WIN CONGRATS O N T A R I O TO OUR AWARD WINNERS

TIPS FROM OUR PROS || JOB OPPORTUNITIES || SEASON EVENTS
FA L L 2 0 1 3
||
s n o w p r o . c o m /o n t a r i o
O N TA R I O
WIN
A TRIP FOR TWO
TO TREMBLANT OR
A PAIR OF ELAN SKIS
CONGRATS
TO OUR AWARD WINNERS
& NEW MEMBERS
BRIAN
DONATO
ANNOUNCED
AS KEYNOTE
PTS
QUALIFIES FOR
EDUCATION
CREDITS
PLUS LOTS
OF TIPS!
50 years of
servicing the top
Pros in Ontario
STAY AHEAD
OF THE CARVE
Did you know that The Sign of the Skier was
founded by a CSIA Level 3 member in 1962?
Our ski and snowboard department offers a full range of equipment from leading
manufacturers including Atomic, Burton, Capita, Dynastar, Head, Rossignol,
Salomon and Stepchild. Our experienced and fully-trained staff ensure that each of
our customers is fitted with the appropriate equipment for their individual needs.
THE SIGN OF THE SKIER
2794 YONGE STREET, TORONTO
M4N 2J2
[email protected]
416-488-2118
WWW.THESIGNOFTHESKIER.COM
Ask to speak to one of our professional equipment testers. We've tried all the skis
and can help you pick the best ski for your next course, training, or for teaching.
RESERVE A SPACE TO DEMO THE 2013/14 SKIS THIS SEASON!
CONTACT US
AT [email protected]
LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE
You can also call 416-488-2118 to book an equipment seminar for your snow school
CHAIR’Sletter
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
 Miranda Sorensen
Chair
 Kevin McMillan
Vice Chair
 Ed Young
Treasurer
 Sharon Lax
Secretary
DIRECTORS
LEFT – MIRANDA SORENSEN,
CSIA ONTARIO CHAIR
RIGHT – BERNADETTE CELIS,
TECHNICAL STANDARDS
& SAFETY AUTHORITY
GREAT EXPECTATIONS!
 Simon Holden
Level 1 Program
 AJ Leeming
Technical Liaison
 Allison Sharpe
Magazine/
Sponsorship
 Andrew Hansen
IT/Website
Tom Dovey
Communication/
Outreach
 Tamara Crispin
Member Events

T
here was a wonderful comment made at our May AGM by Gord Layhew a
45-year member of the CSIA and member of the Ontario Hall of Fame. He spoke
of all the events that occur each year and the Ontario members’ expectations
that these events continue with greatness! The membership has “great expectations”
of the board of directors and staff.
As the Ontario board of directors, we have great expectations of ourselves as well.
We continue to strive to improve the social and educational opportunities for Ontario
members each year.
The Professional Training Series line-up is once again filled with challenging session
topics. These one-day sessions are led by some of Ontario’s top Level 4 instructors and
are designed to send you home with new skills and goals for your own advancement.
Some of the PTS sessions will be credit worthy towards your Level 2 certification
through the new education pathway format that is being introduced this winter by our
National office. Check out which sessions are eligible for credits on page 7.
The Ontario website is continually being updated and improved. Our newest board
member, Andrew Hansen, is an IT specialist and is ready to help modernize the look
and functionality of the site.
You may have noticed that our board portfolios have new names. This summer, we
restructured the portfolios to better align with the needs of the members, and created
detailed job descriptions for each position. These job descriptions along with the skill
sets required to run the portfolio will create a better system for recruitment of new
board members; a potential director will know which portfolio they are applying for and
know if they bring suitable skills to that role.
Communications is an area where we continually focus our efforts to ensure
that we connect with our membership. As a result, we have created a Marketing/
Communications portfolio comprising of three of the portfolios with the Vice-Chair
acting as the committee chair. The three portfolios are the IT/Website, Magazine/
Sponsorship and Communication/Outreach. Our hope is that we can connect with
all 8,000 Ontario members through this magazine, Facebook and our website to be a
source of inspiration, education and fun for this fantastic job of ski teaching!
If you have any suggestions, “expectations” or would like to volunteer for any of our
events, please email me at [email protected]
Miranda Sorensen, Chair, CSIA Ontario
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 3
FALL2013
CONTENTS
Editorial ............................................5
Ontario Conference ......................6
Professional Training Series .........7
Boot Fitting .....................................8
Training Tip .....................................9
Tips from Sandy ...........................12
Managing a Split Class ...............13
Recognition ...................................15
In Memory .....................................18
Fitness Tip .....................................20
Feedback Tip ...............................21
Tip for Pivoting .............................22
Managing Your Speed ................23
O N TA R I O
Big Mountain Skiing ....................25
Teaching Kids ...............................26
EDITORIAL TEAM
Teaching Women ........................26
Allison Sharpe
Editor
Job Watch .....................................27
Shelagh Mulveney
Administration
PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS
Tom Dovey, Kevin McMillan
and Stuart Teather
Proof Reading
DESIGN & PUBLISHING
Jason Chow and Andrew Elsdon
CSIA ONTARIO OFFICE
3 Concorde Gate, Suite 209
Toronto Ontario
T: 416-426-7261
[email protected]
snowpro.com/ontario
facebook.com/csiaontario
4 || O N TA R I O
Cover photo: Andrew Elsdon,
CLLik Photography
Skier: Scott Pritchard
CONTRIBUTORS
Barry Allison, Rob Butler, Dave Campbell,
Sandy Gardner, Anik Gaumond, Dr.
Stephen Hotz, Jamie Innes, Dr. Thomas
Lam, Ian Morrison, Mike Nicolls, Jeff
Sinclair and Meredith Youmans
• FA L L 2 01 3 •
Laura Weatherston
K9 Design Co. (k9designco.com)
PRINTING
Ted Southam
Kempenfelt Group
(kempenfeltgroup.com)
PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT
41057019
Printed using a sustainable resource
EDITOR'Sthoughts
NORTH BAY: SIR THRIFT-A-LOT
WINDSOR: VINTAGE TRAVEL POSTCARDS
ONTARIO: DOLLARDOWNLOADS
GOOD THINGS GROW,
IN ONTARIO!
Allison Sharpe, Editor
M
y garden
is starting
to shrink
back into the
ground to prepare
for another winter.
All the blubs and
roots are soaking in
their energy so that
by April they can
grow back into the
amazing hostas and
ferns that I enjoy all summer long. We are
fortunate to live in a province so ripe for
growing some of the country’s best plants
and vegetables.
Actually, lots of other good things grow
in our province.
Ontario contains a third of the planet’s
fresh water with our 250,000 lakes, it is
abundant with natural resources, and is
home to many cultures where diversity
thrives. It is also a place where we grow
the ski industry with new skiers joining our
sport every winter.
When it comes to alpine skiing our
province might be a little more flat than
other parts of our country, but that doesn’t
stop our ability to produce awesome skiers!
Consider the number of Ontario athletes
on our national team. Philip Brown,
Madison Irwin and Erin Mielzynski are all
holding spots on the Alpine Team. On
the Para-Alpine Team we can call Chris
Williamson one of our own. The Ski Cross
Team also sports a local, Dave Duncan.
Is it a surprise that Ontario is producing
top skiers? In my opinion it’s not surprising
at all. We make every inch of vertical count.
We focus on getting results for each run
we make and when we get powder-like
conditions we get in as many laps as
possible because we know it is a special
treat. But what I think really drives our
greatness are the people who share their
passion to perfect turns on 800 feet of
vertical or less.
Each year CSIA Ontario recognizes
some of these great instructors at over 40
resorts for their dedication and excellence
with the Award of Merit. It is so clear that
from the great examples of our winners,
that there are many more of you out there
sharing your passion and being part of our
industry growth; confirming that Ontario is
critical to the sport of skiing.
In this issue of Ski Pro Ontario, we have
focused on bringing you the best of what
Ontario pros have to offer. Our province
is rich with talented ski instructors and
coaches who have made skiing their life.
Too often we look outside our borders for
advice and forget that some of the best
are right here in Ontario! They have shared
their tips and ideas in these pages to help
make this your best season yet! ◆
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 5
ONTARIOevents
ONTARIO FALL
CONFERENCE
& TRADE SHOW
SUNDAY NOVEMBER 3
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Paramount Events & Conference
Centre, Woodbridge
Register for CSIA events through our eStore at
snowpro.com/ontario and enter for a chance to
win an Ultimate Ski Vacations package! Draw will
take place at the end of the 2013/14 season.
1.
USV TREMBLANT TRIP PACKAGE
» 3 NIGHTS SLOPE SIDE VILLAGE HOTEL
» 3-DAY LIFT TICKET FOR TWO
2. ELAN AMPHIBIO 82 XTi
SKI PACKAGE
THANK YOU TO OUR PRIZE SPONSORS:
KEYNOTE SPEAKER:
BRIAN DONATO
CSIA Level 4, Snow School Director,
Hockley Valley Resort
TICKET INCLUDES
»
»
»
»
Keynote presentation
Knowledge sessions
Trade Show
Breakfast, lunch and
refreshments
PRICE
»$65
THANK YOU TO OUR PRIZE SPONSOR:
ONTARIOevents
PROFESSIONAL
TRAINING SERIES 2014
» Full-day sessions focused on
promoting excellence in skiing and
teaching
» Sessions take place on Fridays
throughout the season
Ø
SEASON OPENER DEC 19/20
This 2-day season opener will
focus on building a healthy and effective
training plan, at your level, for the season.
3
2
SHORT TURNS JAN 10
You will start the day re-discovering what is required to make powerful
short turns and will continue to progress
until you reach your personal best.
2
ADVANCED & EXPERT
PARALLEL JAN 17
This session will dial in your performance
at higher speeds in a larger radius turn.
3
LOCATION
DATE
TIME
REGULAR
MSLM
Sat. Dec. 14
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
MSLM
Sat. Dec. 14
1:00 - 4:00
A&D
HORSESHOE RESORT
Sun. Dec. 15
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
HORSESHOE RESORT
Sun. Dec. 15
1:00 - 4:00
SUPER PDP
HORSESHOE RESORT
Mon. Dec. 16
9:00 - 4:00
REGULAR
BLUE MOUNTAIN
Sat. Dec. 21
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
BLUE MOUNTAIN
Sat. Dec. 21
1:00 - 4:00
REGULAR
GLEN EDEN
Sun. Dec. 22
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
GLEN EDEN
Sun. Dec. 22
1:00 - 4:00
A&D
MSLM
Sun. Dec. 29
9:00 - 12:00
A&D
ALPINE
Sun. Dec. 29
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
MSLM
Sun. Dec. 29
1:00 - 4:00
REGULAR
ALPINE
Sun. Dec. 29
1:00 - 4:00
A&D
LAKERIDGE
Sun. Dec. 29
9:00 - 12:00
ADVANCED & EXPERT
TEACHING
(CONSOLIDATION) FEB 14
A&D
LAKERIDGE
Sun. Dec. 29
1:00 - 4:00
SUPER PDP
DAGMAR
Sat. Jan. 4
9:00 - 4:00
A&D
BLUE MOUNTAIN
Sun. Feb. 23
9:00 - 12:00
This session will serve as a continuation
to the Acquisition session or as a standalone for semi-confident instructors.
REGULAR
BLUE MOUNTAIN
Sun. Feb. 23
1:00 - 4:00
A&D
MSLM
Wed. Mar. 5
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
MSLM
Wed. Mar. 5
1:00 - 4:00
SUPER PDP
CALABOGIE PEAKS
Sun. Mar. 9
9:00 - 4:00
SUPER PDP
DEVIL’S ELBOW
Sun. Mar. 9
9:00 - 4:00
A&D
MANSFIELD
Sun. Mar. 9
9:00 - 12:00
REGULAR
MANSFIELD
Sun. Mar. 9
1:00 - 4:00
2
CORRIDOR TRAINING JAN 31
Corridor training will help you ski
outside of your comfort zone by changing
your turn shape, pushing your speed and
learning to attack the slope!
2
PUSHING YOUR LIMITS
FEB 7
This session will challenge your comfort
and confidence with speed and terrain.
LEVEL 3 PREP JAN 3
You will head home with ideas
on how to continue to attack your goals
and plan to reach your peak performance
for the Level 3.
ADVANCED & EXPERT
TEACHING (ACQUISITION)
JAN 24
You will discover how to make decisions
that will build a better lesson. You will also
learn how to find out what students want,
their readiness for challenge and how to
select appropriate terrain and tactics.
ONTARIO PDP SCHEDULE
TYPE
LEVEL 2 PREP JAN 3
This session will help you
establish a training plan that best suits
you on your road to the 2!
3
» 4.5 hrs on snow + lunch break with
discussion
» Sessions are led by active Level 4’s
» Participants have access to discounted
lift tickets
3
Ø
BUMPS FEB 21
The Bumps PTS will target
your development of comfort and
performance in the bumps.
2
LEVEL 2 / 3 CHECK UP
FEB 28
The Check Up PTS is a great way to wrapup your season training efforts. Receive
general ski improvement with specific
comments aimed at helping you put final
touches on your training.
Ø
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
PDP’s now qualify for education
credits too!
MEN’S & LADIES’ DAY MAR 7
Gender specific ski improvement
day with a focus on having fun and
touching up on final season development.
? NATIONAL EDUCATION CREDITS:
» Accumulate as many credits as you
» Become certified at your own
wish: As credits are collected and
pace: Achieve your L2 certification by
published in your member’s profile,
accumulating 10 elective credits of your
any credits banked can eventually
choice, in any order and at any time,
be applied towards any levels of
plus the L2 Training followed by the L2
certification.
Assessed Training modules.
2
REGULAR PDP
3
ASSESSMENT & DEVELOPMENT PDP
3
INSTRUCTOR TRAINING PDP
3
SUPER PDP
To register for a PDP please go to snowpro.com
and login to your member page.
All members in good standing (dues paid)
are entitled to attend 1 PDP per SEASON.
TO REGISTER FOR A PTS SESSION PLEASE GO TO
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
snowpro.com/ontario
|| 7
EQUIPMENTtip
Everything
CHOOSING
THE RIGHT BOOT
FOR YOUR FOOT
Barry Allison, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
You Need Y
Custom boot fitting
and custom foot beds
Montana Crystal Glide
service centre
Adults and childrens
gear, helmets, clothing
and accessories for race,
freestyle and free ride
Childrens’ gear
trade-in program
Pro deals for most ski
and snowboard brands
10720 Yonge st. Richmond Hill, ont
905 883 5586 or 1 888 KENMARK
kenmarkSnowsports.com
Some pro deals expire as early as mid-November. please check with the store for full details.
All pro deals are subject to product availability.
8 || O N TA R I O
• snowpro.com/ontario •
ou wouldn’t buy a car without taking it for a test drive,
but we buy ski boots, where the fit is critical, after simply
trying them on a concrete floor. Being informed and
asking the right questions will set you up for a more successful
purchase. The following information should help you start off on
the right foot:
1. How often you ski? Someone who spends more time in
their boots and skis a bit more aggressively may want a high
performance boot and tighter fit. Alternatively, someone who
skis only a few times a year can usually get away with a more
forgiving fit. A tighter, more responsive fit will give a better
feel for the snow and help the skis respond.
2. What type of skier are you and what type of terrain do you
like to ski? A more experienced skier usually prefers a stiffer
boot, but if you like skiing bumps you may want a boot that
gives you more flex.
3. What was the size of your last boots? Did you have any issues?
Know the size of your last boot and also the width of the boot.
If you can tell the sales person the width of your last boot and
any issues you may have had, it can help him or her select a
new boot for you. Take your old boots with you when you are
selecting a new boot.
4. Once a boot is selected, the only way to ensure the boot is
the proper size is to look at your bare foot in the shell. You
should be able to fit two fingers over-lapped (1/2” to 3/4”)
between your heel and the back of the boot when your toes
are lightly touching the front. With the liner, the boots should
feel snug, your toes will probably touch the end of the boot
but after a couple runs your boots will feel pretty good.
5. A lot of people will have foot and fit issues that will require
them to have the shell customized. After purchasing your
boots, you should see your fitter right away if they are not
fitting you properly. They will hopefully be able to identify
and correct issues by looking at your foot in the shell.
6. When it comes to fitting the boot, the hardest boots to
customize are the ones that say they are custom! However,
companies are coming out with new materials all the time. A
good fitter will look at what’s going on with your foot and try
to figure out the source of the problem. If the boot simply gets
punched where you say it hurts, chances are you’ll be making
another appointment to get your boot punched again.
I hope this helps making the daunting task of finding a new boot a bit
easier. For more information check out www.skiconnexions.ca. ◆
TRAININGtip
PREPPING FOR
THAT NEXT LEVEL
– A GUIDE FOR
BUSY PEOPLE
Jamie Innes, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
W
hen I moved back to Ottawa a
couple of years ago to start a
new career, I was struck by how
hard it was to balance work demands, family
demands and skiing. I think that I gained a
much stronger appreciation for those nutty
part-timers at Blue who worked all week in
the GTA and then battled the traffic and
weather every Friday night to come up to
Collingwood for the weekend.
That same year I decided to make another
attempt at the Level 4 certification. It was
going to be a very different year for me. I
was no longer giving sessions 2 times a day,
6 days a week, living and breathing skiing
and ski teaching as the normal course of my
week. Instead, I would have to maximize my
quality of time on snow. This meant that I had
to plan.
So here are a couple things I learned as
part of my journey as well as what I learned
from supporting many ski pros to progress
through our system.
PREPARE TO PREPARE…
SET UP YOUR SEASON:
» It’s critical to get all your ducks in a row
before the season starts. If you’re teaching
in Southern Ontario you may need to plan
some quality time on snow with decent
elevation. These road trips will require
the support of your day-job bosses, your
family and your ski school. Map it out and
start communicating your plans early.
By planning it in advance it is possible to
make it work.
» Get … or get back … into shape. I’m going
to make a non-sanctioned statement. If
you can’t physically ski top-to-bottom all
day on one of the bigger hills in the east
and enjoy it, you really need to consider
stepping up your off-season training.
» Work with your ski school director to figure
out a training plan that makes sense for
the year that balances teaching time and
training time, but please don’t make the
mistake of thinking that you HAVE to be
teaching advanced students to pass your
next level. When I passed the Level 4, I was
teaching adult beginners all year at Camp
Fortune. Teaching beginners can teach you
a lot and will really help you hone your skills.
» My last point, do NOT stop teaching in
order to focus on your skiing for the year.
This one drives me crazy and I’ve seen
more people not complete their Level 3 or
4 when they’ve decided to take the year
off from teaching in order to focus on their
training. It’s much better to be constantly
engaged in your craft in order to perfect
it. Removing yourself from a ski school
in order to become a better ski teacher
lacks logic and, perhaps more importantly,
doesn’t get results.
Stay tuned for more ideas on how to
manage your on-snow and off-snow time
during the winter season to achieve your
next level. ◆
A Ski Club made for Ski Pros
like you! Give yourself a treat.
✓ Ski and train with some of the best Level 4’s
✓ Video and review everyday, trips, camps and programs
JOIN IN THE FUN…TODAY
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JustForFun_Fall2013.indd 1
| JEFF SINCLAIR
705 727-8600
| JAMES SCOTT
705 790-2095
• FA L L 2 01 3 • || 9
2013-09-18 1:31 PM
O N TA R I O
SKIpro
SKIER: DAVE WEBB
LOCATION: SIR SAM'S
PHOTOGRAPHER: JASON CHOW
10 || O N TA R I O
• snowpro.com/ontario •
SENIOR TRAINERS
Jf Beaulieu CSIA level 4, CSIA level 4 examiner, CSCF level 3, French
National Ski Instructor and CSIA Interski Demo Team Member.
Dan Renauld CSIA level 4, CSIA level 4 examiner, CSCF level 3 a
nd
CSIA Interski Demo Team Member.
WE OFFER
High Performance Training for
preparation toward Level 1, 2, 3 and
4 Canadian Ski Instructors’ Alliance or
Canadian Association of Snowboard
Instructors. Custom programs available.
TWO LOCATIONS
Mont-Sainte-Anne, Québec, Canada
Treble Cone, New Zealand
WEEK BY WEEK OR WEEKENDS
programs available starting at 40$/hour
FEAR NO
WEATHER
the ski slopes are in
Subaru country!
CSIA SKI PRO EXCLUSIVE OFFER
Save $1,500 off the purchase of a new Subaru at Davenport Subaru Orillia
($750 CSIA rebate from Subaru and $750 additional rebate from Davenport Subaru)
385 West St S, Orillia
Call Mike Davenport direct to qualify for the CSIA discount
1-888-719-9994
www.davenportsubaru.com
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 11
TEACHINGtip
A FEW THINGS EVERY
SKI INSTRUCTOR
SHOULD KNOW …
Sandy Gardner, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2, Ontario Level 1/PDP Coordinator
T
echnical articles are great. Sure we
need to know how to apply the basic
competencies or how to improve
edge grip early in “Phase 2” of the arc to
improve your lateral adhesion as you enter
the fall line. But this article is going to offer
real tips every ski instructor should know
for everyday life on the slopes and what to
remember when dealing with real students.
PICK THE SHORTEST LIFT LINE
If you don’t have a “Snow School Priority”
lift line, stay clear of the lifts that get busy
earliest, and be aware of which sides of the
line up are the quickest to get through. This
may affect your terrain availability, but 12
runs over the morning instead of five or six
will make a huge difference in the results
you can achieve.
DON’T LECTURE … SKI!
Especially here in Ontario, all good
Pro’s need to understand the difference
between lecturing and teaching. Stopping
three times as you teach your way down
Blue Mountain is crazy … a wise person
once told me “Talking isn’t teaching, and
12 || O N TA R I O
listening isn’t learning”. Time your stops
down the hill so your students actually have
a chance to try what you’re teaching them.
Keep your directions brief and to the point,
and only try to fix one issue at a time.
MANAGE YOUR TIME
Use your time wisely. Take advantage of
lift lines and chairlift rides to give specific
instruction to individuals. Give “High 5’s”
once they understand and then discuss
goals with the next student. When skiing
with the little ones rest your arms on the
safety bar, it helps to stay down at face-toface level which is great for communicating
– and don’t forget to lift your goggles!
USE TERRAIN THE RIGHT WAY
Any good ski instructor knows the
“maximum speed on minimum terrain”
approach, but you also need to remember
there are benefits in challenging students
on steeper terrain to develop steering skills
– a ”must have” for any skier. Working on
one thing in different situations will create
versatility and give you the opportunity
to ski – rather than talk all the time. This
• snowpro.com/ontario •
will also give you a chance to re-integrate
changes back into your students' skiing
gradually so they will “stick”.
DEVELOP SIMPLE CHANGES BEFORE
TACKLING BIG ONES
There’s no point in trying to work on
advanced bump skiing until you have
developed basic bump skiing. A well
developed and balanced set of basic
competencies is a must (listen up all of
you almost Level 3’s), because wrinkles in
the lower, slower end will turn into giant
creases once speed increases and terrain
gets more challenging!
LUNCHTIME REMINDERS
Do your best to avoid the noon hour
cafeteria rush. Coming in at 12 pm unless
absolutely necessary will only keep you
waiting in the pizza line rather than the lift
line. Come in 20 minutes early before it’s
packed and get back on the snow while
everyone else is inside trying to grab a bite
to eat. This also makes it reasonable to
think that you can get your group all at one
table. Stuff your hats and goggles in the
coat sleeves of your jackets or put them in
your helmet and sling over the back of the
chairs to reserve your table.
All of these simple things seem like common sense. People learn by skiing, not
being lectured. People learn by simple and
clear direction, not by confusing “ski-geek”
banter. If you follow these simple non-technical guidelines, you’ll get better results! ◆
CLASStip
MANAGING
A SPLIT CLASS
Mike Nicholls, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
A
s a rookie instructor I remember beginning every group
lesson with a “ski off”. Instructors and students would head
to the top of the hill. The students would stand nervously
waiting to be waved down and after a few shaky turns, each student
would be corralled into smaller groups of matching abilities. This
rarely went as planned and took up so much time that only a few
runs were left for actual instruction.
When working with larger, busier ski schools a different approach
to identify your student’s abilities needs to be taken - often before
seeing students ski. Getting a sense of their experience level by
looking at equipment, how they are dressed and asking questions
related to their ability level is helpful. How often have you skied?
Have you taken a lesson before? Which runs do you ski on? But
despite your best efforts, a split in the class can still pop up.
Perhaps the most common mistake rookie instructors make is
thinking that just because two skiers are of different abilities they
need to be working on different things. Stance and balance is often
a good starting point, obviously for weaker skiers, but there’s not a
strong skier that couldn’t benefit from slowing down and working
on their stance.
Once you give skiers a technical focus, have a stronger skier lead
the way (good skiers love to show off their skills). This is a good time
for them to slow down and practice what they are working on. Let
the weaker skier follow, giving them a tactical focus such as “watch
how rhythmical and round the skier’s turns are in front of you, see if
you can stay in their track”. Less confident skiers often find following
a confidence boost.
Have students follow you. Start by having the weaker skiers
follow so you can set the turn shape and speed. Eventually let them
go ahead while you lead the stronger skiers and challenge them
by increasing speed or skiing off the groomer track onto more
challenging snow.
To keep it simple:
1. Do your best to determine your student’s abilities prior to the
lesson.
2. Find a common theme that the whole group can work on.
3. Use the “follow me / follow them” approach to meet the needs
of all the skiers.
If all else fails, recommend a private lesson and remind them that
they can ask for you by name at the ski school desk. ◆
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 13
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www.tssa.org
www.safetyinfo.ca
AWARDS
2013 CSIA
ONTARIO HALL OF
FAME INDUCTEE
ANDREA CIOTTI
2013 AWARD OF MERIT RECIPIENTS
PRESENTED BY TSSA
Andrea Ciotti was inducted into the CSIA
Ontario Hall of Fame for her enormous
dedication to the sport of skiing and the
CSIA. Many know Andi for her professionalism and her infectious enthusiasm for life,
friends and her students!
For over 36 years Andi has engaged
many skiers across many generations. As
a Level 4 instructor, she supports many
programs that develop new instructors as
well as helps veterans push themselves
to try new things. Andi’s ability to put her
students at ease and create a sense of trust
is hard to match.
Andi started her passion for skiing at
the age of 4 at Osler Bluff Ski Club. Rising
through the racing ranks of Nancy Greene
League and onto Pontiac Cup and NorAm
Levels in her teens, she continued to feed
her passion for skiing.
Andi’s impressive history includes time
spent at Banff Ski Club with the Banff
Alpine Racers, Snow School Director at
Georgian Peaks and Craigleith Ski Clubs
as well as a full time coach at the National
Ski Academy in Collingwood. With a friend,
Andi launched jPrep, an on-line health and
safety training tool for snow resorts. jPrep
was instrumental in building the CSIA recall
program and the Level 1 e-prep.
Many know Andi from PD Day,
Professional Training Series, PTS Women’s
Day or Just For Fun training sessions. She
has contributed as an Ontario board member and just this past year chaired our 75th
Anniversary Committee.
Thank you Andi for your outstanding
contributions to CSIA Ontario and the
sport of skiing!
Each year, snow school directors and CSIA
Ontario honour deserving ski instructors
with the Award of Merit. These recipients
demonstrate excellence as a ski instructor
by providing great guest service, leading
by example, supporting their snow school’s
activities and promoting a safe experience.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO OUR RECIPIENTS!
TSSA SAFETY
AWARD ANDREA DOWELL,
CENTENNIAL PARK
We are pleased to congratulate Andrea
Dowell of Centennial Park as the winner
of the TSSA Safety Award. This award
recognizes Andrea’s dedication to safety.
Thank you Andrea for taking safety
seriously!
OUTSTANDING
SERVICE
AWARD
RECIPIENT
ANIK
GAUMOND
TARA KIVLICHAN, Alpine Ski School
KEITH GALLOWAY, Batawa Ski Hill
PAUL STEWART, Blue Mountain Snow School
STEVE HAINSWORTH, Boler Mountain
KAYLEE-ANNE KOSORALO, Brimacombe Snow School
Anik Gaumond was
recognized as our 2013 Outstanding
Service Award recipient for her work
supporting the 75th Anniversary Gala.
Her experience working with hotels
and catering groups to set up corporate
events was invaluable. Additionally, Anik's
professionalism, attention to detail and
desire for perfection made the event an
amazing success.
JAIME FERGUSON, Caledon Ski Club
ANDREA DOWELL, Centennial Park
BRENNAN HAGEY, Chicopee Snow School
LIZ ROSS, Craigleith Ski Club
DOUG PRITCHARD, Devil’s Glen
SARAH FOSCARINI, Earl Bales
PAUL CAPES, Georgian Peaks Club
JACQUELINE SMITH, Glen Eden Snow School
JULIE MACDONALD, Heights of Horseshoe
BRIAN YOUNG, Hidden Valley
OLIVIA LU, High Park Ski Club
CALE NORTHEY, Lakeridge Ski & Ride School
LUKAS KASPERAVICIOUS, Laurentian Ski Hill
ELISSA DOYLE, Mansfield Ski Club
MEAGHAN NAHIRNY, Mt. Chingacousy Ski Hill
PAUL CHAMBERLAIN, Mount Pakenham
FRANK HELLINGMAN, Mount St. Louis Moonstone
LEVEL 1
COURSE
CONDUCTOR
OF THE YEAR
ALLISON
SHARPE
JOHN MACDOUGALL, North Toronto Ski Club
KATE HUBBS, Osler Bluff Ski Club
LEVEL 1
COURSE
CONDUCTOR
ROOKIE OF
THE YEAR
GREG RICH
LISA BUSE, Searchmont Resort
ALEX ROOME, Sir Sam’s Ski School
KIRSTI SUUTARI, Ski Bees
MICHAEL KELLY, Snowhawks Ski & Snowboard
School (Ottawa)
SARAH BANKS, Snowhawks Ski & Snowboard
School (Toronto)
TAMARA MUELLER, Snow Valley
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 15
RECOGNITION
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1,119 CSIA ONTARIO MEMBERS WHO WERE SUCCESSFUL
IN BECOMING CERTIFIED AS A NEW LEVEL 1, 2, 3 OR 4 INSTRUCTOR!
LEVEL 1
William Aback
Adam Aber
Samuel Aitken
Cecily Alexander
Aria Alizadeh
Kahli Allen
Krista Allen
Kristy Allen
Ryley Alp
Samira Amid
Sandeep Anand
Mark Andrews
Camille Archer
Hugh Archibald
Sascha Armour
Alexandra Louise
Armstrong
Shelby Arthur
Glenn Ashford
Jason Au
Madeleine Austen
Alicia Ayers
Daniel Azin
Lauren Azzopardi
Nenad Babic
Michelle Backhouse
Ivan Badaiants
Mike Bahl
Adam Balinsky
Lucy Balthazard
Viraj Bangari
Jonathan Bardwell
Carolyne Barker
Spencer Barnes
Ben Barnes
Alexandra Barr
Toni Barr
Amy Barrett
Rachelle Barrette
Christale Barrette
Oriane Barrier
Scott Bennet
Nicholas Berczi
Jaime Berger
Sarah Bernath
Paméla Bertrand
Thomas Bevilacqua
Shalaila Bhalla
Andrew Biemann
Hannah Blair
Pamela Blake
Karoline
Blioumenfeld
Hudson Blue
Chris Bohme
Kerry Boire
Nicole Boland
Kevin Boon
Dalton Boothby
Niloufar
Boroumand
Jeff Boucher
Nicholas Bougie
Pierre Boutin
Mike Bowes
Owen Bowie
Madison Boyce
Martin Boyce
Sarah Boyce
Lauren Boyle
Sarah Boyne
Aleksandar Bozic
Marina Bozic
Kristina Brand
Dalton Brates
Jessie Brazier
Ben Brisbourne
Kelsey Brown
Adrian Brown
Allison Brown
Jessie Browne
Natalie Brunelle
Natalie Bruno
Ryan Bryden
Calvin Choi
Elizabeth Chong
Dylan Clark
Noah Clark
Emma Clarke
Matt Clarke Jenkins
Scott Clements
Lydia Climenhaga
Diane Cloutier
Lauren Cluney
Griffin Cole
Jacob Colllins
Chloe
Congourdeau
Jessica Cooper
Edward Copping
Johnny Copping
Andrew Corbett
Eleanor Cornish
Jenna Corrin
Abby Corrin
Meghan Corry
Claire
Courtemanche
Annette Cousens
Mathew Cousineau
Andrew Cox
Peter Coxford
Stephen Coxford
Robbie Crane
Ariana Crispin-Frei
Emer Cummins
Aoife Cummins
Erin Curtis
Jordan Dale
Keith Dalgliesh
Sarah Dalton
Sonia Darlison
Grant Davenport
Stuart David
Christopher David
Alex Davis
Katherine Davis
LAST SEASON WAS ANOTHER OUTSTANDING YEAR
FOR ONTARIO. MEET YOUR 2 NEW LEVEL 4S
» SCOTT FILMAN
Angelaina Bartosik
Lindsay Barwise
Brittany Barwise
Andy Bassett
William Bastien
Grace Bastien
Nathan Bauman
Alexandra Bayer
Ruslan Bazilev
Michelle Beal
Ethan Beallor
Cameron Beattie
Cameron
Beauchesne
Izabela Beben
Kyle Bechtel
Cordell BeckerWhite
Nicole Belanger
Leigh-Ann Bell
Julia Bellini
Matthieu Belliveau
Drewe Bender
16 || » GREG RICH
Jonah Buckstein
Daniel Budovic
Adam Burek
Sarah Burgess
Lauren Burkhardt
Sebastian BurtonVulovic
Shelly Busse
Robyn Buttigieg
Douglas Buttigieg
Kieran Campbell
Julie Campbell
Leslie Cant
Bingjun Cao
Jeff Carr
Chris Carrier
Christina Chen
Jimmy Cheng
Jeremy Chinsen
Brennan Chiu
Dana Cho
Cameron Choi
O N TA R I O
Julie Anne De Bruyn
Rani De Caluwe
Nicole De St. Croix
Nicholas Dearing
Erik Degeer
Tyler Del Bosco
Nicholas Del Fatti
Robert Delzotto
Alexandra Dent
Teagan Dern
Mark Desmarais
Patrick Desrosiers
Quinn Devlin
Joshua Dey
Anthony Di Palma
Hannah Dickie
Lexie Diemer
Kate Dier
Kassandra Dignard
Mirjana Dimitrijevic
Kayla Dobson
Allison Dodge
Alice Donaldson
Jiahui Dong
Kylee Dormer
Lizzy DownesThom
Stephen Draper
Nicholas Dryden
Kaitlin Dryden
Jamie Duffield
Adam Dugas
Emily Dugas
Denis Dumas
Matthew Duncan
Cameron Dunfee
Brianna Dunn
Elizabeth DunnBoylen
Jessica Dunning
Mia Durkovic
Heather Dutcher
Jennifer Dzaldov
Dylan Eadie
Brett Ealey-Borsa
Matthew
Ebsworthy
Reed Eckel
Craig Edmonds
Clay Eisenhour
Emily Elder
Geoffrey Elder
Nicole Elliott
George Emerson
Simon Ettin
David Evans
Megan Eves
John Eves
David Fairbairn
Stuart Fairlie
Helmut Farmer
Nicholas
Farnsworth
Cara Farquharson
Madeline Feder
Kari Fellows
Robyn Feraday
Ephraim Fernandez
Arlaina Ferraro
Eliana FieldMarsham
Valerie Filicetti
Hailey Findlay
Kaelan Findlay
Alexandra Findlay
David Firman
Jason Fischer
Sam Fisher
Garrett Fisher
Jacqueline Fitts
Rob Fitzgerald
Patrick Flanagan
Lukas Fleck
Bradley Floreani
Shayne Flynn
David Forrestall
Rhys Forsyth
Katrine Fortin
Sarah Fox
Colin Foxcroft
Kaitlyn Francis
Shaun Francis
Taylor Frankel
• snowpro.com/ontario •
Liana Fraser
Mark Frederick
Sarah Frederick
Jocelyn French
Teige Frid
Jenna Froebelius
Aleksander Fronc
Leonard Furtado
Laura Fyfe
Tori Gaasenbeek
Maddie
Gaasenbeek
Konrad Gajewski
Isaiah Galbraith
Allison Gallagher
Connor Gallagher
Hippolyte Gallot
Keith Galloway
Virginia Galpin
Alexander Gambin
Sarah Garner
Gillian Gawron
Pam Geertse
Shayne Gelinas
Natalie Gennaro
Sebastian Germann
Emma Gern
Ingrid Gerol
Erica Getliffe
Sina Ghasempour
Ahmad
Ghasempour
Kevin Giffen
Gabrielle Gigone
Ashley Gilbank
Kristin Gilbert
Taylor Gill
Jacob Givertz-Steel
Maximilian Glidden
Colin Goad
Dawid Gocek
Johnny Gomes
Brady Gooding
Catherine
Goodman
Eric Gottfried
Harrison Graham
Karac Graham
Nathan Graham
Allie Granic
David Grant
Caitlin Graup
Emmerson Gravett
Nicholas
Greenberg
Robert Greenwood
Kendra Greer
Kevin Greig
Charlotte Grieve
David Gropp
André Groskopf
Jim Grosse
Nick Groulx
Leah Groves
Phillip
Grozdanovski
Ioan Haba
Sarah Hackett
Thomas Hadfield
Gillian Hague
Elliot Haigh
Ryan Hamilton
Charlotte Hansen
John Hapgood
Joshua Hapgood
John Haralovich
Miranda Harmsen
Emma Harris
Dean Harris
Jonathan Harris
Kait Harth
Victoria Hartviksen
Scott Harvey
David Havelock
Craig Hawthorne
John Hayden
Margot Hayden
Steven Hayes
Timothy Healey
Elizabeth Hearn
Anna Hecold
Michael Henderson
Audrey Heng
Madeleine Henry
Madeleine Hession
Emma Heyl
Thomas Heysel
Madeline Hickey
William Higgs
Sarah Hill
Matthew Hilts
Haytham Hinawy
Alex Hoch
Simon Hofley
Erin Hogan
Daniel Hogarth
Jack Hogarth
Josh Holierhoek
Avila Holland
Max Holzberg
Angela Hoover
Mike Hopkins
Emma Hopper
Elizabeth Horner
Emma Hosey
James Houghton
Kylie Houston
Emma Howard
Spencer Howe
Jackson Huang
Matthew Hudson
Kaela Hughes
Carolyn Hughes
Sean Humphrey
Stephen
Humphries
McKinley Hunt
Erin Hunt
Jennifer Hunter
Cameron Hunter
Ben Hurst
Camille Hutcheson
Connor Hutchison
Peggy Huycke
Hugh Hyndman
Noreen Iles
Christopher Illidge
Jakob Innes
Hanna Isakow
Shane Isakow
Aaron Jackson
Susan Jackson
Eugene Jacta
Lilly Jalali Sosan
Abady
Somerset Jarvis
Meghan Jeffery
Colin Jeffs
Eric Jemetz
Rachel Jenkins
Brayden Jenson
Erica Jewett
Ming Jin
Tristan Joanette
Chelsea Johnson
Tylon Johnson
Brigitte Johnstone
Christopher Jones
Caroline Jordan
Srdjan Josipovic
Emma Jowitt
Barb Judge
Samantha Kacaba
Michael Kahn
Samuel Karovitch
Talia Keay
Logan Keckes
Mitchell Kedrosky
Heather Kee
Kane Keeling
Melissa Kehoe
Donald Lavictoire
Ford Laxdal
Hailey Learmonth
Brendan Leclair
Kendra Lee
Andrea Lee Lee
Woohyun Lee
Adrian Lee
Paul Lefebvre
Richard Leger
Brian Legros
Caitlyn Legrow
Kyle Leis
Sean Leizerovich
Jennifer Lesage
Michael Letros
Joe Leung
Ginny Levy
Ethan Levy
Matthew Lezzi
Dylan Liao
Samantha Libby
Quinn Limoges
David Kelleher
Ethan Kelly
Vanessa Kelly
Heili Kelly
Kevin Kelly
Aaron Kennedy
Brooke Kennedy
Rebeccah Kennedy
Carson Kennedy
Klade Kerr
Martha Kilian
Woon Soo Kim
Jaeeun Kim
Eunsol Kim
Samantha King
Laura King
Sarah Kinoshita
Lindsey Kirkhus
Hannah Kirkland
Alicia Klaassen
Noah Klein
Lilian Klekner-Alt
Aaron Klem
Mark Klin
Jake Knowles
Ruby Konkol
Paul Kooren
Maria Kouras
Mark Kovich
Stefan Kremic
Erika Kreze
Philip Krolczyk
Randy Kruen
Jan Krynicki
Douglas Kube
Annelise Kubicki
Derryl Kuz
Olivia Kuzmich
Katharine LaBarge
Devon Labrie
Bryan Laks
Patricia Lalor
Alexandra Lam
Lyle Lamkie
Lara Lapchinsky
Dan Lapkovsky
Madison Larochelle
Katrina Larson
Mary Lasenko
Adrian Lathey
Maria Lau
Stephanie
Laughton
Melissa Lavery
Friend
Alysia Lisanti
Scott Litchfield
Gavin Little
Die Liu
Margaret Lloyd
Gregory Lloyd
Jessica Lobo
Katie Locke
Hannah Lomax
Mathew Lonetto
Adam Lopatka
Laine Lubgans
Stephen Lucas
Andrew Ludyka
Bonnie Lugg
Warren Lundy
Natalie Lupton
Johnny Lynch
Lindsay Lyster
Jin Ma
Elizabeth MacbonLang
Emma MacDonald
James MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
Ian MacDonald
Tom MacDowall
Kiera MacGregor
Mark MacIver
Connor Maclean
Ian MacPherson
Austin MacPherson
Charlotte Maher
Mack Mahoney
Derek Main
Michael Maish
Hannah Majury
Julio Malpica
Jan Marchwica
Kent Mardlin
Jenna Marinigh
Sara Markovic
Mikaela Martin
Tatjana Martincevic
Tvrtko Martincevic
Mark Marynowicz
Mathew
Mascarenhas
Rich Mason
Michael
Masongsong
Jason Massicotte
Joshua Matsuoka
RECOGNITION
Travis Matthews
Mark Matthews
Kelly Mawhinney
Patrick McAllister
Kyle McCallum
Ryan McCandless
Kirsten McCann
Oliver McClelland
Nicholas
McCloskey
Samuel McCormick
Emma McDonald
Tanya McDonald
Erin McDougall
Daniel McFerran
Mara McGoey
Alex McGrath
Meghan McGregor
Jack McIlraith
Ben McKaig
Sigrid McKay
Lauren McKenzie
Melanie McKernan
Paul McLaughlin
Jason McLellan
Scott McMillan
Rachel McMullan
Blanaid McNally
Louise McNicoll
Carolyn McPherson
Tatum McTeague
Morgan McWatters
Thera Medcof
Alexandra
Meikleham
Laura Metzger
Nina Micanovic
Lucas MilicevicCaron
Natalie Miller
Cameron Miller
Liam Miller
Gabrielle Millette
Philip Milligan
Ashley Mills
Melissa Millward
Jessica Milotzki
Jeffrey Misner
Nicholas Monteith
Margaret
Montgomery
Samantha Moody
Jeffrey Moody
Jonathon Moody
Drew Moore
Avalon Morell
Alexander Moroz
Jameson Morphet
Rowan Morris
Robert Morris
Steve Morris
Eden Morris
Connor Morrow
Tyra Morton
James Morton
Rachele Mortveit
Stephen Motyer
Rodion
Mourakhtanov
Holly Mowbray
Jack Mozas
Colin Mudd
Declan Mullen
Sara Murakami
Victoria Murat
William Murphy
Vaughan Murphy
Dana Murray
Brian Murray
Dorothy Murray
Jackie Muru
Sophia Naprawa
Serena Natale
Isabelle Naumovski
Jack Naylor
Michael Neerhof
Kylie Negus
Tristan NelsonBarrett
Julia Nesbitt
Matthew Ng
Jamie Niles
Julia Nitz
Andreas Noe
Andrew
Nordemann
Marius Norgaard
Matthew Northey
Ras-Jeevan Obhi
Megan O’Brien
Bronwyn O’Brien
Amy O’Donnell
Erin O’Donohue
Lauren O’Donohue
Brendan O’Farrell
Haley O’Halloran
David Olive
Kaitlin Oliver
Maddie O’Neill
Caroline Oorschot
Matthieu Orr
Tess Osborne
Rafe Osborne
Duncan Osler
Jamie Oswald
Keenan O’Toole
John O’Toole
Taylor Pace
Selena Paglia
Jake Palleschi
Sydney Palter
Antonia Paquin
Ryan Park
Eun Sook Park
Chris Parr
Andrew Paul
Seanna Payne
Christie Peacock
Leah Peacock
Lizzie Pearson
Joshua Penciner
Marialuisa
Perlingieri
Kasper Petersen
Brigitte Phillips
Cierra Phillips
Sarah Phillips-Smith
Meghan PhillipsSmith
Cameron
Pinnington
Monika Pinto Lee
Martin Piotrowicz
Krzysztof Piotrowicz
Marzena
Piotrowiczn
Joanne Plahouras
Peter Pogorski
Veronika Polanska
Lucas Porter
Sean Pratt
Eric Prekurat
Luc Presseau
Catherine Presseau
Clifford Preston
Mick Pretorian
Rebekah Price
Phil Primmer
Scott Prins
Jay Proulx
Tie Pylatuk
Chuyang Qi
Claudine Quinn
Danielle Raja
Tom Raja
Gabrielle Ralphs
Mark Ramirez
Carla Rawson
Emily Real
Meredithe Rechan
Tate Rechan
Charlie Reed
Ali Reeve
Mikayla Reid
Jessica Reid
Stewart Reid
Teagan Retty
Reynal Rheault
Jacob Rice
Christine Richards
William Richardson
Blaire Richie
Jessy Rivest
Aleda Roberts
Paul Roberts
Ryan Roberts
Mikayla Robertson
Samantha-Kate
Robinson
Eric Robson
Michaela Rocha
Alex Roeder
Cassandra Romain
Sarah Romani
Amanda Romano
Wayne Ross
Sarah Ross
Katherine Ross
Mathew Rossi
Julia Rowe
Patrick Rowland
Joshua Rubin
Isabel Ruby-Hill
Kristof Saar
Alexandra Sagan
Trevor Salkeld
Hilary Salter
Ozren Sarcevic
Frank Satira
Robert Saunders
Hannah Saville
Cameron Saville
Danielle Saxby
James Schanck
Timothy Schjerning
Katrina Schmid
Myles Schmidt
Petr Schumacher
Charlotte Schwass
Randy Seabrook
Benjamin Seagrove
Samantha Sears
Pauline Sels
Matthew Senyshen
Haig Shahinian
Mitchell Sharkey
Sukait Sharma
Rachel Sharp
Holly Shaw
Laura Shepherd
Julie Sheremeto
Tim Sheridan
Lucas Shwed
Mylène Simoneau
Trevor Sims
Hannah Smegal
Wyn Smith
Mackenzie Smith
Kelly Smith
Donald Smith
Edward SmithWindsor
Emma Soave
Mark Sochaniwskyj
Erica Sorensen
Callum
Sorgerbrock
Lauren Sorli
Thomas Sproule
Monika Spudas
James Stacey
Matthew
Stackhouse
Anna Staines
Sean Stalteri
Maddy Stanton
Nick Steele
Amy Steels
Riley Steenson
Jordan Steenson
Sonya Stepanova
Shane Stephenson
Lexi Sterio
Paul Stevens
Ian Stewart
Tom Stiemerling
Kyle Stimpson
Samantha Stinson
Martin Stirajs
Claire Stirling
Lauren Stobo
Moira Stoecker
David Storrie
Julia Stothart
Evan Stott
Victoria Stroh
Raylan Stroud
Keirstin Strum
Emma Struthers
Leah Sullivan
Sean Sullivan
Mauricie Summers
Everett Summers
Kirsten Sutherland
Ingrid Swenker
Paul Szorenyi
Paul Szorenyi
Laura Tangelder
Max Tarnowski
Natalie Tasker
Richard Taylor
Matty Taylor
Lee Taylor
Jared Taylor
Cameron
Teboekhorst
Jacqueline Tett
Liam Tharp
Hannah Thibault
Jacob Thielen
Holly Thomlison
Susan Thompson
Gregory Thomson
Erin Thorne
Kaitlin Timmons
Nicolai Timofte
Jon Tokiwa
Austen Tong
Celia Torrey
Stuart Tremayne
Joel Tremblay
Caroline
Tsambalieros
Cory Turk
Emma Turner
Jacob Turola
Ryan Underdown
Charlotte Upans
Kate Usher
Jack Van Den Broek
Miggs Van Der
Velden
Tyler Van Der
Velden
Mike Van Doorn
Ron Vanes
Erica Vanviack
Michelle Veilleux
Jesse Verschuren
Daniel Verta
Mariepe Villanueva
Michael Vince
Lindsay Virene
Nishkka Vora
Jacquelin Vouk
Nikola Vulin
Nicole Waddick
Kelly Walcroft
Samantha Waller
Tim Walma
Jake Walterhouse
Yafang Wang
Jada Wardowski
Natasha Warenycia
Glenn Warnock
Ryan Warren
Peter Warwick
Race Watson
Maximillian Watson
Andrew Watson
Sandy Watt
Emily Weber
Bradley WebsterCho
Tasha Weigand
Rachel Weisenberg
Evan Weiser
Tylor Weller
Riley Weller
Ian Wellman
Dennis Werden
Nicole Werker
Rachael Whiteley
Cameron Whittle
Lisa Whitwell
Sarah Wiley
Claire Wilkinson
Lauren Williams
Jeremy Williams
Eric Williamson
Patrick Williamson
Hannah Willis
Andrew Willoughby
Katie Wimmer
Cameron Wissing
Michael Witecki
Jakob Wodnicki
Elaine Wolf
Robert Wolfer
Taylor Wong
Austin Wong
Daniel Wong
Amanda Wong
Max Wood
James Wood
Julia Wood
Claire Woodside
Maija Wootton
Megan Woroch
Dan Worrod
Emeshe Xavier
Yan Xu
Jia Xu
James Xu
Christine Yan
Sarina Yao
Libby Young
Alexis Young
Jiang Yu
Songyi Yuan
Ingrid Yuen
Chloe Zabek
Natalia Zambrowicz
Calvin Zehr
Katya Zeisig
Rachel Zevy
Rachel Zigelstein
Daniel Zimmerman
Darko Zivkovic
Philip Zivkovic
Haley Zsolt
Adrian Zweig
LEVEL 2
Shelby Aggiss
Keisha Aitchison
Brent Allen
Daniel Anghel
Scott Armstrong
Nenad Babic
Vanessa Bacher
Mike Bahl
Connor Bassels
William Bastien
Meredith Bawks
François Belle-Isle
Gus Bernardo
Harrison BolgerMunro
Jonathan
Boulanger
Lisa Buse
Bingjun Cao
David Cardoza
Joel Cargill
Brennan Chiu
Brian Chun
Peter Chun
Julian Cobisa
Austin Constable
Alexandra Convey
Miles Cranmer
Kristopher Creor
Randal Cronkite
Shea Darlison
Brodie Deluco
Matthew Denyes
Ken Desaulnier
Macgill Doner
Greg Douglas
Elissa Doyle
Heather Drescher
Nicole Dubé
Lauren Fine
Jason Fischer
Sherryl Fitzpatrick
Vivianne Fortin
Sarah Foscarini
Andria Frej
Brent Gazarek
Alan Gearing
Rodney Geyer
Ruth Givertz
Blake Gooding
Adam Gores
Brett Gorski
Cameron Graham
Robert Greenop
Susan Greig
Meghan Henderson
Nelson Higenell
Emily Hobbins King
Doug Hodgins
Bill Hogg
James Houghton
Jackson Huang
Michael Hunt
Jennifer Hunter
Sara Hutchison
Caleb Jackson
Eugene Jacta
Michael Jamieson
Alexander
Jamieson
Mitchell Rath
Jonathan Reid
Hamish Reid
Courtnay Romkey
Darius Sablinskas
Daina Sablinskas
Marceline Sammut
Marco Sangalli
Michelle Savoy
Philippe Savoy
Eric Savoy-Pitfield
Alexander Schwass
Justine Scobie
Janice Seline
Thomas Sellors
Alexander Sellors
Andrew Shinoff
Steve Soloduka
Matas Sriubiskis
Sarah Strandholt
Sylvie Sugrue
Kristine Sultmanis
Jianfeng Sun
Michael Jaunkalns
Amy Kim
Elizabeth King
Hiroki Kinoshita
Liam Knight
Luke Knowles
Artem Kobelev
Ryan Kochuta
Konstantin Kogan
Stephen Kovacic
Blair Kutcy
Nataliya Latysh
Robert Lawson
Anna Ledoux
Carl Leszkowicz
Peter Lindell
Colin Lloyd
Peter MacDonald
David Makepeace
Valerie Marchildon
Chris Martin
Rob Martin
Rebecca Massey
Jason Massicotte
Carley Maxwell
Corynne McCathie
Cheryl McConachie
Andrew McDevitt
Micheal McDonald
Patrick
McNaughton
Louise McNicoll
Alex Merryweather
Paul Merryweather
Letitia Miclescu
Stephanie Millar
Robin Moffatt
Caine Moreau
Greg Morton
Sam Neumann
Lucas OsmondTaylor
Zsuzsi Pal
William Parks
Jessica Parr
Alison Paul
Geordie Paul
Marie Paxton
Ian Pendrill
Maria Luisa
Perlingieri
John Philpott
Chip Pitfield
Aleksandra Popovik
Matthew TeedArthur
Steven Thibideau
Robert Underdown
Ludwig Van Bryce
Ned Veletic
Marcus Vogel
Matthew
Warszawski
Cameron Watson
Marc Watson
David Weale
Chris Webb
Bob Weir
Tylor Weller
Lisa Whitwell
Alexa Wisnoski
Elaine Wolf
Kevin Woodcock
Julia Woolsey
Brian Wright
Douglas
Younghusband
Cole Zigelstein
Ivan Zinger
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
LEVEL 3
Luc Belanger
Darren Blacklaws
Andrew Brooks
Rick Clarke
Spencer Cuddy
Geoffrey Elliott
David Geddes
Andrew Hansen
Adam Kulakowsky
Chris Meszaros
Sarah Pearson
Bac Phan
Larry Robinson
Mike Romano
Dirk Sell
Gregory Smith
Todd Thornley
Kurt Vendrig
Tony Xu
Pengfei Zhang
LEVEL 4
Scott Filman
Greg Rich
|| 17
INmemory
DON BILODEAU
1950 – 2013
GREG HAY
1963 – 2013
JIM RICHARDSON
1942 – 2013
It’s tragic that Don has left us. It’s so
unfortunate that young pros, just starting
out, will never get a chance to feel his
energy and enthusiasm or appreciate
the intelligent and personal way he
approached ski teaching when he ran
the ski school at Blue, or when he and
his wife Heather ran their snow school at
Panorama.
Ski demonstrators from the 80’s and
90’s seem to have something special. You
can see it when you watch Don ski the
bumps in his videos. Did it have anything
to do with learning to ski on long skis?
Don Bilodeau was only 5’7’’ tall but he
skied on 203’s. Not tall in stature, Don
was nonetheless a very grand presence
in the CSIA in so many ways. He will be
missed.
A tribute video can be watched
here: http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=8CtQ-yIgWZ0
Skiing with Greg was always a pleasure.
He always brought his passion for
skiing to the snow to share with fellow
instructors, students and skiers. Recently,
he fought a tough battle with Multiple
Myeloma Cancer and, through this, we
saw the same tenacious spirit in Greg.
If Greg taught us something, it’s that
life can be exciting and you can get a lot
out of it if you put passion and energy
into it.
Your NTSC gang will miss you, Greg!
Until we meet again, on a snowy hillside
with smiling faces.
For members of the North Toronto Ski
Club there is going to be something
missing, something that matters that
just isn’t there anymore as we mourn the
passing of an ever-present member and
ski instructor, Jim Richardson.
Jim was with NTSC for so long that few
can remember a time before Jim was a
member.
When there were lessons to be taught,
he taught them. Serve the Board - no
problem! Ski School Director - happy
to oblige. Lead NTSC as President...
been there, done that. When there was
camaraderie to be enjoyed, he was in the
thick of the social with new members and
long-timers alike. When dancing shoes
were required, he will be remembered as
one of the first out on the floor.
18 || O N TA R I O
• snowpro.com/ontario •
SKIpro
INSTRUCTOR: JAMES SCOTT
LOCATION: SUPER CAMP, MONT-SAINTE-ANNE
PHOTOGRAPHER: ANDREW ELSDON
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 19
LEFT: © INDYKB
RIGHT: © MASTA4650
FITNESStip
HOW
YOU MOVE
Dr. Thomas Lam, Fitness Director of Alpine Ontario
D
“The Snowsport area
CLOSE TO HOME”
CSIA/CASI/CSCF
Instructors required:
Full/part time positions
• Competitive pay scale (bonus options)
• Flexible hours (weeknights/weekends)
• Staff perks
• Minimal travel time
Phone: 905 889-3291 :: Fax: 905 889-6559
E-mail: [email protected]
20 || O N TA R I O
o you want to ski full days for
an entire ski vacation without
a physical problem? Imagine
waking-up with a youthful bounce in your
step instead of being stiff and achy. How
can you be in the best shape of your life
when life is so incredibly busy?
The secret for all these factors is how
you move. Research has shown that over
90% of our injuries are related to how we
control our bodies during movement.
In this article, two simple tests are
showcased that will greatly help you
understand your movement control on
each leg and identify where you need to
focus your development.
SINGLE LEGGED SQUAT
This is a basic strength test. While standing
on one leg you lower yourself as low as
possible. The opposite leg is either infront
or behind your body. Look for the following:
» Control and alignment of your knee.
Make sure your knee does not move
inward. It should be aligned in a straight
line between your hip and ankle.
» Control and alignment of your spine
and hip. Your hip should not move to
• snowpro.com/ontario •
the side and your spine should remain
upright. Spine side bend is a very
common problem.
» Balance and movement control.
» Smoothness and depth. We like to see
a parallel squat position.
10 SINGLE LEGGED HOPS
This test measures re-activeness, power
and body control. You should hop as high
as possible; making the time you spend on
the ground as short as possible. Perform
10 hops on each side and look for:
» Control and alignment of your knee,
spine and hip just like the single
legged squat. The hop test imposes
more control challenge.
» Hop precision. You don’t want to see
too much drift between hops. A good
athlete will be able to repeat hops
from the same spot.
» Hop height – the higher the better.
» Ground contract time should be short.
Research with elite alpine ski racers has
shown that the symmetry between each
leg is critical to avoid injuries that will
surely ruin a ski season. Big discrepancies
between sides and qualities are a
concern for any athlete. The weaker side
tends to be more susceptible for injuries
such as ACL ruptures, knee pain, and
even low back problems.
Please feel free to try these exercises,
but please ensure you are ready and
cleared by an appropriately trained
health care professional. Visit www.
fitstoronto.com/alpine to be properly
tested and develop a customized
program for your specific needs. ◆
PSYCHOLOGYtip
EXPERT TEACHERS KNOW
“ITS ALL ABOUT FEEDBACK”
Steve Hotz, Ph.D., C. Psych. Psychologist
E
ffective feedback not only helps a
skier improve their skills, it is also
crucial for their persistence and
motivation. Feedback helps the skier
identify their progress towards goals,
feel encouraged and figure out what
they need to be working on. Imprecise
or poorly delivered feedback can
undermine confidence and create a real
barrier to learning.
How to make your feedback more
effective:
» Give feedback about the skiing that
has just happened; this ensures it
will be about the skier’s immediate
performance.
» Be specific about the performance in
relation to the actual goal or task being
worked on.
» Talk about what you see, not your
subjective opinion. For example:
say this
“You’re working on adapting to steeper
terrain and on that run I saw that you’re
lateral balance and grip on the snow
was better so your skis weren’t skidding
out from under you. I also saw that you
got caught sitting back in the second
part of the turn and that forced you to
hurry to initiate the next turn and made
you rotate your upper body.”
instead of this
“I think you get anxious and worry
about wiping out when it gets steeper
and your speed increases, then you get
hesitant about committing to the turn
and lose focus on where your centre of
mass is and what you want your skis to
be doing.”
» Link your feedback to a specific
statement about the next step, “on the
next run make 6 turns and experiment
with how you can keep your whole body
accelerating through the turn in time
with your feet and your skis, not behind
them.”
» Keep to the point. Its not a lecture, it’s
a short message aimed at adjusting
something in the skiing.
» Positive feedback is not simply praise
(e.g., “That was good” or “It’s looking
better”). Rather, it describes exactly the
improvement that you observed (“When
it got steeper you stayed over your
downhill ski, that resulted in better lateral
balance and allowed you to keep the skis
more on edge so you got good grip.”)
» Feedback, both positive and negative,
needs to be given immediately,
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otherwise there is little opportunity
for the skier to link it to their own
experience and use it to change their
skiing. After a run, waiting until you
get to the top of the lift again, or part
way down the run telling the skier to
continue skiing and that you’ll talk
about it on the lift, compromises the
impact of your feedback.
» Negative feedback needs to be about
the performance not the person, and
delivered in a ‘matter-of-fact’ way.
Otherwise the skier will hear it as
general criticism of their ability
Give feedback in relation to effort and
progress made towards a clear goal. It’s
a mistake to wait and then simply offer
praise when the goal has been reached.
Good feedback is balanced; it contains
what the skier is doing correctly and what
needs to be improved to achieve a goal.
Consider your own strengths and
weaknesses when it comes to giving
feedback. What do you need to improve
about this crucial aspect of your
teaching? Take some time to develop and
strengthen your ‘feedback vocabulary.’
Think about some skiers that you’ve
taught recently and then practice by
writing out some feedback phrases you
could give them using these guidelines.
Set a goal for yourself to find and practice
the words that convey accurate and
balanced feedback concerning a skiers'
efforts and performance. ◆
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TECHNOLOGY
The Modulator™ is a high contrast, photochromic lens
at the cutting edge of technology. The lens colour
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• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 21
LEGS UNWINDING
SKItip
LEGS TURNING RIGHT
LEGS TURNING LEFT
PIVOTING
Jeff Sinclair, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
W
hat!? Ok, so I did agree to
do an article on pivoting
… perhaps one of the
most contentious and misunderstood
of the skiing skills we promote. Let’s
see if we can clarify it by the end of
this article.
Many avid, keen skiers improve their
skiing in the summer when they’re not
skiing and that’s because of how the brain
works. We tend “to do” what “we think”.
The brain figures things out in our down
time and determines what it is going to
have the body do the next time we ski.
So as far as Pivoting and skiing go, let’s
make sure our brain is sending the right
message to the right place, the right way,
at the right time.
RIGHT PLACE
Your ideal pivot point is under the
centerline of your foot, just ahead of your
heel pad. If it is forward on the ball of the
foot or back near the heel, you will use hip
and upper body rotation to help change
direction. (Stand up and try it.)
22 || O N TA R I O
1 NEUTRAL STANCE
2 CENTRED PIVOT POINT
RIGHT WAY
Turn your leg (all of it). The foot, knee and
thigh should all rotate together. Whether
you turn inwards or outwards, your whole
leg must be relaxed (unweighted). Try this:
Pigeon Toe, Duck Foot and repeat. Allow
the muscles in your legs to be loose and
relaxed, this allows the femur to rotate freely
in the hip for an easy change of direction.
Note: We hear instructors saying “turn
your feet” all the time, but notice, if you
only turn your feet it is really hard on your
knees and your foot rolls to the outside
promoting skis to end up on the outside
edge, not what you want.
RIGHT TIME
“Do you pivot first or edge first?” We hear
this question all the time as well. The key is
to not think sequentially because both are
• snowpro.com/ontario •
3 HEEL AS PIVOT POINT
4 TOE AS PIVOT POINT
happening all the time no matter where
you are in a turn. The ski can pivot the leg
and the leg can pivot the ski. The easiest
focal point is that moment you are about to
change direction, when the edge is released
and there is that momentary lightness
and looseness in your thighs. The legs will
unwind and you can physically rotate (pivot)
the leg and point the feet in a new direction.
If you do it one leg at a time it creates a
wedge before skis become parallel. How
much you turn your legs at this point is up to
you and the type of turn you wish to make –
skidded, steered or carved.
The right place – arch of your foot, the
right way – turn the whole leg and the
right time – when edges are released and
legs are relaxed.
I hope this helps your brain, train your
body! ◆
SKItip
SKIDDING IS NOT AN
OPTION ... OR IS IT?
50 years of
servicing the top
Pros in Ontario
Meredith Youmans, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2, CASI Level 2
H
ave you ever stood at the top
of a perfectly groomed slope
on a “bluebird” day and said
to yourself; “I’m going to CARVE IT UP
down here!”? Skidding is not an option.
Then, has the following sequence of
events ever happened to you?
» You decide to ski directly under
the chairlift so you can impress the
observers with your effortless, clean,
edge to edge carving.
» You begin by pointing your skis
directly downhill to generate speed.
» You make your first turn by tipping
your edges over into the snow as hard
as you can! Turn #1 feels great!
» You decide to make Turn #2 by
tipping your edges over the same
way. Turn #2 feels great and Turn #3
actually feels great too! You are still
in control.
» As you approach Turn #4, you begin
to realize that the slope is getting
steeper, the snow is harder and your
speed is increasing.
» You “crank out” Turn #4 and realize
that your “carved turns” aren’t slowing
you down. You are locked into your
turns and you need to get back into
control. Skidding is not an option.
» You quickly realize you have 3 choices
here:
1. You can hold onto the end of Turn
#4 a bit longer and try to slow down
by going further across the slope
on your edges. However, you may
risk the chance of having someone
crash into your unpredictable turn
shape from behind.
2. You can stop by the side of the
slope and pretend to fix your boot.
3. You can continue to ski out of
control a bit longer and grip your
ski poles a bit tighter because you
realize you are skiing in Ontario
and you know the slope will be flat
in about 2 more turns! You will be
able to regain control soon and
get back into your carves!
If this sequence of events has ever
happened to you, it may be time for you
to try one more option for staying in
control while carving. From the chairlift
above, you will appear to be carving in
control down the slope, however, you
are secretly controlling your speed by ...
SKIDDING!!
Making a small effort to scrub speed at
the top of each turn on steeper slopes can
really help you carve the rest of the turn
effortlessly from edge to edge while maintaining speed control from turn to turn.
On steeps, think of scrubbing or
twisting your skis against the snow (like
an SOS pad) at the beginning of each
turn. Try to spray the trees with snow at
the sides of the slope. By twisting your
skis, you can slow down and turn your
ski tips early in the direction of the new
turn which will help with speed control.
It’s a very subtle move, but with a little
practice it will feel great and keep you in
control! No one will ever know you are
SKIDDING! ◆
You can also call
416-488-2118 to
book an equipment
seminar for your
snow school
RESERVE A SPACE TO DEMO
THE 2013/14 SKIS THIS
SEASON!
CONTACT US AT
[email protected]
LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE
THE SIGN OF THE SKIER
2794 YONGE STREET, TORONTO
M4N 2J2
[email protected]
416-488-2118
WWW.THESIGNOFTHESKIER.COM
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 23
TIPfromIAN
GETTING
THE MOST
OUT OF
TERRAIN
Ian Morrison, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
I
am lucky enough to call Revelstoke
Mountain Resort with 1,713 m vertical
my workplace. I am also lucky enough
to have had the pleasure of skiing with the
instructors who call Mount Chinguacousy
with 21 m vertical their workplace. With
such great differences in both vertical and
acreage to ski, it makes us wonder how
the terrain we have at our disposal influences our decisions.
A wise mentor once said “it’s all about
balance.” Whether teaching beginners or
advanced skiers, my main focus is teaching them how to remain balanced while
skiing. The difference between challenging a student’s balance in British Columbia versus Ontario is the different terrain
and snow conditions that are available.
Big bumps, small bumps, soft snow,
trees, berms, natural half pipes, cliffs,
ridges, chutes and so much more is available to use as teaching tools. Some of this
you’ll find at your home hill in Ontario and
some you won’t. If you look hard enough
you can find lots of different terrain
features to challenge your students. Some
of it natural - some of it man made. Look
for bumps, rollers, side hills, jumps or
groomer ridges. Instead of hockey stops
on flat groomed slopes, challenge your
students by trying it on a ridge or side hill.
Make them try it faster and faster to mimic
the pull they’ll feel on a bigger hill. If you
challenge their balance they will become
better skiers and will be better prepared
to handle challenging terrain when they
move onto bigger mountains.
However, having all this terrain at our
disposal means nothing if we don’t know
how to manage it to set our students up
for success. Whether you’re teaching
on big mountains or small hills, a good
instructor will choose appropriate terrain
so that the student’s skiing improves.
Making a wrong decision with terrain will
only hamper your progression. Often
our students struggle because we make
them ski on terrain that is too difficult and
then we make it even worse by skiing too
fast or too slow. Don’t worry about what
little terrain you may have to use. Worry
about how you will use it to achieve your
student’s goals.
Don’t think for a minute that because
you teach at a small hill you can’t improve
someone’s ability to ski big mountains.
Instructors in Ontario are blessed with
some, if not the best teaching terrain in
the world. It is up to you to find its vast
potential so that when someone reads
a “skier’s mountain” on the webpage of
a big mountain resort, they won’t panic.
Thanks to you, they’ll be “skiers” and
ready to tackle those big lines! ◆
• FA L L 2 01 3 • O N TA R I O
|| 25
TEACHINGtips
FUN, FAST,
AND FAIR
Dave Campbell, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 4
W
orking with young girls and
boys in any context can be a
very positive experience and
extremely rewarding! Here are three
fundamental principles to ensure you
are offering the best experience to your
athletes.
FUN – This is why I think we all do it. If
it’s not fun, people won’t come back and
we probably won’t take much from the
lesson or class. As the coach or instructor,
you need to be having fun. It’s amazing
how young children have the ability to
pick up on body language that shows
them you are tuned into
them. Your ability to motivate
and engage your class is impacted if you are busy checking your phone or riding
up the chair with the other
instructors and coaches. You
need to be fully engaged
with the class and in turn they will be fully
engaged with you!
FAST – Keep young kids moving.
Nothing loses a group of 5-10 year old
kids more than drawn out explanations
and stopping on the side of a hill multiple
times each run. As a professional, you
need to be organized and confident. This
will allow you to make good decisions
for when to talk and when to ski. Keep it
moving and keep it fast. This is guaranteed to cut down on the pole taps you will
IS THERE REALLY A DIFFERENT
WAY TO TEACH WOMEN? YES!
Anik Gaumond, CSIA Level 4, CSCF Level 2
find yourself skiing alone for the rest of
the season.
Women are more about technique
and control, rather than speed ... though
speed will come once they are confident.
A learning environment that is challenging, yet non-threatening is key. A women’s
group is perfect for this as women are
generally a lot more supportive and encouraging of each other.
T
o be honest, the same good ski
teaching principles remain, but
tweaking your lessons to suit
women may keep them coming back
season after season ... and that’s an awesome thing!
SISTERHOOD
While yelling “first one down” is never a
good idea on the first day of lessons, you
would probably have some takers if this
was said to a group of men. It would no
doubt result in many stories and bragging
rights for the rest of the season. However,
said to a group of women your outcome
would be much different. You also might
26 || O N TA R I O
NO PAPARAZZI!
Women are often more open to change as
long as they buy in to what you are trying
to achieve; and as long as new things are
not tried for the first time under the main
chairlift for all to see and cheer on.
Video day should never be a surprise as
make-up and ski outfits need be coordinated - Just kidding! Do keep in mind that
women are highly critical of themselves,
so set the rules straight from the get go.
When looking at their video they must
be encouraged to say something they
like about their skiing. As their instructor,
you need to be ready to explain and go
through the desired movements or outcomes with them while viewing their run.
• snowpro.com/ontario •
see from your group while you are talking
and the wet snow pants from them lying
down in the snow!
FAIR – Be fair to yourself and the group.
Honesty and respect are key attributes
that are fundamental to develop not only
as an athlete and coach but also as an
individual. Fairness is appreciated by all,
even at a young age. If you can be truthful
and gain the respect of your group from
day one, good things will happen! ◆
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Using analogies that are women specific
so they can relate usually brings a lot of
laughter, it gets results and is fun. Women
are often busy with work and raising a
family. This is often the only time they
have for themselves so it needs to be enjoyable and help them to reach their goal
of becoming better skiers.
MARILYN ON SKIS
Now for the obvious; women are different
than men in so many ways, but let’s focus
on biomechanics!
Most women are not as strong, physically, as men so skiing efficiently is key
for them to enjoy a full day of skiing. One
definite advantage women have over men
is... Hips! So let’s teach women how to
use their hips to be more efficient as it is
the strongest joint. Because of these hips
women have a lower Centre of Mass, (another bonus) but in the quest for efficiency
we need to ensure that this lower, great
asset is over their feet and not behind! Try
taking them on easier terrain so they can
experiment, get them to ski backwards,
get them to engage their core muscles
with a stomach crunch, get them to skate
and eventually take them on varied terrain
so they can hop off little bumps!
Teaching women is a lot of fun and
don’t forget ...Women are beautiful,
fashionable and can rip! ◆
JOBwatch
SNOWHAWKS RAVEN TORONTO
SNOWHAWKS OTTAWA
INSTRUCTORS REQUIRED
FOR PART TIME POSITIONS:
• CSIA & CASI Levels 1 – 4
• Park & Pipe – Ski
• Freestyle Snowboard
• Ottawa only – midweek, after school and
March Break Programs
TORONTO
Contact: Mitch Gorski
Tel: 416-487-5271
Fax: 416-489-0107
email: [email protected]
OTTAWA
Contact: Harvey Brodkin
Tel: 613-730-0701
Fax: 613-730-0702
email: [email protected]
Milton Alpine Ski Team
WORK
WHERE
YOUPLAY
The Glen Eden Snow School
is hiring motivated & energetic
ski and snowboard instructors,
and coaches with a passion for
sharing their sport with others.
Glen Eden is located in Milton, Ontario tucked into the Niagara Escarpment.
Though we may be Ontario’s smallest “Escarpment Club,” we boast one of
Canada’s biggest snow schools, busiest lesson centres, and four of Canada’s
top Level 4 instructors. Work opportunities range from part-time to full-time,
including days, evenings, weekends and holidays. Training within the snow
school is second to none, with sessions available to staff 6 days a week.
gleneden.on.ca
Available Positions:
Ski, Snowboard, Coach
Level 1, EL
Level 2, DL
Level 3, PL
Level 4, PL Adv
Snow School Supervisors
Applications may be submitted online:
www.surveymonkey.com/s/GESnowSchoolStaff2014
Looking forward to having you join our team!
AJ Leeming
Simon Holden
Sarah Edwards
Snow School Manager
CSIA IV, CSCF II
Manager, Programs & Services
CSIA IV, CSCF II, CASI 4
Head Coach
CSCF III, CSIA III
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JOBwatch
Want the COOLEST Job
on the Ski Hill?
NOW HIRING!
We are looking for ski and snowboard
Instructors and Coaches of all levels
(part time instructional/coaching and full time
supervisory positions).
Competitive remuneration, excellent
incentive program and strong training for
professional development.
NOW HIRING!
Brimacombe Snow School requires
CSIA and CASI instructors of all levels,
including park instructors,
for the 2013-14 season.
Great opportunities available for those
with freestyle and/or racing certifications.
Applicants should hold or be willing to
attain CSIA, CSCF, CASI or CADS
Certification.
Both full- and part-time positions are
available with flexible hours
(days/evenings/weekends).
Applicants must be passionate about
sliding on snow and sharing this experience
with others.
COMPETITIVE PAY & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
FUN WORKING ENVIRONMENT
BEST TERRAIN EAST OF TORONTO
For more information, please contact:
JAYNE FISHER
[email protected] | 905 983 6451
If this sounds like you, then please apply to:
[email protected]
horseshoeresort.com
TORONTO SKI CLUB
WANTS YOU!
Georgian Peaks is seeking trained and passionate
instructors, coaches and trainers to join our team
for the upcoming season. We offer competitive
wages, a great work environment to improve
personal skiing/snowboarding skills in a fun team
environment while being able to ski on the best
terrain in Southern Ontario.
We are looking for instructors who love to
ski/snowboard and enjoy sharing that passion
with their athletes and peers.
2013/14 POSITIONS
» CSIA ski instructors - 10 positions for
8 week programs and holiday camps
» Freestyle Snowboard Coaches (CSCP or
CASI) – 2 positions for 8 week programs
and holiday camps
» Dual certified CASI & CSIA instructors
– 3 positions
» CSIA Ski instructor trainer
(minimum level 3) – 1 position
» Freestyle Supervisor – 1 position
Please send your cover letter and resume to:
Lindsay Young
Progression Program Director
[email protected]
519-599-6771 xt. 372
28 || O N TA R I O
TSC OFFERS A COMPLETE RANGE OF PROGRAMS
TO TSC MEMBERS FROM BEGINNER SKIERS AND
SNOWBOARDERS TO SLOPE STYLE AND RACING
PROGRAMS. PROGRAM CLASS SIZES ARE SMALL
AND DESIGNED TO MAXIMIZE LEARNING AND FUN!
TSC is looking for individuals with the following
certifications for full and part time positions to work
with our recreation and competitive programs:
» CSIA Level 1,2, 3 and 4
» CSCF Level 1(EL), 2(DL) and 3(PL)
» CASI Level 1,2 and 3
» Alpine Snowboard race coach
» Freestyle park and pipe coach skiing
» Freestyle park and pipe coach snowboarding
WE OFFER YOU
»
»
»
»
»
Excellent training with CSIA level IV trainers
Training with CSCF Performance Level Coaches
Competitive wages
flexible schedules
100% reimbursement for CSIA, CSCF, CASI
courses passed
» Spyder Uniform
» Discounts on TSC food and beverages
All TSC programs take place at Blue Mountain
Resort and a BMR Super Pass is provided.
If you are interested please contact:
Jeff Jones, ChPC, CSIA IV, CSCF III
Alpine Programs Manager
Toronto Ski Club
705-445-1890 ext 27
[email protected]
My Snow School inc.
at
Dagmar Resort
NOW HIRING!
My Snow School Inc. is owned and
operated by me, Meredith Youmans.
I am a Level 4 instructor and I am
very passionate about skiing and riding!
This season, I am looking for CSIA, CSCF
and CASI instructors of all levels to work
with my team at Dagmar Resort near
Uxbridge!
I can offer you:
• A uniform at no cost!
• Training by Level 3s and 4s!
• A flexible working schedule!
• A really up-beat and fun working environment!
• Competitive pay rates and incentives!
• Lots of home-made cookies and treats!
To apply, please contact me at:
905-649-2002 Ext 22
or: [email protected]
I look forward to skiing with you this winter!
:: 1220 Lakeridge Road, Ashburn, L0B 1A0 ::
:: [email protected] ::
:: tel: 905.649.2002 xt 22 ::
• snowpro.com/ontario •
Dagmar_2.25x4.5.indd 1
2013-09-13 4:22 PM
JOBwatch
NOW HIRING!
Mansfield Ski Club is currently looking for
instructors and coaches of all certification levels.
We offer competitive daily wage rates for all staff,
and a comprehensive incentive package.
Please direct all email inquires to:
[email protected] or fax your resume
Attention: Gord Manuel Fax: 705 435 6873
BMR_SnowSchool_Recruitment_quarterpagevert.pdf 1 8/12/2013 3:28:57 PM
Come join our team!
Join our team!
Blue Mountain Resort’s
Snow School is currently
hiring for the 2013/14
winter season.
C
Find more details at
www.bluemountain.jobs
M
Y
CM
MY
CY
CMY
K
BlueMountain.ca 877-445-0231
MOUNT CHINGUACOUSY
SKI/SNOWBOARD AND TUBING HILL
We are a growing winter program looking for committed,
passionate, responsible instructors and support staff
to join our team in our fast paced environment.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Full-time days or Part-time nights/
weekends/Holidays. Starting
December through end of March
Break
♦ CSIA / CASI instructors
♦ Weekend supervisors
♦ Snow School Administration
♦ Rental shop
♦ Ski Patrol
♦ Snow Crew / Lift attendants
♦ Uniforms Provided
IDEAL CANDIDATE MUST HAVE:
♦ Current Criminal Record
Search (Vulnerable)
♦ Standard First Aid / CPR C
♦ Excellent customer service
♦ Reliable transportation
♦ Commitment to work early
December to end of March
Break
Please apply online at www.brampton.ca
and click on Job Opportunities
For more information please contact
Recreation Programmer
905-458-6555
WE NEED YOU!
WE WANT YOU!
OUR PROGRAMS
HAVE EXPLODED
BECAUSE OF OUR
GREAT STAFF AND
WE NEED MORE.
Private ski club, Heights
of Horseshoe is looking for
great people to join their
Snow Sports Team!
CSIA Instructors Levels 1,
2, 3 and 4, CSCF Coaches,
Freestyle and CASI
Snowboard Instructors
» Training available
everyday from Level 4
and 3 conductors
» Free uniform
» Fantastic fun
» We help with your goals
» Set your own flexible
schedule
Apply if you want to
contribute and work with
great people.
[email protected]
horseshoe.com or Ph. 705 835-7887
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SKIpro
SKIER: JOHN GILLIES
LOCATION: SUPER CAMP, MONTE-SAINTE-ANNE
PHOTOGRAPHER: ANDREW ELSDON
30 || O N TA R I O
• snowpro.com/ontario •
Indoor skiing isn t just for first-timers or those who can t handle the Canadian cold, although we do
guarantee that beginners will learn eight times faster and never suffer from frostbite.
Yet our facility also offers a unique and challenging opportunity for the already established skier.
With mirrors to look at yourself in real time, speed and slope angle adjustment, and no breaks for
chair lifts, experts can become pros, and pros can become masters.
Not only is Alpine Slopes beneficial for working on your weaknesses, but it also provides an arena
for maintaining the skills you already have.
Practice makes perfect, and you can finally practice all year round.
www.alpineslopes.ca
905-232-7699
1248 Dundas Street East
Mississauga, ON
NEW NAME.
NEW LOCATION.
Come and find out why we’re Canada’s best ski and snowboard show.
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