Author Index

December 2006
Author Index
Abou-Khalil, R., & Abou-Khalil, B.
Cortical stimulation mapping
and speech production. October
2003. 10-15.
Abrahamsen, E. Sensory Integration
Therapy. June 2002. 20-24.
Adamovich, B. L. B. Measurement
of functional outcomes. August
1994. 2-4.
Adamovich, B. L. B. The role of the
speech-language pathologist in
the evaluation and treatment of
adolescents and adults with
traumatic brain injury. July
1992. 1-6.
Adams, K. M. The neuropsychology
of AIDS. November 1991. 7-9.
Armour, J. Floor Time and evidence-based practice. June 2002.
16-20.
Arvedson, J. C., & Heintskill, B.
Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS).
June 2006. 7-11.
Avent, J. Reciprocal scaffolding
treatment for aphasia. June 2004.
15-18.
Avent, J., Graham, M., & Peppard,
R. Group treatment across
disorders. June 2004. 23-25.
Avery, J., & Kennedy, M. Intervention for memory disorders after
TBI. October 2002. 9-14.
Ballard, K. J. Principles of motor
learning and treatment for AOS.
December 2001. 13-18.
Baltaxe, C. A. M. Pragmatic language disorders in children with
social communication disorders
and their treatment. April 1993.
2-8.
Author Index
Subject Index
Title Index
Barnes, E. F. Motor speech function
in young males with Fragile X
syndrome. June 2006. 3-7.
Barrett, A. M. Treatment of unilateral neglect in patients with
right hemisphere brain damage.
December 2000. 18-26.
Barriere, I. Agraphia. April 2002.
13-20.
Bayles, K. A. Human memory and
overview. October 1992. 1-4.
Bayles, K. A., & Tomoeda, C. K.
Principles and techniques for
managing the memory deficits of
persons with mild to moderate
dementia. October 1996. 21-27.
Baylor, C. R. Structural CT and
MRI—The basics. April 2003.
18-24.
Beeson, P. M. Definitional issues
affecting treatment of aphasia
and related disorders. April
1994. 2.
Beeson, P. M. Memory impairment
associated with aphasia due to
stroke. October 1992. 9-11.
Beeson, P. M. Staging treatment for
progressive neurogenic communication disorders. October
1999. 6.
Belanger, S. A. General considerations for managing the aphasic
patient in the acute medical
setting. October 1994. 2-6.
Bethoux, F. A. Management of
multiple sclerosis. June 2000. 411.
Blachman, B. A. The role of phonological awareness in early
reading acquisition. June 1993.
15-18.
Page 1
Page 8
Page 20
Blachman, B. A., Scarborough, H.
S., & Fowler, A. E. The relationship between language disorders
and reading disabilities. June
1993. 12-15.
Blomgren, M., & Nagarajan, S. S.
Brain activation patterns in
stuttering and nonstuttering
speakers: Preliminary results and
future directions. December 2003.
8-11.
Blount, M. A. R. Stuttering: Review
of genetic data. October 1993. 69.
Boles, L. Conducting conversation:
a case study using the spouse in
aphasia treatment. September
1998. 24-31.
Boles, L., Purdy, M., Schneider, S.
L., Solomon, L., Stierwalt, J., &
Kennedy, M. Education and
Mentoring Committee. April
2004. 21-22.
Bose, A., & Square, P. A. PROMPT
treatment method and apraxia of
speech. December 2001. 5-9.
Boyle, M. Aphasia treatment
planning in acute rehabilitation
settings. October 1994. 6-9.
Boyle, M. Semantic feature analysis:
The evidence for treatment of
lexical impairments in aphasia.
June 2001. 23-28.
Boyle, M. What’s this all about?
July 1999. 2.
Bremer, M., Pighetti, J., & Orjada, S.
Educating communities about
aphasia. December 2002. 38-39.
Brobeck, T. C. Strategies for
enhancing the body of evidence
for clinical decision making.
April 2004. 11-16.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Brooks, J. Introduction. November
1991. 1-2.
Brooks, J. The psychology of HIVinfection and AIDS. November
1991. 9-15.
Brookshire, R. H. Group studies of
treatment for adults with aphasia: Efficacy, effectiveness, and
believability. December 1994. 514.
Brown, T., Petersen, S. E., &
Schlaggar, B. L. Functional
neuroimaging approaches to the
study of human brain development. June 2003. 3-10.
Brown, D. F., & White, C. L.
Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s
disease and the Lewy body
variant of Alzheimer’s disease:
synapse density and pathological staging: New pieces of the
puzzle. December 1997. 11-15.
Brown, J., & Murray, D. Communication-based behavioral interventions for children with autism
spectrum disorder. June 2002. 8-12.
Brownell, H. Discourse. June 1996.
15-22.
Brush, J. A., & Camp, C. J. Effective
interventions for persons with
dementia: Using spaced retrieval
and Montessori techniques.
October 1999. 27-32.
Burns, M. S. Speech-pathology
management of TBI in schoolaged children. October 2004. 1419.
Busch, C. Does Medicare cover
group therapy? December 2001.
29.
Busch, C. How is a treatment plan
for an aphasic patient reviewed
in terms of Medicare policy and
guidelines? October 1994. 1417.
Busse, E., & Turkstra, L. Communication strategies for parents and
children. December 2004. 10-16.
Buzolich, M. J. AAC in the integrated kindergarten. June 2004.
18-23.
Buzolich, M. J. Augmentative and
alternative communication
(AAC) assessment: Adult aphasia. December 2006. 4-12.
2
Campbell, T. F. Functional treatment outcomes for young
children with communication
disorders. December 1996. 1619.
Cannizzaro, M. S., Coelho, C. A., &
Youse, K. Treatment of discourse
deficits following TBI. October
2002. 14-19.
Carter, J. E. Some drugs used in the
treatment of traumatic brain
injury. August 1992. 3-4.
Cazzato, K. R. A case of functionally based rehabilitation following a mild traumatic brain injury.
May 1998. 3-8.
Chapman, S. B. Discourse markers
of Alzheimer’s disease versus
normal advanced aging. December 1997. 20-26.
Chapman, S. B. Recent breakthroughs in Alzheimer’s disease:
risk factors, biological markers,
cognitive and linguistic distinctions, and pharmacological
interventions. December 1997.
4-10.
Cheng, L-R. L. Sensitivity to
multiple linguistic and social
identities. April 2005. 19-20.
Cheng, L-R. L. Successful clinical
management requires cultural
intelligence. April 2005. 16-19.
Ciccia, A. H., Turkstra, L. S., &
Tkach, J. Functional imaging of
social cognition. June 2003. 1420.
Cimino-Knight, A. M., Hollingsworth,
A. L., & Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J.
Acalculia. April 2002. 30-36.
Cleary, S., & Hopper, T. Advocating
for nursing home residents. June
2000. 21-22.
Coelho, C. A. Issues related to
treatment planning for aphasia in
various medical setting. October
1994.
Coneff, P. Clinical practice guidelines: What is the anticipated
outcome? [Letter to the editor].
April 2003. 39.
Cullum, C. M., & Lacritz, L.
Cognitive functioning in
Alzheimer’s disease: Evidence
for preclinical abnormalities?
December 1997. 15-20.
Cwik, V. A. Pharmaceutical treatment
of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
June 2000. 11-16.
Davis, G. A. Introduction to the
second round on cognition. June
1996. 2.
Davis, G. A. Introduction: Cognition in the rehabilitation of
neurogenic language disorders.
March 1996. 2-3.
Davis, G. A. Obligations and
options in the evaluation of
aphasia. June 1996. 3-8.
Del Toro, J. F. Plasticity and
recovery from brain damage in
adulthood: What can recovery
from aphasia teach us? October
1997. 8-15.
De Nil, L. F., Roth, I. D., SaltzmanBernaiah, J., & Sandor, P.
Speech, language, and learning
deficiencies associated with
Tourette’s syndrome. June 2006.
12-16.
Doyle, P. Evaluating efficacy and
outcome of treatment in adults
with acquired aphasia December
1994. 2.
Doyle, P. J. Advancing the development and understanding of
patient-based outcomes in
persons with aphasia. October
2005. 7-11.
Duffy, J. R. Pearls of wisdom—
Darley, Aronson, and Brown and
the classification of the
dysarthias. October 2005. 22-27.
Duffy, J. R. Why differential
diagnosis? March 1995 2-6.
Education Committee. Committee
corner. April 2003. 40-41.
Elman, R. J. Aphasia treatment
planning in an outpatient
medical rehabilitation center:
Where do we go from here?
October 1994. 9-13.
Elman, R. J. Long-term care approaches to aphasia treatment
and management. December
1999. 15-17.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Elman, R. J. Introduction: Speechlanguage pathology practice in
long-term care settings. December 1999. 3.
Ennis, M. R. Comprehension
approaches for word retrieval
training in aphasia. June 2001. 1823.
Fein, D. Nosologic issues in
discriminating linguistic and
social impairments in preschool
children. April 1993. 9-12.
Fink, R., Lowery, J., & Sobel, P.
Clinical narrative. October 2002. 2529.
Fink, R. B. Mapping treatment: An
approach to treating sentence
level impairments in agrammatism. October 2001. 14-23.
Foldi, N. S. Memory disorders in
Alzheimer’s disease. October
1992. 4-7.
Fox, L. E., Ginley, S., & Poulsen, S.
B. A residential approach to
conversational intervention.
December 2004. 4-10.
Fox, P. T., Ingham, R. J., & Ingham, J.
C. Functional imaging of speech
and speech disorders. June 2003.
10-14.
Frattali, C. Trends in functional
assessment. August 1994. 4-10.
Frattali, C., Helm-Estabrooks, N.,
Myers, P., Golper, L., Katz, R.,
Wertz, R., Bayles, K., Beeson, P.,
Kennedy, M., Robin, D.,
Wambaugh, J., & Yorkston, K.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Progress
report. April 2004. 23-24.
Frattali, C. M. Measuring disability.
December 1996. 7-10.
Freed, D. Two case studies of family
influence on treatment outcome
after stroke. December 2004. 1619.
Frieson, L. M., & Tremblay, K. L.
Electrophysiological measures of
hearing, speech, and language.
April 2003. 3-10.
Frost, L. The Picture Exchange
Communication System. June
2002. 13-15.
George, P. A consultative approach.
June 1999. 5-10.
3
Gilger, J. W. An update on the
genetics, neurology, and treatment of language-related
disorders. May 1997. 4.
Gilger, J. W. The role of genes in
the development of language
and language-related disorders.
May 1997. 5-10.
Gillam, R. B. Fast ForWord: Training children’s brains to learn
language? April 2000. 15-18.
Glista, S. Educating and supporting
individuals with aphasia and
their families. December 2006.
25-31.
Goldsmith, T. Ethical issues facing
the speech-language pathologist
in the acute care setting. June
1999. 20-24.
Golper, L. A. C. Report on the
Consensus Conference on
Medical Speech-Language
Pathology. October 1995. 28.
Golper, L. A. C., & Cherney, L. Back
to basics: Assessment practices
with neurogenic communication
disorders. July 1999. 3-8.
Golper, L. A. C., & Wertz, R. T.
Reading research. April 2002.
27-31.
Gordon, J. K. Associations and
dissociations: An investigation
of lexical access deficits in
agrammatism and anomia.
October 2005. 19-23.
Graham, M. S. Group therapy for
the survivor of head and neck
cancer: It’s all about quality of
life. June 2004. 8-15.
Greenhouse, A. H. Drugs in the
elderly. August 1992. 11-12.
Greenwald, M., & Bowyer, S.
Magnetoencephalography
(MEG) studies of speech production. October 2003. 4-9.
Greenwald, M., & George, P. Alexia.
April 2002. 4-13.
Greenwald, M., & Mikola, J.
Agnosia. April 2002. 25-30.
Grimes, A. M. HIVD and hearing
loss. November 1991. 19-23.
Groher, M. The adult with AIDS:
Clinical and research issues.
(Abstract of ASHA Convention
program presentation.) November 1991. 30-31.
Haley, K., Jenkins, K., Hadden, C.,
Womack, J., Hall, J., &
Schweiker, C. Sorting pictures to
assess participation in life
activities. December 2005. 1115.
Haley, M., & Raymer, A. M. Speech,
language and cognitive impairments in ALS. April 2000. 2-5.
Halpern, A. Evidence-based practice guidelines for autism in
children 0 to 3 years. April 2002.
32.
Hammen, V. L. Differential diagnosis of dysarthrias: The physiologic approach. March 1995. 69.
Hammen, V. L. Managing speaking
rate in dysarthria. December 2002.
17-21.
Hammond, J. Ethical issues for the
nonphysician in the AIDS crisis,
November 1991. 23-28.
Happé, F. The contribution of
theory of mind to communicative competence. April 1993. 1720.
Harris, V. M., Aftonomos, L. B., &
Steele, R. D. Language Care
Center treatment programs and
the rehabilitation of aphasia and
related disorders. April 2000. 1114.
Hartley, L. L. Linguistic deficits
after traumatic brain injury. April
1994. 20-24.
Helm-Estabrooks, N., & Hotz, G.
Perseveration: A manifestation of
memory deficit. October 1992. 79.
Henri, B. P., & Hallowell, B.
Funding alternatives to offset
the reimbursement impacts of
managed care. March 1999. 1114.
Henry, M. L., & Beeson, P. M.
Primary progressive aphasia and
semantic dementia. April 2006.
21-27.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Hillis, A. Clinical implications of
recent research on semantic
processing. April 1994. 2-6.
Hinckley, J. Outcomes of intensive
aphasia treatment. April 2002.
Power of One.
Hodge, M. H. Nonspeech oral motor
treatment approaches for dysarthria: Perspectives on a controversial clinical practice. December 2002. 22-28.
Hodge, M. M. Differential diagnosis of motor speech disorders in
children: Current limitations and
future possibilities. March 1995.
10-15.
Holland, A. L. Recovered memories: My life as a Skinnerian.
October 2005. 2-6.
Holland, A. L. Report from the
Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of
Persons With Traumatic Brain
Injury. March 1999. 2-4.
Hollingsworth, A. L., CiminoKnight, A. M., & GonzalezRothi, L. J. Limb apraxia. April
2002. 20-25.
Horne, N. R., & Bondi, M. W.
Neuroimaging changes in
preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.
December 2003. 12-19.
Huer, M. B. Acquisition of culture
from a developmental perspective. April 2005. 7-15.
Hungerford, S., Coppens, P., &
Clarke, N. Computer-based
treatment in a case of LandauKleffner syndrome. September
1998. 12-17.
Johnson, A. Dealing with change in
service reimbursement: Introduction. March 1999. 5.
Johnson, A. Managing or caring?
March 1999. 6-8.
Johnson, K., & Bourgeois, M.
Language intervention for
patients with dementia attending
a respite program. 11-16.
Jacobs, H. E. Behavior disorders
and traumatic brain injury. July
1992. 14-16.
4
Johnson, A. F. A new clinical data
base for medical speech-language pathology. August 1994.
10-14.
Kahn, H., Stannard, T., & Skinner, J.
The use of words versus
nonwords in the treatment of
apraxia of speech: A case study.
September 1998. 5-10.
Katz, R. C. The role of computers in
the treatment of people with
aphasia: Reflections on the past
20 years. April 2000. 6-10.
Kavrie, S. Diagnostic decisionmaking process in the acute care
setting. June 1999. 10-15.
Kearns, K. P. Back to the future
with single-subject experimental
designs in aphasia treatment
research. October 2005. 14-22.
Kearns, K. P. Single-subject experimental designs and the clinician
scientist. December 1994. 2-5.
Kelly, R. A model for assessing
hearing loss in older adults with
neurogenic communication
disorders. October 2006. 18-25.
Kennedy, M. R. T., & Chiou, H-H.
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. June 2005. 20-23.
Khaldi, A., Beach, W., Clausen, T.,
& Bullock, R. Neurosurgical
management of head injury. June
2000. 16-20.
Kim, M. Verb production in fluent
aphasia: A preliminary report.
December 2004. 24-27.
Kimbarow, M. Applying for CEU
co-sponsorship of educational
events. October 1995. 26-28.
Kimbarow, M. L. Continuing
education committee update.
August 1995. 2.
Kiran, S. Pure alexia: Causes,
characteristics, and treatment.
April 2006. 16-21.
Klasner, E. Speech treatment for
individuals with Huntington’s
disease. October 1995. 12-15.
Kohnert, K. Cognitive-linguistic
interactions in bilingual aphasia: Implications for intervention. June 2005. 9-14.
Landa, R. Genetic studies: A
conceptual overview. October
1993. 1-4.
Landa, R. L. Evidence for the
heritability of autism. October
1993. 4-6.
Langdon, H. W. Providing speechlanguage services to older
populations: The role of
ethnicity and acculturation.
April 2005. 21-25.
LaPointe, L. L. An interview with
Leonard L. LaPointe. December
1998. 2-4.
Larson, M. J., Kelly, K. G., &
Perlstein, W. M. Functional
neuroimaging of “executive”
dysfunction in traumatic brain
injury: A cognitive neuroscience
perspective. December 2003. 2029.
Leonard, C. M. Neurobiological
bases of dyslexia. June 1993. 24.
Lockwood, S. L. Implementing
computer assisted evaluation of
speech and voice in a pediatric
practice: One clinician’s experience. August 1995. 11-15.
Loeb, D. F. Early language acquisition and intervention. May
1997. 18-25.
Logemann, J. A. Evaluation and
treatment of swallowing disorders in head injury. July 1992.
12-14.
Lucas, L. S. Working to influence
public policy through grassroots
advocacy. October 2000. 13-15.
Lux, J. B. Towards a common
language for functioning and
disablement: ICIDH-2 (The
international classification of
impairments, activities, and
participation. March 1999. 8-10.
Lyon, J. G. Measurement of treatment effects in natural settings.
December 1996. 10-15.
Lyon, J. G. Service delivery for
people confronting aphasia:
some thoughts and practical
suggestions in troubled times.
December 1999. 18-23.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Mackey, R. W. The effects of drugs
on language and learning
disorders in a pediatric population. August 1992. 7-9.
Maher, L. Interview with Nancy
Helm-Estabrooks, Recipient of
the 2000 Honors of the Association. December 2000. 3-4.
Maher, L. M. Agrammatism. April
1994. 6-11.
Maher, L. M. Board of Division
Coordinators meeting. September 1998. 4.
Maher, L. M. Sentence production
treatments for aphasia. October
2001. 3.
Kiran, S. Pure alexia: Causes,
characteristics, and treatment.
April 2006. 16-21.
Mahendra, N. A multicultural
perspective on assessing TW, a
bilingual client with aphasia.
October 2006. 9-18.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevick, R.,
Adler, R., Cheng, L-R. L, DavisMcFarland, E., Deal-Williams, V.,
Garrett, D., Riquelme, L. F.,
Salisbury, T., Schneider, W., &
Villanueva, A. Why is yogurt
good for you? Because it has
live cultures. April 2005. 3-7.
Martin, V. C., Kubitz, K. R., & Maher,
L. M. Melodic intonation therapy.
October 2001. 33-37.
Mateer, C. A. Managing impairments in attention following
traumatic brain injury. October
1996. 12-21.
Mateer, C. Manifestations of
memory impairment in traumatic
brain injury and their clinical
implications. October 1992. 1113.
Mathy, P. Augmentative and alternative communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired dysarthria. December 2002.
28-36.
Mayer, J. The role of fMRI in
aphasiology: Interface between
technology, theory, and clinical
care. December 2003. 4-7.
5
McFarlane, S. C., & Brophy, J. W.
Effects of drugs on voice. August
1992. 9-10.
McLaughlin, S. A., Rogers, M. A., &
Shibata, D. K. A primer on
functional magnetic resonance
imaging (fMRI). April 2003. 2533.
Milekic, S. Clinical and not-soclinical approaches to the study
of aphasia. March 1996. 14-17.
Miller, J. F. Understanding the
language performance of persons
with mental retardation: Genetic
implications. October 1993. 1214.
Miller, R. M. Relationship between
speech and swallowing disorders
in degenerative disease: Implications for management. October
1995. 20-25.
Minifie, F. D. The future of the
discipline. October 1996. 35-37.
Mitchum, C. C. Normal cognition
as a framework for intervention.
June 1996. 9-14.
Mitchum, C. C. Verbs and sentence
production in aphasia: evidencebased intervention. October 2001.
4-13.
Molfese, D. L., & Fox, D. R. Early
brain and language development. May 1997. 11-17.
Montgomery, E. B. Recent advances
in the management of Parkinson’s
disease. December 2000. 11-17.
Morris, M. K. Nonverbal affective
signals in social communication
disorders. April 1993. 12-17.
Musson, N. A quick review: The
federal government, congress
and a bill. October 2000. 5-8.
Musson, N. Let’s get in the game!
October 2000. 4-5.
Musson, N. The eyes and the ears
for the senator: Conversation
with the staff. October 2000. 22.
Musson, N. Questions and answers
from a Division 2 legislative
councilor. October 1999. 4-6.
Murray, L. Neurogenic language
case studies. September 1998.
11.
Myers, P. Specialty recognition
update. May 1997. 3.
Myers, P. Specialty recognition
update. September 1998. 3-4.
Nebel-Gould, A. Pediatric AIDS: A
speech-language pathology
perspective. November 1991. 1519.
Nebel-Gould, A. Glossary of terms.
November 1991. 28-30.
Neils-Strunjas, J. Cognitive intervention case studies. December
1998. 5.
Netsell, R., & Lefkowitz, D. Speech
production following traumatic
brain injury: Clinical and
research implications. November
1992. 1-8.
Netsell, R. W. Rationale, procedures, and instrumentation in the
evaluation and treatment of
individuals with dysarthria.
August 1995. 7-11.
Netsell, R. W. Speech rehabilitation
for individuals with unintelligible speech and dysarthria: The
respiratory and velopharyngeal
systems. December 1995. 6-9.
Neustadt, G. Alphabet soup, postacute care, and the speechlanguage pathologist: Surviving
the current crisis. March 1999.
14-20.
Ochipa, C. Limb apraxia. April
1994. 17-20.
Ochipa, C., Maher., L. M., &
Raymer, A. M. One approach to
the treatment of anomia. September 1998. 18-23.
Oehring, A., Arvedson, J., Busch, C.,
Clark, H., & Halper, A. Advocacy
Committee. October 2003. 22-23.
Off, C. A. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission
tomography. April 2003. 34-38.
Orange, J. B., & Colton-Hudson, A.
A case study of a spousal
communication eduction and
training program for Alzheimer’s
disease. December 1998. 22-29.
Patterson, J. P. FAQs on CEUs. June
2001. 30.
Patterson, J. P. The effectiveness of
cueing hierarchies as a treatment
for word retrieval impairment.
June 2001. 11-18.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Patterson, J. P., & Avent, J. R. The
practice of evidence-based
practice: A case study approach.
October 2006. 4-8.
Paustian, G. Shaken baby syndrome. October 2004. 4-8.
Potter, J. G. Setting a course for
advocacy success. October 2000.
9-12.
Prelock, P. A. Interventions for
children with autism spectrum
disorders: Making decisions based
on the evidence. June 2002. 3-7.
Purdy, M. Management of dysphagia following stroke: A case
study. December 2006. 20-25.
Ramig, L. O., & Countryman, S.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Parkinson disease. October
1995. 15-20.
Ramig, L. O. Speech treatment for
individuals with Parkinson
disease. December 1995. 10-13.
Raskin, S. A. Prospective memory
training after acquired brain
damage. October 1996. 27-33.
Raymer, A. Treatment of lexical
impairments in aphasia: Focus on
the evidence. June 2001. 3-4.
Reinmuth, O. M. Stroke: Mechanisms and effects. October 1997.
16-19.
Research Committee. Committee
corner. December 2003. 31-32.
Reynolds, E., & Turkstra, L. A case
study of behavioral intervention
after childhood traumatic brain
injury. December 1998. 6-10.
Roberts, P. M. Bilingual aphasia: A
brief introduction. June 2005. 39.
Roberts, P. M. Bilingual aphasia: A
brief introduction. June 2005. 39.
Robey, R. R. From clinical practice to
clinical outcome research and
back again. Part I: Clinical
outcomes. Part II: Treatment
effectiveness, treatment efficacy,
and clinical trials. Part III:
Evidence-based practice. Part IV:
Meta-Analysis. April 2001. 3-18.
Robin, D. Technology in the
treatment of language disorders:
Introduction. April 2000. 6.
6
Robin, D. A. Introduction: Differential diagnosis of motor speech
disorders. March 1995. 2.
Rogers, M. A. Treatment research on
augmentative and alternative
communication for adults with
apraxia of speech. December
2001. 21-28.
Rogers, M. A., & Alarcon, N. B.
Characteristics and management
of primary progressive aphasia.
October 1999. 12-26.
Rosenthal, W. S. Group therapy is
better than individual therapy:
With special attention to stuttering. June 2004. 3-8.
Ross, K. B. Assessing quality of life
with aphasia: An annotated
bibliography. October 2005. 1518.
Roth, C. R. Developing and
implementing a quality improvement plan in an acute care
hospital setting. June 1999. 2428.
Rothi, L. J. G. Action needed.
October 1994. 25-26.
Royal, C. Specialty certification:
What’s in it for me? October
1999. 3.
Royal-Evans, C., & Wilson, B.
Clinical Committee: “Pick of the
lit.” June 2004. 26-27.
Royal-Evans, C., Alarcon, N., Fink,
R., Howell, M., Vickers, C., &
Wilson, B. Back to basics:
Documenting hearing status in
adults. June 2003. 24.
Scarborough, H. S., & Fowler, A. E.
The relationship between
language disorders and reading
disabilities. June 1993. 12-15.
Shane, H. C. Application of augmentative and alternative
communication in traumatic
brain injury. July 1992. 8-12.
Shapiro, L. P. Sentence processing.
March 1996. 7-13.
Sheehy, L. Crossed aphasia: A
review of the syndrome. April
2006. 11-16.
Shekim, L. Pharmacology 101:
relevant information for the
speech-language pathologist in
the acute care setting. June
1999. 15-19.
Shuster, L. I. FMRI and normal
speech production. October 2003.
16-21.
Shuster, L. I. Oral motor training and
treatment for apraxia of speech.
December 2001. 18-20.
Siegel, L. S. The discrepancy
definition of dyslexia. June
1993. 7-11.
Silkes, J. P. Cerebral vascular
imaging: Methods, applications,
and considerations. April 2003.
10-17.
Simmons-Mackie, N. Using the ICF
framework to define outcomes.
April 2004. 9-11.
Simmons-Mackie, N. N. Contributions of qualitative research to
the study of functional communication and outcome in aphasia.
December 1994. 14-18.
Singer, E. J. Central nervous system
(CNS) sequelae of HIV disease.
November 1991. 2-7.
Smith, E. Effects of psychotropic
medications on speech and
language. August 1992. 4-7.
Snowling, M. J. The definition and
characteristics of dyslexia. June
1993. 5-7.
Sohlberg, M. M. Introduction:
Updates in cognitive rehabilitation. October 1996. 6.
Sohlberg, M. M. Making the
management of awareness
deficits a core part of cognitive
rehabilitation. October 1996. 612.
Sohlberg, M. M. An overview of
approaches to managing attention impairments. October 2002.
4-8.
Sohlberg, M. M., & Ehlhardt, L.
Case report: Management of
confabulation after subarachnoid
hemorrhage. May 1998. 9-13.
Solomon, L. Return to work after
stroke. December 2004. 19-23.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Solomon, N. P., & Stierwalt, J. A. G.
Strength and endurance training
for dysarthria. December 1995.
13-16.
Spencer, K. Evidence-based practice: Treatment of individuals
with dysarthria. December 2006.
13-19.
Spencer, K. A., & Yorkston, K. M.
Evidence for the treatment of
respiratory/phonatory dysfunction from dysarthria. December
2002. 4-16.
Square, P. A. Neuromotor speech
impairment accompanying
aphasia. April 1994. 11-16.
Stierwalt, J. A. G. Credible, or Incredible? Evaluating the quality of
information on the Internet.
December 2002. 39-40.
Stierwalt, J. The World Wide Web:
Friend or foe? October 2001. 3839.
Strand, E. A. Ethical issues related
to progressive disease. October
1995. 3-8.
Suarez, J. I. Acute ischemic stroke:
Current treatment and future
direction. December 2000. 5-11.
Taylor, M. Epileptiform activity
and discontinuities in language
acquisition. April 2006. 4-11.
Thompson, C. K. A linguisticspecific approach for improving
sentence production and comprehension in agrammatic
aphasia: Treatment of underlying forms. October 2001. 24-32.
Threats, T. The use of the ICF in
intervention for persons with
neurogenic communication
disorders. April 2004. 4-8.
Threats, T. T. ICF and QOL: A
partnership. October 2005. 4-6.
Threats, T., Clark, H., Ellmo, W.,
Busch, C., & Oerhing, A. Advocacy and Reimbursement
Committee: Advocacy for
whom? October 2004.
Till, J. A. Diagnostic goals and
computer-assisted evaluation of
speech and related physiology.
August 1995. 3-7.
7
Todis, B., & Glang, A. School
experiences of students with
acquired brain injury (ABI):
What happens after transition?
December 1999. 3-9.
Tomblin, J. B. Genetics of specific
language impairment and
dyslexia. October 1993. 9-12.
Tonkovich, J. D. Managing the
long-term communication and
memory consequences of
dementia. December 1999. 9-14.
Tseng, C.-H. An account of human
cognition. March 1996. 3-7.
Turkstra, L. Frontiers of clinical
neuroscience continued. December 2000. 4.
Turkstra, L. Introduction: Update
on pharmacological and medical
management of neurological
disorders. June 2000. 3.
Turkstra, L. S. Neuroprotection
following stroke and head injury.
October 1997. 3-7.
Turkstra, L. Traumatic brain injury
case studies. May 1998. 3.
Turkstra, L., Gamazon-Waddell, Y.,
& Evans, J. Traumatic brain
injury and post-secondary
education. October 2004. 19-24.
Vanhalle, C., Van der Linden, M.,
Belleville, S., & Gilbert, B.
Putting names with faces: Use of
a spaced retrieval strategy in a
patient with dementia of the
Alzheimer type. December 1998.
17-21.
Vega-Barachowitz, C. Review of
recent literature. June 1999. 4-5.
Vega-Barachowitz, C. Speechlanguage pathology practice in
the acute care setting. June
1999. 3-4.
Vickers, C. Communicating in
groups: One stop on the road to
improved participation for
persons with aphasia. April 2004.
16-20.
Voeller, K. K. S. Neurobiologic
substrates of social-emotional
behaviors. April 1993. 20-26.
Vogel, D. Drug treatment issues:
introduction. August 1992. 1-2.
Walker, V. G. Communicating with
your legislators: Advocating
effectively for your patients.
October 2000. 19-21.
Wambaugh, J. Empirical support for
treatment of acquired apraxia of
speech. December 2001. 4.
Wambaugh, J., Duffy, J., McNeil,
M., Robin, D., & Rogers, M.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Apraxia of
speech (AOS) report. October
2004. 27-28.
Wambaugh, J. L. Sound production
treatment for apraxia of speech.
December 2001. 9-13.
Ward, S. R. Clinical narrative. July
1999. 9-11.
Warren, R. L. A model for the
measurement of outcomes.
December 1996. 20-23.
Warren, R. L. Outcomes measurement: Moving toward the
patient. December 1996. 5-6.
Weiner, M. F. Drug treatment of the
cognitive, emotional, and
behavioral symptoms of
Alzheimer’s disease. December
1997. 26-31.
Wertz, R. T. Department of Veterans
Affairs cooperative studies on
aphasia revisited. October 2005.
6-13.
Wong, P. C. M. Neurophysiologic
correlates and disorders of
lexical tones. June 2005. 15-19.
Workinger, M. S. Treatment of
severe dysarthria after TBI—or—
Who says they can’t talk?
December 1995. 2-6.
Ylvisaker, M. Intervention for
individuals with challenging
behavior after TBI. October 2002.
19-24.
Ylvisaker, M. School re-entry after
TBI. July 1992. 6-8.
Ylvisaker, M., & Feeney, T. A
Vygotskyan approach to rehabilitation after TBI: A case
illustration. May 1998. 14-19.
Yorkston, K. M. Introduction to the
management of speech disorders
in degenerative disease. October
1995. 2-3.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Yorkston, K. M. Management of
dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis. October 1995. 8-12.
Yorkston, K. M., & Beukelman, D.
Staging interventions in progressive dysarthria. October 1999. 712.
Yorkston, K., Beukelman, D., Duffy,
J., Golper, L., Miller, R., Spencer,
K., Strand, E., & Sullivan, M.
ANCDS Evidence-based practice
guidelines report: Dysarthria
report. June 2004. 27-28.
Young, A. J. Association lobbying:
Your role at the grassroots level.
October 2000. 16-18.
Zecker, S. G. Attention-deficit/
hyperactivity disorder:
Information for school-based
practioners. October 2004. 8-13.
8
Subject Index
Language
Normal Language and
Cognition
Language Development
Acquisition of culture from a
developmental perspective.
Huer, M. B. April 2005. 7-15.
Early brain and language development. Molfese, D. L., & Fox, D.
R. May 1997. 11-17.
Early language acquisition and
intervention. Loeb, D. F. May
1997. 18-25.
Epileptiform activity and
discontinuities in language
acquisition. Taylor, M. April 2006.
4-11.
Functional neuroimaging approaches
to the study of human brain
development. Brown, T., Petersen,
S. E., & Schlaggar, B. L. June
2003. 3-10.
The role of genes in the development of language and languagerelated disorders. Gilger, J. W.
May 1997. 5-10.
The role of phonological awareness
in early reading acquisition.
Blachman, B. A. June 1993. 1518.
Language Use in Adults
An account of human cognition.
Tseng, C.-H. March 1996. 3-7.
Clinical implications of recent
research on semantic processing.
Hillis, A. April 1994. 2-6.
The contribution of theory of mind
to communicative competence.
Happé, F. April 1993. 17-20.
Discourse. Brownell, H. June 1996.
15-22.
Functional imaging of social
cognition. Ciccia, A. H., Turkstra,
L. S., & Tkach, J. June 2003. 1420.
Introduction to the second round
on cognition. Davis, G. A. June
1996. 2.
Normal cognition as a framework
for intervention. Mitchum, C. C.
June 1996. 9-14.
Sentence processing. Shapiro, L. P.
March 1996. 7-13.
Related Cognitive Domains
Human memory and overview.
Bayles, K. A. October 1992. 1-4.
Language Disorders
Aphasia and Other Adult
Language Disorders
Aculculia
Acalculia. Cimino-Knight, A. M.,
Hollingsworth, A. L. &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
30-36.
Agnosia
Agnosia. Greenwald, M. & Mikola,
J. April 2002. 25-30.
Agrammatism
Agrammatism. Maher, L. M. April
1994. 6-11.
Associations and dissociations: An
investigation of lexical access
deficits in agrammatism and
anomia. Gordon, J. K.. October
2005. 19-23.
Verb production in fluent aphasia: A
preliminary report. Kim, M.
December 2004. 24-27.
Alexia and Agraphia
Agraphia. Barriere, I. April 2002.
13-20.
Alexia. Greenwald, M. & George, P.
April 2002. 4-13.
The definition and characteristics
of dyslexia. Snowling, M. J. June
1993. 5-7.
The discrepany definition of
dyslexia. Siegel, L. S. June 1993.
7-11.
Genetics of specific language
impairment and dyslexia.
Tomblin, J. B. October 1993. 912.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Aphasia
Advancing the development and
understanding of patient-based
outcomes in persons with
aphasia. Doyle, P. J. October
2005. 7-11.
Assessing quality of life with
aphasia: An annotated bibliography. Ross, K. B. October 2005.
15-18.
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Associations and dissociations: An
investigation of lexical access
deficits in agrammatism and
anomia. Gordon, J. K. October
2005. 19-23.
Augmentative and alternative
communication (AAC) assessment: Adult aphasia. Buzolich,
M. J. December 2006. 4-12.
Back to the future with singlesubject experimental designs in
aphasia treatment research.
Kearns, K. P. October 2005. 1422.
Bilingual aphasia: A brief introduction. Roberts, P. M. June 2005.
3-9.
Characteristics and management of
primary progressive aphasia.
Rogers, M.A., & Alarcon, N.B.
October 1999. 12-26.
Clinical and not-so-clinical
approaches to the study of
aphasia. Milekic, S. March 1996.
14-17.
Clinical implications of recent
research on semantic processing.
Hillis, A. April 1994. 2-6.
Clinical narrative. Fink, R., Lowery,
J., & Sobel, P. October 2002. 2529.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K..
June 2005. 9-14.
Crossed aphasia: A review of the
syndrome. Sheehy, L. April 2006.
11-16.
9
Definitional issues affecting
treatment of aphasia and related
disorders. Beeson, P. M. April
1994. 2.
Department of Veterans Affairs
cooperative studies on aphasia
revisited. Wertz, R. T. October
2005. 6-13.
Educating and supporting individuals with aphasia and their
families. Glista, S. December
2006. 25-31.
Educating communities about
aphasia. Bremer, M., Pighetti, J.,
& Orjada, S. December 2002. 3839.
Evaluating efficacy and outcome of
treatment in adults with acquired
aphasia. Doyle, P. December
1994. 2.
Group treatment across disorders.
Avent, J., Graham, M., &
Peppard, R. June 2004. 23-25.
A model for assessing hearing loss
in older adults with neurogenic
communication disorders. Kelly,
R. October 2006. 18-25.
A multicultural perspective on
assessing TW, a bilingual client
with aphasia. Mahendra, N.
October 2006. 9-18.
Neuromotor speech impairment
accompanying aphasia. Square,
P. A. April 1994. 11-16.
Perseveration: A manifestation of
memory deficit. HelmEstabrooks, N., & Hotz, G.
October 1992. 7-9.
Plasticity and recovery from brain
damage in adulthood: What can
recovery from aphasia teach us?
Del Toro, J. F. October 1997. 815.
The practice of evidence-based
practice: A case study approach.
October 2006. 4-8. Patterson, J.
P., & Avent, J.R.
Primary progressive aphasia and
semantic dementia. Henry, M. L.,
& Beeson, P. M. April 2006. 2127.
Pure alexia: Causes, characteristics,
and treatment. Kiran, S. April
2006. 16-21.
Reciprocal scaffolding treatment
for aphasia. Avent, J. June 2004.
15-18.
Recovered memories: My life as a
Skinnerian. Holland, A. L.
October 2005. 2-6.
Return to work after stroke. Solomon,
L. December 2004. 19-23.
The role of fMRI in aphasiology:
Interface between technology,
theory, and clinical care. Mayer, J.
December 2003. 4-7.
Sorting pictures to assess participation in life activities. Haley, K.,
Jenkins, K., Hadden, C.,
Womack, J., Hall, J., &
Schweiker, C. December 2005.
11-15.
Two case studies of family influence
on treatment outcome after stroke.
Freed, D. December 2004. 16-19.
Verb production in fluent aphasia: A
preliminary report. Kim, M.
December 2004. 24-27.
Vickers, C. Communicating in
groups: One stop on the road to
improved participation for persons
with aphasia. April 2004. 16-20.
Language Disorders in
Children
AAC in the integrated kindergarten.
Buzolich, M. J. June 2004. 18-23.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K.
June 2005. 9-14.
Communication-based behavioral
interventions for children with
autism spectrum disorder. Brown,
J., & Murray, D. June 2002. 8-12.
Computer-based treatment in a case
of Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Hungerford, S., Coppens, P., &
Clarke, N. September 1998. 1217.
The effects of drugs on language
and learning disorders in a
pediatric population. Mackey, R.
W. August 1992. 7-9.
Epileptiform activity and
discontinuities in language
acquisition. Taylor, M. April
2006. 4-11.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Evidence for the heritability of
autism. Landa, R. L. October
1993. 4-6.
Genetics of specific language
impairment and dyslexia.
Tomblin, J. B. October 1993. 912.
Group treatment across disorders.
Avent, J., Graham, M., & Peppard,
R. June 2004. 23-25.
Neurobiologic substrates of socialemotional behaviors. Voeller, K.
K. S. April 1993. 20-26.
Neurobiological bases of dyslexia.
Leonard, C. M. June 1993. 2-4.
Nonverbal affective signals in
social communication disorders.
Morris, M. K. April 1993. 12-17.
Nosologic issues in discriminating
linguistic and social impairments in preschool children.
Fein, D. April 1993. 9-12.
Pediatric AIDS: A speech-language
pathology perspective. NebelGould, A. November 1991. 1519.
Pragmatic language disorders in
children with social communication disorders and their treatment. Baltaxe, C. A. M. April
1993. 2-8.
The relationship between language
disorders and reading disabilities. Scarborough, H. S., &
Fowler, A. E. June 1993. 12-15.
The role of genes in the development of language and languagerelated disorders. Gilger, J. W.
May 1997. 5-10.
Speech, language, and learning
deficiencies associated with
Tourette’s syndrome. De Nil, L.
F., Roth, I. D., SaltzmanBernaiah, J., & Sandor, P. June
2006. 12-16.
Understanding the language
performance of persons with
mental retardation: Genetic
implications. Miller, J. F. October 1993. 12-14.
10
Dementia: Language/
Cognitive Impairments
A case study of a spousal communication education and training
program for Alzheimer’s disease.
Orange, J. B., & Colton-Hudson,
A. December 1998. 22-29.
Characteristics and management of
primary progressive aphasia.
Rogers, M. A., & Alarcon, N. B.
October 1999. 12-26.
Cognitive functioning in
Alzheimer’s disease: Evidence
for preclinical abnormalities?
Cullum, C. M., & Lacritz, L.
December 1997. 15-20.
Discourse markers of Alzheimer’s
disease versus normal advanced
aging. Chapman, S. B. December
1997. 20-26.
Memory disorders in Alzheimer’s
disease. Foldi, N. S. October
1992 4-7.
Neuroimaging changes in preclinical
Alzheimer’s disease. Horne, N. R.,
& Bondi, M. W. December 2003.
12-19.
Primary progressive aphasia and
semantic dementia. Henry, M. L.,
& Beeson, P. M. April 2006. 2127.
Recent breakthroughs in
Alzheimer’s disease: Risk
factors, biological markers,
cognitive and linguistic distinctions, and pharmacological
interventions. Chapman, S. B.
December 1997. 4-10.
Limb Apraxia
Limb apraxia. Hollingsworth, A. L.,
Cimino-Knight, A. M. &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
20-25.
Limb apraxia. Ochipa, C. April
1994. 17-20.
Memory Impairments
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Clinical narrative. Ward, S. R. July
1999. 9-11.
Intervention for memory disorders
after TBI. Avery, J., & Kennedy,
M. October 2002. 9-14.
Manifestations of memory impairment in traumatic brain injury
and their clinical implications.
Mateer, C. October 1992. 11-13.
Memory disorders in Alzheimer’s
disease. Foldi, N. S. October
1992 4-7.
Memory impairment associated
with aphasia due to stroke.
Beeson, P. M. October 1992. 911.
The neuropsychology of AIDS.
Adams, K. M. November 1991. 79.
Perseveration: A manifestation of
memory deficit. HelmEstabrooks, N., & Hotz, G.
October 1992. 7-9.
Language Disorders in
Personality and Psychiatric
Disturbances
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder: Information for schoolbased practioners. Zecker, S. G.
October 2004. 8-13.
Effects of psychotropic medications
on speech and language. Smith,
E. August 1992. 4-7.
TBI: Language/Cognitive
Impairments
Application of augmentative and
alternative communication in
traumatic brain injury. Shane, H.
C. July 1992. 8-12.
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Communication strategies for
parents and children. Busse, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 2004.
10-16.
Behavior disorders and traumatic
brain injury. Jacobs, H. E. July
1992. 14-16.
A case of functionally based
rehabilitation following a mild
traumatic brain injury. Cazzato,
K. R. May 1998. 3-8.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
A case study of behavioral intervention after childhood traumatic brain injury. Reynolds, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 1998. 610.
Functional neuroimaging of
“executive” dysfunction in
traumatic brain injury: A cognitive neuroscience perspective.
Larson, M. J., Kelly, K. G., &
Perlstein, W. M. December 2003.
20-29.
Introduction: Updates in cognitive
rehabilitation. Sohlberg, M. M.
October 1996. 6.
Linguistic deficits after traumatic
brain injury. Hartley, L. L. April
1994. 20-24.
Manifestations of memory impairment in traumatic brain injury
and their clinical implications.
Mateer, C. October 1992. 11-13.
The role of the speech-language
pathologist in the evaluation
and treatment of adolescents and
adults with traumatic brain
injury. Adamovich, B. L. B. July
1992. 1-6.
School re-entry after TBI. Ylvisaker,
M. July 1992. 6-8.
Shaken baby syndrome. Paustian, G.
October 2004. 4-8.
Speech-pathology management of
TBI in school-aged children.
Burns, M. S. October 2004. 14-19
Traumatic brain injury and postsecondary education. Turkstra, L.,
Gamazon-Waddell, Y., & Evans, J.
October 2004. 19-24.
Assessment and Intervention
Screening
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Assessment
Acalculia. Cimino-Knight, A. M.,
Hollingsworth, A. L. &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
11
Advancing the development and
understanding of patient-based
outcomes in persons with
aphasia. Doyle, P. J. October
2005. 7-11.
Agnosia. Greenwald, M., & Mikola,
J. April 2002. 25-30.
Assessing quality of life with
aphasia: An annotated bibliography. Ross, K. B. October 2005.
15-18.
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Back to basics: Assessment practices with neurogenic communication disorders. Golper, L. A. C.,
& Cherney, L. July 1999. 3-8.
Bilingual aphasia: A brief introduction. Roberts, P. M. June 2005.
3-9.
Clinical implications of recent
research on semantic processing.
Hillis, A. April 1994. 2-6.
Cognitive functioning in
Alzheimer’s disease: Evidence
for preclinical abnormalities?
Cullum, C. M., & Lacritz, L.
December 1997. 15-20.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K.
June 2005. 9-14.
A consultative approach. George, P.
June 1999. 5-10.
Diagnostic decision-making
process in the acute care setting.
Kavrie, S. June 1999. 10-15.
The discrepany definition of
dyslexia. Siegel, L. S. June 1993.
7-11.
Evaluation and treatment of
swallowing disorders in head
injury. Logemann, J. A. July
1992. 12-14.
Limb apraxia. Hollingsworth, A. L.,
Cimino-Knight, A. M., &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
20-25.
Managing the long-term communication and memory consequences of dementia. Tonkovich,
J. D. December 1999. 9-14.
Measurement of functional outcomes. Adamovich, B. L. B.
August 1994. 2-4.
Measurement of treatment effects in
natural settings. Lyon, J. G.
December 1996. 10-15.
Measuring disability. Frattali, C. M.
December 1996. 7-10.
A model for the measurement of
outcomes. Warren, R. L. December 1996. 20-23.
A multicultural perspective on
assessing TW, a bilingual client
with aphasia. Mahendra, N.
October 2006. 9-18.
Obligations and options in the
evaluation of aphasia. Davis, G.
A. June 1996. 2-8.
Outcomes measurement: Moving
toward the patient. Warren, R. L.
December 1996. 5-6.
The role of the speech-language
pathologist in the evaluation
and treatment of adolescents and
adults with traumatic brain
injury. Adamovich, B. L. B. July
1992. 1-6.
Trends in functional assessment.
Frattali, C. August 1994. 4-10.
Psychological Measures of
Language Function
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K.
June 2005. 9-14.
Sorting pictures to assess participation in life activities. Haley, K.,
Jenkins, K., Hadden, C.,
Womack, J., Hall, J., &
Schweiker, C. December 2005.
11-15.
Two case studies of family influence on treatment outcome after
stroke. Freed, D. December 2004.
16-19.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Intervention
Aphasia and Other Adult Language
Disorders
Acalculia. Cimino-Knight, A. M.,
Hollingsworth, A. L., &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
Agnosia. Greenwald, M., & Mikola,
J. April 2002. 25-30.
Aphasia treatment planning in
acute rehabilitation settings.
Boyle, M. October 1994. 6-9.
Aphasia treatment planning in an
outpatient medical rehabilitation
center: Where do we go from
here? Elman, R. J. October 1994.
9-13.
Associations and dissociations: An
investigation of lexical access
deficits in agrammatism and
anomia. Gordon, J. K. October
2005. 19-23.
Back to the future with singlesubject experimental designs in
aphasia treatment research.
Kearns, K. P. October 2005. 1422.
Bilingual aphasia: A brief introduction. Roberts, P. M. June 2005.
3-9.
Case report: Management of
confabulation after subarachnoid
hemorrhage. Sohlberg, M. M., &
Ehlhardt, L. May 1998. 9-13.
Clinical narrative. Ward, S. R. July
1999. 9-11.
Clinical narrative. Fink, R.,
Lowery, J., & Sobel, P. October
2002. 25-29.
Communicating in groups: One stop
on the road to improved participation for persons with aphasia.
Vickers, C. April 2004. 16-20.
Comprehension approaches for
word retrieval training in
aphasia. Ennis, M. R. June 2001.
18-23.
Conducting conversation: A case
study using the spouse in
aphasia treatment. Boles, L.
September 1998. 24-31.
12
Definitional issues affecting
treatment of aphasia and related
disorders. Beeson, P. M. April
1994. 2.
Department of Veterans Affairs
cooperative studies on aphasia
revisited. Wertz, R.T. October 2005. 613.
Drug treatment issues: Introduction.
Vogel, D. August 1992. 1-2.
The effectiveness of cueing hierarchies as a treatment for word
retrieval impairment. Patterson,
J. P. June 2001. 11-18.
Evaluating efficacy and outcome of
treatment in adults with acquired
aphasia. Doyle, P. December
1994. 2.
General considerations for managing the aphasic patient in the
acute medical setting. Belanger,
S. A. October 1994. 2-6.
Group studies of treatment for
adults with aphasia: Efficacy,
effectiveness, and believability.
Brookshire, R. H. December
1994. 5-14.
Introduction: Cognition in the
rehabilitation of neurogenic
language disorders. Davis, G. A.
March 1996. 2-3.
Issues related to treatment planning
for aphasia in various medical
settings. Coelho, C. A. October
1994.
Language Care Center treatment
programs and the rehabilitation
of aphasia and related disorders.
Harris, V. M., Aftonomos, L. B., &
Steele, R. D. April 2000. 11-14.
Limb apraxia. Hollingsworth, A. L.,
Cimino-Knight, A. M., &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
20-25.
A linguistic-specific approach for
improving sentence production
and comprehension in agrammatic
aphasia: Treatment of underlying
forms. Thompson, C. K. October
2001. 24-32.
Long-term care approaches to
aphasia treatment and management. Elman, R. J. December
1999. 15-17.
Mapping treatment: An approach to
treating sentence level impairments in agrammatism. Fink, R. B.
October 2001. 14-23.
Melodic intonation therapy. Martin,
V. C., Kubitz, K. R., & Maher, L.
M. October 2001. 33-37.
Neurogenic language case studies.
Murray, L. September 1998. 11.
Normal cognition as a framework for
intervention. Mitchum, C. C. June
1996. 9-14.
One approach to the treatment of
anomia. Ochipa, C., Maher, L. M.,
& Raymer, A. M. September 1998.
18-23.
Outcomes of intensive aphasia
treatment. Power of one.
Hinckley, J. April 2002.
Providing speech-language services
to older populations: The role of
ethnicity and acculturation.
Langdon, H. W. April 2005. 2125.
Reciprocal scaffolding treatment
for aphasia. Avent, J. June 2004.
15-18.
Recovered memories: My life as a
Skinnerian. Holland, A. L.
October 2005. 2-6.
A residential approach to conversational intervention. Fox, L. E.,
Ginley, S., & Poulsen, S. B.
December 2004. 4-10.
Return to work after stroke. Solomon,
L. December 2004. 19-23.
The role of computers in the treatment of people with aphasia:
Reflections on the past 20 years.
Katz, R. C. April 2000. 6-10.
Semantic feature analysis: The
evidence for treatment of lexical
impairments in aphasia. Boyle,
M. June 2001. 23-28.
Sensitivity to multiple linguistic
and social identities. Cheng, LR. L. April 2005. 19-20.
Sentence production treatments for
aphasia. Maher, L. M. October
2001. 3.
Service delivery for people confronting aphasia: Some thoughts
and practical suggestions in
troubled times. Lyon, J. G.
December 1999. 18-23.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Successful clinical management
requires cultural intelligence.
Cheng, L-R. L. April 2005. 1619.
Technology in the treatment of
language disorders: Introduction. Robin, D. April 2000. 6.
Treatment of lexical comprehension
impairments in aphasia. Jacobs, B.
June 2001. 4-11.
Treatment of lexical impairments in
aphasia: Focus on the evidence.
Raymer, A. June 2001. 3-4.
Treatment of unilateral neglect in
patients with right hemisphere
brain damage. Barrett, A. M.
December 2000. 18-26.
Two case studies of family influence
on treatment outcome after stroke.
Freed, D. December 2004. 16-19.
Verbs and sentence production in
aphasia: Evidence-based intervention. Mitchum, C. C. October
2001. 4-13.
Child Language Disorders
AAC in the integrated kindergarten.
Buzolich, M. J. June 2004. 18-23.
Acquisition of culture from a
developmental perspective.
Huer, M. B. April 2005. 7-15.
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity
Disorder: Information for schoolbased practioners. Zecker, S. G.
October 2004. 8-13.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K.
June 2005. 9-14.
Communication-based behavioral
interventions for children with
autism spectrum disorder. Brown,
J., & Murray, D. June 2002. 8-12.
Computer-based treatment in a case
of Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Hungerford, S., Coppens, P., &
Clarke, N. September 1998. 1217.
Early language acquisition and
intervention. Loeb, D. F. May
1997. 18-25.
The effects of drugs on language
and learning disorders in a
pediatric population. Mackey, R.
W. August 1992. 7-9.
13
Evidence-based practice guidelines
for autism in children 0 to 3 years.
Halpern, A. April 2002. 32.
Fast ForWord: Training children’s
brains to learn language? Gillam,
R. B. April 2000. 15-18.
Floor Time and evidence-based
practice. Armour, J. June 2002.
16-20.
Functional treatment outcomes for
young children with communication disorders. Campbell, T. F.
December 1996. 16-19.
Interventions for children with
autism spectrum disorders:
Making decisions based on the
evidence. Prelock, P. A. June
2002. 3-7.
The Picture Exchange Communication System. Frost, L. June 2002.
13-15.
Pragmatic language disorders in
children with social communication disorders and their treatment. Baltaxe, C. A. M. April
1993. 2-8.
Managing the long-term communication and memory consequences of dementia. Tonkovich,
J. D. December 1999. 9-14.
Principles and techniques for
managing the memory deficits of
persons with mild to moderate
dementia. Bayles, K. A., &
Tomoeda, C. K. October 1996.
21-27.
Putting names on faces: Use of a
spaced retrieval strategy in a
patient with dementia of the
Alzheimer type. Vanhalle, C.,
Van der Linden, M., Belleville,
S., & Gilbert, B. December 1998.
17-21.
Sensory Integration Therapy.
Abrahamsen, E. June 2002. 20-24.
Speech, language and cognitive
impairments in ALS. Haley, M., &
Raymer, A. M. April 2000. 2-5.
Staging treatment for progressive
neurogenic communication
disorders. Beeson, P. M. October
1999. 6.
Dementia: Language/
Cognitive Impairments
TBI: Language/
Cognitive Impairments
A case study of a spousal communication education and training
program for Alzheimer’s disease.
Orange, J. B., & Colton-Hudson,
A. December 1998. 22-29.
Characteristics and management of
primary progressive aphasia.
Rogers, M. A., & Alarcon, N. B.
October 1999. 12-26.
Drug treatment of the cognitive,
emotional, and behavioral
symptoms of Alzheimer’s
disease. Weiner, M. F. December
1997. 26-31.
Effective interventions for persons
with dementia: using spaced
retrieval and Montessori techniques. Brush, J. A., & Camp, C.
J. October 1999. 27-32.
Language intervention for patients
with dementia attending a
respite program. Johnson, K., &
Bourgeois, M. December 1998.
11-16.
A case of functionally based
rehabilitation following a mild
traumatic brain injury. Cazzato,
K. R. May 1998. 3-8.
A case study of behavioral intervention after childhood traumatic brain injury. Reynolds, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 1998. 610.
Communication strategies for parents
and children. Busse, E., &
Turkstra, L.December 2004. 10-16.
Evaluation and treatment of
swallowing disorders in head
injury. Logemann, J. A. July
1992. 12-14.
Intervention for memory disorders
after TBI. Avery, J., & Kennedy,
M. October 2002. 9-14.
Intervention for individuals with
challenging behavior after TBI.
Ylvisaker, M. October 2002. 1924.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Intervention for memory disorders
after TBI. Avery, J., & Kennedy,
M. October 2002. 9-14.
Introduction: Updates in cognitive
rehabilitation. Sohlberg, M. M.
October 1996. 6.
Making the management of awareness deficits a core part of
cognitive rehabilitation.
Sohlberg, M. M. October 1996.
6-12.
Managing impairments in attention
following traumatic brain injury.
Mateer, C. A. October 1996. 1221.
An overview of approaches to
managing attention impairments.
Sohlberg, M. M. October 2002.
4-8.
Prospective memory training after
acquired brain damage. Raskin,
S. A. October 1996. 27-33.
Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic
Brain Injury. Holland, A. L.
March 1999. 2-4.
The role of the speech-language
pathologist in the evaluation
and treatment of adolescents and
adults with traumatic brain
injury. Adamovich, B. L. B. July
1992. 1-6.
School experiences of students with
acquired brain injury (ABI):
What happens after transition?
Todis, B., & Glang, A. December
1999. 3-9.
School re-entry after TBI. Ylvisaker,
M. July 1992. 6-8.
Shaken baby syndrome. Paustian, G.
October 2004. 4-8.
Some drugs used in the treatment of
traumatic brain injury. Carter, J.
E. August 1992. 3-4.
Speech-pathology management of
TBI in school-aged children.
Burns, M. S. October 2004.
14-19.
TBI case studies. Turkstra, L. May
1998. 3.
Traumatic brain injury and postsecondary education. Turkstra, L.,
Gamazon-Waddell, Y., & Evans, J.
October 2004. 19-24.
14
Treatment of discourse deficits
following TBI. Cannizzaro, M. S.,
Coelho, C. A., & Youse, K. October
2002. 14-19
A Vygotskyan approach to rehabilitation after TBI: A case illustration. Ylvisaker, M., & Feeney, T.
May 1998. 14-19.
Speech
Nature of Normal Speech
Anatomy and Physiology of
the Adult Speech and
Swallowing System
Cortical stilulation mapping and
speech production. Abou-Khalil,
R., & About-Khalil, B. October
2003. 10-15.
fMRI and normal speech production. Shuster, L. I. October 2003.
16-21.
Magnetoencephalography (MEG)
studies of speech production.
Greenwald, M., & Bowyer, S.
October 2003. 4-9.
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P. C. M. June 2005. 15-19.
Perception of Speech
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P. C. M. June 2005. 15-19.
Speech and Voice and
Swallowing Disorders
Articulation and Resonance
Disorders
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Apraxia of
speech (AOS) report. Wambaugh,
J., Duffy, J., McNeil, M., Robin,
D., & Rogers, M. October 2004.
27-28.
Two case studies of family influence on treatment outcome after
stroke. December 2004. Freed, D.
16-19.
Physiologically Based Speech
and Swallowing Disorders
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Apraxia of
speech (AOS) report. Wambaugh,
J., Duffy, J., McNeil, M., Robin,
D., & Rogers, M. October 2004.
27-28.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Report: Dysarthria
report. Yorkston, K., Beukelman,
D., Duffy, J., Golper, L., Miller, R.,
Spencer, K., Strand, E., & Sullivan,
M. June 2004. 27-28.
Differential diagnosis of
dysarthrias: The physiologic
approach. Hammen, V. L. March
1995. 6-9.
Differential diagnosis of motor
speech disorders in children:
Current limitations and future
possibilities. Hodge, M. M.
March 1995. 10-15.
Effects of psychotropic medications
on speech and language. Smith,
E. August 1992. 4-7.
Evidence-based practice: Treatment
of individuals with dysarthria.
December 2006. 13-19. Spencer,
K.
Introduction: Differential diagnosis
of motor speech disorders.
Robin, D. A. March 1995. 2.
Management of dysphagia following stroke: A case study. December 2006. 20-25. Purdy, M.
Motor speech function in young
males with Fragile X syndrome.
June 2006. 3-7. Barnes, E. F.
Neuromotor speech impairment
accompanying aphasia. Square,
P. A. April 1994. 11-16.
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P. C. M. June 2005. 15-19.
Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. Palmer, P. M., & Neel, A. T.
June 2006. 17-21.
Pearls of wisdom-Darley, Aronson,
and Brown and the classification
of the dysarthias. Duffy, J. R.
October 2005. 22-27.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Relationship between speech and
swallowing disorders in degenerative disease: Implications for
management. Miller, R. M.
October 1995. 20-25.
Speech, language, and learning
deficiencies associated with
Tourette’s syndrome. June 2006.
12-16. De Nil, L. F., Roth, I. D.,
Saltzman-Bernaiah, J., & Sandor,
P.
Speech production following
traumatic brain injury: Clinical
and research implications.
Netsell, R., & Lefkowitz, D.
November 1992. 1-8.
Stuttering and Other Fluency
Disturbances
Group therapy is better than individual therapy: With special
attention to stuttering. Rosenthal,
W. S. June 2004. 3-8.
Group treatment across disorders.
Avent, J., Graham, M., & Peppard,
R. June 2004. 23-25.
Stuttering: Review of genetic data.
Blount, M. A. R. October 1993.
6-9.
Voice and Other Laryngeal
Disorders
Group therapy for the survivor of
head and neck cancer: It’s all
about quality of life. Graham, M.
S. June 2004. 8-15.
Group treatment across disorders.
Avent, J., Graham, M., &
Peppard, R. June 2004. 23-25.
Assessment and Intervention
Assessment
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Diagnostic goals and computerassisted evaluation of speech
and related physiology. Till, J. A.
August 1995. 3-7.
Differential diagnosis of
dysarthrias: The physiologic
approach. Hammen, V. L. March
1995. 6-9.
15
Implementing computer assisted
evaluation of speech and voice
in a pediatric practice: One
clinician’s experience.
Lockwood, S. L. August 1995.
11-15.
Introduction: Differential diagnosis
of motor speech disorders.
Robin, D. A. March 1995. 2.
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P. C. M. June 2005. 15-19.
Pearls of Wisdom—Darley, Aronson,
and Brown and the classification
of the dysarthias. Duffy, J. R.
October 2005. 22-27.
Rationale, procedures, and instrumentation in the evaluation and
treatment of individuals with
dysarthria. Netsell, R. W. August
1995. 7-11.
Recovered memories: My life as a
Skinnerian. Holland, A. L.
October 2005. 2-6.
Why differential diagnosis? Duffy,
J. R. March 1995. 2-6.
Intervention
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Apraxia of
speech (AOS) report. Wambaugh,
J., Duffy, J., McNeil, M., Robin, D.,
& Rogers, M. October 2004. 2728.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Report: Dysarthria
report. Yorkston, K., Beukelman,
D., Duffy, J., Golper, L., Miller,
R., Spencer, K., Strand, E., &
Sullivan, M. June 2004. 27-28.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with
acquired dysarthria. Mathy, P.
December 2002. 28-36.
Effects of drugs on voice.
McFarlane, S. C., & Brophy, J. W.
August 1992. 9-10.
Empirical support for treatment of
acquired apraxia of speech.
Wambaugh, J. December 2001. 4.
Evidence for the treatment of
respiratory/phonatory dysfunction from dysarthria. Spencer, K.
A., & Yorkston, K. M. December
2002. 4-16.
Evidence-based practice: Treatment
of individuals with dysarthria.
Spencer, K. December 2006. 1319.
Group therapy is better than
individual therapy: With special
attention to stuttering.
Rosenthal, W. S. June 2004. 3-8.
Introduction to the management of
speech disorders in degenerative
disease. Yorkston, K. M. October
1995. 2-3.
Management of dysarthria in
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Yorkston, K. M. October 1995. 812.
Management of dysphagia following stroke: A case study. Purdy,
M. December 2006. 20-25.
Managing speaking rate in dysarthria. Hammen, V. L. December
2002. 17-21.
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P. C. M. June 2005. 15-19.
Nonspeech oral motor treatment
approaches for dysarthria:
Perspectives on a controversial
clinical practice. Hodge, M. H.
December 2002. 22-28.
Oral motor training and treatment
for apraxia of speech. Shuster, L.
I. December 2001. 18-20.
Principles of motor learning and
treatment for AOS. Ballard, K. J.
December 2001. 13-18.
PROMPT treatment method and
apraxia of speech. Bose, A., &
Square, P. A. December 2001. 59.
Rationale, procedures, and instrumentation in the evaluation and
treatment of individuals with
dysarthria. Netsell, R. W. August
1995. 7-11.
Relationship between speech and
swallowing disorders in degenerative disease: Implications for
management. Miller, R. M.
October 1995. 20-25.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Sound production treatment for
apraxia of speech. Wambaugh, J.
L. December 2001. 9-13.
Speech rehabilitation for individuals with unintelligible speech
and dysarthria: The respiratory
and velopharyngeal systems.
Netsell, R. W. December 1995. 69.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Huntington’s disease.
Klasner, E. October 1995. 12-15.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Parkinson disease. Ramig,
L. O., & Countryman, S. October
1995. 15-20.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Parkinson disease. Ramig,
L. O. December 1995. 10-13.
Staging interventions in progressive dysarthria. Yorkston, K. M.,
& Beukelman, D. October 1999.
7-12.
Staging treatment for progressive
neurogenic communication
disorders. Beeson, P. M. October
1999. 6.
Strength and endurance training for
dysarthria. Solomon, N. P., &
Stierwalt, J. A. G. December
1995. 13-16.
Treatment of severe dysarthria after
TBI—or—Who says they can’t
talk? Workinger, M. S. December
1995. 2-6.
The use of words versus nonwords
in the treatment of apraxia of
speech: a case study. Kahn, H. J.,
Stannard, T., & Skinner, J.
September 1998. 5-10.
Instrumentation for Diagnosis,
Treatment, and Research
Brain activation patterns in stuttering
and nonstuttering speakers:
Preliminary results and future
directions. Blomgren, M., &
Nagarajan, S. S. December 2003.
8-11.
Cortical stimulation mapping and
speech production. Abou-Khalil,
R., & Abou-Khalil, B. October
2003. 10-15.
16
Diagnostic goals and computerassisted evaluation of speech
and related physiology. Till, J. A.
August 1995. 3-7.
fMRI and normal speech production.
Shuster, L. I. October 2003. 16-21.
Functional imaging of speech and
speech disorders. Fox, P. T.,
Ingham, R. J., & Ingham, J. C. June
2003. 10-14.
Implementing computer assisted
evaluation of speech and voice
in a pediatric practice: One
clinician’s experience.
Lockwood, S. L. August 1995.
11-15.
Magnetoencephalography (MEG)
studies of speech production.
Greenwald, M., & Bowyer, S.
October 2003. 4-9.
Rationale, procedures, and instrumentation in the evaluation and
treatment of individuals with
dysarthria. Netsell, R. W. August
1995. 7-11.
Speech rehabilitation for individuals
with unintelligible speech and
dysarthria: The respiratory and
velopharyngeal systems. Netsell,
R. W. December 1995. 6-9.
Assistive Technology
Group treatment across disorders.
Avent, J., Graham, M., &
Peppard, R. June 2004. 23-25.
Augmentative and Alternative
Communication
AAC in the integrated kindergarten.
Buzolich, M. J. June 2004. 1823.
Augmentative and alternative
communication (AAC) assessment: Adult aphasia. Buzolich,
M. J. December 2006. 4-12.
Application of augmentative and
alternative communication in
traumatic brain injury. Shane, H.
C. July 1992. 8-12.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with
acquired dysarthria. Mathy, P.
December 2002. 28-36.
Avent, J., Graham, M., & Peppard,
R. Group treatment across
disorders. June 2004. 23-25.
A residential approach to conversational intervention. Fox, L. E.,
Ginley, S., & Poulsen, S. B.
December 2004. 4-10.
Treatment research on augmentative
and alternative communication for
adults with apraxia of speech.
Rogers, M. A. December 2001. 2128.
Professional and General
Scientific Issues
Professional Affairs
Neuroscience
Central nervous system (CNS)
sequelae of HIV disease. Singer,
E. J. November 1991. 2-7.
Frontiers of clinical neuroscience
continued. Turkstra, L. December
2000. 4.
Neurobiologic substrates of socialemotional behaviors. Voeller, K.
K.S. April 1993. 20-26.
Neurobiological bases of dyslexia.
Leonard, C. M. June 1993. 2-4.
Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s
disease and the Lewy body
variant of Alzheimer’s disease:
synapse density and pathological staging: New pieces of the
puzzle. Brown, D. F., & White, C.
L. December 1997. 11-15.
Neuroprotection following stroke
and head injury. Turkstra, L. S.
October 1997. 3-7.
Plasticity and recovery from brain
damage in adulthood: What can
recovery from aphasia teach us?
Del Toro, J. F. October 1997. 815.
Recent breakthroughs in
Alzheimer’s disease: Risk
factors, biological markers,
cognitive and linguistic distinctions, and pharmacological
interventions. Chapman, S. B.
December 1997. 4-10.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Some drugs used in the treatment of
traumatic brain injury. Carter, J.
E. August 1992. 3-4.
Stroke: Mechanisms and effects.
Reinmuth, O. M. 16-19.
Medicine/Medical Issues
Acute ischemic stroke: Current
treatment and future direction.
Suarez, J. I. December 2000. 511.
The adult with AIDS: Clinical and
research issues. [Abstract of
ASHA Convention program
presentation.] Groher, M.
November 1991. 30-31.
Drugs in the elderly. Greenhouse, A.
H. August 1992. 11-12.
Ethical issues for the nonphysician
in the AIDS crisis. Hammond, J.
November 1991. 23-28.
Genetic studies: A conceptual
overview. Landa, R. October
1993. 1-4.
HIV and hearing loss. Grimes, A. M.
November 1991. 19-23.
Introduction: Update on pharmacological and medical management
of neurological disorders.
Turkstra, L. June 2000. 3.
Management of multiple sclerosis.
Bethoux, F. A. June 2000. 4-11.
Neurosurgical management of head
injury. Khaldi, A., Beach, W.,
Clausen, T., & Bullock, R. June
2000. 16-20.
The neuropsychology of AIDS.
Adams, K. M. November 1991. 79.
Pediatric AIDS: A speech-language
pathology perspective. NebelGould, A. November 1991. 1519.
Pharmaceutical treatment of
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Cwik, V. A. June 2000. 11-16.
Pharmacology 101: Relevant
information for the speechlanguage pathologist in the
acute care setting. Shekim, L.
June 1999. 15-19.
The psychology of HIV-infection
and AIDS. Brooks, J. November
1991. 9-15.
17
Recent advances in the management of Parkinson’s disease.
Montgomery, E. B. December
2000. 11-17.
Review of recent literature. VegaBarachowitz, C. June 1999. 4-5.
Stroke: Mechanisms and effects.
Reinmuth, O. M. 16-19.
Professional Standards and
Ethics
Acquisition of culture from a
developmental perspective.
Huer, M. B. April 2005. 7-15.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Progress
report. Frattali, C., HelmEstabrooks, N., Myers, P., Golper,
L., Katz, R., Wertz, R., Bayles,
K., Beeson, P., Kennedy, M.,
Robin, D., Wambaugh, J., &
Yorkston, K. April 2004. 23-24.
Educating other professionals
about what audiologists and
speech-language pathologists
do. 1999 ASHA Executive Board
subcommittee (Logemann, J.,
Swigert, N., Busacco, D., Fagan,
E., & Pietranton, A.). October
1999. 33.
Ethical issues facing the speechlanguage pathologist in the
acute care setting. Goldsmith, T.
June 1999. 20-24.
Ethical issues for the nonphysician
in the AIDS crisis. Hammond, J.
November 1991. 23-28.
Ethical issues related to progressive
disease. Strand, E. A. October
1995. 3-8.
A multicultural perspective on
assessing TW, a bilingual client
with aphasia. Mahendra, N.
October 2006. 9-18.
The practice of evidence-based
practice: A case study approach.
Patterson, J. P., & Avent, J. R.
October 2006. 4-8.
Providing speech-language services
to older populations: The role of
ethnicity and acculturation.
Langdon, H. W. April 2005. 2125.
Sensitivity to multiple linguistic
and social identities. Cheng, LR. L. April 2005. 19-20.
Specialty certification: What’s in it
for me? Royal, C. October 1999.
3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. May 1997. 3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. September 1998. 3-4.
Successful clinical management
requires cultural intelligence.
Cheng, L-R.L. April 2005. 16-19.
The use of the ICF in intervention
for persons with neurogenic
communication disorders.
Threats, T. April 2004. 4-8.
Why is yogurt good for you?
Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevick,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L-R. L,
Davis-McFarland, E., DealWilliams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L. F., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
April 2005. 3-7.
Governmental and
Professional Regulations
Advocacy Committee. Committee
corner. October 2003. 22-23.
Advocating for nursing home
residents. Cleary, S., & Hopper,
T. June 2000. 21-22.
Association lobbying: Your role at
the grassroots level. Young, A. J.
October 2000. 16-18.
Alphabet soup, post-acute care, and
the speech-language pathologist: Surviving the current crisis.
Neustadt, G. March 1999. 14-20.
Communicating with your legislators: Advocating effectively for
your patients. Walker, V. G.
October 2000. 19-21.
Developing and implementing a
quality improvement plan in an
acute care hospital setting. Roth,
C. R. June 1999. 24-28.
Educating and supporting individuals with aphasia and their
families. Glista, S. December
2006. 25-31.
Education Committee. Committee
corner. April 2003. 40-41.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
The eyes and the ears for the
senator: Conversation with the
staff. Musson, N. October 2000.
22.
How is a treatment plan for an
aphasic patient reviewed in
terms of Medicare policy and
guidelines? Busch, C. October
1994. 14-17.
Let’s get in the game! Musson, N.
October 2000. 4-5.
A quick review: The federal
government, congress and a bill.
Musson, N. October 2000. 5-8.
Research Committee. Committee
corner. December 2003. 31-32.
Setting a course for advocacy
success. Potter, J. G. October
2000. 9-12.
Working to influence public policy
through grassroots advocacy.
Lucas, L. S. October 2000. 1315.
Service Provision Models and
Problems
Advocacy and Reimbursement
Committee: Advocacy for
whom? Threats, T., Clark, H.,
Ellmo, W., Busch, C., & Oerhing,
A. October 2004. 26-27.
Aphasia treatment planning in
acute rehabilitation settings.
Boyle, M. October 1994. 6-9.
Aphasia treatment planning in an
outpatient medical rehabilitation
center: Where do we go from
here? Elman, R. J. October 1994.
9-13.
Clinical practice guidelines: What is
the anticipated outcome? [Letter
to the editor]. Coneff, P. April
2003, 39.
A consultative approach. George, P.
June 1999. 5-10.
Dealing with change in service
reimbursement: Introduction.
Johnson, A. March 1999. 5.
Developing and implementing a
quality improvement plan in an
acute care hospital setting. Roth,
C. R. June 1999. 24-28.
18
Ethical issues facing the speechlanguage pathologist in the acute
care setting. Goldsmith, T. June
1999. 20-24.
Funding alternatives to offset the
reimbursement impacts of managed care. Henri, B. P., &
Hallowell, B. March 1999. 11-14.
General considerations for managing
the aphasic patient in the acute
medical setting. Belanger, S. A.
October 1994. 2-6.
ICF and QOL: A partnership.
Threats, T.T. October 2005. 4-6.
Introduction: Speech-language
pathology practice in long-term
care settings. Elman, R. J. December 1999. 3.
Issues related to treatment planning
for aphasia in various medical
settings. Coelho, C. A. October
1994.
Managing or caring? Johnson, A.
March 1999. 6-8.
Measurement of functional outcomes. Adamovich, B. L. B.
August 1994. 2-4.
Measuring disability. Frattali, C. M.
December 1996. 7-10.
Outcomes measurement: Moving
toward the patient. Warren, R. L.
December 1996. 5-6.
Speech-language pathology practice
in the acute care setting. VegaBarachowitz, C. June 1999. 3-4.
Staging treatment for progressive
neurogenic communication
disorders. Beeson, P. M. October
1999. 6.
Towards a common language for
functioning and disablement:
ICIDH-2 (The International
Classification of Impairments,
Activities, and Participation). Lux,
J. B. March 1999. 8-10.
The use of the ICF in intervention for
persons with neurogenic communication disorders. Threats, T.
April 2004. 4-8.
Why is yogurt good for you?
Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevick,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L-R. L,,
Davis-McFarland, E., DealWilliams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L. F., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
April 2005. 3-7.
Research Issues and
Methodology
Advancing the development and
understanding of patient-based
outcomes in persons with
aphasia. Doyle, P. J. October
2005. 7-11.
Assessing quality of life with
aphasia: An annotated bibliography. Ross, K. B. October 2005.
15-18.
Back to basics: Documenting hearing
status in adults. Royal-Evans, C.,
Alarcon, N., Fink, R., Howell, M.,
Vickers, C., & Wilson, B. June
2003. 24.
Back to the future with singlesubject experimental designs in
aphasia treatment research.
Kearns, K. P. October 2005. 1422.
Bilingual aphasia: A brief introduction. Roberts, P. M. June 2005.
3-9.
Central nervous system (CNS)
sequelae of HIV disease. Singer, E.
J. November 1991. 2-7.
Cerebral vascular imaging: Methods,
applications, and considerations.
Silkes, J. P. April 2003. 10-17.
Contributions of qualitative research
to the study of functional communication and outcome in aphasia.
Simmons-Mackie, N. N. December
1994. 14-18.
Credible, or incredible? Evaluating
the quality of information on the
Internet. Stierwalt, J. A. G. December 2002. 39-40.
Department of Veterans Affairs
cooperative studies on aphasia
revisited. Wertz, R.T. October
2005. 6-13.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Electrophysiological measures of
hearing, speech, and language.
Frieson, L. M., & Tremblay, K. L.
April 2003. 3-10.
A model for the measurement of
outcomes. Warren, R. L. December 1996. 20-23.
Neurobiologic substrates of socialemotional behaviors. Voeller, K. K.
S. April 1993. 20-26.
Neurobiological bases of dyslexia.
Leonard, C. M. June 1993. 2-4.
Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s
disease and the Lewy body variant
of Alzheimer’s disease: Synapse
density and pathological staging:
New pieces of the puzzle. Brown,
D. F., & White, C. L. December
1997. 11-15.
Neuroprotection following stroke
and head injury. Turkstra, L. S.
October 1997. 3-7.
A new clinical data base for
medical speech-language
pathology. Johnson, A. F. August
1994. 10-14.
Positron emission tomography and
single photon emission tomography. Off, C. A. April 2003. 34-38.
Plasticity and recovery from brain
damage in adulthood: What can
recovery from aphasia teach us?
Del Toro, J. F. October 1997. 815.
The practice of evidence-based
practice: A case study approach.
Patterson, J. P., & Avent, J. R.
October 2006. 4-8.
A primer on functional magnetic
resonance imaging (fMRI).
McLaughlin, S. A., Rogers, M.
A., & Shibata, D. K. April 2003.
25-33.
Reading research. Golper, L. A. C.,
& Wertz, R. T. April 2002. 27-31.
Recent breakthroughs in
Alzheimer’s disease: Risk
factors, biological markers,
cognitive and linguistic distinctions, and pharmacological
interventions. Chapman, S. B.
December 1997. 4-10.
Single-subject experimental designs
and the clinician scientist. Kearns,
K. P. December 1994. 2-5.
19
Some drugs used in the treatment of
traumatic brain injury. Carter, J. E.
August 1992. 3-4.
Strategies for enhancing the body of
evidence for clinical decision
making. Brobeck, T. C. April
2004. 11-16.
Stroke: Mechanisms and effects.
Reinmuth, O. M. 16-19. Contributions of qualitative research to the
study of functional communication and outcome in aphasia.
Simmons-Mackie, N. N. December
1994. 14-18.
Structural CT and MRI—The basics.
Baylor, C. R. April 2003. 18-24.
The use of the ICF in intervention for
persons with neurogenic communication disorders. Threats, T.
April 2004. 4-8.
Interdisciplinary Concerns
Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic
Brain Injury. Holland, A. L. March
1999. 2-4.
Report on the Consensus Conference
on Medical Speech-Language
Pathology. Golper, L. A. C.
October 1995. 28.
Towards a common language for
functioning and disablement:
ICIDH-2 (The International
Classification of Impairments,
Activities, and Participation). Lux,
J. B. March 1999. 8-10.
The World Wide Web: Friend or foe?
Stierwalt, J. October 2001. 38-39.
Professional Training
Education and Continuing
Education
Action needed. Rothi, L. J. G.
October 1994. 25-26.
Alphabet soup, post-acute care, and
the speech-language pathologist:
Surviving the current crisis.
Neustadt, G. March 1999. 14-20.
Applying for CEU co-sponsorship of
educational events. Kimbarow, M.
October 1995. 26-28.
Clinical Committee: “Pick of the lit.”
Royal-Evans, C., & Wilson, B.
June 2004. 26-27.
Continuing education update.
Patterson, J. December 1999. 2425.
Education and Mentoring Committee. Boles, L., Purdy, M.,
Schneider, S. L., Solomon, L.,
Stierwalt, J., & Kennedy, M. April
2004. 21-22.
The future of the discipline. Minifie,
F. D. October 1996. 35-37.
Glossary of terms. Nebel-Gould, A.
November 1991. 28-30.
Pearls of wisdom—Darley, Aronson,
and Brown and the classification
of the dysarthias. Duffy, J. R.
October 2005. 22-27.
Questions and answers from a
Division 2 legislative councilor.
Musson, N. October 1999.4-6.
Specialty certification: What’s in it
for me? Royal, C. October 1999.
3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. May 1997. 3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. September 1998. 3-4.
Strategies for enhancing the body
of evidence for clinical decision
making. Brobeck, T. C. April
2004. 11-16.
Using the ICF framework to define
outcomes. Simmons-Mackie, N.
April 2004. 9-11.
Why is yogurt good for you?
Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevick,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L-R. L.,
Davis-McFarland, E., DealWilliams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L. F., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
April 2005. 3-7.
Counseling
Communication strategies for
parents and children. Busse, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 2004.
10-16.
Group therapy for the survivor of
head and neck cancer: It’s all
about quality of life. Graham, M.
S. June 2004. 8-15.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Group therapy is better than
individual therapy: With special
attention to stuttering.
Rosenthal, W. S. June 2004. 3-8.
Sorting pictures to assess participation in life activities. Haley, K.,
Jenkins, K., Hadden, C.,
Womack, J., Hall, J., &
Schweiker, C. December 2005.
11-15.
Two case studies of family
influence on treatment outcome
after stroke. Freed, D. December
2004. 16-19.
20
Title Index
AAC in the integrated kindergarten.
Buzolich, M. J. June 2004. 1823.
Acalculia. Cimino-Knight, A. M.,
Hollingsworth, A. L. &
Gonzalez-Rothi, L. J. April 2002.
30-36.
An account of human cognition.
Tseng, C.-H. March 1996. 3-7.
Acquisition of culture from a
developmental perspective.
Huer, M.B. April 2005. 7-15.
Action needed. Rothi, L. J. G.
October 1994. 25-26.
Acute ischemic stroke: Current
treatment and future direction.
Suarez, J. I. December 2000. 511.
The adult with AIDS: Clinical and
research issues. [Abstract of
ASHA Convention program
presentation.] Groher, M.
November 1991. 30-31.
Advancing the development and
understanding of patient-based
outcomes in persons with
aphasia. Doyle, P. J. October
2005. 7-11.
Advocacy and Reimbursement
Committee: Advocacy for
whom? Threats, T., Clark, H.,
Ellmo, W., Busch, C., & Oerhing,
A. October 2004. 26-27.
Advocating for nursing home
residents. Cleary, S., & Hopper,
T. June 2000. 21-22.
Agnosia. Greenwald, M., & Mikola, J.
April 2002. 25-30.
Agrammatism. Maher, L. M. April
1994. 6-11.
Agraphia. Barriere, I. April 2002. 1320.
Alexia. Greenwald, M., & George, P.
April 2002. 4-13.
Alphabet soup, post-acute care, and
the speech-language pathologist: Surviving the current crisis.
Neustadt, G. March 1999. 14-20.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Apraxia of
speech (AOS) report. Wambaugh,
J., Duffy, J., McNeil, M., Robin,
D., & Rogers, M. October 2004.
27-28.
ANCDS Evidence-based practice
guidelines report: Dysarthria
report.Yorkston, K., Beukelman,
D., Duffy, J., Golper, L., Miller,
R., Spencer, K., Strand, E., &
Sullivan, M. June 2004. 27-28.
ANCDS Evidence-Based Practice
Guidelines Project: Progress
report. Frattali, C., HelmEstabrooks, N., Myers, P.,
Golper, L., Katz, R., Wertz, R.,
Bayles, K., Beeson, P., Kennedy,
M., Robin, D., Wambaugh, J., &
Yorkston, K. April 2004. 23-24.
Aphasia treatment planning in
acute rehabilitation settings.
Boyle, M. October 1994. 6-9.
Aphasia treatment planning in an
outpatient medical rehabilitation
center: Where do we go from
here? Elman, R. J. October 1994.
9-13.
Application of augmentative and
alternative communication in
traumatic brain injury. Shane, H.
C. July 1992. 8-12.
Applying for CEU co-sponsorship
of educational events.
Kimbarow, M. October 1995. 2628.
Assessing quality of life with
aphasia: An annotated bibliography. Ross, K. B. October 2005.
15-18.
Assessment tools for adolescents
and adults in languages other
than English. Kennedy, M. R. T.,
& Chiou, H-H. June 2005. 20-23.
Association lobbying: Your role at
the grassroots level. Young, A. J.
October 2000. 16-18.
Associations and dissociations: An
investigation of lexical access
deficits in agrammatism and
anomia. Gordon, J. K. October
2005. 19-23.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity
disorder: Information for schoolbased practioners. Zecker, S. G.
October 2004. 8-13.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired dysarthria. Mathy, P.
December 2002. 28-36.
Back to basics: Assessment practices with neurogenic communication disorders. Golper, L. A. C.,
& Cherney, L. July 1999. 3-8.
Back to the future with singlesubject experimental designs in
aphasia treatment research.
Kearns, K. P. October 2005. 1422.
Behavior disorders and traumatic
brain injury. Jacobs, H. E. July
1992. 14-16.
Bilingual aphasia: A brief introduction. Roberts, P. M. June 2005.
3-9.
Board of Division Coordinators
meeting. Maher, L. M. September
1998. 4.
A case of functionally based
rehabilitation following a mild
traumatic brain injury. Cazzato,
K. R. May 1998. 3-8.
Case report: Management of
confabulation after subarachnoid
hemorrhage. Sohlberg, M. M., &
Ehlhardt, L. May 1998. 9-13.
A case study of a spousal communication education and training
program for Alzheimer’s disease.
Orange, J. B., & Colton-Hudson,
A. December 1998. 22-29.
A case study of behavioral intervention after childhood traumatic brain injury. Reynolds, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 1998. 610.
Central nervous system (CNS)
sequelae of HIV disease. Singer,
E. J. November 1991. 2-7.
Characteristics and management of
primary progressive aphasia.
Rogers, M. A., & Alarcon, N. B.
October 1999. 12-26.
21
Clinical and not-so-clinical
approaches to the study of
aphasia. Milekic, S. March 1996.
14-17.
Clinical Committee: “Pick of the
lit.” Royal-Evans, C., & Wilson,
B. June 2004. 26-27.
Clinical implications of recent
research on semantic processing.
Hillis, A. April 1994. 2-6.
Clinical narrative. Ward, S. R. July
1999. 9-11.
Clinical narrative. Fink, R.,
Lowery, J., & Sobel, P. October
2002. 25-29.
Cognitive functioning in
Alzheimer’s disease: Evidence
for preclinical abnormalities?
Cullum, C. M., & Lacritz, L.
December 1997. 15-20.
Cognitive intervention case
studies. Neils-Strunjas, J.
December 1998. 5.
Cognitive-linguistic interactions in
bilingual aphasia: Implications
for intervention. Kohnert, K..
June 2005. 9-14.
Communicating in groups: One
stop on the road to improved
participation for persons with
aphasia. Vickers, C. April 2004.
16-20.
Communicating with your legislators: Advocating effectively for
your patients. Walker, V. G.
October 2000. 19-21.
Communication-based behavioral
interventions for children with
autism spectrum disorder. Brown,
J., & Murray, D. June 2002. 8-12.
Communication strategies for
parents and children. Busse, E.,
& Turkstra, L. December 2004.
10-16.
Comprehension approaches for word
retrieval training in aphasia.
Ennis, M. R. June 2001. 18-23.
Computer-based treatment in a case
of Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Hungerford, S., Coppens, P., &
Clarke, N. September 1998. 1217.
Conducting conversation: A case
study using the spouse in
aphasia treatment. Boles, L.
September 1998. 24-31.
A consultative approach. George, P.
June 1999. 5-10.
Continuing education committee
update. Kimbarow, M. L. August
1995. 2.
Continuing education update.
Cherney, L. December 1998. 31.
Continuing education update.
Cherney, L. March 1999. 21.
Continuing education update.
Patterson, J. December 1999. 2425.
The contribution of theory of mind
to communicative competence.
Happé, F. April 1993. 17-20.
Contributions of qualitative
research to the study of functional communication and
outcome in aphasia. SimmonsMackie, N. N. December 1994.
14-18.
Credible, or incredible? Evaluating the
quality of information on the
Internet. Stierwalt, J. A. G. December 2002. 39-40.
Dealing with change in service
reimbursement: Introduction.
Johnson, A. March 1999. 5.
The definition and characteristics
of dyslexia. Snowling, M. J. June
1993. 5-7.
Definitional issues affecting
treatment of aphasia and related
disorders. Beeson, P. M. April
1994. 2.
Department of Veterans Affairs
cooperative studies on aphasia
revisited. Wertz, R. T. October
2005. 6-13.
Developing and implementing a
quality improvement plan in an
acute care hospital setting. Roth,
C. R. June 1999. 24-28.
Diagnostic decision-making
process in the acute care setting.
Kavrie, S. June 1999. 10-15.
Diagnostic goals and computerassisted evaluation of speech
and related physiology. Till, J. A.
August 1995. 3-7.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Differential diagnosis of
dysarthrias: The physiologic
approach. Hammen, V. L. March
1995. 6-9.
Differential diagnosis of motor
speech disorders in children:
Current limitations and future
possibilities. Hodge, M. M.
March 1995. 10-15.
Discourse. Brownell, H. June 1996.
15-22.
Discourse markers of Alzheimer’s
disease versus normal advanced
aging. Chapman, S. B. December
1997. 20-26.
The discrepancy definition of
dyslexia. Siegel, L. S. June 1993.
7-11.
Does Medicare cover group therapy?
Busch, C. December 2001. 29.
Drug treatment issues: Introduction.
Vogel, D. August 1992. 1-2.
Drug treatment of the cognitive,
emotional, and behavioral
symptoms of Alzheimer’s
disease. Weiner, M. F. December
1997. 26-31.
Drugs in the elderly. Greenhouse, A.
H. August 1992. 11-12.
Early brain and language development. Molfese, D. L., & Fox, D.
R. May 1997. 11-17.
Early language acquisition and
intervention. Loeb, D. F. May
1997. 18-25.
Educating communities about
aphasia. Bremer, M., Pighetti, J., &
Orjada, S. December 2002. 38-39.
Educating other professionals
about what audiologists and
speech-language pathologists
do. 1999 ASHA Executive Board
subcommittee( Logemann, J.,
Swigert, N., Busacco, D., Fagan,
E., & Pietranton, A.). October
1999. 33.
Education and Mentoring
Committee.Boles, L., Purdy, M.,
Schneider, S. L., Solomon, L.,
Stierwalt, J., & Kennedy, M.
April 2004. 21-22.
The effectiveness of cueing hierarchies as a treatment for word
retrieval impairment. Patterson, J.
P. June 2001. 11-18.
22
The effects of drugs on language
and learning disorders in a
pediatric population. Mackey, R.
W. August 1992. 7-9.
Effective interventions for persons
with dementia: Using spaced
retrieval and Montessori techniques. Brush, J. A., & Camp, C.
J. October 1999. 27-32.
Effects of drugs on voice.
McFarlane, S. C., & Brophy, J. W.
August 1992. 9-10
Effects of psychotropic medications
on speech and language. Smith,
E. August 1992. 4-7.
Empirical support for treatment of
acquired apraxia of speech.
Wambaugh, J. December 2001. 4.
Ethical issues facing the speechlanguage pathologist in the
acute care setting. Goldsmith, T.
June 1999. 20-24.
Ethical issues for the nonphysician
in the AIDS crisis. Hammond, J.
November 1991. 23-28.
Ethical issues related to progressive
disease. Strand, E. A. October
1995. 3-8.
Evaluating efficacy and outcome of
treatment in adults with acquired
aphasia. Doyle, P. December
1994. 2.
Evaluation and treatment of
swallowing disorders in head
injury. Logemann, J. A. July
1992. 12-14.
Evidence for the heritability of
autism. Landa, R. L. October
1993. 4-6.
Evidence for the treatment of respiratory/phonatory dysfunction from
dysarthria. Spencer, K. A. &
Yorkston, K. M. December 2002. 416.
Evidence-based practice guidelines
for autism in children 0 to 3 years.
Halpern, A. April 2002. 32.
The eyes and the ears for the
senator: Conversation with the
staff. Musson, N. October 2000.
22.
Fast ForWord: Training children’s
brains to learn language? Gillam,
R. B. April 2000. 15-18.
FAQs on CEUs. Patterson, J. P. June
2001. 30.
Floor Time and evidence-based
practice. Armour, J. June 2002. 1620.
From clinical practice to clinical
outcome research and back again.
Part I: Clinical outcomes. Part II:
Treatment effectiveness, treatment
efficacy, and clinical trials. Part
III: Evidence-based practice. Part
IV: Meta-Analysis. Robey, R. R.
April 2001. 3-18.
Frontiers of clinical neuroscience
continued. Turkstra, L. December
2000. 4.
Functional treatment outcomes for
young children with communication disorders. Campbell, T. F.
December 1996. 16-19.
Funding alternatives to offset the
reimbursement impacts of
managed care. Henri, B. P., &
Hallowell, B. March 1999. 1114.
The future of the discipline.
Minifie, F. D. October 1996. 3537.
General considerations for managing the aphasic patient in the
acute medical setting. Belanger,
S. A. October 1994. 2-6.
Genetic studies: A conceptual
overview. Landa, R. October
1993. 1-4.
Genetics of specific language
impairment and dyslexia.
Tomblin, J. B. October 1993. 912.
Glossary of terms. Nebel-Gould, A.
November 1991. 28-30.
Group studies of treatment for
adults with aphasia: Efficacy,
effectiveness, and believability.
Brookshire, R. H. December
1994. 5-14.
Group therapy for the survivor of
head and neck cancer: It’s all
about quality of life. Graham,
M. S. June 2004. 8-15.
Group therapy is better than
individual therapy: With special
attention to tuttering.Rosenthal,
W. S. June 2004. 3-8.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Group treatment across
disorders.Avent, J., Graham, M.,
& Peppard, R. June 2004. 23-25.
HIVD and hearing loss. Grimes, A.
M. November 1991. 19-23.
How is a treatment plan for an
aphasic patient reviewed in
terms of Medicare policy and
guidelines? Busch, C. October
1994. 14-17.
Human memory and overview.
Bayles, K. A. October 1992. 1-4.
ICF and QOL: A partnership.
Threats, T. T. October 2005. 4-6.
Implementing computer assisted
evaluation of speech and voice
in a pediatric practice: One
clinician’s experience.
Lockwood, S. L. August 1995.
11-15.
Intervention for individuals with
challenging behavior after TBI.
Ylvisaker, M. October 2002. 19-24.
Intervention for memory disorders
after TBI. Avery, J., & Kennedy, M.
October 2002. 9-14.
Interventions for children with autism
spectrum disorders: Making
decisions based on the evidence.
Prelock, P. A. June 2002. 3-7.
An interview with Leonard L.
LaPointe. December 1998. 2-4.
Interview with Nancy HelmEstabrooks, Recipient of the
2000 Honors of the Association.
Maher, L. December 2000. 3-4.
Introduction: Brooks, J. November
1991. 1-2.
Introduction: Cognition in the
rehabilitation of neurogenic
language disorders. Davis, G. A.
March 1996. 2-3.
Introduction: Differential diagnosis
of motor speech disorders.
Robin, D. A. March 1995. 2.
Introduction: Speech-language
pathology practice in long-term
care settings. Elman, R. J.
December 1999. 3.
Introduction: Update on pharmacological and medical management
of neurological disorders.
Turkstra, L. June 2000. 3.
23
Introduction: Updates in cognitive
rehabilitation. Sohlberg, M. M.
October 1996. 6.
Introduction to the management of
speech disorders in degenerative
disease. Yorkston, K. M. October
1995. 2-3.
Introduction to the second round
on cognition. Davis, G. A. June
1996. 2.
Issues related to treatment planning
for aphasia in various medical
settings. Coelho, C. A. October
1994. 1-2.
Language Care Center treatment
programs and the rehabilitation
of aphasia and related disorders.
Harris, V. M., Aftonomos, L. B., &
Steele, R. D. April 2000. 11-14.
Language intervention for patients
with dementia attending a
respite program. Johnson, K., &
Bourgeois, M. December 1998.
11-16.
Let’s get in the game! Musson, N.
October 2000. 4-5.
Limb apraxia. Hollingsworth, A. L.,
Cimino-Knight, A. M. & GonzalezRothi, L. J. April 2002. 20-25.
Limb apraxia. Ochipa, C. April
1994. 17-20.
Linguistic deficits after traumatic
brain injury. Hartley, L. L. April
1994. 20-24.
A linguistic-specific approach for
improving sentence production
and comprehension in agrammatic
aphasia: Treatment of underlying
forms. Thompson, C. K. October
2001. 24-32.
Long-term care approaches to
aphasia treatment and management. Elman, R. J. December
1999. 15-17.
Making the management of awareness deficits a core part of
cognitive rehabilitation.
Sohlberg, M. M. October 1996.
6-12.
Management of dysarthria in
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Yorkston, K. M. October 1995. 812.
Management of multiple sclerosis.
Bethoux, F. A. June 2000. 4-11.
Managing impairments in attention
following traumatic brain injury.
Mateer, C. A. October 1996. 1221.
Managing or caring? Johnson, A.
March 1999. 6-8.
Managing speaking rate in dysarthria.
Hammen, V. L. December 2002. 1721.
Managing the long-term communication and memory consequences of dementia. Tonkovich,
J. D. December 1999. 9-14.
Manifestations of memory impairment in traumatic brain injury
and their clinical implications.
Mateer, C. October 1992. 11-13.
Mapping treatment: An approach to
treating sentence level impairments in agrammatism. Fink, R. B.
October 2001. 14-23.
Measurement of functional outcomes. Adamovich, B. L. B.
August 1994. 2-4.
Measurement of treatment effects in
natural settings. Lyon, J. G.
December 1996. 10-15.
Measuring disability. Frattali, C. M.
December 1996. 7-10.
Melodic intonation therapy. Martin,
V. C., Kubitz, K. R., & Maher, L.
M. October 2001. 33-37.
Memory disorders in Alzheimer’s
disease. Foldi, N. S. October
1992 4-7.
Memory impairment associated
with aphasia due to stroke.
Beeson, P. M. October 1992. 911.
A model for the measurement of
outcomes. Warren, R. L. December 1996. 20-23.
Neurobiologic substrates of socialemotional behaviors. Voeller, K.
K. S. April 1993. 20-26.
Neurobiological bases of dyslexia.
Leonard, C. M. June 1993. 2-4.
Neurogenic language case studies.
Murray, L. September 1998. 11.
Neuromotor speech impairment
accompanying aphasia. Square,
P. A. April 1994. 11-16.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Neuropathology of Alzheimer’s
disease and the Lewy body
variant of Alzheimer’s disease:
synapse density and pathological staging: New pieces of the
puzzle. Brown, D. F., & White, C.
L. December 1997. 11-15.
Neurophysiologic correlates and
disorders of lexical tones. Wong,
P.C.M. June 2005. 15-19.
Neuroprotection following stroke
and head injury. Turkstra, L. S.
October 1997. 3-7.
Nonspeech oral motor treatment
approaches for dysarthria:
Perspectives on a controversial
clinical practice. Hodge, M. H.
December 2002. 22-28.
The neuropsychology of AIDS.
Adams, K. M. November 1991. 79.
Neurosurgical management of head
injury. Khaldi, A., Beach, W.,
Clausen, T., & Bullock, R. June
2000. 16-20.
A new clinical data base for
medical speech-language
pathology. Johnson, A. F. August
1994. 10-14.
Nonverbal affective signals in
social communication disorders.
Morris, M. K. April 1993. 12-17.
Normal cognition as a framework
for intervention. Mitchum, C. C.
June 1996. 9-14.
Nosologic issues in discriminating
linguistic and social impairments in preschool children.
Fein, D. April 1993. 9-12.
Obligations and options in the
evaluation of aphasia. Davis, G.
A. June 1996. 2-8.
One approach to the treatment of
anomia. Ochipa, C., Maher, L.
M., & Raymer, A. M. September
1998. 18-23.
Oral motor training and treatment for
apraxia of speech. Shuster, L. I.
December 2001. 18-20.
Outcomes measurement: Moving
toward the patient. Warren, R. L.
December 1996. 5-6.
Outcomes of intensive aphasia
treatment. Hinckley, J. April 2002.
Power of One.
24
An overview of approaches to
managing attention impairments.
Sohlberg, M. M. October 2002. 4-8.
Pearls of wisdom—Darley, Aronson,
and Brown and the classification
of the dysarthias. Duffy, J.R..
October 2005. 22-27.
Pediatric AIDS: A speech-language
pathology perspective. NebelGould, A. November 1991. 1519.
Perseveration: A manifestation of
memory deficit. HelmEstabrooks, N., & Hotz, G.
October 1992. 7-9.
Pharmaceutical treatment of
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Cwik, V. A. June 2000. 11-16.
Pharmacology 101: Relevant
information for the speechlanguage pathologist in the
acute care setting. Shekim, L.
June 1999. 15-19.
The Picture Exchange Communication
System. Frost, L. June 2002. 13-15.
Plasticity and recovery from brain
damage in adulthood: What can
recovery from aphasia teach us?
Del Toro, J. F. October 1997. 815.
Pragmatic language disorders in
children with social communication disorders and their treatment. Baltaxe, C. A. M. April
1993. 2-8.
Principles and techniques for
managing the memory deficits of
persons with mild to moderate
dementia. Bayles, K. A., &
Tomoeda, C. K. October 1996.
21-27.
Principles of motor learning and
treatment for AOS. Ballard, K. J.
December 2001. 13-18.
PROMPT treatment method and
apraxia of speech. Bose, A., &
Square, P. A. December 2001. 5-9.
Prospective memory training after
acquired brain damage. Raskin,
S. A. October 1996. 27-33.
Providing speech-language services
to older populations: the role of
ethnicity and acculturation.
Langdon, H. W. April 2005. 2125.
The psychology of HIV-infection
and AIDS. Brooks, J. November
1991. 9-15.
Putting names on faces: Use of a
spaced retrieval strategy in a
patient with dementia of the
Alzheimer type. Vanhalle, C.,
Van der Linden, M., Belleville,
S., & Gilbert, B. December 1998.
17-21.
Questions and answers from a
Division 2 legislative councilor.
Musson, N. October 1999. 4-6.
A quick review: The federal
government, Congress and a bill.
Musson, N. October 2000. 5-8.
Rationale, procedures, and instrumentation in the evaluation and
treatment of individuals with
dysarthria. Netsell, R. W. August
1995. 7-11.
Reading research. Golper, L. A. C. &
Wertz, R. T. April 2002. 27-31.
Recent advances in the management
of Parkinson’s disease. Montgomery, E. B. December 2000. 1117.
Recent breakthroughs in
Alzheimer’s disease: Risk
factors, biological markers,
cognitive and linguistic distinctions, and pharmacological
interventions. Chapman, S. B.
December 1997. 4-10.
Reciprocal scaffolding treatment
for aphasia. Avent, J. June 2004.
15-18.
Recovered memories: My life as a
Skinnerian. Holland, A. L.
October 2005. 2-6.
The relationship between language
disorders and reading disabilities. Scarborough, H. S., &
Fowler, A. E. June 1993. 12-15.
Relationship between speech and
swallowing disorders in degenerative disease: Implications for
management. Miller, R. M.
October 1995. 20-25.
Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic
Brain Injury. Holland, A. L.
March 1999. 2-4.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Report on the Consensus Conference on Medical SpeechLanguage Pathology. Golper, L.
A. C. October 1995. 28.
A residential approach to conversational intervention. Fox, L. E.,
Ginley, S., & Poulsen, S. B.
December 2004. 4-10.
Return to work after stroke.
Solomon, L. December 2004. 1923.
Review of recent literature. VegaBarachowitz, C. June 1999. 4-5.
The role of computers in the
treatment of people with aphasia: Reflections on the past 20
years. Katz, R. C. April 2000. 610.
The role of genes in the development of language and languagerelated disorders. Gilger, J. W.
May 1997. 5-10.
The role of phonological awareness
in early reading acquisition.
Blachman, B. A. June 1993. 1518.
The role of the speech-language
pathologist in the evaluation
and treatment of adolescents and
adults with traumatic brain
injury. Adamovich, B. L. B. July
1992. 1-6.
School experiences of students with
acquired brain injury (ABI):
What happens after transition?
Todis, B., & Glang, A. December
1999. 3-9.
School re-entry after TBI. Ylvisaker,
M. July 1992. 6-8.
Semantic feature analysis: The
evidence for treatment lexical
impairments in aphasia. Boyle,
M. June 2001. 23-28.
Sensitivity to multiple linguistic
and social identities. Cheng, LR. L. April 2005. 19-20.
Sensory Integration Therapy.
Abrahamsen, E. June 2002. 20-24.
Sentence processing. Shapiro, L. P.
March 1996. 7-13.
Sentence production treatments for
aphasia. Maher, L. M. October
2001. 3.
25
Service delivery for people confronting aphasia: Some thoughts
and practical suggestions in
troubled times. Lyon, J. G.
December 1999. 18-23.
Setting a course for advocacy
success. Potter, J. G. October
2000. 9-12.
Sorting pictures to assess participation in life activities. Haley, K.,
Jenkins, K., Hadden, C.,
Womack, J., Hall, J., &
Schweiker, C. December 2005.
11-15.
Shaken baby syndrome. Paustian,
G. October 2004. 4-8.
Single-subject experimental
designs and the clinician
scientist. Kearns, K. P. December
1994. 2-5.
Speech, language and cognitive
impairments in ALS. Haley, M., &
Raymer, A. M. April 2000. 2-5.
Some drugs used in the treatment of
traumatic brain injury. Carter, J.
E. August 1992. 3-4.
Sound production treatment for
apraxia of speech. Wambaugh, J.
L. December 2001. 9-13.
Specialty certification: What’s in it
for me? Royal, C. October 1999.
3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. May 1997. 3.
Specialty recognition update.
Myers, P. September 1998. 3-4.
Speech-language pathology
practice in the acute care setting.
Vega-Barachowitz, C. June 1999.
3-4.
Speech-pathology management of
TBI in school-aged children.
Burns, M. S. October 2004. 1419.
Speech production following
traumatic brain injury: Clinical
and research implications.
Netsell, R., & Lefkowitz, D.
November 1992. 1-8.
Speech rehabilitation for individuals with unintelligible speech
and dysarthria: The respiratory
and velopharyngeal systems.
Netsell, R. W. December 1995. 69.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Huntington’s disease.
Klasner, E. October 1995. 12-15.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Parkinson disease. Ramig,
L. O., & Countryman, S. October
1995. 15-20.
Speech treatment for individuals
with Parkinson disease. Ramig,
L. O. December 1995. 10-13.
Staging interventions in progressive dysarthria. Yorkston, K. M.,
& Beukelman, D. October 1999.
7-12.
Staging treatment for progressive
neurogenic communication
disorders. Beeson, P. M. October
1999. 6.
Strategies for enhancing the body
of evidence for clinical decision
making. Brobeck, T. C.
April 2004. 11-16.
Strength and endurance training for
dysarthria. Solomon, N. P., &
Stierwalt, J. A. G. December
1995. 13-16.
Stroke: Mechanisms and effects.
Reinmuth, O. M. 16-19.
Stuttering: Review of genetic data.
Blount, M. A. R. October 1993.
6-9.
Successful clinical management
requires cultural intelligence.
Cheng, L-R. L. April 2005. 1619.
TBI case studies. Turkstra, L. May
1998. 3.
Technology in the treatment of
language disorders: Introduction.
Robin, D. April 2000. 6
Towards a common language for
functioning and disablement:
ICIDH-2 (The International
Classification of Impairments,
Activities, and Participation).
Lux, J. B. March 1999. 8-10.
Traumatic brain injury and postsecondary education. Turkstra,
L., Gamazon-Waddell, Y., &
Evans, J. October 2004. 19-24.
Treatment of discourse deficits
following TBI. Cannizzaro, M. S.,
Coelho, C. A., & Youse, K. October
2002. 14-19.
Division 2, Neurophysiology and
Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders
Treatment of lexical comprehension
impairments in aphasia. Jacobs, B.
June 2001. 4-11.
Treatment of lexical impairments in
aphasia: focus on the evidence.
Raymer, A. June 2001. 3-4.
Treatment of severe dysarthria after
TBI—or—Who says they can’t
talk? Workinger, M. S. December
1995. 2-6.
Treatment of unilateral neglect in
patients with right hemisphere
brain damage. Barrett, A. M.
December 2000. 18-26.
Treatment research on augmentative
and alternative communication for
adults with apraxia of speech.
Rogers, M. A. December 2001. 2128.
Trends in functional assessment.
Frattali, C. August 1994. 4-10.
Two case studies of family influence on treatment outcome after
stroke. Freed, D. December 2004.
16-19.
Understanding the language performance of persons with mental
retardation: Genetic implications.
Miller, J. F. October 1993. 12-14.
An update on the genetics, neurology, and treatment of languagerelated disorders. Gilger, J. W. May
1997. 4.
The use of the ICF in intervention
for persons with neurogenic
communication disorders.
Threats, T. April 2004. 4-8.
The use of words versus nonwords in
the treatment of apraxia of speech:
A case study. Kahn, H. J.,
Stannard, T., & Skinner, J. September 1998. 5-10.
Using the ICF framework to define
outcomes. Simmons-Mackie, N.
April 2004. 9-11.
Verbs and sentence production in
aphasia: Evidence-based intervention. Mitchum, C. C. October
2001. 4-13.
Verb production in fluent aphasia:
A preliminary report. Kim, M.
December 2004. 24-27.
26
A Vygotskyan approach to rehabilitation after TBI: A case illustration.
Ylvisaker, M., & Feeney, T. May
1998. 14-19.
Why differential diagnosis? Duffy, J.
R. March 1995. 2-6.
Why is yogurt good for you?
Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevick,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L-R. L,
Davis-McFarland, E., DealWilliams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L. F., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
April 2005. 3-7.
Working to influence public policy
through grassroots advocacy.
Lucas, L. S. October 2000. 13-15.
The World Wide Web: Friend or foe?
Stierwalt, J. October 2001. 38-39.
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