only Cat. And us.
PAGE
6523 E Mj,.,
dliCity
Ph 872 2930
BANKAMERICARD
(FREE PARKING Pi THE REAR)
DOERRlNS
AGENCY
Phone
872-3615
COACH LIGHT PHARMACY
MIKK \ V K \ \ KK.
TWRT.VP
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-fHURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8, 1973
Marge Randall
Retirement
Kaihryn M. Turner, F I C
3189 N Decker Road
Decker. Michigan
Phone Sno\er 672-9515
If you are self-employed, you'll get a tax
break for preparing for retirement. Deduct all you put into retirement plans up
to 10% of earnings ($2500 a year maximum)
Phone today about Gleaner's Self-Employed
Retirement Plan.
Others Get Quick Results With The
Chronicle's Classified Ads —
You Will Too!
Mrs Marge Randall of
Vassar is scheduled to hold
a children's rally Sunday.
Nov 11, at 10 am at First
Baptist church All boys and
girls of the community are
invited
Mrs Randall has a collection of over 300 puppets,
which she uses along with
scenofelt and other objects
to illustrate Bible stories.
She writes much of her own
material and recently won a
contest sponsored by the
National Association of
Ventriloquism
The rally will be held m
the new fellowship hall of
the church during the regular Sunday School hour
Mrs Randall, who was in
charge of vacation Bible
School this summer at the
Baptist church, will also be
assisting in the children's
church program
Photographers caught up
with Elliot Richardson the
Sunday morning after he
quit being Richard Nixon's
man for all jobs. The result,
in newspapers all over the
world, was pictures of Richardson in short pants, running when he could have
been walking.
Just when I was beginning to trust him.
The trouble with this
country is it is run by men
who could sleep in on
Sunday mornings, but don't.
I am sick of reading about
oresidential aides who chin
themselves 1.456 times
every morning before eating
railroad spikes for breakfast.
I gag at congressmen who
skip lunch and go to a gym
where they pound on each
other because it feels so
good when they stop.
It was easy to stifle a sob
MUTUAL
SAVINGS
PASSBOOK SAVINGS
Compounded Daily, Earnings Paid Quarterly.
Annual Yield 5.39%. No Minimum Balance.
Withdraw Anytime. Add Anytime. All Funds
in by the 10th of the Month Earn from the
1st of that Monin.
(Effective October 1, 1973)
when I heard about tne
sweat-suited senator who
was mugged while jogging
through a slum. What did he
expect, rose petals strewn
in his path?
If God had intended man
to swim or sink. He wouldn't
have invented Ivory soap.
The big shots should learn
to float with the tide, coast
in neutral, and walk on the
grass.
Relax. Sure, the fastest
runner will get free TV time
to explain his shortcuts. But
what does it profit a man if
he wins the sweepstakes
but lose his place in line at
the Laurel and Hardy Film
Festival?
It is a paradox. The big
problem is there are too
many Gung Ho men in
Washington. But if a guy
isn't Gung Ho, his only
chance at the White House
is on a guided tour.
This nation respects —
and elects —- men who
never waste a minute. Men
who do push-ups in the
backseat and go to bed with
dictaphones. This nation
rejects men who loiter
around pretty girls and are
always late getting back
from lunch.
Obviously, it should be
the other way around. The
ambitious men. with rowing
machines and cots in their
offices, have made a terrible
mess of things. They have
forgotten
that
noses
weren't created for grindstones. Noses were created
to smell a flower or a dirty
little kid wrapped around
your neck at 5:30 every
evening.
A lazy man knows about
noses. And he knows that
sometimes the greatest
thing to do is to do nothing
.KCAI. MITICK DISTUUT IV
You ;in- hcrrliy nidified n( ;i nu-rtini: lor
»• jmr|H»M' "i w-liflinn rmnmict". for OHiHriuinf! l u s t n r l of The Michin;in llr.in
I H S T K K T M P IV
IATK
CERTI-BOOK SAVINGS
Earnings Paid and Compounded Quarterly.
Annual Yield 5.88%. Minimum tnuance
$500.00 with Additions or Withdrawals in
Multiples of $100.00 or More. Withdrawals
Anytime or on yu Days Written Notice.
Earnings Then Paid to Date of Withdrawal.
OPEN
a.OO A. M. - J uo f. M. MON.-THURS.
9:00 A. M. - 5:00 P. M. FR1.
a UO A. M. - NOON SAT.
MUTUAL SAVINGS
Cass City, Mich.
.Phone 872-2105
PAGE FIVE :
BY JIM FITZGERALD
THE PLACE
6459 Main St.
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8,
Walk, do not run
For the
Self-Employed
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
"If It Fitz..."
scheduled for
children's rally
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
'LACK
Akmii K.nrnrmr Ilitfh St-hiwil
j[.-j |>
M*i«fi \ntir r f j i r « - M - n I a t i \ r on lh<Michigan (Iran i'"rtiniivM'tii (IT a
thrcr > rar
trrin.
startniM
a r.-purl on M i c h i g a n Itca
t ' < tin t n t ssi tin
.it-Uvitics
i
rt-si-arc-h .md v,il.-v pr<»n;(ilm:i h
yiKii
.Uislrift
('(itniiii^Mo
inrn;lMT and \>\ Ma v nan! I
llr'i«,iilii-. s(-<-r<-t,ir> tnaiLi>;cr '»!
the CiitiinnsMnti
t l n l ' S K K I I . I . N O 2ll».Scc-tmn4. Part ^*
reads i jwrl A inn-lmu nf particitulin^
slutll U- held in rach liiMnci each
ii-n a vai-aiRA u i l l iK-rur Ttic
Conim ,sion shall K|V*' notirt* <>( each
nut-tint; hy at least 2 inse lions m a (arm
puhlication ol general (-, cu l a t mn Jn thr
( islnct where the meeting s t:i In- helil. Ihr
trial inserting U-in^ at lea t 10 days tM-fon
he tm-elinn Ttie Commis ion shall super
ise the conduct of the meeting TVo
mmintfs (or participating men-liters of the
'omrnissiou shall Ix- M-h-cled at eaet
nut-ling and submitted to the Governor
tnr iif these nomini-es shall no appointed
>y (he (iovernor. suhjecl to the advife and
consent tit the Senate
MICHK; AN HKAN COMMISSION
921 N. Washington
l-ansinR. Mich 4WOH
at all. Just sit and watch and
remember nice things. Go
fishing without a pole. Go
walking without a sweat
suit.
The Wall Street Journal
told about a high-powered
businessman who had a
marvelous aquarium in his
office. But he ordered it
removed because too many
visitors wanted to talk
about the fish, instead of
talk business. He didn't
have the time to waste Poor
man.
The Washington wi2ards
never waste time. They
waste money and people
and consciences as they
run. run. run for the power
and the glory and the
wealth. Breathing deeply all
the way. and doing isometrics at stop lights.
Ironically, when the world
begins to blow up1, the
official advice will be:
Walk, do not run. to the
nearest exit.
HOLBROOK
Sugar grants are available
High School or college
students pursuing Home
Economics or Agriculture
careers are eligible to apply
for S3.000 in scholarships
being offered by the Beet
Sugar Industry of Michigan.
College studies may be
taken at any accredited
Michigan college or university offering course work
leading to a degree in Home
Economics or Agriculture.
Awards are based on
scholastic ability, financial
need, extra-curricular participation and citizenship.
Application forms have
been mailed to all Michigan
high schools and are also
available by contacting the
Scholarship Selection Committee, Farmers and Manufacturers Beet Sugar Association, 506 Second National Bank Building, Saginaw, Mich. 48607.
Two scholarships for
51,500 each are being
offered this year. More than
537,000 has previously
been awarded in the scholarship program, which has
Thursday evening dinner
guests of Mr. and Mrs.jOlin
Bouck were Mr. and JMrs.
Clifford Furness of (taseville, Mr. and Mrs. George
Peterson of Port Austin.
Mr. and Mrs. Erjnest
Bouck and children of Detroit spent Friday through
Sunday with Mr. and IMrs.
Olin Bouck. Chris remained
with his grandparents for a
few days.
:
Mr. and Mrs. Glenrj Iddings were Monday luncheon guests of Mr. and |Mrs.
Olin Bouck.
|
Mr. and Mrs. Yagqman
were Tuesday
supper
guests of Olin Bouck. I
been jointly sponsored by
the growers and processors
of Big Chief and Pioneer
Sugar since 1955.
Prospective students are
requested to complete the
application form and submit
it to their high school
principal or
guidance
counselor, who should forward it with an official
transcript to the Beet Sugar
Association.
Deadline to apply for next
fall's stipends is March 31,
1974.
Suzuki 292 Nomad
Buy now, get a
full season of
savings
Buy any John Deere Snowmobile now and get a
lot of peak-season use with only a small down
payment... and no installment payments until
December 1 of this year. That
isn't all. There are no finance
charges until April 1, 1974.
This special offer also applies
to John Deere Snowmobile
fashions and accessories
purchased with your
snowmobile.
Offer ends
November
30,1973.
nothing
i runs
like a
Deere
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
General
State of Michigan. File No.
22141.
Probate Court for the
County of Tuscola.
Estate of Helen S. Stevens. Deceased.
It is Ordered that on
November 29, 1973. at 9:00
a.m., in the Probate Courtroom Caro, Michigan a
hearing will be held on the
petition of Marguerite
Burke for probate of a
purported will dated July
23. 1969. and codicil dated
March 15. 1973. and for
granting of administration
to the executor named, or
some other suitable (jerson.
and for a determination of
heirs.
Creditors of the deceased
are notified that all claims
against the estate must be
presented to the Executor
and proof thereof filiid with
the Court on or before
February 7. 1974.
That a license be granted
to the Executor to :;ell the
real estate at pnva'le sale.
Persons interested in said
estate are directed to appear at said hearing 1:0 show
cause why such license
should not be granted.
Notice is further given
that the estate will be
thereupon assigned to persons appearing of record
entitled thereto.
Publication and service
shall be made as provided
by Statute and Court Rule
Dated: November 1.
1973.
M. C. Ransford, Attorney
for estate. 429 N. State
Street, Caro, Mich. Phone:
673-4151.
Marguerite Burk<e, Petitioner, 3077 Williamsburg.
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
A true copy.
Beatrice P. Berry, Register of Probate.
11-8-1
JOHN DEERE SNOWMOBILE SPECIAL
UtETHEM EQUIPMENT CO.
337 Montague St., Caro
Phone 673-3939
WINTERIZE
Max. output - 20 hp at 6,000 rpm, Track width - 15 in.. Suspension, rearBogie with torsion Coil
capliper disc, instrument* speedometer, tail stop lamp & trailer hitch.
PRE SEASON SAVINGS. BUY BEFORE
PRICES INCREASE.
NOTHING FREE OR GIVEN AWAY
JUST LOW LOW PRICES, HIGH QUALITY AND
48 HR GUARANTEED SERVICE.
ALL MODELS AVAILABLE WITH PRICES
AS LOW AS
SAVE GAS
Buy A
TORBO VAPOR INJECTOR
30,000 operators report 25% better gas
mileage.
ALL SIZES SNOW
TIRES IN STOCK
Get our prices before you buy
SNOWMOBILE BELTS
& ACCESSORIES
SUZUKI CYCLE SALES
New Location
,
ELKTON
Corner M-142 & Pinnebog Rd.
N
o
.
CASS CITY GOLF SERVICE
6415 Main
Phone 872-3850
: TVREPAIR
' Admiral
•RCA
I
*
*
*
*
• Zenith • Motorola
• Philco
•GE
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Kritzman spent from Thursday
throiugh Sunday with Mr.
and.Mrs. Irvin Kritzman and
famijly of Millersburg, Indiana.
• All other Brands
BABY SHOWER
IT'S NOT NECESSARY TO HAVE PURCHASED YOUR
TV FROM US TO GET SERVICE. WE REPAIR ALL
MAKES REGARDLESS OF WHERE IT WAS PURCHASED.
Sohneeberger's have the Factory
Trained servicemen, the Parts,
The equipment to get your machine working again.
I
Tujesday morning, Mrs.
Dale! Leslie entertained in
honor of LeAnn Meredith,
infant daughter of Mr. and
Mrs.! Dale Meredith, at a
baby] shower.
Breakfast was served to
14 gjjests, followed by the
opening of many baby gifts.
\IMM.I\NOS H KM HIM
j
Cass Oil,
Ptune: 872-2696
Marie Meredith
Shabbona Area News
; ALL MAKE MACHINES
-•T
CASS CITY, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1973
PAGE SIX .
Advertise It In The Chronicle.
Thursday visitors of Mr.
and Mrs. Earl Springstead
werej Jennie Tufft of
Bloomfield Hills, Sue McDaniqll. Ethel Page of Birmingham and Julia Sanchez of
Berkley.
Mr.j and Mrs. Laurence
Hyattjand sons were Sunday
afternoon callers of Rev.
and Mrs. Curtice Deford of
Ellington.
The Pioneer group will
meet at the Crossroads
Tuesday, Nov. 13. for a
12:30 dinner. For reservation, please call 872-4008 or
872-3467.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon
Ferguson were Tuesday
evening callers of Mr. and
Mrs. Andy Hoagg.
ADULT GROUP
The Adult Group of the
RLDS Church met Friday
evening at 'the church annex.
A short business meeting
was conducted by Mrs.
Voyle Dorman. Miss Lillian
Dunlap had charge of recreation. Lunch was served by
Mrs. Curtis Cleland.
The next meeting will be
Jan. 4.
Rhonda and Ryan Smith
were overnight guests of
their grandparents Friday.
DISTRICT MEETING
The Methodist Women
will have a district meeting
at the Elkton Methodist
Church Thursday, Nov. 15.
Dinner will be served at 6
p.m. A meeting will be held
at 7 p.m.
WITH INFLATION-FIGHTING
DODGE DART DEALS!
Mr. and Mrs. John Dunlap
Sr. were Saturday callers of
Mr. and Mrs. Don Smith and
family. Mrs. Dunlap brought
a birthday cake to help
celebrate their daughter
Janice's birthday.
Indian River and spent tne
week end at East Jordan
with their son and family.
Rev. and Mrs. Dale Turner
and family.
Akio and Hiroko Kabayashi of Lansing spent the
week end visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Dean Smith and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Ron Smith
and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Smith and Mr. and
Mrs. David Richmond were
Sunday dinner guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Vern Geister of
Marlette.
Debbie Hunt of Fremont
and Jeannie Kreger of Caro
spent the week end visiting
the latter's parents. Mr. and
Mrs. Merrill Kreger.
Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Phillips
and family of St. Clair
Shores were week-end
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Earl
Springstead. Other weekend guests were Peggy
Regneurs and Dan Bera.
Mrs. Harland Trisch and
boys were Sunday guests of
Mr. and Mrs. John Dunlap.
The next meeting will be
Nov. 17 with Mr. and Mrs.
Joe Riley, hosts.
4- + + -f- + -f
The RLDS Women's De
partment will meet Nov. 15
Phone 672-9489
Tuesday afternoon, Mrs
Howard Gregg. Mrs. Don
Smith. Mrs. Robert Sawdon
and Marie Meredith attended a meeting at the
home of Mrs. Dean Smith
when final plans for the
Holly Fair were made.
Mrs. Richard Kerbyson
and Bruce Alberts of Flint
were Sunday guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Voyle Dorman.
BUNCO
The Bunco Group met
Saturday evening. Nov. 3, at
the Community hall with Mr.
and Mrs Raymond Wallace
hosts
Robert Wheeler won
High: Mrs. Andy Hoagg. low.
and Mrs. Hoagg. door prize
with Mrs. Wilfred Turner for
an afternoon meeting
Mr. and Mrs Don Smith
and Julie were Saturday
evening guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Dale Leslie and family
The occasion was in honor
of Janice's birthday.
BUILT TO GIVE YOU TOP VALUE.
There are over a million happy Dart owners. Ask someone you know
about Dodge Dart.
PRICED TO FIT ALMOST ANY BUDGET.
k us about our Dart deals- We have lots of different Dart models
Saturday, Nov. 24 - Arnold
Kramer will sell farm machinery at the premises
located three miles east and
% mile north of Unionville
on N. Colling Rd.
Boyd Tait, auctioneer.
BACKED IN THE DEPENDABLE DODGE BOYS' TRADITION.
We have dependable service; competitive deals; and solid, goodlooking, value-packed cars. See us now!
!
AUTHORIZED DEALERS
WORK FOR YOU
I
The Cass City Chronicle
J
TO
KEEP YOU
OH THE
GO!
Westinghouse
Standard White
LIGHT BULBS
Your choice
60-75-100 Watts
6 69d
LADIES' SOFT "TERRY" SLIPPERS
Casual, comfori.tble scuffs for joungmg.
Fully washable cotton terrycloth with
sofl foam soles. Choice of colors and
2.00
Value
27C
$1.85 Value
be» stabilizing nasxei lit* over front floor
hump on all cars. Durable, washable vinyl
in your choice of decorator colors. Compact and portable, folds fla-r for storage.
1.25 VALUE
$23.25
LEMON
SCENTED
Plastic
STORAGE
BAGS
CASS CITY BORON
Phone 872-3683
Cass City
SMesttoghouse
LARGE "FOLD-AWAY" AUTO LITTER BASKET
AMMONIA
Per
77
Package of 3
(12 Flashes)
Plus Taxes
Includes 20 w
Pennzoil with Z-7
VALUE PAlK
FLASH CUBES
SNOW
TIRES
PERMANENT
SAVE $ $
HHCE-BREAKERS
60 Ct.
39t
Regular 79£ Value
CARD'S LEADING JEWELER
PH. 673-2444
The names of students in this week,
the Cass City Intermediate
Students must have atand high school earning tained a B or better in all
ranking on the first term grades to be listed. A +
honor roll were released before the name indicates
AGAIN FROM COACH LIGHT!
SUPER TRAC
F78 x 14
THIS YEAR, MORE THAN EVER, DEPEND ON
RABIDEAU MOTORS, 6513 Main St.,
Cass City
named for first marking period
fc<Z&.
OIL
CHANGE
Dodge
j
SOAP
PADS
Oakley Phetteplace of
Ypsilanti spent the week
end visiting Mr. and Mrs.
Merrill Kreger and family.
Coming- Auctions
Honor roll students at Cass Qty
18 Count
Mr. and Mrs/Ralph Smith
attended the Gideon banquet at Sandusky Saturday
night.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred
Turner visited relatives in
want ads
I
4-Her's of the Evergreen
Guys and Gals are reminded
of the meeting Nov. 12 for
all members. Bring enroll
ment sheets. Money and
pins will be distributed and
new officers sworn in.
CASS CITY
BORON
PACE ET.BVEK
r A^S riTV CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
CASS CITY. MICHIGAN
We Accept All
Fre-Paid Prescription Plans
IOC
32 oz.
plastic bottlej
39£ Value
COACH LIGHT PHARMACY
BANKAMERICARD
all A's.
FIFTH GRADE
Chris Buehrly, Oarla
Grouse, Dan Dickinson,
Carol Dillon, Lori Gohsman,
Ruth Harmer. Alesia Hoag;
Brenda Izydorek, Susanna
Kappen. Shelley LaPeer.
Tom Loomis, Kathy Massey,
Scott Murphy, Linda McAlpine, Beabe McLachlin.
David Nye, Mechelle Particka, John Scollon, Wendy
Smith, Julie Sweeney, Tammy Tibbits, David Whittaker,
Rita Whittaker, Robert
Witzke, Penny Wright, Steve
Wynn, Teresa Zmierski.
SIXTH GRADE
Sharon Bader, Robbie
Clarke, Renee Erla, Anne
Esau, Lori Ewald, Tim Fahrner, John Gallagher, Yvonne
Hahn, Angel Harmon, Libby
Hartel, Lori Harrison, Julie
Helwig.Sue Hendrick, Rusty
Hoag. Jane Hobart, Scott
Krueger, Susan Langenberg, Daniel LaPonsie,
Sharon Lowe, Ken Martin,
Yvonne Mathewson, Max
Morrish, Debra McAlpine,
Denise Okerstrom, Melanie
Particka. Tammie Root.
Kathy Rosenberger, Darwin
Rushlo, Chris Russell, Karen
Schmidt, -(-Teresa Scollon,
Cynthia Smith, Julie Stine,
Karen Stine, Lori Teichman,
Nancy Tonti, Tracy Vandiver, Kathleen Vargo, Kevin Wagg, Karen Wallace,
Linda Whittaker, Tina
Wright, Mark Guinther.
SEVENTH GRADE
Debra Stevens, Diane Stine,
Debra Sowden, Belh Tracy,
+Barbara Tuckey, Karen
Wagg, Wendy Ware, Sally
Ware, Kim Witherspoon,
Brenda Whittaker, -I-Janice
Wentworth.
NINTH GRADE
Ann Ballagh, Laura Ba.uer,
Tommy Brinkman, Don
Childs, Dale Dudde, BethErla, Shelley Gallagher,
LuAnn Gallaway, Patricia
Goslin, Brenda Hahn, Cathy
Hobart, Teresa Hofstedt,
Debra Joos, Christine
Krueger, Brenda Lapeer,
LeeAnn Lapeer, Faith LaPonsie, Brenda Little. Kurt
Little, Diane Lowe, Noreen
MacCallum, James McCampbell, Phillip Martin,"
Gloria Morrish, Ronald
O'Dell, Karen Perry, Lena
Rabideau, Laura Smith,
Sally Smith, Kathleen Toner,
Stuart Venema, Ann Whittaker, Lisa Zimba.
TENTH GRADE
Kathy
Ciarne, Alan
Grouse, Rick Doerr, Pam
Gallagher, Lucy Hartsell,
+ Ann Hobart, Rodney
Hutchinson, Karen Krug,
Grace LaPonsie, Colleen
Leslie, -f-Kathy Luana, Glen
MacCallum, Jeffrey Maharg,
Tim Muz, Terry Nanney,
Delores Peters, Jane Peterson, Blaise Posluszny, Jane
Rabideau, -r-Beth Shagene,
Maxine Smith, Dawn Stahlbaum, Pam Stickle, Christine Strace, Judy Tracy. Lori
Tuckey.
Todd Alexander, Teresa
Bergman, + Robert Brown,
ELEVENTH GRADE
Sara Brown, Lori Comment,
Jill Dudde, Douglas Erla,
+Janet Auvil, Linda BatPaul Guernsey. Rita Gutier- tel, Julie Bills, Susan Bond,
rez, + David Heinz. Barbara Mari Butler, Sandi Doyen,
Herron, Janet Kapala, Fran- Joan Erla. Jill Field, Kelly
ces Kozan, Hope LaPonsie Gee, Sheryl Guc, +Marie
Suzanne Little, Mary Jo
Hobart, Cathy Kerbyson,
Lockwood, +Dwight LoedNancy Koepfgen, Randy
ing, Cynthia • Mackowiak, Lapeer, +Carol Little, SherRochelle Messer, Genevieve
ri Little, Joyce Locke, Sally
Peddie, Jeffrey Prieskorn, Masten, Vickie Richmond,
Kurt Proctor, Cindy RosenDorothy Schwartz, Diane
berger, Renee Schember, Sefton. Jerry Toner. Cindy
Linda Spencer, Michael
Tuckey, Kathy Zink.
Truemner, Shari VanAllen,
+Maryke Venema, + CynTWELFTH GRADE
thia Ware, Laurie Ware, Lisa
Ware, Becky Whittaker.
Toshiyuki Arai, Gloria Arroyo. +Melody Bacon. SherEIGHTH GRADE
yll Batts, Molli Butler, Cindy
Susan Asher, Lorraine Calka, Sue Cori, +Sharon
Brooks, Kevin Brown, Paula Cox. Sally Doerr, Dave Erla,
Butler, Kim Cox, Joyce Dianna Fisher. Bette FredDaley, Joan Freiburger, erick, Vicki German, Sheila
Brenda Goslin, Glenn Guc, Fae Hampshire, Louis
Guilds, Tim Hill, Jane Hutch- Laming. Robin Lapp, Diane
inson, Peter Kessler, Kathy Leslie, Dean Little, -t-RichKirn, David Kitchen, Susan ard Lowe, Karen Martin,
Knight, Julie Landholt, Edward Nizzola, Karen
Debbie Lockwood, Doug O'Dell, Sean Ouvry, Cara
McCampbell, Janet Mur- Prieskorn, Deborah Raydick, Susan Nolan, Mark mond, Carla Ruso, Louie
Particka, +Rita Rabideau, Sabo, Paul Sefton, Delores
Michael Richards, Ross Sherrard, Cathy SiebenRidenour. Linda Sieradzki, eicher, Chester Sieradzki,
Julie Slaughter, Dianna Lori Stahlbaum, Jeri Starr,
Smith, Dwayne Smith, Charles Tuckey.
JBAGETEN
CASS CITV, MICHIGAN
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 8. 1973
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^i
Your neighbor says
Cass City's role in operating and maintaining the
Elkland Township Cultural
Center has been discussed
and reviewed in recent
years with some calling for
the village to dispose of its
interests in the building
entirely, citing the expense.
Recently, Village Council
voted to spend S375 toward
putting a new roof on the
structure. Other improvements and renovations have
also been made.
Mrs. Ruth Hoffman, 4507
N. Seeger St., thinks the
present arrangement is just
fine and hopes it will
continue.
"It is an added expense to
the village; that's very
true," she said. "Yet it is a
part of our heritage and I
really think it ought to be
preserved and the village
should continue its interests in it."
She added that the building serves a useful purpose
in providing a meeting place
for civic groups.
Ms. Hoffman has lived in
Cass City the past 27 years
and is employed at Wood
Drug. She is also active in
the American Cancer Society chapter of Tuscola
county.
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COACH LIGHT PHARMACY
MIK!
» i \ \ \\{. O w n . r .
r
I'd. !',72-:Uil. (.
The regular meeting of
the United Methodisl Women was held Monday
evening. Nov. 5. with Mrs.
Helen Baker presiding.
BY DR. WALTER C. ALVAREZ and DR. WILLIAM J. WELCH
A DISCOVERY ABOUT
BODILY RESISTANCE
TO INFECTION
Actual Size 4"x5"
install officers
Hope for cancer patients
At present, only surgery is
capable of curing lung
cancer. There has not been
much success with the use
of radiation or anti-cancer
drugs. But now I read some
encouraging news from the
fine Roswell Park Memorial
Institute for the study of
cancer, which can give some
hope to people with cancer
of the lung.
In a report by Drs. Hiroshi
Takita and Antonio Brugarolas, of the department
of thoracic (lung) surgery, I
read that the doctors have
been able to prolong the
survival time of several lung
cancer patients by giving
them a tumor vaccine prepared from the patients'
own tumors.
Eleven patients with lung
cancer were selected for the
study; six of these patients
were operated on to remove
the cancerous tissue, and
then were given the conventional p o s t - s u r g e r y
therapy, and all of them died
within 3 to 19 months after
surgery.
The other five patients
were given injections of
"autologous tumor vaccine"
immediately after surgery.
Fortunately, three of the
five patients who receix'ed
the tumor vaccine have
stayed alive for up to 31
months. That certainly is
hopeful, and the doctors are
making further studies to
learn more about how the
tumor vaccine works.
The Roswell Park Memorial Institute is located at 666
Elm St.. Buffalo, N.Y. 14203.
Recently, in a release
from the great Memorial
Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center in New York City. I
read that with the exceedingly powerful electron
microscope, scientists have
discovered that lymphocytes, a type of round white
blood cell, are not uniformly
smooth and of only one type,
as for some 60 years or
more it had been thought
when the cells could be
looked at only with an
ordinary microscope.
With the electron microscope it can now be seen
that there are two types of
human lymphocytes: one
type, which the researchers
call B cells, has large
numbers of tiny finger-like
projections from the surface: and the other type,
called T cells, are relatively
smooth.
The two types of cells
seem to have different
functions; the B cells give
one type of immunity and
the T cells give another. The
T cells apparently are responsible for the rejection
of transplanted organs, and
may also be a factor in the
immune defense
that
healthy people are thought
to have against cancer.
The scientists
have
counted the different cells,
and have found that in the
blood of normal individuals,
about 20 per cent of the
cells have the tiny rods,
while 80 per cent of the cells
have the smoother surface.
Interestingly, in persons
with lymphocytic leukemia,
a sort of cancer of the blood,
most of the lymphocytes are
of the rough surface type.
buildings today, and will
design buildings, especially
public buildings, with features which will enable
people in wheelchairs to
move around comfortably in
them.
There should be a ground
level entrance or a ramp.
There should be an easily
opened door, wide enough
to permit passage of a
wheelchair. There should be
some ramps in a building.
An elevator should be
accessible to the handicapped. The doors should
be at least 32 inches wide. A
water fountain and a public
telephone should be low
enough to be used by
persons in wheelchairs.
There should be handrails
on all stairways, and special
parking spaces wide enough
to enable a person to get out
of a car and into a wheelchair.
Certainly in a building
where there are doctors'
offices there should be
ample space for wheelchairs. There should be
special space also in public
buildings such as libraries.
im. n i . \ i .
Much study is being done
now to see if people with
cancer have mainly rough
cells. Much good to man may
come out of this discovery of
the smooth -- and rough -surfaced lymphocyte cells.
I mention the work here
to cheer people with cancer,
showing them that an
enormous amount of research is being done which
someday will doubtless result in a cure.
PUBLIC BUILDINGS
AND WHEELCHAIRS
For years. I have been
interested in the fact that (
many of our buildings
should have entrances such
as can be used by people in
wheelchairs. It is to be
hoped that more and more
architects will become
aware of the difficulties of
persons in wheelchairs, and
the barriers posed by many
CASS CITY GUN CLUB
4 south, 1 east. 1/4 north of Cass Cit>
Pancake Breakfast
CASS CITY CHRONICLE-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1973 I
Trinity Women
BETTER HEALTH
Keep the
Cultural Center
CASS cm. MICHIGAN
1'np liki-s In prc.-ich t'ronomy
:nnl then HD on ;i fishing (rip
while Mom pnii'tiri's it.
The Rev. E.K. Isaacs installed new officers and
charged them with the
responsibilities of their offices. They are as follows:
president. Mrs. .Janet
Christner; vice-president.
Mrs. Mary Rexin: secretary.
Mrs. Joan Merchant, and
treasurer, Mrs. Doris Rawson.
Chairwomen of program
areas are: Christian Social
Involvement. Mrs. Pec; Neitzel; Christian Global Concern. Mrs. Marilyn Alexander-.
Christian. Personhood. Mrs. Georgene
Hurd. and Supportive Community. Mrs. Alice Ruhl.
Chairwomen of service
areas: local church responsibilities. Mrs Shirley
Wagg: World Bank. Shirley
K a r r ; membership. Mrs.
Lou Kozan; Chelsea Home,
Mrs.
Jennie Hutchinson;
publicity. Mrs. Iva Profit:
flowers and gifts. Mr;;. 6ea
Baker and Mrs. Mildied
McConkey; members of
committee on nominations,
Mrs. Mary Brack. Mrs. Hazel
Gallagher and Mary Rexin
Mrs. Clara McConkey and
Mrs.
Elaine Proctor and
members of Group 4 served
a 6:30 dinner preceding the
program.
CROFT-CLARA
LUMBER, INC.
CLOSED
WILL BE
THURSDAY, NOV. 15
FOR THE
FIRST DAY OF
DEER SEASON
Your cooperation will 'be
EVERY SUNDAY
appreciated so that employees
At 7:30 a.m.
Trap shooting practice every 2nd and
4th Saturdays weather permitting.
can enjoy the first day of tide
season
PAGE SEVEN -
AGENT'S
Marie Meredith
Shabbona Area News
CORNER
Grudge — a heavy load
Phone 672-9498
Margaret Ross - Extension Agent
Plans were made to go to
Crossroads
for dinner
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Moriartey were Friday evening Tuesday, Nov. 13. Dinner
callers of Mr. and Mrs. Jack will be served at 12:30. For
reservations, call 872-4008
Ruggles of Sandusky.
or 872-3467.
Mr. and Mrs Wilfred
Turner were Sunday evening guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Mr. and Mrs. Keith MurBernard Pearl of Richmond.
phy and family,
Jean
Jeannie Kreger was a
Gyomory and
Douglas
Sunday caller of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Merrill O'Dell of Cass City were
Sunday dinner guests of Mr.
Kreger.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mori- and Mrs. Bruce Kritzman.
Mrs. Robert Burns, Mrs.
artey were Sunday afterClair Auslander, Mrs. Arlie
noon callers of Mr. and Mrs.
Gray, Mrs. Lloyd Bader, Mrs.
Ray Moriartey of Marlette.
Robert Bader and Miss
Mr. and Mrs. David OsenGrace Wheeler attended the
toski were Sunday afterPort Huron District annual
noon callers of Mr. and Mrs.
meeting Thursday of WSCS
Ryerson Puterbaugh.
at the Lapeer United MethMr. and Mrs. Laurence
odist Church.
Hyatt and family had dinner
at the Sveden House in
EXTENSION
Sagmaw, along with members of Mizpah Church,
The Shabbona Extension
Sunday.
Group met Monday evening,
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon
Oct. 22, with Mrs. Gordon
Ferguson were Saturday
Ferguson.
evening callers of Mr. and
The meeting was called to
Mrs. Joe Moriartey.
order by Mrs. Laurence
DELAYED NEWS
PIONEER GROUP
The Pioneer Group met
Thursday, Oct. 25, at noon
for a cooperative dinner at
the Decker Masonic Hall.
A short business meeting
was conducted by the president. Mrs. Fred Emigh. The
following o f f i c e r s were
elected for the coming year:
Mrs. Emigh. president: Mrs.
William Patch, vice-president: Mrs Irma Hicks,
secretary and treasurer,
and Mrs Avis Youngs, flower
chairman
Hyatt, chairman. They repeated the women's Creed
in unison, followed by a
minute of silent prayer for
peace.
The secretary's and
treasurer's reports were
given. Roll was answered to
"What do you think the
trend will be by 1985?" by
16 members and one visitor.
The yearbook was finished.
The lesson on The Rural
Community and the Rural
Family in 1985 was given by
Mane Meredith and Mrs.
Hyatt.
VISIT OUR EXPANDED
JEWELRY DEPARTMENT
Lunch was served by the
hostess.
The Nov. 26 meeting will
be with Mrs. Arlie Gray. The
lesson on How Big, How
Much. How Fresh will be
given by Mrs. Robert Burns
and Mrs. Lloyd Bader.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Smith
and Mr. and Mrs. Vern
Geister
attended
the
Marching Band competition
at Bridgeport Saturday
evening. Marlette band won
first in Class B.
The Shabbona Methodist
women's bake sale and
bazaar will be held at the
Cass City Gulf Station.
Thelma Ward and Margaret Black of Flint were
Sunday guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Virgil VanNorman.
Mr. and Mrs. John Dunlap
Sr. were Saturday afternoon
callers of Mr. and Mrs. Don
Smith and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Vern Springstead of Detroit were
Wednesday and Thursday
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Earl
Springstead.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Sprague and Sherry and
Kellie of Bay Port spent the
week end visiting Mr. and
Mrs. Ryerson Puterbaugh
and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Dale Leslie
and family entertained in
honor of Mrs. Leslie's mother's birthday. Mrs. Louis
Behr, Sunday. Guests were
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Behr
and family of Saginaw, Mr.
and Mrs. Troy Rhinehardt
and family of Pontiac. Mr.
and Mrs. Dale Mitchell and
family of Carleton. Mr. and
Mrs. Harold Deering and
family of Deford. Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Palmer and
Paul of Sandusky and Louis
Behr.
Mr. and Mrs. George
Regneurs and family entertained Saturday in honor of
Ron Springstead's birthday
A Wide Selection
AUTO-TRUCK-TRACTOR
NEEDS
.25 to $12.00
Sterling Silver Rings I
Your
AND
MACHINE
'
COACH LIGHT PHARMACY
RESOURCEFUL
Life is a continual battle andwhen the going gets tough, the.
tough get going.
FORMAL WEAR
RYAN'S
Men's Wear and
Formal Wear Rental
Phone 872-3431
KINGSTON VILLAGE
FLOOR COVERING
ROAD - KINGSTON
NOW OFFERING
FAMOUS
BRAND NAMES IN
CARPETING
and
LINOLEUM
j Sales and service by Ed Whisler,
| formerly of Whisler's Carpet
j Service. 10 years' experience.
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS
SHOP
$1.00 and up
(FREE PARKING IN THE REAR)
3:00 p.m. with Walt Bradtke Tuesday, Nov. 13, in the 3=
County Building at Bad Axe^—
or Thursday, Nov. 29, in the"
Civil Defense Center at Caro. Social worker Walt _
Bradtke of the Saginaw Catholic Family Service will =be visiting instructor for the E
Thumb Extension Service Family Living lesson on "Self Understanding Brings =:
Change".
In a FUTURE SHOCK _
world where changes are .
taking place with impossible speed, relating to other =
people becomes critically important. These sessions will help people gain meaning and understanding for
personally coping with ~=_
changing values and behav- I"
ioral patterns of the 70's.
RUBBER BACK
Costume Jewelry
IT'S COACH LIGHT FORVARIETY - SELECTION - LOW PRICES
H^^^H^^BV^^^^^^^^^^^ft
We Accept All PRE-PAID ^•I^9HI
PRESCRIPTION PLANS BANKAMERICARD
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
Smith of Snover and Mrj and
Mrs. Ralph Smith hadldinner Sunday at a restaurant
in Imlay City. They were
celebrating their anniversary,
i
Mr. and Mrs. Dan Cargill
of Roseville spent overj the
week end visiting Mr. land
Mrs. Floyd Mclntosh land
family.
i
Ann
Leslie
was! a
Wednesday supper guest of
Julie Smith.
I
Mr. and Mrs. Merle Waun
of Birch Run were Sunday
afternoon callers of MrJand
Mrs. Virgil VanNormanj
The Methodist Women
will meet Wednesday bvening, Nov. 7, with Mrs.
Arthur Caister. This is a
change in date.
j
Miss Sherry Turner spent
the week end visitingj her
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Wilfred Turner.
i
Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Kjreger entertained at a birthday
supper Thursday for their
grandson. Scott Elsljiolz.
Guests were Mike land
Sherri Kreger. Mrs. Thomas
Hagen and Mrs. Diane
Elsholz.
i
Mr. and Mrs. Qene
Groombridge and jack
spent the week end at
Central Lake visiting I the
latter's mother and cither
relatives.
!
A sign on a busy highway
says that "The heaviest load
to carry is a grudge". Yet
how often do we play games
with our grudges in order to
"get even"?
One author speaks of
grudges as being like trading stamps or coupons that
can be cashed in to get a
special favor or gift - or to
"get even". But there are
other ways to deal with
grudges that are kind.
Many of us behave as
children sometimes, as parents sometimes, and occasionally as thinking adults.
How can you tell when you
are acting like a child - or
"bossing" like some parents? Or perhaps acting like
a rational adult? Dr. Eric
Berne devised terms to
analyze behavior and help
people to see what they are
as persons in a 1961
publication "Transactional
Analysis in Psycho Therapy". Other writers have
applied these theories and
been able to help explain
behavior.
If you are interested in
learning more about behavior theories and application,
spend from 9:30 a.m. to
FOR ALL YOUR
Earrings
$2.00 to $5.00
in the home ot Mr. and Mrs.
Earl Springstead. Guests
were: Mr. and Mrs. Eminelo
Shanchez of Warren,, Mr.
and Mrs. Louis Gybati of
Allen Park, Mr. and iMrs.
Milton Phillips and family of
St. Clair Shores and Mrj and
Mrs. John Agar and family of
Shabbona.
;
Mr. and Mrs. Ryerson
Puterbaugh were Sunday
evening callers of Mr.; and
Mrs. Ray Pallas of Sandusky.
Mr. and Mrs. Harley IDorman and family of Caro were
Thursday evening callers of
Mr. and Mrs. Voyle Dorinan.
SERVICE
.45 yd.
(Installed)
WITH PAD (Installed)
THUMB PARTS
and MACHINE CO.
6647 MAIN
.99 yd.
KITCHEN
Carpet
Patterned Nylon
SEE
I
Pattern Nylon
Drive Out To Save A lot
2 Miles east of Kingston on M-46 and
1 1/2 Miles north on Clothier Rd.
PHONE 872-31210
WHOLESALE - RETAIL
yd.
I
CALL 683-2317
for Samples shown in your own home
at your convenience.
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