Author Index December 2005

December 2005
Author Index
Ahlers, J., & Leiter, J. Ten years of
technology. April 1994. 3-5.
Alant, E. AAC in developing countries: The center for AAC at the
university of Pretoria, South
Africa. August 2003. 6-8.
Anctil, T. M. Understanding social
security disability and work
incentives. February 1998. 5-7.
Angelo, D. Family issues in AAC.
November 1998. 4-6.
Armstrong, J. S. Forming parent and
professional partnerships. November 1998. 7-9.
Arvidson, H. Test accomodations:
What do we know? August 1998.
16-17.
Beck, A. R. Children’s attitudes
toward peers who use AAC. June
2005. 20-23.
Baker, B. Finding the hidden metaphor. September 1996. 5-7.
Ball, L. J., Beukelman, E. R., Pattee, G.
L. AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. April 2002. 7-12.
Bardach, L., & Newman, D. Augmentative and alternative communication in ALS. Decembar 2003. 1421.
Beck, A., & Thompson, J. R. Special
educators and SLPs working
together to provide AAC services.
December 2000. 13-14.
Becker, L .B. The value of the interdisciplinary team evaluation in the
assessment of individuals with
AAC needs. September 1999. 5-6.
Author Index
Subject Index
Title Index
Bersani, H. A., & Fried-Oken, M.
Transition planning: Not just a
good IDEA, it’s the law! February
1998. 4-5.
Beukelman, D. R. Unusual research
partners. August 2002. 24.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J. Organizational strategies. August 2002. 1417.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J. System
appeal/attitudes. August 2002. 2123.
Blackstone, S. W. Virtually speaking.
November 2002. 2-3.
Blischak, D. From the guest editor.
December 2000. 2.
Blockberger, S. Helping the AAC user
acquire grammatical morphology.
November 1997. 5-7.
Brady, N., Sevcik, R. A., Caves, K.,
Mclean, L., Mollica, B. M.,
Romski, M., Snell, M., & PaulBrown, D. There are no prerequisites for communication. August
2003. 27-29.
Brady, N. C. “Repair work ahead”:
The importance of assessing
communication breakdown and
repair in AAC. December 1999. 1011.
Brady, N. C. Comprehension and
production in AAC. June 2001. 1719.
Bridges, S. Delivery of AAC services
to a rural American Indian community. May 2000. 6-9.
Page 1
Page 6
Page 16
Broehl, M. Spot the funding: A
hypothetical case study illustrating funding dilemmas of older age
persons with communication
disabilities. March 1995. 11-12.
Brothers, S., Sewell, R., Smith, S.,
Anderson, K., & Dublin, C. A
theater script. November 1995. 810.
Browning, J., Lococo, V., Forrest, S.,
& Fox, A. Graduate assistantship
experience promotes research
foundation for clinical practice.
February 1999. 13-14.
Bruno, J. Assessing the school-aged
child for AAC. April 2005. 3-7.
Bruno, J. A report of the division
survey on direct versus indirect
services. August 1994. 9-10.
Bruno, J. Direct vs indirect time:
What are the needs in AAC?
November 1992. 2-3.
Bruno, J. Mom went to speech instead
of the beach: Camp Chatterbox—
Children’s specialized hospital.
May 1997. 11-13.
Bryen, D. N., & Slesaransky-Poe, G.
ACES: Augmentative communication and empowerment supports.
May 1997. 15-17.
Buzolich, M. J. Acts. April 1994. 3.
Calculator, S. N. AAC curriculum, or
placing the cart before the horse.
November 1996. 4-5.
Calculator, S. N. AAC knowledge and
skills. November 2002. 17-18.
Casey, K. Play-based assessment for
AAC. November 1995. 10-13.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Caves, K., DeRuyter, R., & Beukelman,
D. R. Interface design. August 2002.
8-11.
Cheslock, M. Issues of language
input and output in AAC with
young children. September 2004.
11-14.
Cheslock, M., Romski, M. A., Sevcik,
R. A., & Adamson, L. B. Augmented language intervention
project: From school-aged youth
to toddlers. June 2001. 15-17.
Chung, P., & Tull, R. G. Technology
use among teens and young adults
with autism and related disorders.
August 2000. 16-18.
Clark, E. A., & Clark, E. G. Using
evidence-based practice to guide
decision making in AAC. November
2002. 6-9.
Corwin, M., & Koul, R. Augmentative and alternative communication intervention for individuals
with chronics severe aphasia: An
evidence-based practice process
illustration. September 2003. 1115.
Cottier, C., & Fishman, I. Financial
aspects of specialty recognition.
June 1996. 9-10.
Cress, C. Will my child talk? December 2003. 10-11.
Cress, C. Questions and answers
about Resna’s quality assurance
activities. November 1995. 13-15.
Cress, C. J. Transitions from spontaneous to intentional behaviors.
May 1999. 4-7.
Cress, C. J. A communication “tools”
model for AAC intervention with
early communicators. June 2001.
20-22.
Cress, C. J., & Wood, L. A. Language
and AAC intervention in young
children: Never too early or too
late to start. June 2001. 2-3.
Culp, D. AAC in the public schoolshelpful Web sites. June 2005. 2728.
Culp, D. If mama ain’t happy, ain’t
nobody happy. December 2003. 39.
Culp, D. In search of AAC access for
all individuals with complex
communication needs. April 2004.
4-5.
2
Cumley, G. D., & Robinson, N. B.
Perspectives on teaching AAC.
June 2004. 2-3.
Cumley, G. D., & Stuart, S. The aging
process and the affect on successful AAC use. September 2005. 2225.
Damico, S. AAC and literacy summer
program: Facilitating transfer of
content and methods to the regular
academic classroom. May 1997. 67.
DePaepe, P., Feeley, K., & Wood, L. A.
Augmentative and alternative
communication considerations for
adults with significant cognitive
disabilities. April 2002. 20-25.
Deputy, P. N. Running the maze.
August 1993. 4-5.
Division 12 Professional Preparation
Committee. Augmentative and
alternative communication (AAC)
resources for professional preparation. December 2001. (Supplement) 1-13.
Dowden, P. Using internet sources
within and beyond the classroom.
June 2004. 17-20.
Doyle, M., & Burton, W. Update on
Medicare and speech generating
devices. April 2005. 13-18.
Dropik, P., & Reichle, J. Developing
an intervention strategy to replace
challenging behavior used to
escape undesired activities: A case
example. March 2001. 8-10.
d’Oliveira de Paula Nunes, L. R. AAC
intervention research with children
and youth with moderate and
severe disabilities in Brazil.
August 2003. 2-6.
Eberle, C. M. Breaking down barriers
in geriatrics. September 2005. 7-9.
Effinger, J. Comments on ethical
dilemmas. November 1996. 16-17.
Erickson, K. Reading Development in
AAC. February 2003. 8-10.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
June 2005. 11-16.
Erickson, K. A., & Koppenhaver, D. A.
Should AAC be taught as a separate curriculum? November 1996.
5-7.
December 2005
Evans, L. M. Pennsylvania’s solution
to funding school-based assistive
technology. June 2001. 22-24.
Fagan, E. Credentialing considerations. November 1996. 20-22.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L., &
Jakobs, T. New access options for
head pointing. April 2004. 16-20.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., & Jakobs, T.
AAC intervention for locked-in
syndrome using the safe-laser access
system. April 2002. 4-6.
Finch, A., & Meier, S. Clinician’s
education associated with AAC.
September 1999. 2-4.
Foley, B. Language, literacy, and
AAC: Translating theory into
practice. February 2003. 5-8.
Fried-Oken, M. Story telling as an
augmentative communication
approach for a man with severe
apraxia of speech and expressive
aphasia. March 1995. 3-4.
Fried-Oken, M., & Bersani, H. Framing the transition issues: “Take one
giant step.” “Mother may I?”
February 1998. 3.
Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach, L. Endof-life issues for people who use
AAC. September 2005. 15-19.
Frost, L. The picture exchange
communication system. April
2003. 8-10.
Gangkofer, M. H. Is it easy or hard to
“read” a picture? September 1996.
4-5.
Garrett, K. Expanding expressive
communication options for a
person with severe aphasia. March
1995. 5-7.
Geluso, B. Supplementing residual
speech with high-tech AAC.
December 2005. 5-6.
Gillette, Y. Teaching resources in AAC
and distance learning. February
1999. 16-18.
Gillette, Y. A Web site worth checking
out: aac.unl.edu. August 2000. 1516.
Glennen, S. AAC at ASHA news.
September 2003. 19.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Goldsmith, S. Educating,
credentialing and employing
health care providers: A view of
our profession as seen by the PEW
health professions commission.
August 1994. 7-9.
Golinker, L. Insurance funding for
AAC devices: Update. February
2003. 12.
Golinker, L. Medicaid AAC device
funding for nursing facility
residents. August 2003. 29-33.
Golinker, L. Medicare coverage of
voice amplifiers. December 2004,
20.
Golinker, L. Medicare funding for
AAC devices. May 1998. 11-12.
Golinker, L. Medicare now covers
AAC devices. March 2001. 12-14.
Golinker, L. Medicare eliminates
computer-based device exclusion:
A new class of AAC device
emerges. June 2001. 29-32.
Golinker, L. Responding to threats to
Medicaid SGD coverage & funding. December 2005. 11-13.
Golinker, L. Tricare expands SGD
coverage. September 2005. 25-26.
Gradel, K. AAC over the long haul.
November 1998. 9-10.
Harlan, N., & Kravitz, E. Assessing
expertise in AAC. June 1996. 7-9.
Harris, O. AAC training practices in
speech-language pathology and
special education programs at
historically Black colleges and
universities. February 1999. 11-12.
Harris, O. An AAC training program at
an historically Black university.
May 2000. 2-13.
Hemphill, J. Instructional programs
teach literacy to AAC users.
December 2005. 6-7.
Hetzroni, O. E. Identifying intentional communication in children
with severe disabilities. June 2001.
7-10.
Hidecker, M. J. C. Transitions in early
intervention and AAC. September
2004. 15-19.
Higdon, C. W. ASHA 2002 AAC
program. November 2002. 14-16.
Higginbotham, D. J. Introduction:
Research on utterance-based
communication. December 2001.
2-5.
3
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G. W.
The ambiguous keyboard. April
2004. 12-16.
Higginbotham, J., & McNaughton, D.
Kovack, T. Performance and usability. August 2002. 17-19.
Higgins, J. M., & Carney, R. The
play’s the thing. August 1994. 2-4.
Huer, M. B. Our journey. November
1994. 9-10.
Huer, M. B. International activities in
AAC. August 2003. 17-19.
Huer, M. B. Reflections from a project
director (1994-2000). May 2000.
14-16.
Hunt-Berg, M. Gestures in development: Implications for early
intervention in AAC. June 2001. 47.
Hunt-Berg, M. The Bridge School: A
community of practice in AAC.
June 2005. 6-10.
Kaiser, A. P., & Hancock, T. B.
Teaching parents to support their
children’s communication: Adaptations for AAC. September 2004. 46.
Kangas, K. Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world.”
September 1996. 14-16.
Kangas, K. Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world,”
Part II. November 1996. 11-14.
Kaye & Phillip (in collaboration with
G. Van Tatenhove). A student guide
for successful inclusion. September
1995. 12-14.
Kempka, D. Hurry, hurry, find the fire!
November 1995. 7-8.
Kennedy, M., & Shiller, B. A. Collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. June 2004. 3-7.
King-DeBaun, P. Making dramatic
centers print rich. November 1995.
3-4.
Korsten, J. E. Meaningful data—
Making sense of “+” and “-”.
November 2002. 10-13.
Kortz, D. The importance of home and
school connections. November
1998. 6-7.
Koul, R., & Schlosser, R. Clinician
and researcher database in augmentative and alternative communication. September 2001. 22-24.
December 2005
Kovach, T. Context is the key.
November 1996. 7-10.
Kovach, T. The United States society
for augmentative and alternative
communication. August 2003. 1920.
Kraat, A. Specialty recognition in
ACC. August 1994. 5-7.
Kravitz, E., Bruno, J., Tullman, J.,
Wilkinson, K., Wiseman, V. A., &
Zangari, C. Specialty Recognition
Committee final report—May 23,
2001. September 2001. 20-22.
Kwasniewski, J. Word prediction: A
time saver? August 1994. 4-5.
Lasker, J. P. Categorical AAC assessment of persons with aphasia (PWA).
April 2002. 14-19.
Lasker, J. P. Development of a model
AAC syllabus: Exploring new
competencies. June 2004. 25-28.
Lasker, J. P. Language and organization for adults with acquired
disorders: Clinical framework for
aphasia assessment. September
2005. 10-14.
Leseth, L., & Meader, L. Utilizing an
AAC system to maximize receptive
and expressive communication
skills of a person with Alzheimer’s
Disease. March 1995. 7-9.
Light, J., & Beukelman, D. R. Representational strategies. August 2002. 2021.
Light, J., & Drager, K. Re-thinking
access to AAC technologies for
young children: Simplifying the
learning demands. April 2004. 512.
Light, J., McNaughton, D., Drager, K.,
Roberts, B., & Wilson, K. The Penn
State partnerships in AAC project:
A multidisciplinary preservice
program for speech-language
pathologists and special education
teachers. June 2004. 8-12.
Lindsay, S. D. Family participation in
AAC. February 1999. 19.
Lloyd, L. L. ISAAC panel on Resna’s
assistive technology credentialing
program. November 1996. 20.
Lloyd, L. L. Resna’s AAC
credentialing activities. June 1996.
12-14.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Lloyd, L. L. Will ASHA’s new structure meet your needs? August
1997. 17-19.
Lloyd, L. L., & Pufpaff, L. They said
it couldn’t be done, but we did it
anyway. February 1999. 8-11.
Lowe, M. A. Selecting reading and
writing vocabulary for the AAC
user. April 2003. 3-7.
Lytton, R. Augmentative
communicaton as a medical
necessity. April 1994. 6-8.
Lytton, R. Early intervention: Assessment issues. September 2004. 2224.
MacFarland, S. Z. Beyond calendar
boxes: The importance of systematic instruction of the van Dijk
approach for learners who are deafblind. December 2000. 4-7.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevcik, R.,
Adler, R., Cheng, L., DavisMcFarland, E., Deal-Williams, V.,
Garrett, D., Riquelme, L.,
Salisbury, T., Schneider, W., &
Villanueva, A. Why is yogurt good
for you? Because it has live
cultures. December 2004. 17-19.
Mathy, P. Augmentative and alternative communication intervention
in neurogenic disorders with
acquired dysarthria. April 2003.
11-17.
McCloskey, S. R. Assistive technology:
School-related issues. November
2002. 2-3.
McCloskey, S. R. Inclusion: Communication technology and the
classroom. September 1995. 4-6.
McCloskey, S. R., & Zabala, J. S. Using
quality indicators to improve service
delivery for assistive technology
services in educational settings.
November 2002. 3-6.
McComas, J. Considering the efficiency of communicative options
available to a beginning communicator. March 2001. 11-12.
McCord, S., & Soto, G. Working with
low-income Latino families: Issues
and strategies. May 2000. 10-12.
McCoy, K. F., Bedrosian, J. L., &
Hoag, L. A. Pragmatic trade-offs in
utterance-based systems: Uncovering technological implications.
December 2001. 12-16.
4
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. A consultative model for AAC/AT support:
A team approach. June 2005. 1620.
McEvoy, M. A., & Neilsen, S. L.
Using functional behavioral
assessment and functional communication training to assess and
prevent challenging behavior.
March 2001. 6-8.
McLean, L. K., Molica, B. M.,
Mirenda, P., Paul-Brown, D.,
Romski, M. A., Sevcik, R. A., &
Snell, M. E. Update from the
National Joint Committee for the
Communication Needs of Persons
with Severe Disabilities. June
2001. 24-27.
McNairn, P. Facilitating literacy
development in AAC users. April
1994. 8-9.
McNaughton, S., & Bryen, D. Employment issues. August 2002. 5-8.
Merrie, M., Holloway, K., Frana, N., &
Gibbroek, J. Engineering the
classroom for ACC. November
1993. 6-8.
Mollica, B. M. AT access and individuals with mental retardation:
Documentation of the need and the
barriers. December 1999. 4-5.
Mollica, B. M. Representing the way
to language learning and expression. November 1997. 3-4.
Moon, J. The ASHA specialty recognition program is here! June 1996.
3-4.
Moore, S. M., Kovach, T. M., &
Donaldson, C. A. What an experience—A preservice training
opportunity! Talking with technology camp. May 1997. 9-11.
Morris, R. D., & Sevcik, R. A. Reading development: Models and
processes. February 2003. 3-5.
Murphy, J. W. The reality of managed
health care: Implications for AAC
service delivery. May 1998. 4-5.
Namy, L. Contemporary research in
symbolic development: factors
influencing acquisition in typically developing children. September 2004. 7-10.
Nelson, B., Howell, M., & Ross, J. A
tale of two transitions. February
1998. 9-10.
December 2005
Nyberg, E. The role of linguistic
theory in AAC. September 1996. 79.
Olsson, C. The EBP experiences of an
AAC service provider: diving in
deep. September 2003. 15-19.
Osborn, S. R. Remembering key
points for inclusion. September
1995. 9-12.
Palenzuela, M. Interview with a
master storyteller. December 2000.
9-10.
Parette, H. P. Culture, families, and
augmentative and alternative
communication impact. May 2000.
3-6.
Patel, R. Rethinking sentence formulation in AAC. December 2001. 57.
Paul, R. Developing preliteracy skills
in children with severe speech and
physical impairments: Fostering
phonological awareness. November 1997. 10-11.
Paul-Brown, D. What is NJC doing for
children and adults with severe
disabilities? December 1999. 8-10.
Pecunas, P. Living with a communication device. April 2002. 27-30.
Rakhman, S. V. Two realities: How the
social conditions of society affect
the quality of life of people with
disabilities (personal and economic points of view). August
2003. 20-27.
Rackensperger, T. The road to fulltime employment. December 2005.
8-9.
Ratcliff, A. ASHA’s new standards for
pre-profesional training in SLP and
what they may mean for ACC.
December 2003. 22-24.
Ratcliff, A. Augmentative and alternative communication: Challenges at
the preservice level. February
1999. 2.
Ratcliff, A. Rationale for preservice
training in AAC. February 1999. 36.
Reed, P. R. Inclusion: Team decision
making and augmentative and
alternative communication
services. September 1995. 8-9.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Reichle, J. The importance of addressing problem behavior among
beginning communicators. March
2001. 1-2.
Rodgers, N. M., & Brown, L. K. AAC:
If you’re not into it yet, you should
be! June 2005. 2-5.
Roth, K. D. Addressing challenges to
success with students who use
augmentative and alternative
communication in the school
setting. June 2005. 24-26.
Rowland, C. But what can they do?
Assessment of communication
skills in children with severe and
multiple disabilities. April 2005.
7-12.
Rowland, C., & Schweigert, P.
Tangible solutions for individuals
with dual sensory impairments.
December 2000. 3-4.
Romski, M. A. Back to the future:
Don’t forget the knowledge we
have as we move into the next
century. December 1999. 2-3.
Romski, M. A., & Sevcik, R. A.
Speech comprehension and early
augmented language intervention:
Concepts, measurement, and
clinical considerations. May 1999.
7-10.
Saenz, T. I., & Huer, M. B. Considerations in the assessment and
treatment of bilingual individuals.
November 1994. 8-9.
Sall, N. Friendship: A social, educational, and communication
concern for children who are deafblind. December 2000. 7-9.
Sargent, J. E. Nonverbal immediacy:
Communicative salience during
interpersonal interactions. September 2005. 4-7.
Scally, C. Visual design: Implications
for developing dynamic display
systems. December 2001. 16-19.
Scherz, J. Communication and active
participation (caregiver) issues.
September 2005. 20-21.
Schlosser, R., Calculator, S., Finch, A.,
Kovach, T., & Sevcik, R. A.
Augmentative and alternative
communication: A bibliography.
June 2001. 32-33.
5
Schlosser, R. W. Evidence-based
practice: Frequently asked questions, myths, and resources.
September 2003. 4-7.
Schlosser, R. W. Evidence-based
practice: Meeting the challenge.
September 2003. 3-4.
Schwartz, J. AAC-RERC writers
brigade: Purpose, function, and
outcome. December 2005. 3-4.
Seaver, R. I. Psychological perspectives of AAC use. September 1996.
9-13.
Sementelli, C. “I brought my talker,
my sleeping bag, and my little
brother!” May 1997. 8.
Sevcik, R. A. Introduction. February
2003. 2.
Sevcik, R. A. Research with young
children at risk for speech/language development disorders. May
1999. 1-4.
Sevcik, R. A., & Romski, M. Expanding our understanding of AAC in
Hong Kong. August 2003. 14-16.
Sigafoos, J., & Drasgow, E. Empirically validated strategies, evidence-based practice, and basic
principles in communication
intervention for learners with
developmental disabilities.
September 2003. 7-10.
Smyzek, A. AAC: Growing in Poland.
August 2003. 8-11.
Soto, G. A cultural perspective on
augumentative and alternative
communication. November 1994.
6-7.
Soto, G. An AAC training program
with emphasis on collaboration
and inclusion. June 2004. 13-16.
Soto, G. “We have come a long
way…” AAC and multiculturalism:
From cultural awareness to cultural
responsibility. May, 2000. 1-3.
Spitler, C. K. Music, play, and AAC.
November 1995. 4-6.
Staehely, J., Murphy, J., & Myers, C.
Sharing a dream: A summer
institute for language and literacy.
May 1997. 13-14.
Starr, J. The Oregon health plan:
Understanding implications for
people with disabilities. May
1998. 7-8.
December 2005
Staugler, K. Response to “Ethical
dilemmas.” November 1996. 1416.
Steele, R. Benefits of advanced AAC
technology uses to adults with
acquired aphasia. December 2004.
3-7.
Stuart, S. AAC and pediatric palliative
care. December 2004. 12-16.
Stuart, S. Expanding communicative
participation using augmetative
and alternative communication
within a game playing activity for
a man with severe aphasia. March
1995. 9-11.
Stuart, S. Service learning model for
preprofessional preparation in AAC
at New Mexico State University.
February 1999. 7.
Sturm, J. Improving technologies for
school-age children with severe
physical handicaps. August 2002.
12-13.
Sundberg, R. Oregon’s Medicaid
program and managed care: A case
study of legal issues. May 1998. 6.
Sutton, A. Grammatical development
and AAC. November 1997. 7-9.
Sweeney, L. A. Toward autonomy in
AAC practice. August 1993. 2-4.
Swengel, K. AAC and our family!
Interview with Carol Sneath,
mother of Melissa. November
1998. 10-12.
Swengel, K., & Armstrong, J. S.
Translating theory into practice: A
baker’s dozen. November 1998. 34.
Symons, F. J. Self injury as alternative
communication: Bridging behavior and biology. March 2001. 3-5.
Todman, J. Availability and accessibility in whole utterance-based
devices. December 2001. 8-11.
Valot, L. S. Pick a curriculum, any
curriculum: What to use with
people who use AAC. November
1996. 10-11.
Van Tatenhove, G. M. Field of
dreams. November 1993. 8-11.
Van Tatenhove, G. M. Language
production wth cognitively
challenged adults: A case study.
November 1997. 12-16.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Van Tatenhove, G. M. Supporting
AAC device users living in residential care settings. December
2004. 8-11.
Van Tatenhove, G. M. Using competent AAC users as peer trainers.
August 1993. 5-7.
Ward, M. J. Personal perspectives on
transition and assistive technology. February 1998. 7-8.
Wasson, C. A. Multicultural demographics in AAC. November 1994.
7.
Watkins, C. W. Resna credentialing
program. June 1996. 11-12.
Wilder, K. (for T. Ayers). My story of
managed care. May 1998. 8-10.
Wilkinson, K. Gender differences in
the communication of individuals
with developmental disabilities.
December 1999. 6-8.
Wilkinson, K. M. Specialty recognition. May 1999. 13.
Williams, B. The Edwin and Esther
Prentke AAC distinguished lecture.
March 2001. 15-16.
Williams, M. What is an RERC? August
2002. 4-5.
Wood, L. Early intervention and ACC
assessment resources. December
2003. 12-13.
Wood, L. A. Early literacy activities
and language learning opportunities for children who use AAC.
June 2001. 10-11.
Yoder, P., & Warren, S. F. Prelinguistic
communication intervention may
be one way to help children with
developmental delays learn to talk.
May 1999. 11-12.
Yong, S. AAC in Singapore: Blending
culture, language, and technology
to serve our island’s people.
August 2003. 11-14.
Younkerman, T. WebCrawlers –
Taking AAC devices to a new
level. December 2005. 9-10.
Zabala, J. The SETT framework:
Choosing and using tools that
promote inclusion through communication participation, and
productivity. September 1995. 6-8.
Zangari, C. Online instruction in
AAC: Engaging the learner. June
2004. 20-24.
6
Zangari, C. Symbolization and the
young child with significant
communication challenges.
September 2004. 19-21.
Zangari, C. Specialty recognition.
November 1998. 12.
Zangari, C. Using natural context
AAC assessments to plan meaningful intervention. April 1994. 5-6.
Zangari, C. Where are we with
specialty recognition? June 1996.
4-6.
Zangari, C. Helping families gain
acceptance of AAC strategies. June
2001. 12-15.
December 2005
Subject Index
Language Assessment and
Intervention
Assessment
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
Assessing the school-aged child for
AAC. Bruno, J. April 2005. 3-7.
Augmentative and alternative
communication considerations for
adults with significant cognitive
disabilities. DePaepe, P., Feeley,
K., & Wood, L. A. April 2002. 2025.
But what can they do? Assessment of
communication skills in children
with severe and multiple disabilities. Rowland, C. April 2005. 7-12.
Categorical AAC assessment of persons
with aphasia (PWA). Lasker, J. P.
April 2002. 14-19.
Considerations in the assessment and
treatment of bilingual individuals.
Saenz, T. I., & Huer, M. B. November 1994. 8-9.
Early intervention and ACC assessment resources. Wood, L. December 2003. 12-13.
Improving technologies for school-age
children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Language and organization for adults
with acquired disorders: Clinical
framework for aphasia assessment.
Lasker, J. P. September 2005. 1014.
Play-based assessment for AAC.
Casey, K. November 1995. 10-13.
“Repair work ahead”: The importance
of assessing communication
breakdown and repair in AAC.
Brady, N. C. December 1999. 1011.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K. M, & Clendon, S. A.
June 2005. 11-16.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Selecting reading and writing vocabulary for the AAC user. Lowe,
M. A. April 2003. 3-7.
Test accomodations: What do we
know? Arvidson, H. August 1998.
16-17.
There are no prerequisites for communication. Brady, N., Sevcik, R. A.,
Caves, K., Mclean, L., Mollica, B.
M., Romski, M., Snell, M., & PaulBrown, D. August 2003. 27-29.
Using functional behavioral assessment and functional communication training to assess and prevent
challenging behavior. McEvoy, M.
A., & Neilsen, S. L. March 2001. 68.
Using natural context AAC assessments to plan meaningful intervention. Zangari, C. April 1994. 5-6.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
The value of the interdisciplinary
team evaluation in the assessment
of individuals with AAC needs.
Becker, L. B. September 1999. 5-6.
Intervention
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC and literacy summer program:
Facilitating transfer of content and
methods to the regular academic
classroom. Damico, S. May 1997.
6-7.
AAC and our family! Interview with
Carol Sneath, mother of Melissa.
Swengel, K. November 1998. 1012.
AAC: If you’re not into it yet, you
should be! Rodgers, N. M., &
Brown, L. K. June 2005. 2-5
AAC in the public schools—Helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
ACES: Augmentative communication
and empowerment supports. Bryen,
D. N., & Slesaransky-Poe, G. May
1997. 15-17.
Assessing the school-aged child for
AAC. Bruno, J. April 2005. 3-7.
7
Augmentative and alternative communication considerations for adults
with significant cognitive disabilities. DePaepe, P., Feeley, K., &
Wood, L. A. April 2002. 20-25.
Augmentative communicaton as a
medical necessity. Lytton, R. April
1994. 6-8.
Augmented language intervention
project: From school-aged youth
to toddlers. Cheslock, M., Romski,
M. A., Sevcik, R. A., & Adamson, L.
B. June 2001. 15-17.
Back to the future: Don’t forget the
knowledge we have as we move
into the next century. Romski, M.
A. December 1999. 2-3.
Beyond calendar boxes: The importance of systematic instruction of
the van Dijk approach for learners
who are deaf-blind. MacFarland, S.
Z. December 2000. 4-7.
But what can they do? Assessment of
communication skills in children
with severe and multiple disabilities. Rowland, C. April 2005. 7-12.
Categorical AAC assessment of persons
with aphasia (PWA). Lasker, J. P.
April 2002. 14-19.
A communication “tools” model for
AAC intervention with early
communicators. Cress, C. J. June
2001. 20-22.
Comprehension and production in
AAC. Brady, N. C. June 2001. 1719.
Considerations in the assessment and
treatment of bilingual individuals.
Saenz, T. I., & Huer, M. B. November 1994. 8-9.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Context is the key. Kovach, T.
November 1996. 7-10.
Developing an intervention strategy
to replace challenging behavior
used to escape undesired activities: A case example. Dropik, P., &
Reichle, J. March 2001. 8-10.
Developing preliteracy skills in
children with severe speech and
physical impairments: Fostering
phonological awareness. Paul, R.
November 1997. 10-11.
December 2005
Friendship: A social, educational, and
communication concern for
children who are deaf-blind. Sall,
N. December 2000. 7-9.
Early literacy activities and language
learning opportunities for children
who use AAC. Wood, L. A. June
2001. 10-11.
Engineering the classroom for ACC.
Merrie, M., Holloway, K., Frana, N.,
& Gibbroek, J. November 1993. 68.
Expanding communicative participation using augmetative and
alternative communication within
a game playing activity for a man
with severe aphasia. Stuart, S.
March 1995. 9-11.
Expanding expressive communication options for a person with
severe aphasia. Garrett, K. March
1995. 5-7.
Facilitating literacy development in
AAC users. McNairn, P. April 1994.
8-9.
Field of dreams. Van Tatenhove, G. M.
November 1993. 8-11.
Forming parent and professional
partnerships. Armstrong, J. S.
November 1998. 7-9.
From the guest editor. Blischak, D.
December 2000. 2.
Gestures in development: Implications for early intervention in AAC.
Hunt-Berg, M. June 2001. 4-7.
Grammatical development and AAC.
Sutton, A. November 1997. 7-9.
Helping families gain acceptance of
AAC strategies. Zangari, C. June
2001. 12-15.
Helping the AAC user acquire grammatical morphology. Blockberger,
S. November 1997. 5-7.
“I brought my talker, my sleeping
bag, and my little brother!”
Sementelli, C. May 1997. 8.
Identifying intentional communication in children with severe
disabilities. Hetzroni, O. E. June
2001. 7-10.
Instructional programs teach literacy
to AAC users. Hemphill, J. December 2005. 6-7.
Interview with a master storyteller.
Palenzuela, M. December 2000. 910.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Introduction. Sevcik, R. A. February
2003. 2.
Language and AAC intervention in
young children: Never too early or
too late to start. Cress, C. J., &
Wood, L. A. June 2001. 2-3.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Language production with
cognitively challenged adults: A
case study. Van Tatenhove, G. M.
November 1997. 12-16.
Making dramatic centers print rich.
King-DeBaun, P. November 1995.
3-4.
Meaningful data—Making sense of “+”
and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November
2002. 10-13.
Mom went to speech instead of the
beach: Camp Chatterbox—
Children’s specialized hospital.
Bruno, J. May 1997. 11-13.
Music, play, and AAC. Spitler, C. K.
November 1995. 4-6.
Pick a curriculum, any curriculum:
What to use with people who use
AAC. Valot, L. S. November 1996.
10-11.
The Picture Exchange Communication System. Frost, L. April 2003.
8-10.
The play’s the thing. Higgins, J. M., &
Carney, R. August 1994. 2-4.
Prelinguistic communication intervention may be one way to help
children with developmental
delays learn to talk. Yoder, P., &
Warren, S. F. May 1999. 11-12.
Reading development: Models and
processes. Morris, R. D., & Sevcik,
R. A. February 2003. 3-5.
Representing the way to language
learning and expression. Mollica,
B. M. November 1997. 3-4.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A. June
2005. 11-16.
Re-thinking access to AAC technologies for young children: Simplifying the learning demands. Light, J.,
& Drager, K. April 2004. 5-12.
8
Sharing a dream: A summer institute
for language and literacy. Staehely,
J., Murphy, J., & Myers, C. May
1997. 13-14.
Speech comprehension and early
augmented language intervention:
Concepts, measurement, and
clinical considerations. Romski,
M. A., & Sevcik, R. A. May 1999.
7-10.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings.
VanTatenhove, G. December 2004.
8-11.
Tangible solutions for individuals
with dual sensory impairments.
Rowland, C., & Schweigert, P.
December 2000. 3-4.
A theater script. Brothers, S., Sewell,
R., Smith, S., Anderson, K., &
Dublin, C. November 1995. 8-10.
Transitions from spontaneous to
intentional behaviors. Cress, C. J.
May 1999. 4-7.
Using competent AAC users as peer
trainers. Van Tatenhove, G. M.
August 1993. 5-7.
Using functional behavioral assessment and functional communication training to assess and prevent
challenging behavior. McEvoy, M.
A., & Neilsen, S. L. March 2001. 68.
Utilizing an AAC system to maximize
receptive and expressive communication skills of a person with
Alzheimer’s disease. Leseth, L., &
Meader, L. March 1995. 7-9.
Why is yogurt good for you? Because
it has live cultures. Mahendra, N.,
Ribera, J., Sevcik, R., Adler, R.,
Cheng, L., Davis-McFarland, E.,
Deal-Williams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
December 2004. 17-19.
Nonspeech Communication
Systems
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
December 2005
Assessing the school-aged child for
AAC. Bruno, J. April 2005. 3-7.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention for
individuals with chronic severe
aphasia: An evidence-based
practice process illustration.
Corwin, M., & Koul, R. September
2003. 11-14.
But what can they do? Assessment of
communication skills in children
with severe and multiple disabilities. Rowland, C. April 2005. 7-12.
Categorical AAC assessment of
persons with aphasia (PWA).
Lasker, J. P. April 2002. 14-19.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S.,
& Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
Evidence-based practice: Meeting the
challenge. Schlosser, R. W. September 2003. 3.
Evidence-based practice: Frequently
asked questions, myths, and
resources. Schlosser, R. W. September 2003. 4-6.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Improving technologies for schoolage children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
In search of AAC access for all
individuals with complex communication needs. Culp, D. April
2004. 4-5.
Instructional programs teach literacy
to AAC users. Hemphill, J. December 2005. 6-7.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Language and organization for adults
with acquired disorders: Clinical
framework for aphasia assessment.
Lasker, J. P. September 2005. 1014.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
Organizational strategies.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J.
August 2002. 14-17.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
The Picture Exchange Communication System. Frost, L. April 2003.
8-10.
Representational strategies. Light, J.,
& Beukelman, D. R. August 2002.
20-21.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A. June
2005. 11-16.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 2123.
Unusual research partners.
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 24.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
What is an RERC? Williams, M.
August 2002. 4-5.
Assistive Technology
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
AAC intervention for locked-in
syndrome using the safe-laser access
system. Fager, S., Beukelman, D., &
Jakobs, T. April 2002. 4-6.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
Assistive technology: School-related
issues. McCloskey, S. R. November
2002. 2-3.
AT access and individuals with
mental retardation: Documentation
of the need and the barriers.
Mollica, B. M. December 1999. 45.
9
Availability and accessibility in
whole utterance-based devices.
Todman, J. December 2001. 8-11.
Benefits of advanced AAC technology uses to adults with acquired
aphasia. Steele, R. December 2004.
3-7.
But what can they do? Assessment of
communication skills in children
with severe and multiple disabilities. Rowland, C. April 2005. 7-12.
Categorical AAC assessment of persons
with aphasia (PWA). Lasker, J. P.
April 2002. 14-19.
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S., &
Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Improving technologies for school-age
children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Introduction: Research on utterancebased communication.
Higginbotham, D. J. December
2001. 2-5.
ISAAC panel on Resna’s assistive
technology credentialing program.
Lloyd, L. L. November 1996. 20.
Language and organization for adults
with acquired disorders: Clinical
framework for aphasia assessment.
Lasker, J. P. September 2005. 1014.
Meaningful data—Making sense of “+”
and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November
2002. 10-13.
Medicare funding for AAC devices.
Golinker, L. May 1998. 11-12.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
December 2005
Organizational strategies. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 1417.
Pennsylvania’s solution to funding
school-based assistive technology.
Evans, L. M. June 2001. 22-24.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
Personal perspectives on transition
and assistive technology. Ward. M.
J. February 1998. 7-8.
Pragmatic trade-offs in utterancebased systems: Uncovering
technological implications.
McCoy, K. F., Bedrosian, J. L., &
Hoag, L. A. December 2001. 12-16.
Representational strategies. Light, J., &
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 2021.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A. June
2005. 11-16
Re-thinking access to AAC technologies for young children: simplifying the learning demands. Light, J.,
& Drager, K. April 2004. 5-12.
Rethinking sentence formulation in
AAC. Patel, R. December 2001. 57.
A student guide for successful
inclusion. Kaye & Phillip (in
collaboration with G. Van
Tatenhove). September 1995. 1214.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman, D.
R., & Light, J. August 2002. 21-23.
Technology use among teens and
young adults with autism and
related disorders. Chung, P., &
Tull, R. G. August 2000. 16-18.
Ten years of technology. Ahlers, J., &
Leiter, J. April 1994. 3-5.
Unusual research partners. Beukelman,
D. R. August 2002. 24.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Visual design: Implications for
developing dynamic display
systems. Scally, C. December 2001.
16-19.
WebCrawlers—Taking AAC devices
to a new level. Younkerman, T.
December 2005. 9-10.
What is an RERC? Williams, M. August
2002. 4-5.
Word prediction: A time saver?
Kwasniewski, J. August 1994. 4-5.
Augmentative and Alternative
Communication
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC: If you’re not into it yet, you
should be! Rodgers, N. M., &
Brown, L. K. June 2005. 2-5
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
Addressing challenges to success
with students who use augmentative and alternative communication in the school setting. Roth, K.
D. June 2005. 24-26.
The aging process and the affect on
successful AAC use. Cumley, G. D.,
& Stuart, S. September 2005. 2225.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
ASHA’s new standards for preprofessional training in SLP and
what they may mean for AAC.
Ratcliff, A. December 2003. 22-24.
The Bridge School: A community of
practice in AAC. Hunt-Berg, M.
June 2005. 6-10.
A cultural perspective on
augumentative and alternative
communication. Soto, G. November 1994. 6-7.
A Web site worth checking out:
aac.unl.edu. Gillette, Y. August
2000. 15-16.
Augmentative and alternative
communication: A bibliography.
Schlosser, R., Calculator, S., Finch,
A., Kovach, T., & Sevcik, R. A.
June 2001. 32-33.
10
Augmentative and alternative communication considerations for adults
with significant cognitive disabilities. DePaepe, P., Feeley, K., &
Wood, L. A. April 2002. 20-25.
Augmentative and alternative
communication in ALS. Bardach,
L., & Newman, D. December 2003.
14-21.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired
dysarthria. Mathy, P. April 2003.
11-17.
Benefits of advanced AAC technology uses to adults with acquired
aphasia. Steele, R. December 2004.
3-7.
Categorical AAC assessment of persons
with aphasia (PWA). Lasker, J. P.
April 2002. 14-19.
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Communication and active participation (caregiver) issues. Scherz, J.
September 2005. 20-21.
Considering the efficiency of communicative options available to a
beginning communicator.
McComas, J. March 2001. 11-12.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Culture, families, and augmentative
and alternative communication
impact. Parette, H. P. May 2000. 36.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Early intervention and ACC assessment resources. Wood, L. December 2003. 12-13.
Early intervention: Assessment issues.
Lytton, R. September 2004. 22-24.
The Edwin and Esther Prentke AAC
distinguished lecture. Williams, B.
March 2001. 15-16.
Family issues in AAC. Angelo, D.
November 1998. 4-6.
December 2005
Family participation in AAC. Lindsay,
S. D. February 1999. 19.
Gender differences in the communication of individuals with developmental disabilities. Wilkinson, K.
December 1999. 6-8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
The importance of addressing problem behavior among beginning
communicators. Reichle, J. March
2001. 1-2.
The importance of home and school
connections. Kortz, D. November
1998. 6-7.
Improving technologies for school-age
children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
Instructional programs teach literacy
to AAC users. Hemphill, J. December 2005. 6-7.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Introduction. Sevcik, R. A. February
2003. 2.
Is it easy or hard to “read” a picture?
Gangkofer, M. H. September 1996.
4-5.
Issues of language input and output
in AAC with young children.
Cheslock, M. September 2004. 1114.
Language and organization for adults
with acquired disorders: Clinical
framework for aphasia assessment.
Lasker, J. P. September 2005. 1014.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Meaningful data—Making sense of “+”
and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November
2002. 10-13
Medicare coverage of voice amplifiers. Golinker, L. December 2004.
20.
Multicultural demographics in AAC.
Wasson, C. A. November 1994. 7.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Organizational strategies. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 1417.
Our journey. Huer, M. B. November
1994. 9-10.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
Perspectives on teaching AAC.
Cumley, G. D., & Robinson, N. B.
June 2004. 2-3.
The Picture Exchange Communication System. Frost, L. April 2003.
8-10.
Reading development in AAC.
Erickson, K. February 2003. 3-5.
Reflections from a project director
(1994-2000). Huer, M. B. May
2000. 14-16.
Representational strategies. Light, J., &
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 2021.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A. June
2005. 11-16
Re-thinking access to AAC technologies for young children: Simplifying the learning demands. Light, J.
& Drager, K. April 2004. 5-12.
The role of linguistic theory in AAC.
Nyberg, E. September 1996. 7-9.
Selecting reading and writing vocabulary for the AAC user. Lowe,
M. A. April 2003. 3-7.
Spot the funding: A hypothetical case
study illustrating funding dilemmas of older age persons with
communication disabilities.
Broehl, M. March 1995. 11-12.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings.
VanTatenhove, G. December 2004.
8-11.
Symbolization and the young child
with significant communication
challenges. Zangari, C. September
2004. 19-21.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman, D.
R., & Light, J. August 2002. 21-23.
11
Teaching parents to support their
children’s communication: Adaptations for AAC. Kaiser, A. P., &
Hancock, T. B. September 2004. 46.
There are no prerequisites for communication. Brady, N., Sevcik, R. A.,
Caves, K., Mclean, L., Mollica, B.
M., Romski, M., Snell, M., & PaulBrown, D. August 2003. 27-29.
Transitions in early intervention and
AAC. Hidecker, M. J. C. September
2004. 15-19.
Unusual research partners. Beukelman,
D. R. August 2002. 24.
Update from the National Joint
Committee for the Communication
Needs of Persons with Severe
Disabilities. McLean, L. K.,
Molica, B. M., Mirenda, P., PaulBrown, D., Romski, M. A., Sevcik,
R. A., & Snell, M. E. June 2001.
24-27.
Using evidence-based practice to guide
decision making in AAC. Clark, E.
A., & Clark, E. G. November 2002.
6-9.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
“We have come a long way…” AAC
and multiculturalism: From
cultural awareness to cultural
responsibility. Soto, G. May 2000.
1-3.
What is an RERC? Williams, M.
August 2002. 4-5.
Why is yogurt good for you? Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevcik,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L., DavisMcFarland, E., Deal-Williams, V.,
Garrett, D., Riquelme, L.,
Salisbury, T., Schneider, W., &
Villanueva, A. December 2004. 1719.
Working with low-income Latino
families: Issues and strategies.
McCord, S., & Soto, G. May 2000.
10-12.
December 2005
Speech Assessment and
Intervention
Assessment
AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. Ball, L. J.,
Beukelman, E. R., & Pattee, G. L.
April 2002. 7-12.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired
dysarthria. Mathy, P. April 2003.
11-17.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
Intervention
AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. Ball, L. J.,
Beukelman, E. R., & Pattee, G. L.
April 2002. 7-12.
Developing preliteracy skills in
children with severe speech and
physical impairments: Fostering
phonological awareness. Paul, R.
November 1997. 10-11.
Expanding expressive communication options for a person with
severe aphasia. Garrett, K. March
1995. 5-7.
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
Story telling as an augmentative
communication approach for a man
with severe apraxia of speech and
expressive aphasia. Fried-Oken, M.
March 1995. 3-4.
Utilizing an AAC system to maximize
receptive and expressive communication skills of a person with
Alzheimer’s disease. Leseth, L., &
Meader, L. March 1995. 7-9.
Nonspeech Communication
Systems
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. Ball, L. J.,
Beukelman, E. R., & Pattee, G. L.
April 2002. 7-12.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention for
individuals with chronic severe
aphasia: An evidence-based
practice process illustration.
Corwin, M. & Koul, R. September
2003. 11-14.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S.,
and Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Improving technologies for schoolage children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
In search of AAC access for all
Individuals with complex communication needs. Culp, D. April
2004. 4-5.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
Organizational strategies.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J.
August 2002. 14-17.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
Representational strategies. Light, J.,
& Beukelman, D. R. August 2002.
20-21.
Responding to a common early ACC
question: “Will my child talk?”.
Cress, C. December 2003. 10-11.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings.
VanTatenhove, G. December 2004.
8-11.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 2123.
12
Unusual research partners.
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 24.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
What is an RERC? Williams, M.
August 2002. 4-5.
Assistive Technology
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC intervention for locked-in
syndrome using the safe-laser
access system. Fager, S.,
Beukelman, D., & Jakobs, T. April
2002. 4-6.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired
dysarthria. Mathy, P. April 2003.
11-17.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S.,
& Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Improving technologies for schoolage children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
In search of AAC access for all
individuals with complex communication needs. Culp, D. April
2004. 4-5.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
ISAAC panel on Resna’s assistive
technology credentialing program.
Lloyd, L. L. November 1996. 20.
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
December 2005
Organizational strategies.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J.
August 2002. 14-17.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
Representational strategies. Light, J.,
& Beukelman, D. R. August 2002.
20-21.
Responding to a common early ACC
question: “Will my child talk?”
Cress, C. December 2003. 10-11.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 2123.
Unusual research partners.
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 24.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
WebCrawlers—Taking AAC devices
to a new level. Younkerman, T.
December 2005. 9-10.
What is an RERC? Williams, M.
August 2002. 4-5.
Augmentative and Alternative
Communication
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. Ball, L. J.,
Beukelman, E. R., & Pattee, G. L.
April 2002. 7-12.
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
Addressing challenges to success
with students who use augmentative and alternative communication in the school setting. Roth, K.
D. June 2005. 24-26.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
ASHA’s new standards for preprofessional training in SLP and
what they may mean for AAC.
Ratcliff, A. December 2003. 22-24.
Augmentative and alternative
communication in ALS. Bardach,
L., & Newman, D. December 2003.
14-21.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired
dysarthria. Mathy, P. April 2003.
11-17.
The Bridge School: A community of
practice in AAC. Hunt-Berg, M.
June 2005. 6-10.
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Communication and active participation (caregiver) issues. Scherz, J.
September 2005. 20-21.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S.,
& Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Improving technologies for schoolage children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
In search of AAC access for all
individuals with complex communication needs. Culp, D. April
2004. 4-5.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
Organizational strategies.
Beukelman, D. R., & Light, J.
August 2002. 14-17.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
13
Representational strategies. Light, J.,
& Beukelman, D. R. August 2002.
20-21.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman,
D. R.,& Light, J. August 2002. 2123.
Transitions in early intervention and
AAC. Hidecker, M. J. C. September
2004. 15-19.
Unusual research partners.
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 24.
Using evidence-based practice to
guide decision making in AAC.
Clark, E. A., & Clark, E. G. November 2002. 6-9.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
What is an RERC? Williams, M.
August 2002. 4-5.
Professional Affairs
Professional Standards and
Ethics
AAC knowledge and skills. Calculator,
S. N. November 2002. 17-18.
Addressing challenges to success
with students who use augmentative and alternative communication in the school setting. Roth, K.
D. June 2005. 24-26.
ASHA’s new standards for preprofessional training in SLP and
what they may mean for AAC.
Ratcliff, A. December 2003. 22-24.
Comments on ethical dilemmas.
Effinger, J. November 1996. 16-17.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
End-of-life issues for people who use
AAC. Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach,
L. September 2005. 15-19.
Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world.” Kangas,
K. September 1996. 14-16.
Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world,” Part II.
Kangas, K. November 1996. 11-14.
Meaningful data — Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November
2002. 10-13.
December 2005
Response to “Ethical dilemmas.”
Staugler, K. November 1996. 1416.
The road to full-time employment.
Rackensperger, T. December 2005.
8-9.
Update on Medicare and speech
generating devices. Doyle, M., &
Burton, W. April 2005. 13-18.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
Will ASHA’s new structure meet your
needs? Lloyd, L. L. August 1997.
17-19.
Governmental and
Professional Regulations
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Insurance funding for AAC devices:
Update. Golinker, L. February
2003. 12.
International activities in AAC. Huer,
M. B. August 2003. 17-19.
Medicaid AAC device funding for
nursing facility residents.
Golinker, L. August 2003. 29-33.
Medicare coverage of voice amplifiers. Golinker, L. December 2004,
20.
Medicare eliminates computer-based
device exclusion: A new class of
AAC device emerges. Golinker, L.
June 2001. 29-32.
Medicare funding for AAC devices.
Golinker, L. May 1998. 11-12.
Medicare now covers AAC devices.
Golinker, L. March 2001. 12-14.
Oregon’s Medicaid program and
managed care: A case study of
legal issues. Sundberg, R. May
1998. 6.
The Oregon health plan: Understanding implications for people with
disabilities. Starr, J. May 1998. 78.
The reality of managed health care:
Implications for AAC service
delivery. Murphy, J. W. May 1998.
4-5.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Two realities: How the social conditions of society affect the quality
of life of people with disabilities
(Personal and economic points of
view). Rakhman, S. V. August
2003. 20-27.
Understanding social security
disability and work incentives.
Anctil, T. M. February 1998. 5-7.
Service Provision Models and
Problems
AAC and literacy summer program:
Facilitating transfer of content and
methods to the regular academic
classroom. Damico, S. May 1997.
6-7.
AAC: Growing in Poland. Smyzek, A.
August 2003. 8-11.
AAC in developing countries: The
Centre for AAC at the University of
Pretoria, South Africa. Alant, E.
August 2003. 6-8.
AAC in the public schools—Helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
AAC in Singapore: Blending culture,
language, and technology to serve
our island’s people. Yong, S.
August 2003. 11-14.
AAC intervention research with
children and youth With moderate
and severe disabilities in Brazil.
d’Oliveira de Paula Nunes, L. R.
August 2003. 2-6.
AAC knowledge and skills. Calculator, S. N. November 2002. 17-18.
AAC over the long haul. Gradel, K.
November 1998. 9-10.
An AAC training program with
emphasis on collaboration and
inclusion. Soto, G. June 2004. 1316.
ACES: Augmentative communication
and empowerment supports. Bryen,
D. N., & Slesaransky-Poe, G. May
1997. 15-17.
Acts. Buzolich, M. J. April 1994. 3.
The aging process and the affect on
successful AAC use. Cumley, G. D.,
& Stuart, S. September 2005. 2225.
Assistive technology: School-related
issues. McCloskey, S. R. November
2002. 2-3.
14
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
Delivery of AAC services to a rural
American Indian community.
Bridges, S. May 2000. 6-9.
The EBP experiences of an AAC
service provider: Diving in deep.
Olsson, C. September 2003. 15-19.
End-of-life issues for people who use
AAC. Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach,
L. September 2005. 15-19.
Engineering the classroom for ACC.
Merrie, M., Holloway, K., Frana, N.,
& Gibbroek, J. November 1993. 68.
Expanding our understanding of AAC
in Hong Kong. Sevick R. A.,&
Romski, M. August 2003. 14-16.
Forming parent and professional
partnerships. Armstrong, J. S.
November 1998. 7-9.
Framing the transition issues: “Take
one giant step.” “Mother may I?”
Fried-Oken, M., & Bersani, H.
February 1998. 3.
Hurry, hurry, find the fire! Kempka, D.
November 1995. 7-8.
“I brought my talker, my sleeping
bag, and my little brother!”
Sementelli, C. May 1997. 8.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Inclusion: Communication technology and the classroom.
McCloskey, S. R. September 1995.
4-6.
Inclusion: Team decision making and
augmentative and alternative
communication services. Reed, P.
R. September 1995. 8-9.
International activities in AAC. Huer,
M. B. August 2003. 17-19.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Meaningful data—Making sense of
“+” and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November 2002. 10-13.
Mom went to speech instead of the
beach: Camp Chatterbox—
Children’s specialized hospital.
Bruno, J. May 1997. 11-13.
My story of managed care. Wilder, K.
(for T. Ayers). May 1998. 8-10.
December 2005
Nonverbal immediacy: Communicative salience during interpersonal
interactions. Sargent, J. E. September 2005. 4-7.
Oregon’s Medicaid program and
managed care: A case study of
legal issues. Sundberg, R. May
1998. 6.
Personal perspectives on transition
and assistive technology. Ward. M.
J. February 1998. 7-8.
The reality of managed health care:
Implications for AAC service
delivery. Murphy, J. W. May 1998.
4-5.
Remembering key points for inclusion. Osborn, S. R. September
1995. 9-12.
Responding to a common early ACC
question: “Will my child talk?”
Cress, C. December 2003. 10-11.
The road to full-time employment.
Rackensperger, T. December 2005.
8-9.
Running the maze. Deputy, P. N.
August 1993. 4-5.
The SETT framework: Choosing and
using tools that promote inclusion
through communication participation, and productivity. Zabala, J.
September 1995. 6-8.
Sharing a dream: A summer institute
for language and literacy. Staehely,
J., Murphy, J., & Myers, C. May
1997. 13-14.
Special educators and SLPs working
together to provide AAC services.
Beck, A., & Thompson, J. R.
December 2000. 13-14.
A student guide for successful
inclusion. Kaye & Phillip (in
collaboration with G. Van
Tatenhove). September 1995. 1214.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings.
VanTatenhove, G. December 2004.
8-11.
A tale of two transitions. Nelson, B.,
Howell, M., & Ross, J. February
1998. 9-10.
Ten years of technology. Ahlers, J., &
Leiter, J. April 1994. 3-5.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
There are no prerequisites for communication. Brady, N., Sevcik, R. A.,
Caves, K., Mclean, L., Mollica, B.
M., Romski, M., Snell, M., & PaulBrown, D. August 2003. 27-29.
Transition planning: Not just a good
IDEA, it’s the law! Bersani, H. A.,
& Fried-Oken, M. February 1998.
4-5.
Transitions in early intervention and
AAC. Hidecker, M. J. C. September
2004. 15-19.
Two realities: How the social conditions of society affect the quality
of life of people with disabilities
(Personal and economic points of
view). Rakhman, S. V. August
2003. 20-27.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., &
Zabala, J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
Research Issues and
Methodology
AAC in the public schools—Helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
Breaking down barriers in geriatrics.
Eberle, C.M. September 2005. 7-9.
The Bridge School: A community of
practice in AAC. Hunt-Berg, M.
June 2005. 6-10.
Clinician and researcher database in
augmentative and alternative
communication. Koul, R., &
Schlosser, R. September 2001. 2224.
End-of-life issues for people who use
AAC. Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach,
L. September 2005. 15-19.
Empirically validated strategies,
evidence-based practice, and basic
principles in communication
intervention for learners with
developmental disabilities.
Sigafoos, J., & Drasgow, E. September 2003. 7-10.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S., &
Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
Graduate assistantship experience
promotes research foundation for
clinical practice. Browning, J.,
Lococo, V., Forrest, S., & Fox, A.
February 1999. 13-14.
15
Improving technologies for school-age
children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
Introduction. Sevcik, R. A. February
2003. 2.
Issues of language input and output
in AAC with young children.
Cheslock, M. September 2004. 1114.
Nonverbal immediacy: Communicative salience during interpersonal
interactions. Sargent, J. E. September 2005. 4-7.
Organizational strategies. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 1417.
Performance and usability. August
2002. Higginbotham, J.,
McNaughton, D., & Kovack, T. 1719.
Representational strategies. Light, J., &
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 2021.
Reading development: Models and
processes. Morris, R. D., & Sevcik,
R. A. February 2003. 3-5.
Reading development in AAC.
Erickson, K. February 2003. 8-10.
Research with young children at risk
for speech/language development
disorders. Sevcik, R. A. May 1999.
1-4.
Re-thinking access to AAC technologies for young children: Simplifying the learning cemands. Light, J.,
& Drager, K. April 2004. 5-12.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman, D.
R., & Light, J. August 2002. 21-23.
Translating theory into practice: A
baker’s dozen. Swengel, K., &
Armstrong, J. S. November 1998.
3-4.
Unusual research partners. Beukelman,
D. R. August 2002. 24.
Update on Medicare and speech
generating devices. Doyle, M., &
Burton, W. April 2005. 13-18.
Virtually speaking. Blackstone, S. W.
November 2002. 2-3.
What is an RERC? Williams, M. August
2002. 4-5.
December 2005
Interdisciplinary Concerns
AAC: If you’re not into it yet, you
should be! Rodgers, N. M., &
Brown, L. K. June 2005. 2-5
AAC in the public schools-helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
An AAC training program with
emphasis on collaboration and
inclusion. Soto, G. June 2004. 1316.
Breaking down barriers in geriatrics.
Eberle, C. M. September 2005. 7-9.
The Bridge School: A community of
practice in AAC. Hunt-Berg, M.
June 2005. 6-10.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Employment issues. McNaughton, S.,
& Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
Finding the hidden metaphor. Baker,
B. September 1996. 5-7.
Inclusion: Team decision making and
augmentative and alternative
communication services. Reed, P.
R. September 1995. 8-9.
Nonverbal immediacy: Communicative salience during interpersonal
interactions. Sargent, J. E. September 2005. 4-7.
The Penn State partnerships in AAC
project: A multidisciplinary
preservice program for speechlanguage pathologists and special
education teachers. Light, J.,
McNaughton, D., Drager, K.,
Roberts, B., & Wilson, K. June
2004. 8-12.
Perspectives on teaching AAC.
Cumley, G. D., & Robinson, N. B.
June 2004. 2-3.
Psychological perspectives of AAC
use. Seaver, R. I. September 1996.
9-13.
The road to full-time employment.
Rackensperger, T. December 2005.
8-9.
The role of linguistic theory in AAC.
Nyberg, E. September 1996. 7-9.
Tricare expands SGD coverage.
Golinker, L. September 2005. 2526.
Update on Medicare and speech
generating devices. Doyle, M., &
Burton, W. April 2005. 13-18.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
The value of the interdisciplinary
team evaluation in the assessment
of individuals with AAC needs.
Becker, L. B. September 1999. 5-6.
WebCrawlers—Taking AAC devices
to a new level. Younkerman, T.
December 2005. 9-10.
Professional Training
Education and Continuing
Education
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC at ASHA News. Glennen, S.
September 2003. 19.
AAC curriculum, or placing the cart
before the horse. Calculator, S. N.
November 1996. 4-5.
AAC in the public schools—Helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
AAC knowledge and skills. Calculator,
S. N. November 2002. 17-18.
AAC training practices in speechlanguage pathology and special
education programs at historically
Black colleges and universities.
Harris, O. February 1999. 11-12.
An AAC training program at an
historically Black university.
Harris, O. May 2000. 12-13.
An AAC training program with
emphasis on collaboration and
inclusion. Soto, G. June 2004. 1316.
The aging process and the affect on
successful AAC use. Cumley, G. D.,
& Stuart, S. September 2005. 2225.
AAC-RERC writers brigade: Purpose,
function, and outcome. Schwartz,
J. December 2005. 3-4.
The ASHA specialty recognition
program is here! Moon, J. June
1996. 3-4.
ASHA 2002 AAC program. Higdon, C.
W. November 2002. 14-16.
ASHA’s new standards for preprofessional training in SLP and
what they may mean for AAC.
Ratcliff, A. December 2003. 22-24.
Assessing expertise in AAC. Harlan,
N., & Kravitz, E. June 1996. 7-9.
16
Augmentative and alternative
communication: Challenges at the
preservice level. Ratcliff, A.
February 1999. 2.
Augmentative and alternative
communication (AAC) resources
for professional preparation.
Division 12 Professional Preparation Committee. December 2001.
(Supplement) 1-13.
Benefits of advanced AAC technology uses to adults with acquired
aphasia. Steele, R. December 2004.
3-7.
Breaking down barriers in geriatrics.
Eberle, C. M. September 2005. 7-9.
Clinician’s education associated with
AAC. Finch, A., & Meier, S.
September 1999. 2-4.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Credentialing considerations. Fagan,
E. November 1996. 20-22.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Direct vs indirect time: What are the
needs in AAC? Bruno, J. November 1992. 2-3.
Educating, credentialing and employing health care providers: A view
of our profession as seen by the
PEW health professions commission. Goldsmith, S. August 1994.
7-9.
Financial aspects of specialty recognition. Cottier, C., & Fishman, I.
June 1996. 9-10.
Graduate assistantship experience
promotes research foundation for
clinical practice. Browning, J.,
Lococo, V., Forrest, S., & Fox, A.
February 1999. 13-14.
International activities in AAC. Huer,
M. B. August 2003. 17-19.
ISAAC panel on Resna’s assistive
technology credentialing program.
Lloyd, L. L. November 1996. 20.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Nonverbal immediacy: Communicative salience during interpersonal
interactions. Sargent, J. E. September 2005. 4-7.
December 2005
Online instruction in AAC: Engaging
the learner. Zangari, C. June 2004.
20-24.
The Penn State partnerships in AAC
project: A multidisciplinary
preservice program for speechlanguage pathologists and special
education teachers. Light, J.,
McNaughton, D., Drager, K.,
Roberts, B., & Wilson, K. June
2004. 8-12.
Perspectives on teaching AAC.
Cumley, G. D., & Robinson, N. B.
June 2004. 2-3.
Questions and answers about Resna’s
quality assurance activities. Cress,
C. November 1995. 13-15.
Rationale for preservice training in
AAC. Ratcliff, A. February 1999. 36.
Resna credentialing program.
Watkins, C. W. June 1996. 11-12.
Resna’s AAC credentialing activities.
Lloyd, L. L. June 1996. 12-14.
Service learning model for
preprofessional preparation in AAC
at New Mexico State University.
Stuart, S. February 1999. 7.
Should AAC be taught as a separate
curriculum? Erickson, K. A., &
Koppenhaver, D. A. November
1996. 5-7.
Specialty recognition. Wilkinson, K.
M. May 1999. 13.
Specialty recognition. Zangari, C.
November 1998. 12.
Specialty Recognition Committee
final report—May 23, 2001.
Kravitz, E., Bruno, J., Tullman, J.,
Wilkinson, K., Wiseman, V. A., &
Zangari, C. September 2001. 2022.
Specialty recognition in ACC. Kraat,
A. August 1994. 5-7.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings.
VanTatenhove, G. December 2004.
8-11.
Teaching resources in AAC and
distance learning. Gillette, Y.
February 1999. 16-18.
They said it couldn’t be done, but we
did it anyway. Lloyd, L. L., &
Pufpaff, L. February 1999. 8-11.
Toward autonomy in AAC practice.
Sweeney, L. A. August 1993. 2-4.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Tricare expands SGD coverage.
Golinker, L. September 2005. 2526.
The United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Kovach, T. August 2003.
19-20.
Using Internet sources within and
beyond the classroom. Dowden, P.
June 2004. 17-20.
WebCrawlers—Taking AAC devices
to a new level. Younkerman, T.
December 2005. 9-10.
What an experience—A preservice
training opportunity! Talking with
technology camp. Moore, S. M.,
Kovach, T. M., & Donaldson, C. A.
May 1997. 9-11.
What is NJC doing for children and
adults with severe disabilities?
Paul-Brown, D. December 1999. 810.
Where are we with specialty recognition? Zangari, C. June 1996. 46.Why is yogurt good for you?
Because it has live cultures.
Mahendra, N., Ribera, J., Sevcik,
R., Adler, R., Cheng, L., DavisMcFarland, E., Deal-Williams, V.,
Garrett, D., Riquelme, L.,
Salisbury, T., Schneider, W., &
Villanueva, A. December 2004. 1719.
Counseling
Addressing challenges to success
with students who use augmentative and alternative communication in the school setting. Roth, K.
D. June 2005. 24-26.
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
End-of-life issues for people who use
AAC. Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach,
L. September 2005. 15-19.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
Teaching parents to support their
children’s communication:
Adaptations for AAC. Kaiser, A. P.,
& Hancock, T. B. September 2004.
4-6.
17
Title Index
AAC and literacy summer program:
Facilitating transfer of content and
methods to the regular academic
classroom. Damico, S. May 1997.
6-7.
AAC and our family! Interview with
Carol Sneath, mother of Melissa.
Swengel, K. November 1998. 1012.
AAC and pediatric palliative care.
Stuart, S. December 2004. 12-16.
AAC at ASHA news. Glennen, S.
September 2003. 19.
AAC clinical decision making for
persons with ALS. Ball, L. J.,
Beukelman, E. R., Pattee, G. L.
April 2002. 7-12.
AAC curriculum, or placing the cart
before the horse. Calculator, S. N.
November 1996. 4-5.
AAC: Growing in Poland. Smyzek, A.
August 2003. 8-11.
AAC: If you’re not into it yet, you
should be! Rodgers, N. M., &
Brown, L. K. June 2005. 2-5
AAC in developing countries: The
Centre for AAC at the University of
Pretoria, South Africa. Alant, E.
August 2003. 6-8.
AAC in Singapore: Blending culture,
language, and technology to serve
our island’s people. Yong, S.
August 2003. 11-14.
AAC in the public schools—Helpful
Web sites. Culp, D. June 2005. 2728.
AAC intervention for locked-in
syndrome using the safe-laser
access system. Fager, S.,
Beukelman, D., & Jakobs, T. April
2002. 4-6.
AAC intervention research with
children and youth with moderate
and severe disabilities in Brazil.
d’Oliveira de Paula Nunes, L. R.
August 2003. 2-6.
AAC knowledge and skills. Calculator, S. N. November 2002. 17-18.
AAC over the long haul. Gradel, K.
November 1998. 9-10.
AAC training practices in speechlanguage pathology and special
education programs at historically
Black colleges and universities.
Harris, O. February 1999. 11-12.
December 2005
An AAC training program at an
historically Black university.
Harris, O. May 2000. 12-13.
An AAC training program with
emphasis on collaboration and
inclusion. Soto, G. June 2004. 1316.
AAC-RERC writers brigade: Purpose,
function, and outcome. Schwartz,
J. December 2005. 3-4.
ACES: Augmentative communication
and empowerment supports. Bryen,
D. N., & Slesaransky-Poe, G. May
1997. 15-17.
Acts. Buzolich, M. J. April 1994. 3.
Addressing challenges to success
with students who use augmentative and alternative communication in the school setting. Roth, K.
D. June 2005. 24-26.
The aging process and the affect on
successful AAC use. Cumley, G. D.,
& Stuart, S. September 2005. 2225.
The ambiguous keyboard.
Higginbotham, D. J., & Lesher, G.
W. April 2004. 12-16.
The ASHA specialty recognition
program is here! Moon, J. June
1996. 3-4.
ASHA 2002 AAC program. Higdon, C.
W. November 2002. 14-16.
ASHA’s new standards for preprofessional training in SLP and
what they may mean for AAC.
Ratcliff, A. December 2003. 22-24.
Assessing expertise in AAC. Harlan,
N., & Kravitz, E. June 1996. 7-9.
Assessing the school-aged child for
AAC. Bruno, J. April 2005. 3-7.
Assistive technology: School-related
issues. McCloskey, S. R. November
2002. 2-3.
AT access and individuals with
mental retardation: Documentation
of the need and the barriers.
Mollica, B. M. December 1999. 45.
Augmentative and alternative
communication: A bibliography.
Schlosser, R., Calculator, S., Finch,
A., Kovach, T., & Sevcik, R. A.
June 2001. 32-33.
Augmentative and alternative
communication: Challenges at the
preservice level. Ratcliff, A.
February 1999. 2.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Augmentative and alternative
communication in ALS. Bardach,
L., & Newman, D. December 2003.
14-21.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention for
individuals with chronic severe
aphasia: An evidence-based
practice process illustration.
Corwin, M., & Koul, R. September
2003. 11-15.
Augmentative and alternative
communication intervention in
neurogenic disorders with acquired
dysarthria. Mathy, P. April 2003.
11-17.
Augmentative and alternative
communication (AAC) resources
for professional preparation.
Division 12 Professional Preparation Committee. December 2001.
(Supplement) 1-13.
Augmentative communicaton as a
medical necessity. Lytton, R. April
1994. 6-8.
Augmentative and alternative communication considerations for adults
with significant cognitive disabilities. DePaepe, P., Feeley, K., &
Wood, L. A. April 2002. 20-25.
Augmented language intervention
project: From school-aged youth
to toddlers. Cheslock, M., Romski,
M. A., Sevcik, R. A., & Adamson, L.
B. June 2001. 15-17.
Availability and accessibility in
whole utterance-based devices.
Todman, J. December 2001. 8-11.
Back to the future: Don’t forget the
knowledge we have as we move
into the next century. Romski, M.
A. December 1999. 2-3.
Benefits of advanced AAC technology uses to adults with acquired
aphasia. Steele, R. December 2004.
3-7.
Beyond calendar boxes: The importance of systematic instruction of
the van Dijk approach for learners
who are deaf-blind. MacFarland, S.
Z. December 2000. 4-7.
Breaking down barriers in geriatrics.
Eberle, C. M. September 2005. 7-9.
The Bridge School: A community of
practice in AAC. Hunt-Berg, M.
June 2005. 6-10.
18
But what can they do? Assessment of
communication skills in children
with severe and multiple disabilities. Rowland, C. April 2005. 7-12.
Categorical AAC assessment of persons
with aphasia (PWA). Lasker, J. P.
April 2002. 14-19.
Children’s attitudes toward peers who
use AAC. Beck, A. R. June 2005.
20-23.
Clinician and researcher database in
augmentative and alternative
communication. Koul, R., &
Schlosser, R. September 2001. 2224.
Clinician’s education associated with
AAC. Finch, A., & Meier, S.
September 1999. 2-4.
A collaborative preservice program in
AT and AAC. Kennedy, M., &
Shiller, B. June 2004. 3-7.
Comments on ethical dilemmas.
Effinger, J. November 1996. 16-17.
Communication and active participation (caregiver) issues. Scherz, J.
September 2005. 20-21.
A communication “tools” model for
AAC intervention with early
communicators. Cress, C. J. June
2001. 20-22.
Comprehension and production in
AAC. Brady, N. C. June 2001. 1719.
Considerations in the assessment and
treatment of bilingual individuals.
Saenz, T. I., & Huer, M. B. November 1994. 8-9.
Considering the efficiency of communicative options available to a
beginning communicator.
McComas, J. March 2001. 11-12.
A consultative model for AAC/AT
support: A team approach.
McKamy, V., & Moore, J. R. June
2005. 16-20.
Contemporary research in symbolic
development: Factors influencing
acquisition in typically developing children. Namy, L. September
2004. 7-10.
Context is the key. Kovach, T.
November 1996. 7-10.
Credentialing considerations. Fagan,
E. November 1996. 20-22.
December 2005
A cultural perspective on
augumentative and alternative
communication. Soto, G. November 1994. 6-7.
Culture, families, and augmentative
and alternative communication
impact. Parette, H. P. May 2000. 36.
Delivery of AAC services to a rural
American Indian community.
Bridges, S. May 2000. 6-9.
Developing an intervention strategy
to replace challenging behavior
used to escape undesired activities: A case example. Dropik, P., &
Reichle, J. March 2001. 8-10.
Developing preliteracy skills in
children with severe speech and
physical impairments: Fostering
phonological awareness. Paul, R.
November 1997. 10-11.
Development of a model AAC syllabus: Exploring new competencies.
Lasker, J. P. June 2004. 25-28.
Direct vs indirect time: What are the
needs in AAC? Bruno, J. November
1992. 2-3.
Early intervention and ACC assessment resources. Wood, L. December 2003. 12-13.
Early intervention: Assessment issues.
Lytton, R. September 2004. 22-24.
Early literacy activities and language
learning opportunities for children
who use AAC. Wood, L. A. June
2001. 10-11.
Educating, credentialing and employing health care providers: A view
of our profession as seen by the
PEW health professions commission. Goldsmith, S. August 1994.
7-9.
The Edwin and Esther Prentke AAC
distinguished lecture. Williams, B.
March 2001. 15-16.
The EBP experiences of an AAC
service provider: Diving in deep.
Olsson, C. September 2003. 15-19.
Empirically validated strategies,
evidence-based practice, and basic
principles in communication
intervention for learners with
developmental disabilities.
Sigafoos, J., & Drasgow, E. September 2003. 7-10.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Employment issues. McNaughton, S., &
Bryen, D. August 2002. 5-8.
End-of-life issues for people who use
AAC. Fried-Oken, M., & Bardach,
L. September 2005. 15-19.
Engineering the classroom for ACC.
Merrie, M., Holloway, K., Frana, N.,
& Gibbroek, J. November 1993. 68.
Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world,” Part II.
Kangas, K. November 1996. 11-14.
Ethical dilemmas: Defending principles in the “real world.” Kangas,
K. September 1996. 14-16.
Evidence-based practice: Frequently
asked questions, myths, and
resources. Schlosser, R. W. September 2003. 4-7.
Evidence-based practice: Meeting the
challenge. Schlosser, R. W. September 2003. 3-4.
Expanding communicative participation using augmetative and
alternative communication within
a game playing activity for a man
with severe aphasia. Stuart, S.
March 1995. 9-11.
Expanding expressive communication options for a person with
severe aphasia. Garrett, K. March
1995. 5-7.
Expanding our understanding of AAC
in Hong Kong. Sevcik, R. A., &
Romski, M. August 2003. 14-16.
Facilitating literacy development in
AAC users. McNairn, P. April 1994.
8-9.
Family issues in AAC. Angelo, D.
November 1998. 4-6.
Family participation in AAC. Lindsay,
S. D. February 1999. 19.
Field of dreams. Van Tatenhove, G. M.
November 1993. 8-11.
Financial aspects of specialty recognition. Cottier, C., & Fishman, I.
June 1996. 9-10.
Finding the hidden metaphor. Baker,
B. September 1996. 5-7.
Forming parent and professional
partnerships. Armstrong, J. S.
November 1998. 7-9.
Framing the transition issues: “Take
one giant step.” “Mother may I?”
Fried-Oken, M., & Bersani, H.
February 1998. 3.
19
Friendship: A social, educational, and
communication concern for
children who are deaf-blind. Sall,
N. December 2000. 7-9.
From the guest editor. Blischak, D.
December 2000. 2.
Gender differences in the communication of individuals with developmental disabilities. Wilkinson, K.
December 1999. 6-8.
Gestures in development: Implications for early intervention in AAC.
Hunt-Berg, M. June 2001. 4-7.
Graduate assistantship experience
promotes research foundation for
clinical practice. Browning, J.,
Lococo, V., Forrest, S., & Fox, A.
February 1999. 13-14.
Grammatical development and AAC.
Sutton, A. November 1997. 7-9.
Helping families gain acceptance of
AAC strategies. Zangari, C. June
2001. 12-15.
Helping the AAC user acquire grammatical morphology. Blockberger,
S. November 1997. 5-7.
Hurry, hurry, find the fire! Kempka, D.
November 1995. 7-8.
“I brought my talker, my sleeping
bag, and my little brother!”
Sementelli, C. May 1997. 8.
Identifying intentional communication in children with severe
disabilities. Hetzroni, O. E. June
2001. 7-10.
If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody
happy. Culp, D. December 2003. 39.
In search of AAC access for all
individuals with complex communication ceeds. Culp, D. April
2004. 4-5.
The importance of addressing problem behavior among beginning
communicators. Reichle, J. March
2001. 1-2.
The importance of home and school
connections. Kortz, D. November
1998. 6-7.
Improving technologies for school-age
children with severe physical
handicaps. Sturm, J. August 2002.
12-13.
December 2005
Inclusion: Communication technology and the classroom.
McCloskey, S. R. September 1995.
4-6.
Inclusion: Team decision making and
augmentative and alternative
communication services. Reed, P.
R. September 1995. 8-9.
Instructional programs teach literacy
to AAC users. Hemphill, J. December 2005. 6-7.
Insurance funding for AAC devices:
Update. Golinker, L. February
2003. 12.
Interface design. Caves, K., DeRuyter,
R., & Beukelman, D. R. August
2002. 8-11.
International activities in AAC. Huer,
M. B. August 2003. 17-19.
Interview with a master storyteller.
Palenzuela, M. December 2000. 910.
Introduction. Sevcik, R.A. February
2003. 2.
Introduction: Research on utterancebased communication.
Higginbotham, D. J. December
2001. 2-5.
Introduction to the DIV 12 conference issue. Ball, L. J. September
2005. 2.
Is it easy or hard to “read” a picture?
Gangkofer, M. H. September 1996.
4-5.
ISAAC panel on Resna’s assistive
technology credentialing program.
Lloyd, L. L. November 1996. 20.
Issues of language input and output
in AAC with young children.
Cheslock, M. September 2004. 1114.
Language and AAC intervention in
young children: Never too early or
too late to start. Cress, C. J., &
Wood, L. A. June 2001. 2-3.
Language and organization for adults
with acquired disorders: Clinical
framework for aphasia assessment.
Lasker, J. P. September 2005. 1014.
Language, literacy, and AAC: Translating theory into practice. Foley,
B. February 2003. 5-8.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Language production wth cognitively
challenged adults: A case study.
Van Tatenhove, G. M. November
1997. 12-16.
Living with a communication device.
Pecunas, P. April 2002. 27-30.
Making dramatic centers print rich.
King-DeBaun, P. November 1995.
3-4.
Meaningful data—Making sense of “+”
and “-”. Korsten, J. E. November
2002. 10-13.Medicaid AAC device
funding for nursing facility
residents. Golinker, L. August
2003. 29-33.
Medicare coverage of voice amplifiers. Golinker, L. December 2004,
20.
Medicare eliminates computer-based
device exclusion: A new class of
AAC device emerges. Golinker, L.
June 2001. 29-32.
Medicare funding for AAC devices.
Golinker, L. May 1998. 11-12.
Medicare now covers AAC devices.
Golinker, L. March 2001. 12-14.
New access options for head pointing.
Fager, S., Beukelman, D., Ball, L.,
& Jakobs, T. April 2004. 16-20.
Mom went to speech instead of the
beach: Camp Chatterbox—
Children’s specialized hospital.
Bruno, J. May 1997. 11-13.
Multicultural demographics in AAC.
Wasson, C. A. November 1994. 7.
Music, play, and AAC. Spitler, C. K.
November 1995. 4-6.
My story of managed care. Wilder, K.
(for T. Ayers). May 1998. 8-10.
Nonverbal immediacy: Communicative salience during interpersonal
interactions. Sargent, J. E. September 2005. 4-7.
Online instruction in AAC: Engaging
the learner. Zangari, C. June 2004.
20-24.
The Oregon health plan: Understanding implications for people with
disabilities. Starr, J. May 1998. 78.
Oregon’s Medicaid program and
managed care: A case study of
legal issues. Sundberg, R. May
1998. 6.
20
Organizational strategies. Beukelman,
D. R., & Light, J. August 2002. 1417.
Our journey. Huer, M. B. November
1994. 9-10.
The Penn State partnerships in AAC
project: A multidisciplinary
preservice program for speech
language pathologists and special
education teachers. Light, J.,
McNaughton, D., Drager, K.,
Roberts, B., & Wilson, K. June
2004. 8-12.
Pennsylvania’s solution to funding
school-based assistive technology.
Evans, L. M. June 2001. 22-24.
Performance and usability.
Higginbotham, J., McNaughton, D.,
& Kovack, T. August 2002. 17-19.
Personal perspectives on transition
and assistive technology. Ward. M.
J. February 1998. 7-8.
Perspectives on teaching AAC.
Cumley, G. D., & Robinson, N. B.
June 2004. 2-3.
Pick a curriculum, any curriculum:
What to use with people who use
AAC. Valot, L. S. November 1996.
10-11.
The Picture Exchange Communication System. Frost, L. April 2003.
8-10.
Play-based assessment for AAC.
Casey, K. November 1995. 10-13.
The play’s the thing. Higgins, J. M., &
Carney, R. August 1994. 2-4.
Pragmatic trade-offs in utterancebased systems: Uncovering
technological implications.
McCoy, K. F., Bedrosian, J. L., &
Hoag, L. A. December 2001. 12-16.
Prelinguistic communication intervention may be one way to help
children with developmental
delays learn to talk. Yoder, P., &
Warren, S. F. May 1999. 11-12.
Psychological perspectives of AAC
use. Seaver, R. I. September 1996.
9-13.
Questions and answers about Resna’s
quality assurance activities. Cress,
C. November 1995. 13-15.
Rationale for preservice training in
AAC. Ratcliff, A. February 1999. 36.
December 2005
Reading development in AAC.
Erickson, K. February 2003. 8-10.
Reading development: Models and
processes. Morris, R. D., & Sevcik,
R. A. February 2003. 3-5.
The reality of managed health care:
Implications for AAC service
delivery. Murphy, J. W. May 1998.
4-5.
Reflections from a project director
(1994-2000). Huer, M. B. May
2000. 14-16.
Remembering key points for inclusion. Osborn, S. R. September
1995. 9-12.
“Repair work ahead”: The importance
of assessing communication
breakdown and repair in AAC.
Brady, N. C. December 1999. 1011.
A report of the division survey on
direct versus indirect services.
Bruno, J. August 1994. 9-10.
Representational strategies. Light, J., &
Beukelman, D. R. August 2002. 2021.
Representing the way to language
learning and expression. Mollica,
B. M. November 1997. 3-4.
Research with young children at risk
for speech/language development
disorders. Sevcik, R. A. May 1999.
1-4.
Resna credentialing program.
Watkins, C. W. June 1996. 11-12.
Resna’s AAC credentialing activities.
Lloyd, L. L. June 1996. 12-14.
Responding to a common early ACC
question: “Will my child talk?”
Cress, C. December 2003. 10-11.
Responding to individual needs:
Promoting the literacy development of students who use AAC.
Erickson, K., & Clendon, S. A. June
2005. 11-16.
Responding to threats to Medicaid
SGD coverage & funding.
Golinker, L. December 2005. 1113.
Response to “Ethical dilemmas.”
Staugler, K. November 1996. 1416.
Re-thinking access to AAC technologies for young children: Simplifying the learning demands. Light,
J.m & Drager, K. April 2004. 5-12.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Rethinking sentence formulation in
AAC. Patel, R. December 2001. 57.
The road to full-time employment.
Rackensperger, T. December 2005.
8-9.
The role of linguistic theory in AAC.
Nyberg, E. September 1996. 7-9.
Running the maze. Deputy, P. N.
August 1993. 4-5.
Selecting reading and writing vocabulary for the AAC user. Lowe,
M. A. April 2003. 3-7.
Self injury as alternative communication: Bridging behavior and
biology. Symons, F. J. March 2001.
3-5.
Service learning model for
preprofessional preparation in AAC
at New Mexico State University.
Stuart, S. February 1999. 7.
The SETT framework: Choosing and
using tools that promote inclusion
through communication participation, and productivity. Zabala, J.
September 1995. 6-8.
Sharing a dream: A summer institute
for language and literacy. Staehely,
J., Murphy, J., & Myers, C. May
1997. 13-14.
Should AAC be taught as a separate
curriculum? Erickson, K. A., &
Koppenhaver, D. A. November
1996. 5-7.
Special educators and SLPs working
together to provide AAC services.
Beck, A., & Thompson, J. R.
December 2000. 13-14.
Specialty recognition. Wilkinson, K.
M. May 1999. 13.
Specialty recognition. Zangari, C.
November 1998. 12.
Specialty Recognition Committee
final report—May 23, 2001.
Kravitz, E., Bruno, J., Tullman, J.,
Wilkinson, K., Wiseman, V. A., &
Zangari, C. September 2001. 2022.
Specialty recognition in ACC. Kraat,
A. August 1994. 5-7.
Speech comprehension and early
augmented language intervention:
Concepts, measurement, and
clinical considerations. Romski,
M. A., & Sevcik, R. A. May 1999.
7-10.
21
Spot the funding: A hypothetical case
study illustrating funding dilemmas of older age persons with
communication disabilities.
Broehl, M. March 1995. 11-12.
Story telling as an augmentative
communication approach for a man
with severe apraxia of speech and
expressive aphasia. Fried-Oken, M.
March 1995. 3-4.
A student guide for successful
inclusion. Kaye & Phillip (in
collaboration with G. Van
Tatenhove). September 1995. 1214.
Supporting AAC device users living
in residential care settings. Van
Tatenhove, G. December 2004. 811.
Symbolization and the young child
with significant communication
challenges. Zangari, C. September
2004. 19-21.
System appeal/attitudes. Beukelman, D.
R., & Light, J. August 2002. 21-23.
A tale of two transitions. Nelson, B.,
Howell, M., & Ross, J. February
1998. 9-10.
Tangible solutions for individuals
with dual sensory impairments.
Rowland, C., & Schweigert, P.
December 2000. 3-4.
Teaching parents to support their
children’s communication: Adaptations for AAC. Kaiser, A. P., &
Hancock, T. B. September 2004. 46.
Teaching resources in AAC and
distance learning. Gillette, Y.
February 1999. 16-18.
Technology use among teens and
young adults with autism and
related disorders. Chung, P., &
Tull, R. G. August 2000. 16-18.
Ten years of technology. Ahlers, J., &
Leiter, J. April 1994. 3-5.
Test accomodations: What do we
know? Arvidson, H. August 1998.
16-17.
A theater script. Brothers, S., Sewell,
R., Smith, S., Anderson, K., &
Dublin, C. November 1995. 8-10.
December 2005
There are no prerequisites for communication. Brady, N., Sevcik, R. A.,
Caves, K., Mclean, L., Mollica, B.
M., Romski, M., Snell, M., & PaulBrown, D. August 2003. 27-29.
They said it couldn’t be done, but we
did it anyway. Lloyd, L. L., &
Pufpaff, L. February 1999. 8-11.
Toward autonomy in AAC practice.
Sweeney, L. A. August 1993. 2-4.
Transition planning: Not just a good
IDEA, it’s the law! Bersani, H. A.,
& Fried-Oken, M. February 1998.
4-5.
Transitions from spontaneous to
intentional behaviors. Cress, C. J.
May 1999. 4-7.
Transitions in early intervention and
AAC. Hidecker, M. J. C. September
2004. 15-19.
Translating theory into practice: A
baker’s dozen. Swengel, K., &
Armstrong, J. S. November 1998.
3-4.
Tricare expands SGD coverage.
Golinker, L. September 2005. 2526.
Two realities: How the social conditions of society affect the quality
of life of people with disabilities
(personal and economic points of
view). Rakhman, S. V. August
2003. 20-27.
The United States Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Kovach, T. August 2003.
19-20.
Understanding social security
disability and work incentives.
Anctil, T. M. February 1998. 5-7.
Unusual research partners. Beukelman,
D. R. August 2002. 24.
Update from the National Joint
Committee for the Communication
Needs of Persons with Severe
Disabilities. McLean, L. K.,
Molica, B. M., Mirenda, P., PaulBrown, D., Romski, M. A., Sevcik,
R. A., & Snell, M. E. June 2001.
24-27.
Update on Medicare and speech
generating devices. Doyle, M., &
Burton, W. April 2005. 13-18.
Using competent AAC users as peer
trainers. Van Tatenhove, G. M.
August 1993. 5-7.
Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Using evidence-based practice to guide
decision making in AAC. Clark, E.
A., & Clark, E. G. November 2002.
6-9.
Using functional behavioral assessment and functional communication training to assess and prevent
challenging behavior. McEvoy, M.
A., & Neilsen, S. L. March 2001. 68.
Using Internet sources within and
beyond the classroom. Dowden, P.
June 2004. 17-20.
Using natural context AAC assessments to plan meaningful intervention. Zangari, C. April 1994. 5-6.
Using quality indicators to improve
service delivery for assistive
technology services in educational
settings. McCloskey, S. R., Zabala,
J. S. November 2002. 3-6.
Utilizing an AAC system to maximize
receptive and expressive communication skills of a person with
Alzheimer’s disease. Leseth, L., &
Meader, L. March 1995. 7-9.
The value of the interdisciplinary
team evaluation in the assessment
of individuals with AAC needs.
Becker, L .B. September 1999. 5-6.
Virtually speaking. Blackstone, S. W.
November 2002. 2-3.
Visual design: Implications for
developing dynamic display
systems. Scally, C. December 2001.
16-19.
“We have come a long way…” AAC
and multiculturalism: From
cultural awareness to cultural
responsibility. Soto, G. May 2000.
1-3.
A Web site worth checking out:
aac.unl.edu. Gillette, Y. August
2000. 15-16.
WebCrawlers—Taking AAC devices
to a new level. Younkerman, T.
December 2005. 9-10.
What an experience—A preservice
training opportunity! Talking with
technology camp. Moore, S. M.,
Kovach, T. M., & Donaldson, C. A.
May 1997. 9-11.
What is NJC doing for children and
adults with severe disabilities?
Paul-Brown, D. December 1999. 810.
22
What is an RERC? Williams, M. August
2002. 4-5.
Where are we with specialty recognition? Zangari, C. June 1996. 4-6.
Why is yogurt good for you? Because
it has live cultures. Mahendra, N.,
Ribera, J., Sevcik, R., Adler, R.,
Cheng, L., Davis-McFarland, E.,
Deal-Williams, V., Garrett, D.,
Riquelme, L., Salisbury, T.,
Schneider, W., & Villanueva, A.
December 2004. 17-19.
Will ASHA’s new structure meet your
needs? Lloyd, L.L. August 1997.
17-19.
Word prediction: A time saver?
Kwasniewski, J. August 1994. 4-5.
Working with low-income Latino
families: Issues and strategies.
McCord, S., & Soto, G. May 2000.
10-12.
December 2005
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