Document 2768

A,B,C’S
Activity / Balance / Control
BRISTOL BAY AREA
HEALTHCORPORATION
6000 KANAKANAK RD.
PO BOX 130
DILLINGHAM, AK 99576
1-800-478-5201
EXT. 6293
1-907-842-9293
Lois Schumacher, RN, CDE , BC, ADM- Program Director
Leif Thompson, MD—Physician
Holli Scott, RD—Dietitian
Yolanda Gage-Program Secretary
Diabetes Prevention/
Lifestyle Change Program
Activity / Balance / Control
A,B,C’S
BRISTOL BAY AREA
HEALTHCORPORATION
6000 KANAKANAK RD.
PO BOX 130
DILLINGHAM, AK 99576
1-800-478-5201
E XT . 6 2 9 3
1-907-842-9293
FAX 907-842-9382
Starting 1st
Week of
September
2008
Held at
Kanakanak
Hospital
This month issue:
What is
Pre-Diabetes….…….....1
Recipes………………..2
FPG and OGTT……….3
Add Potassium to Help
Lower Your Blood
Pressure…………..4 & 5
Ideas for a Potassium
Rich Day..…….………6
Puzzle………………….7
August
2008
Vol. 10 Issue 8
Diabetes Prevention/
Lifestyle Change Program
What is pre-diabetes and how is
it different from diabetes?
Pre-diabetes is the state that occurs when a
person's blood glucose levels are higher than
normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of
diabetes. About 11 percent of people with
pre-diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention
Program standard or control group developed
type 2 diabetes each year during the average 3
years of follow-up. Other studies show that
many people with pre-diabetes develop type 2
diabetes in 10 years.
How to Tell if You Have
Pre-Diabetes
While diabetes and pre-diabetes occur in
people of all ages and races, some groups have
a higher risk for developing the disease than
others. Diabetes is more common in African
Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and
Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, as well as
the aged population. This means they are also
at increased risk for developing pre-diabetes.
Continuation on page 3...
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Tickle Your Brain
Taken from the Traditional Food Guide for Alaska Native Cancer Survivors with
Permission from the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Cancer Program
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Beaver
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Native Names: Ce iq’aaq (Yupik)
K’enuy’a (Dena’ina), S’igeidi (Tlingit)
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Beaver can be found throughout the forested
regions of the state. Beavers require 2 to 3 feet
of water in order to protect themselves from enemies. In area where the water
level is too low, they construct dams along waterways to flood the surrounding
area. The pelts of beaver are prized items used to make cold weather items such
as coats, hats, and mittens. The meat is prized for the taste and fermented beaver
tail is a delicacy.
PREPARATION: Beaver can be roasted, fried, boiled, dried or fermented. Its
meat is dark red, fine grained, moist and tender, and when properly prepared, it
can taste like pork.
30 oz Roasted—Calories 180, Protein 30g, Carbohydrates 0g, Fat 6g
-Audrey Armstrong Huslia
LITE ALASKAN SALMON CHOWDER
Servings: 7
Alaska Style Heart Healthy Cookbook
Elizabeth Lind, Chignik Lake
Onion, raw
½ cup
Celery, raw
½ cup
Green pepper, raw
¼ cup
Garlic, raw
1 clove
Condensed Chicken
Broth
1 can
Potato skin, raw 2 potato skins
Carrot, raw
1 cup
Salt, seasoned
1 tsp.
Dill weed, dried ½ tsp.
Zucchini, raw
1 small
Creamed corn
1 can
Nonfat evaporated
Milk
1 ½ cups
In a saucepan,
cook
onion,
celery,
green
pepper and garlic in ¼ cup broth until tender.
Add potatoes, carrots, and seasoned salt if desired, dill and remaining broth. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Add zucchini; simmer for 20 minutes, or
until vegetables are tender. Add zucchini; simmer for 5 minutes. Add corn, milk and salmon;
heat thoroughly.
Calories/Serving: 164
Protein, Carbohydrate, Fat Ratio: 32-56-12
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15
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16
1. With potassium the healthy choice is to 1 more to your 4 .
and any other nutrients such
2. The dash eating pattern is rich in 3
as magnesium, calcium, protein and fiber, and is 11 in total 2 ,
saturated fat and
9 .
3. Pre-diabetes is the state that occurs 12 a person’s blood glucose
levels are higher than 5
but not high enough for a
6
of
diabetes.
4. In 7 , American’s are typically consuming only half the 15 of
potassium that is recommended.
8 , you may often find yourself
5. As you try to 13 healthy
decreasing certain types of foods.
6. While diabetes and pre-diabetes occur in people of all ages and races,
some groups have a higher 10 for developing the disease than others.
7. Healthier options are low-fat, low calorie or 14 choices of these
foods.
8. The Dash eating 16 is recommended in the 2005 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans.
Cut this page and send it back to:
Diabetes Prevention Lifestyle Change Program BBAHC
YOU could be the WINNER of the monthly drawing
$50.00 VEGGIE BASKET
-7Congratulation to our July Winner: Tom Nelson Sr. of Ekwok!!!
Add Potassium!
At every meal, try to add some tasty and healthful potassium foods like
fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy. You may even find that
your meals will be lower in calories, saturated fat, and sodium without any
additional effort, Here are some ideas to get started:
Ideas for a Potassium-Rich Day
Meal
Try…
Breakfast
1 cup oatmeal, 1 medium banana,
8 oz. fat free milk
Lunch
2 oz. turkey, 1 1/2 oz. low fat Swiss
cheese, lettuce and sliced tomato, 2
slices whole wheat bread, 6 baby
carrots, 1 cup cubed cantaloupe
Snack
2/3 cup low-fat granola with 1/4 cup
dried apricots, 6 0z orange juice
Dinner
4 oz. salmon, 1 large baked potato, 6
steamed asparagus spears, 1 cup spinach salad with oil and vinegar dressing,
whole grain dinner roll, 1 teaspoon
reduced-calorie tub margarine
Snack
Totals
3 oz. fruit blend with a good source of
potassium, and 1/2 cup sliced
strawberries
1970 calories, 44 total fat, 9 g saturated
fat, 2390 mg sodium, 5065 mg
potassium
Continuation of page 1...
There are two different tests your doctor can use to determine whether
you have pre-diabetes: the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) or the oral
glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The blood glucose levels measured after
these tests determine whether you have a normal metabolism, or
whether you have pre-diabetes or diabetes. If your blood glucose level
is abnormal following the FPG, you have impaired fasting glucose
(IFG); if your blood glucose level is abnormal following the OGTT,
you have impaired glucose tolerance (IGT).
FPG
OGTT
How to Prevent Pre-Diabetes
Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that can be treated. The
good news is that the recently completed Diabetes Prevention Program
study conclusively showed that people with pre-diabetes can prevent
the development of type 2 diabetes by making changes in their diet and
increasing their level of physical activity. They may even be able to
return their blood glucose levels to the normal range.
While the DPP also showed that some medications may delay the
development of diabetes, diet and exercise worked better. Just 30
minutes a day of moderate physical activity, coupled with a 5-10%
reduction in body weight, produced a 58% reduction in diabetes.
www.diabetes.org
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Nutrition Fact Sheet
And while popular sources, like dairy, potatoes and beef have
potassium many Americans go for the high fat choices. Healthier
options are low-fat, low calorie or lean choices of these foods.
www.eatright.com
Why Do We Need More Potassium?
Add Potassium to Help Lower Blood Pressure
As you try to make healthy choices, you may often find
yourself decreasing certain types of foods. Good news! With
potassium—the healthy choice is to add MORE to your diet.
Research shows that diets higher potassium can help to lower
blood pressure.
Are We Eating Enough Potassium?
American’s are not getting enough potassium in their diet. In
fact, American’s are typically consuming only half the level of
potassium that is recommended.
How Much Potassium Do We Need?
The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend
consuming 4,700 mg of potassium everyday. By including
fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat milk products are
the Dietary Guidelines recommend, you can get enough
potassium in you diet. However, research shows many
Americans are not consuming enough of these foods. Less
than one third of Americans are consuming the recommended
number of servings of fruits and vegetables a day, and only
about half are meeting their needs for low-fat milk products.
The recommended daily potassium intake for adults is 4,700 mg.
The average intake for women is 2200-2400 mg. and for men
2800-3300mg.
Studies show that potassium can significantly lower blood pressure and
reduce the risk of stroke. This is important because high blood
pressure, also called hypertension, affects nearly one in three American
adults, or about 72 million men and women. Nearly 70 million more
adults are at risk or developing high blood pressure (pre-hypertension)
and nine in every 10 people will probably develop high blood pressure
by the time they reach their mid-60s.
Potassium Helps to Lower Blood Pressure
Over 25 intervention studies concluded that blood pressure was reduced
in individuals who had a high intake of potassium. In addition, a diet
high in potassium has been linked to a decreased risk of stroke in
people with normal and high blood pressure. In a study of over ten
thousand men and women from 52 sites around the world, those eating
diets relatively high in potassium had lower blood pressure.
Potassium in the Diet
The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan that
emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy has been scientifically
demonstrated to lower blood pressure. The DASH eating pattern is rich
in potassium and many other nutrients such as magnesium, calcium,
protein and fiber, and is low in total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol.
The follow-up study of DASH showed a significant decrease in blood
pressure beyond the effects of sodium restriction alone. The DASH
eating plan is recommended in the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for
Americans.
Were Are We Getting Our Potassium?
Not only are Americans not getting enough potassium, the
potassium they are getting is not coming from the best
sources. Healthy food that are potassium rich, like fruits and
vegetables, low-fat dairy and whole grain cereals should be
topping the list; but this is not the case. Many people get more
of their potassium from coffee than bananas.
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