SOAS – University of London Academic Teaching Development PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION (PG)

SOAS – University of London
Academic Development Directorate
Academic Teaching Development
PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION (PG)
UK UNIVERSITIES DRAFT COMPARATIVE RESEARCH
This preliminary research document collates extracts from the websites of a number of UK universities; Cambridge, Oxford, UCL, and LSE. Various elements
of programme specification, where available, were collated under the headings as demonstrated in the tables below. It should be noted that the
information given on prospectus web pages is often overlapping between the categories, in particular in relation to the Learning Outcomes and Learning,
Teaching and Assessment categories.
The programmes chosen were as far as possible analogous with SOAS ones, although it should be noted that in some cases (e.g. Social Anthropology)
courses have been placed in a different faculty in these universities than the faculty in which they are placed in SOAS. A further point which should be
noted is that the Cambridge and Oxford postgraduate system is somewhat different from other UK graduate systems, in that an MA is awarded
automatically after BA graduation. Therefore the majority of PG taught courses at these universities are labelled as MPhil courses, some of which have
been identified and extracted below. These particular MPhil courses may act as standalone 1 year postgraduate degrees as well as the precursor to a
research degree, and therefore are analogous to MA / MSc courses in other UK universities.
1
ARTS AND HUMANITIES COURSES
UNI
COURSE
Cambridge
MPhil
African
Studies
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
Our aim is to offer students a
window into the cultural,
intellectual, and political
dynamism of African societies. At a
time when Africa is often
represented a place in need of
outsiders' benevolence and
direction, we hope to give
students the linguistic and
interpretive tools to study African
societies on their own terms. The
degree will provide an excellent
foundation for those who wish to
expand their knowledge of Africa,
and particularly for students
entering positions in the arts, the
media, NGOs, and other
professions.
The MPhil in African Studies
is a new course, offered for
the first time in 2010-11. It
is designed both as a
freestanding qualification
for students who want to
enhance their
understanding of the social,
cultural, political and
economic history and
present condition of Africa,
and also as an excellent
introduction for those who
want to go on to further
primary research. It will
introduce students to the
latest research topics,
methods and debates in
African studies at an
advanced level and provide
intensive research and
language training for those
who wish to go on to
prepare a doctoral
dissertation.
http://www.admin.cam.ac.
uk/offices/gradstud/prospe
c/studying/qualifdir/course
s/hsas/
The Centre has very strong links
with African universities, and each
year it hosts a group of five
Visiting Fellows from Africa, who
come to Cambridge for six months
of coordinated research. MPhil
students will have many
opportunities to interact with, and
learn from, the African Visiting
Fellows. The Centre's 35,000
volume library, newly housed in
the Mond Building, offers rich
resources; and MPhil students will
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
There are four elements comprising
the MPhil course in African Studies :
A core seminar; A discipline-specific
seminar in African History, Social
Anthropology, Geography, African
Politics or Commonwealth and
International Literature; Language
training in Swahili or, by
arrangement, in another African
language; and a dissertation of
15,000 words.
Coursework and
dissertation - See
p.23 of the
handbook
http://www.africa
n.cam.ac.uk/pdfs/
MPhil_handbook_
2010-11.pdf
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
?
?
The course is organized in two parts.
In the first part of the course,
students will enrol in the weekly
core seminar, where they will be
guided through a body of literature
concerning Africa's history,
geography, politics and
anthropology. Students will, at the
same time, attend one of several
discipline-specific seminars, chosen
according to their particular interest.
In Lent term students will write two
5,000 word essays based on their
work in the core seminar and in the
discipline-specific seminar.
In the second part of the course
students will focus their attention on
a research project. They will develop
2
in addition have access to the
University Library, which holds
more than eight million volumes.
MPhil students will make
particular use of the Library's
extensive archival holdings: the
Royal and Commonwealth
Society's papers and photographs;
the Churchill College archives; the
British and Foreign Bible Society's
papers; and other collections.
http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/mp
hil.html
a topic in conversation with a
supervisor, conduct research, and
write intensely during Lent and
Easter terms. Students will discuss
their work regularly with a
supervisor, and will present their
research results in the core seminar.
Throughout the year students will
attend biweekly classes in Swahili
language.
http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/mphil
.html
(See also course handbook for more
detailed programme / course outline
http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/pdfs/
MPhil_handbook_2010-11.pdf )
3
UNI
COURSE
WHAT IS
SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
Oxford
MSc Social
Anthrolopogy
(Although here
based in LSS)
?
?
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
Core and option
courses:
PART ONE:
I. Fundamental
concepts in
Social and
Cultural
Anthropology;
II. The social and
moral order;
III. Perception
and experience;
IV. Option paper
(topic or region).
PART TWO:
Thesis (approx.
10,000 words).
http://www.ox.a
c.uk/admissions/
postgraduate_co
urses/course_gui
de/anthropology
.html
Part One – unseen
examinations; Part
Two – marked
dissertation
http://www.ox.ac.
uk/admissions/pos
tgraduate_courses
/course_guide/ant
hropology.html
Intellectual and
subject specific to provide a strong
background in
analytical and
methodological
issues in Social
Anthropology, and
practice in the
critical evaluation
of its sources, both
in the library and in
the context of
fieldwork;
http://www.ox.ac.
uk/admissions/pos
tgraduate_courses
/course_guide/ant
hropology.html
TEACHING, LEARNING, ASSESSMENT
Subject specific - to prepare high-quality
students from the UK, EU and overseas
either for further research in the discipline
or for employment in fields where sensitivity
to cross-cultural variability is required; to
teach all aspects of the course by taking into
account the recent significant advances in
techniques, information and ideas at the
forefront of current research and to
integrate these within a general
anthropological perspective
Transferable - to provide a range of generic
research skills relevant not only to this
discipline, but to several neighbouring fields
where students might eventually be given
responsibility for research or the
administration or application of research.
http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/postgradu
ate_courses/course_guide/anthropology.ht
ml
4
UNI
COURSE
UCL
MSc
Social
and
Cultural
Anthrop
ology
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
The UCL
Anthropology
Department was the
first in the UK to
integrate biological
and social
anthropology with
material culture into
a broad-based
conception of the
discipline. It is one of
the largest
anthropology
departments in the
UK in terms of both
staff and research
student numbers,
offering an
exceptional breadth
of expertise.
Our excellent results
in the 2001 and 2008
Research Assessment
Exercises show that
we are the top broadbased anthropology
department in the
UK.
Students are
encouraged to take
full advantage of the
wider anthropological
community in London
and the department's
strong links with
European universities
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
The programme is
suitable for graduates
in anthropology and
other social sciences,
and suitably qualified
applicants from other
disciplines, who wish
to develop the ability
to analyse a broad
range of
contemporary issues
in order to pursue a
career in research,
teaching,
development, public
service, journalism
and many other
fields.
First destinations of
recent graduates
include:
UK Borders Agency:
Immigration Case
Officer; Euromonitor:
Analyst Researcher;
Home Office:
Research Officer;
Institute of Ismaili
Studies: Research
Intern; Legal Services
Commission: Policy
Officer; Association
of Commonwealth
Universities: Alumni
Development Officer;
St George's Hospital:
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
Students undertake
courses to the value
of 180 credits.
The programme
consists of two core
courses (45 credits),
three optional
courses (45 credits)
and a research
dissertation (90
credits).
The programme is
delivered through a
combination of
lectures, seminars,
small group
presentations and
discussion, tutorials,
laboratory and
practical work,
independent directed
reading, interactive
teamwork, and video,
film and web based
courses. It includes a
research seminar
series with invited
speakers.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MSANTSSAC01
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Assessment is
through unseen
examination, essays,
and the research
dissertation.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MSANTSSAC01
LEARNING OUTCOMES
The programme aims to
develop knowledge and
understanding of major
theoretical, ethnographic
and methodological debates
in Social Anthropology.
Students develop an
understanding of human
cultural worlds through indepth historical study, gain
knowledge of specific
societies and specialist
approaches, and enhance
their independent research
skills through practical
training in research
methods.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prosp
ective-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMSANT
SSAC01
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual - Particular
emphasis is put on the
Dissertation, which can be
library-based or based upon
a small piece of empirical
fieldwork carried out in the
UK or abroad in May/June.
Both types of dissertation
give students the
opportunity to carry out an
original piece of
independent research. It
will also be of interest to
those wishing to develop an
inter-disciplinary
understanding of a
particular topic by
combining an
anthropological approach
with understanding derived
from another discipline.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthr
opology/degree_programm
es/sa.htm
Subject-based - This MSc is
designed to provide a
thorough grounding in
anthropological theory and
analysis, an understanding
of ethnographic approaches
to the study of social
worlds, and a strong
foundation in research
practices.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prosp
5
and international
institutions.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MSANTSSAC01
Graduate Entry
Dietician; Capital
Studios: Technical
Assistant; University
of Amsterdam:
Heritage Studies;
Whitney Group:
Researcher;
Department for
International
Development:
Deputy Management
Group Officer
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MSANTSSAC01
(See also: more
detailed outline of
the ‘2-track’ system
on this course at
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/anthropology/degre
e_programmes/sa.ht
m)
ective-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMSANT
SSAC01
6
UNI
COURSE
LSE
MSc Social
Anthropology
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
The very strong
tradition of fieldworkbased research within
the Department
directly informs and
enhances teaching.
The MSc is an
excellent and
intensive introduction
to the discipline of
anthropology.
The programme is an
ideal preparation for
research work in
anthropology and
related fields, and
many graduates go
on to complete PhDs.
Previous graduates
have found
employment in
national and
international
organisations and
agencies, including
those concerned with
development.
http://www2.lse.ac.u
k/study/graduate/tau
ghtProgrammes2011/
MScSocialAnthropolo
gy.aspx
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
The programme is an
ideal preparation for
research work in
anthropology and
related fields, and
many graduates go
on to complete PhDs.
Previous graduates
have found
employment in
national and
international
organisations and
agencies, including
those concerned with
development.
This programme is
intended for
graduates with a
good first degree in
any discipline,
including those who
may have studied
anthropology within
the context of a more
general degree
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/
study/graduate/taught
Programmes2011/MSc
SocialAnthropology.asp
x
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
The twelve-month
programme consists
of one compulsory
course, optional
courses to the value
of two units, and an
essay (dissertation).
http://www2.lse.ac.u
k/anthropology/degr
ee_programmes/msc
socanth.aspx
(See also more details
of courses / structure
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/
study/graduate/taught
Programmes2011/MSc
SocialAnthropology.asp
x)
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
After examinations
in June in the
courses above,
students write an
essay (dissertation)
of not more than
10,000 words on
an approved topic
of their own
choice, which is
submitted in midSeptember.
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/anthropology/
degree_programm
es/mscsocanth.asp
x
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
The MSc in Social
Anthropology is
intended to give
students a
thorough
grounding in
anthropology,
both in terms of
its ethnographic
diversity and its
theoretical
development.
The programme
serves as a major
part of
preparation for
research work in
the discipline,
but is also
suitable as an
introduction to
the subject for
students who
intend to
proceed with
other careers.
Prior knowledge
of anthropology
is not essential.
http://www2.lse.
ac.uk/anthropolo
gy/degree_progr
ammes/mscsoca
nth.aspx
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual - The
very strong tradition
of fieldwork-based
research within the
Department directly
informs and
enhances teaching.
Subject-based - The
MSc is an excellent
and intensive
introduction to the
discipline of
anthropology.
Transferable - It will
prepare you for
research work or
provide a
comprehensive
introduction to and
overview of the subject
if you plan a career
which may benefit
from an education in
social anthropology.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/
study/graduate/taught
Programmes2011/MSc
SocialAnthropology.asp
x
7
UNI
COURSE
UCL
MA
Archaeology
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
The UCL Institute of
Archaeology is the
largest and most
diverse department
of archaeology in the
UK.
We are international
in outlook and
membership, with
students and staff
from over 40
countries, and
involvement in field
research projects
around the globe.
UCL is located in
central London,
within walking
distance to the
British Museum and
the British Library.
UCL's own museums
and collections form
a resource of
international
importance for
academic research.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MAARLSING01
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The Archaeology MA is an
intensive induction
programme to current
archaeological theory and
interpretive trends which
equips students to
undertake research in
their chosen field. The
flexible programme of
study serves as an
excellent expansion of
undergraduate studies or
as a self-designed
foundation for further
post-graduate and
professional work. The
programme is particularly
suitable for students with
a first degree in
archaeology,
anthropology, history or
classics. It will appeal to
those who wish to
develop the necessary
skills relevant for a
professional career in
archaeology, and for
those who want to
continue onto a research
degree in the field.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pro
spectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMAA
RLSING011
The MA in Archaeology is a
demanding introduction to
current archaeological theory
and interpretive trends. The MA
is structured around the core
courses, a weekly seminar
discussing the historical
development and current issues
in archaeological theory.
Additionally, students chose
from a large set of graduate
course options covering all
world regions, time periods, and
specialised theoretical topics. A
15,000-word dissertation on a
subject of the student’s choice,
supervised by a member of
staff, is also required. Flexibility
is a strength of this MA; the
course serves as an excellent
expansion of undergraduate
studies or as a self-designed
foundation for further postgraduate and professional work.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeolo
gy/studying/masters/degrees/m
a_archaeology
(See also
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeolo
gy/studying/masters/degrees/m
a_archaeology/structure for
more detailed description of
courses and structure)
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Assessment is
through essays,
oral examination
and the
dissertation.
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt
/TMAARLSING01
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
The programme
provides a wideranging and
challenging
introduction to
theoretical issues
involved in modern
archaeology as a
comparative,
anthropologicallyinformed, and
socially-situated
discipline. Students
develop critically
aware perspectives
on archaeological
practice and
research processes
and gain an indepth
understanding of
approaches to the
collection, analysis
and interpretation
of archaeological
data.
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt
/TMAARLSING01
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual and
subject-specific - Most
teaching is seminar
based, and the sessions
are interactive, with an
emphasis on student
participation and
critical discussion. The
rest of the programme
is delivered through a
combination of
lectures, practicals,
laboratory sessions,
tutorials and site and
museum visits.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/p
rospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TM
AARLSING01
Transferable – See
separate table below
(P.22)
8
UNI
COURSE
UCL
MA Art
History
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
The History of Art
Department is top-rated for
research; and staff are
active researchers in a
range of specialist fields.
UCL's History of Art graduates
have a record of success in
careers in museums and
galleries, the art trade, the
heritage industry, art
publishing, art conservation
and teaching. The unique
combination of visual
sensitivity and intellectual
rigour has also proved
valuable in journalism,
publishing and advertising.
The department is located
in Bloomsbury, close to the
Warburg Institute and the
British Museum. The
National Gallery, Tate
Galleries and the Victoria
and Albert Museum are also
within easy reach. UCL's
own Art Collections, housed
on site in the Strang Print
Room, hold many rare and
important works.
Collaboration with Birkbeck
College, the Courtauld
Institute and staff from
national museums, enables
the UCL department to
offer access to a range of
expertise in virtually any
aspect of the subject.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prosp
ective-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMAHA
RSING01
The programme is designed
for those with a first degree in
the History of Art, or with
some experience of the
subject, who have a high level
of commitment and an
aptitude for academic work.
Students work in smaller
groups and have close contact
with specialists in the field.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospec
tive-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMAHARSI
NG01
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
(See detailed
description of
courses and structure
at
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/arthistory/prospective_
students/masters_st
udents )
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Assessment is by
two essays for
each of the taught
courses (six essays
in all), the
dissertation and a
viva.
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt
/TMAHARSING01
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
Students develop
skills for dealing
with visual
materials as
evidence and gain
historical
knowledge,
enabling them to
interpret visual
artefacts and
documents in
relation to their
historical, social
and cultural
contexts.
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt
/TMAHARSING01
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
The History of Art MA
at UCL draws on the
research and teaching
expertise within the
department, and is
designed to enable
students to acquire
specialised knowledge
pertaining to the field
of art history and
develop independent
research skills.
They are introduced to
current debates and
encouraged to define
their own position
through reasoned
historical and cultural
arguments.
The programme is
delivered through a
combination of
lectures, seminars,
tutorials, and gallery
and museum visits.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/p
rospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TM
AHARSING01
9
UNI
COURSE
LSE
MSc Media,
Communication
and
Development
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT
IT
An intensive, high quality
graduate education in
media and
communications. An
intellectually stimulating,
well resourced learning
environment, with strong
links to media and
communications
industries and policy
makers. The opportunity
for lively cross-cultural
exchange of ideas among
a dynamic group of
fellow students in the
Department and School.
Study with
internationally
recognised active
researchers with
expertise in media and
communications and
politics and democracy,
regulation and policy,
technological change,
audiences, globalisation,
culture, and more.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/st
udy/graduate/taughtPro
grammes2011/MScMedi
aCommunicationandDev
elopment.aspx
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
We attract
students from a
diverse range of
backgrounds,
often including
professional
experience
working in media
and
communications
related fields.
Indeed, the
opportunity for
cross-cultural
meetings and
exchange of ideas
among the
student body is a
valuable feature
of studying at LSE.
On graduating,
our students enter
a variety of
careers in the UK
and abroad,
including
broadcasting,
journalism,
advertising, new
media industries,
political
marketing, market
research,
regulation and
policy, media
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The programme runs for
a full calendar year.
Formal teaching is usually
completed by the end of
the Lent term.
Examinations for all
courses are generally held
during May and June. The
remaining months are set
aside for students to
complete their
dissertations, and it is not
normally essential for
students to remain in
London during these
months.
Part-time students will
normally take and be
examined in courses to
the value of two units in
each year of study. In the
first year, these two units,
selected in discussion
with the student's
academic adviser, will
usually include the
compulsory theoretical
course(s) and one or
more option
course(s). The methods
course(s) and the
dissertation are then
usually taken in the
second year, together
with the remaining option
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
The programme
consists of four units,
including required
and optional courses
and the dissertation.
Courses typically
involve a
combination of
lectures and
seminars. The
Methods of Research
course is taught as a
series of lectures and
practical classes.
A broad social
science
foundation in
qualitative,
quantitative,
empirical and
critical skills. A
diverse, multidisciplinary and
theoretically
oriented
approach to
contemporary
developments,
issues and
debates in the
field.
http://www2.lse
.ac.uk/study/gra
duate/taughtPro
grammes2011/
MScMediaComm
unicationandDev
elopment.aspx
You will be examined
by written
examinations,
research
assignments, essays
related to courses,
and the dissertation
which must be
submitted in the
summer.
http://www2.lse.ac.u
k/study/graduate/ta
ughtProgrammes201
1/MScMediaCommu
nicationandDevelop
ment.aspx
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
A range of
specialist
courses within
media and
communicatio
ns and related
fields,
including an
independent
empirical
research
project
http://www2.l
se.ac.uk/study
/graduate/tau
ghtProgramme
s2011/MScMe
diaCommunica
tionandDevelo
pment.aspx
10
management and
research in both
public and private
sectors. See
lse.ac.uk/[email protected]
se/alumni
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/study/gradua
te/taughtProgram
mes2011/MScMe
diaCommunicatio
nandDevelopment
.aspx
course(s). Students may
be permitted to vary the
courses to be taken in
each year with the
approval of their
academic adviser.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/st
udy/graduate/taughtProg
rammes2011/MScMediaC
ommunicationandDevelo
pment.aspx (also gives a
list of course options)
11
UNI
COURSE
KCL
MA World History
and Culture
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
Students are
required to
complete 180
credits as follows:
Compulsory
modules (40 credits)
Optional modules
(80 credits)
Dissertation (15,000
words) (60 credits)
http://www.kcl.ac.u
k/schools/humaniti
es/depts/history/m
yhandbook/progra
mmes/pgt/world.ht
ml
See also list of
modules at
http://www.kcl.ac.u
k/schools/humaniti
es/depts/history/m
odules/level7/
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
SEE DETAILED
PROGRAMME
SPECIFICATION
DOCUMENT AT
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/schools/humani
ties/depts/history/
myhandbook/progr
ammes/pgt/world.
html
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Modules on the MA
in World History
and Cultures are
taught by weekly
seminars where
students are
expected to
contribute to
discussion and
prepare
presentations.
It is also possible for
students to attend
relevant
undergraduate
lectures
http://www.kcl.ac.u
k/schools/humaniti
es/depts/history/m
yhandbook/progra
mmes/pgt/world.ht
ml
12
UNI
COURSE
KCL
MA Religion in
Contemporary
Society
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
Unrivalled location
gives you access to
cosmopolitan and
vibrant religious
traditions. Close links
and regular fieldwork
trips to religious
centres and
communities in London
offering many
opportunities to
examine the religious
experience of living
communities.Unique
opportunity to engage
in study of a variety of
religious groups and
movements within and
outside the major
traditions (Christianity,
Judaism and Islam) in
the contemporary
world.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/p
rospectus/graduate/ind
ex/name/religion_in_c
ontemporary_society/a
lpha/PQR/header_sear
ch//keyword/religious_
studies
Graduates apply
their skills in a
range of
professions, such
as academic
careers in
departments of
Theology, Social &
Political Sciences,
journalism,
business,
international
relations, teaching,
government, mass
media, and
religious
institutions.
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/prospectus/gra
duate/index/name
/religion_in_conte
mporary_society/a
lpha/PQR/header_
search//keyword/r
eligious_studies
Core programme
content
Dissertation
Indicative noncore content
Compulsory
modules:
Social Scientifice
Study of Religion
in Contemporary
Society
World Religions
and Modernity
Optional
modules:
Religion and
Politics in
Contemporary
Muslim Societes
Contemporary
Religious
Movements
http://www.kcl.a
c.uk/prospectus/
graduate/structu
re/name/religion
_in_contempora
ry_society/alpha
/PQR/header_se
arch//keyword/r
eligious_studies
Taught compulsory
and optional
modules assessed
by coursework plus
a dissertation.
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/prospectus/gra
duate/structure/na
me/religion_in_co
ntemporary_societ
y/alpha/PQR/head
er_search//keywor
d/religious_studies
This unique interdisciplinary
course is designed to
develop your knowledge and
skills in social sciences and
humanities and to encourage
your constructive, critical
and independent thought in
this field. While focusing on
Christianity, Islam and
Judaism, the course will
allow you to specialise in
broad issues cutting across
these traditions and societies
(for example
fundamentalism, new
religions, or religious
pluralism), or to concentrate
on a particular society or
religion. Moreover, you will
master a number of
transferable skills that are
necessary for professional
expertise in a range of areas,
from the academic study of
religion to public policy and
pastoral care.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospe
ctus/graduate/details/name/
religion_in_contemporary_s
ociety/alpha/PQR/header_se
arch//keyword/religious_stu
dies
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual Combines Sociology
& Anthropology of
Religion to focus on
key issues, from
religion in public life
to globalization,
fundamentalism,
and modern
spirituality.
Encourages
research on major
traditions
(Christianity, Islam,
Judaism, Buddhism)
and new
movements.
Practical - Master
skills and
knowledge ideal for
careers in public
policy, journalism,
academia,
education, etc.
http://www.kcl.ac.u
k/prospectus/gradu
ate/index/name/reli
gion_in_contempor
ary_society/alpha/P
QR/header_search/
/keyword/religious_
studies
13
UNI
COURSE
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
Oxford
MSt. Global
and Imperial
History
The History Faculty
offers a wide variety of
postgraduate master’s
programmes. This
reflects both the
diversity and the
clustering of research
interests within the
faculty.
http://www.history.ox.
ac.uk/postgrad/pg_sect
_pgt.htm
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
The Global and
Imperial History
programme is
open to all
students whose
research centres
on the
Commonwealth,
South Asia, or East
Asia. Students
should indicate
from the start
whether their
interests lie in the
Commonwealth,
South Asia or East
Asia.
http://www.histor
y.ox.ac.uk/postgra
d/pg_sect_global.h
tm
The course lasts
for nine months
(from October to
June) and the
examination
results are
normally
published by the
beginning of
July. The
examination
comprises three
elements: (1)
two extended
essays of up to
5,000 words; (2)
an examination
paper; and (3) a
dissertation of
up to 15,000
words.
http://www.hist
ory.ox.ac.uk/pos
tgrad/pg_sect_gl
obal.htm
The examination
comprises three
elements: (1) two
extended essays of
up to 5,000 words;
(2) an examination
paper; and (3) a
dissertation of up
to 15,000 words.
http://www.histor
y.ox.ac.uk/postgra
d/pg_sect_global.h
tm
The one-year M.Sc.
and the two-year
M.Phil. in Economic
and Social History
offer a specially
structured training
course which aims to
equip students with a
knowledge and
understanding of
social-science
approaches and their
implications for the
study of history. This
can offer a route into
history for students
with a social-science
background, or, to
students with a
history background, a
way of broadening
their disciplinary
base. m
http://www.history.o
x.ac.uk/postgrad/pg_
sect_pgt.htm
(See also
http://www.histor
y.ox.ac.uk/postgra
d/pg_sect_pgt.htm
for detailed info on
dissertation
assessment and
feedback)
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
A good dissertation is
driven by a research
question or problem
suitable for original
historical enquiry. The
research question emerges
from critical engagement
with the literature in a
particular field. A candidate
is expected to make
considered and effective
use of the appropriate
sources, which should be
consulted in the original so
far as appropriate and
practical. A thesis is not an
arbitrary or intuitive
processing of primary
material. It must have a
coherent approach or
method – one that is
relevant and effective for
the purpose of the thesis. It
should be presented in a
lucid and scholarly manner.
http://www.history.ox.ac.u
k/postgrad/pg_sect_global.
htm
14
LAW AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
UNI
COURSE
Cambridge
LLM
Law
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD
IT SUIT
Intellectual stimulation; to
improve their career
prospects – whether in
practice, in academia, in
government service.
One of the most highly
respected LL.Ms in the
world. It is rigorous and
intellectually demanding. It
is taught by some of the
finest academics; and it is
studied by students who
are the best in their
generation.
Also has a number of
academic research centres,
international environment,
outsanding facilities and
academic / pastoral care,
professional contacts
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/
courses/llm-why-do-thellm-at-cambridge.php
-Intended for
those wishing
to pursue
further legal
studies after
completing
their first
degree in law,
including
those who are
considering an
academic
career or
intending to
practise law
and those
taking a career
break seeking
to broaden
their
intellectual
horizons.
http://www.la
w.cam.ac.uk/c
ourses/llm.ph
p
A challenging - but
supportive - environment.
The course, with its rich
historical traditions, attracts
students of the highest
calibre
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/
courses/llm.php
PROGRAM
ME
STRUCTURE
Courses and
teaching
methods
http://www.
law.cam.ac.
uk/courses/l
lmcourses.php
ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
TEACHING, LEARNING, ASSESSMENT
Typically a three-hour
written examination at the
end of the academic year
(late May/early June).
In some courses, students
have the option of taking a
two-hour examination and
submitting a short written
essay.In seminar papers
students are examined
through a (compulsory)
supervised thesis. In
addition, in many of the
LL.M. courses, there is also
the option of writing a
thesis in lieu of the
examination. A candidate
whose topic is approved for
a thesis will be entitled to a
prescribed amount of
individual supervision from
a Faculty supervisor.
Students can, however,
write only one thesis and
their chosen topic cannot
overlap substantially with
material covered in another
course.
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/
courses/llm-courses.php
?
Intellectual– groups learning through
mixture of lectures, seminars and small
group teaching. For subjects with fewer
than 15 students, teaching will normally be
conducted through interactive seminars,
usually one two-hour seminar a week. For
larger subjects, in most cases lectures
(again usually 2 hours a week) are
supplemented by 4-6 hours of small group
teaching. Student participation in classes.
Independent research and writing skills on
thesis or seminar research course
Subject-based – In the small groups,
students are expected to analyse complex
legal material, critically examine legal
questions, apply this knowledge to
'problem' situations and consider
underlying policy issues.
Students benefit from direct feedback on
their work and so hone their written skills.
Also the mooting programme
Transferable – written communication
(essays / thesis) and oral communication
(tutorial /lecture participation, mooting),
annual EU institutions trip, student law
review, pro bono work
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/llmwhy-do-the-llm-at-cambridge.php
15
UNI
COURSE
Oxford
BCL Law
(equiv.
to LLM)
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
Among legal
practitioners and legal
academics alike,
Oxford's Bachelor of
Civil Law (BCL) degree
is the most highly
esteemed masterslevel qualification in
the common law
world.
Only those with
outstanding first law
degrees from
common law
jurisdictions are
admitted.
http://www.law.ox.ac
.uk/postgraduate/bcl.
php
WHO WOULD
IT SUIT
?
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
BCL students choose their
courses from a selection of 30 or
so. Each student takes either 3
or 4 BCL courses. Teaching on
the BCL is shared between the
faculty and the colleges. A
typical BCL course might have
one or two faculty-level events
per week (e.g. a seminar and a
lecture). At some point in the
year there will also be a course
of three or four tutorials in each
course at college level. A tutorial
is an hour or so of intensive
discussion between one tutor
and typically two or three
students. All examinations
(except the essay-based
examination for Jurisprudence
and Political Theory) take place
at the end of the year, in early
July.
http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/postgr
aduate/bcl.php
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
The BCL examiners
report has some
useful feedback on
the exams
assessments for
the course, at
http://www.law.ox
.ac.uk/published/b
clexam.pdf
(see also the BCL
programme
specification doc at
http://www.law.ox
.ac.uk/published/b
clprog.pdf )
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
For Programme
Objectives and
Learning Methods
see the Bcl
Programme
Specification 2008
document at
http://www.law.ox.a
c.uk/published/bclpr
og.pdf - worth
reading in full
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Students are expected to analyse
complex material critically and to
consider it from different
perspectives. Attention to legal
puzzles is often combined with
discussion of underlying policy
problems, and you are expected to
make your own contribution to the
debate.
http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/postgrad
uate/bcl.php
(see also the BCL programme
specification doc at
http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/publishe
d/bclprog.pdf )
(For more info on courses /
teaching and support etc see
also
http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/publis
hed/postgraduate/Provision_for
_PGT_students.pdf )
16
UNI
COURSE
UCL
LLM Law
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
UCL Laws is based in
the heart of London,
close to the legal city,
major library
resources and the
West End. The
Institute of Advanced
Legal Studies, which
hosts lectures and
seminars, and has its
own extensive
library, is close by.
UCL Laws has a
remarkable teaching
and research
community,
demonstrated by the
talent and
achievement of its
students, faculty, and
alumni. We are
deeply committed to
the quality and
relevance of our
graduate education.
The programme is
suitable for law students
who wish to practice in
specialist areas of law
and/or pursue further
doctoral studies. Our
LLM attracts students
from all parts of the
world, providing
students from the UK
and abroad with unique
opportunities for formal
and informal critical
comparative analysis.
Students undertake four
courses to the value of
180 credits. One course is
assessed through the
dissertation.
The programme is
assessed through
unseen examination,
coursework and the
research dissertation.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/p
rospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TML
LAWSING07
Students are
equipped with
the forensic legal
skills and
knowledge
which can
usefully be
applied in
further study,
the legal
profession,
public service or
industry. They
develop a
knowledge and
understanding of
law in its
context, the
skills necessary
for advanced
issues in law and
a capacity for
individual
research.
http://www.ucl.
ac.uk/prospectiv
estudents/gradua
testudy/degrees/p
gt/TMLLAWSING
07
Students are taught
by internationally
renowned academics,
at the cutting edge of
their fields, and
leading legal
practitioners from
some of the major
City firms.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
First destinations of
recent graduates
include: Ernst & Young:
Tax Advisor, UCL
Business Plc: Legal
Affairs and Intellectual
Property Manager,
Transport for London:
Lawyer, Price
Waterhouse Coopers:
Trainee Solicitor,
Ministry of Justice:
Lawyer, Mehmet Gun &
Partners: Trainee
Lawyer, Far East
International Company
Ltd. Legal Consultant,
Freshfields Bruckhaus
Deringer: Competition
Law Intern, Linklater's:
Associate Lawyer, BAE
To specialise in a
particular field of law,
students must study
three full courses (or half
course equivalents)
within that specialisation.
(See also a more detailed
programme structure
outline at
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/law
s/prospective/llm/index.s
html?llm_programme )
The programme is
delivered through
lectures, seminars,
tutorials, research
exercises and guided selfstudy. Most of the
courses are supported by
a dedicated website
containing materials, links
and news on the subject.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pro
spectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMLL
AWSING07
Assessment in 135
credits worth of
courses (i.e., three 45credit courses or a
combination of 45 and
22.5-credit courses) is
by examination,
coursework essay or a
combination of both.
Details of specific
course assessment can
be found on the course
summary pages.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/l
aws/prospective/llm/in
dex.shtml?llm_subjects
For one of the 45-credit
courses you have
selected as part of your
180 credits for the
programme, you
choose to be assessed
by 9,000-word
dissertation; the
dissertation replaces
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual - develop
expertise in a range of
subjects; acquire a
systematic
understanding of these
along with a critical
appreciation of the
problems that arise from
these fields;
demonstrate originality
in the application of
knowledge together with
a practical understanding
of how established
research techniques are
used to create and
interpret knowledge;
develop your research
and writing skills through
assessed essays and the
9,000-word dissertation.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/la
ws/prospective/llm/inde
x.shtml?llm_programme
Subject-specific – The
LLM programme
provides a platform for
students who wish to
acquire expertise central
to an understanding of
how law works in a
global environment or
who wish to pursue
doctoral studies at a
later date. A large variety
17
/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/T
MLLAWSING07
(See also details of
law faculty centres
etc at
http://www.ucl.ac.uk
/laws/prospective/ll
m/)
Systems: Legal Assistant,
House of Commons:
Parliamentary
Researcher, L'Oreal InHouse Lawyer, Herbert
Smith PLC Trainee
Lawyer, Foreign and
Commonwealth Office:
Human Rights
Consultant and UCL Law
Department:
Researcher.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pr
ospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMLL
AWSING07
LLM courses are taught
by a variety of lectures,
seminars and tutorials,
and the teachers will
discuss the method of
delivery at the outset of
the course. Each course
will have teaching every
week during terms one
and two in the form of a
2-hour lecture or
seminar. In general
courses with a large
number of students will
have lectures and
additional tutorials, and
courses with smaller
numbers will have
seminars. Seminars and
tutorials involve
discussions and typically
students are expected to
lead these discussions
around a set topic under
the guidance of a teacher.
In some seminars and
tutorials you will be
expected to work in
teams and make
presentations to the rest
of the group.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/law
s/prospective/llm/index.s
html?llm_programme
the standard
assessment for that 45credit course. You
choose a selected topic
of law from this course
and submit the
dissertation on the 1st
September in the year
following entry to the
programme.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/l
aws/prospective/llm/in
dex.shtml?llm_program
me
of courses are offered,
with an opportunity to
take grouped courses for
the award of the LLM
with a named
specialisation.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/pr
ospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMLL
AWSING07
18
UNI
COURSE
LSE
MSc International
Development
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
A high quality
academic training
in development
studies, examining
the importance of
contemporary
theory in the
social sciences for
the policy and
practice of
development.
A wide range of
choice in optional
courses within the
School so that you
can deepen or
widen your
disciplinary
training, or take
up the advanced
study of a
particular region
of the developing
world. Flexibility
of dissertation
topics in the MSc
Development
Studies allows you
to shape your
studies to your
needs.
The Department
of International
Development brin
gs together an
This degree is
intended for those
with experience of
work in
development in
government and
non-governmental
organizations as
administrators,
planners or
technical
specialists, for
those who wish to
take up such work
and also for those
who intend
undertaking
research on
development
problems (for
whom it will
provide an
appropriate
preparation for a
doctoral
programme).
Recent graduates
are already
employed in
responsible
positions in
Government,
NGOs,
international firms
and banks.
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
MSc Development
Studies students
follow one
compulsory core
course,
Development:
Theory, History
and Policy,
optional courses
(to the value of 2
units), a research
methods course
and produce a
10,000 word
dissertation. The
two optional
courses can be
chosen from
courses offered
within the
Department or
from a wide range
of offerings from
other
Departments &
Institutes within
the School such as
Anthropology,
Demography,
Economic History,
Economics,
Government,
Geography,
Information
Systems,
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
?
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
Postgraduate
work in
Development
Studies has to
take account of
the considerable
disciplinary range
and of the
necessary
engagement with
economics.
Anyone who
wishes
successfully to
undertake
research or
practical work in
the field of
development
needs to have a
high level of
competence in
one of the core
disciplines and
also be open to
approaches from
neighbouring
disciplines, partly
through
familiarity with
various
frameworks and
key concepts,
through which it
has been sought
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
It offers high quality
academic training
for development
studies, examining
the importance of
contemporary
theory in the social
sciences for the
policy and practice
of development.
http://www2.lse.ac.
uk/internationalDev
elopment/study/ms
cDevelopmentStudi
es.aspx
19
exciting group of
European and
international
students with a
diversity of
academic and
professional
backgrounds who
have gone on to
establish an
international
alumni network
involved in
development
research and
practice.
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/study/gradua
te/taughtProgram
mes2011/MScDev
elopmentStudies.
aspx
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/international
Development/stu
dy/mscDevelopm
entStudies.aspx
Recent graduates
have gained
employment in
government, nongovernmental
organisations
(NGOs),
international firms
and banks, or
have gone on to
obtain PhDs in
development
studies or other
social science
disciplines.
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/study/gradua
te/taughtProgram
mes2011/MScDev
elopmentStudies.
aspx
International
Relations,
Management,
Social Policy,
Sociology, Law
and Gender.
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/international
Development/stu
dy/mscDevelopm
entStudies.aspx
(See also courses /
structure detail
http://www2.lse.ac.
uk/study/graduate/
taughtProgrammes
2011/MScDevelopm
entStudies.aspx )
to integrate
different
perspectives on
central problems
of social
development and
change. This is
what the MSc
programme aims
to achieve.
http://www2.lse.a
c.uk/international
Development/stu
dy/mscDevelopm
entStudies.aspx
20
UNI
COURSE
LSE
MSc
Economics
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD
IT SUIT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
Study in one of the
largest economics
departments in the
world, renowned
for its research and
contributions to
the development of
the subject area.
Our former
students are
employed as
economists in a
wide range of
national and
international
organisations in
government,
international
institutions,
business and
finance.
Approximately one
third of students
proceed to PhD
programmes at LSE
or other leading
universities. http:/
/www2.lse.ac.uk/st
udy/graduate/taug
htProgrammes2011
/MScEconomics.as
px
This MSc is
intended to
equip students
with the tools
of the
professional
economist, for
work in
government,
international
organisations,
business, or as
preparation
for economics
research. Each
year,
approximately
one-third of
graduates go
onto work in
the private
sector, onethird to the
public sector
and
international
organisations,
and one-third
to pursue
further
education.
http://econ.lse
.ac.uk/study/p
rogrammes/m
scecon.html
Although extensive use is
made of mathematics, this
is primarily to facilitate
analysis (students
interested in a more
mathematically oriented
course should apply for the
MSc Econometrics and
Mathematical Economics).
Academic-year programme.
Students must take three
compulsory courses, one
optional course and a
dissertation linked to the
optional course as shown.
Students are also required
to attend EC400
Introductory Course in
Mathematics and Statistics.
http://www.lse.ac.uk/resou
rces/calendar/programmeR
egulations/taughtMasters/2
010_MScEconomics.htm
(Also gives a list of course
options)
Subject to attaining the
required grades,
students may progress
to the MRes/PhD
Programme. Those
intending from the
outset of their studies
to pursue a research
training, can apply for
the MSc Economics
(Research). See The
PhD Programme in
Economics for details.
http://econ.lse.ac.uk/st
udy/programmes/msce
con.html
To succeed on the
programme you need to
prove that you can work
to a high standard and
have excellent analytical
ability; the core
economics and
econometrics courses
assume a knowledge of
constrained optimisation,
matrix algebra and basic
statistics.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/st
udy/graduate/taughtProg
rammes2011/MScEconom
ics.aspx
The MSc Economics is
intended to equip
you with the main
tools of the
professional
economist, whether
you intend working in
government,
international
organisations or
business
http://www2.lse.ac.u
k/study/graduate/tau
ghtProgrammes2011/
MScEconomics.aspx
This degree can also be
taken over two years for
those students whose first
degree did not specialise in
economics. Students who
successfully complete the
examinations in the
preliminary year will be
awarded a Diploma in
Economics, and those
meeting the required
standard will be permitted
to proceed to the MSc.
Please refer to MSc
Economics (Two Year
Programme).
http://econ.lse.ac.uk/study/
programmes/mscecon.html
See also
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/stud
y/graduate/taughtProgram
mes2011/MScEconomics.as
px
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
The degree is
based on
rigorous training
in core areas of
economics and
an optional
specialisation.
http://econ.lse.a
c.uk/study/progr
ammes/mscecon
.html
The degree
concentrates
on the core
elements of
economic
theory and
econometrics.
Although
extensive use
is made of
mathematics,
this is primarily
to facilitate
analysis
http://www2.l
se.ac.uk/study
/graduate/taug
htProgrammes
2011/MScEcon
omics.aspx
21
UNI
COURSE
Cambridge
MPhil Economics
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
This course has
evolved in response
to the changing
academic needs and
priorities and will
equip students with
the qualifications,
analytical capacities
and skills required
to undertake a
career as a
professional
economist in
business or
government.
http://www.admin.
cam.ac.uk/offices/g
radstud/prospec/st
udying/qualifdir/co
urses/fcec/
This degree is
specifically aimed at
candidates who are
interested in
undertaking a
master’s degree
that will give them
the training
required to
undertake a career
as a professional
economist working
for, say, the UK
Government
Economic Service or
an economics
consultancy.
http://www.econ.ca
m.ac.uk/prospect/n
ewmphil/Economics
/index.html
Each student will
take eight modules
plus a dissertation.
One module is
equivalent to
eighteen hours of
lectures.
http://www.econ.ca
m.ac.uk/prospect/n
ewmphil/Economics
/index.html (Also
gives more detailed
course structure
and module
options)
http://www.econ.ca
m.ac.uk/prospect/n
ewmphil/Economics
/index.html
Students will be
examined on
Microeconomics I,
Macroeconomics I
and Econometrics I
in January and on
the remaining five
modules in the
middle of May. Each
module accounts
for 10% of the
overall mark and
the dissertation
accounts for 20% of
the overall mark.
http://www.econ.ca
m.ac.uk/prospect/n
ewmphil/Economics
/index.html
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
22
LANGUAGES AND CULTURES
UNI
COURSE
WHAT IS
SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
Cambridge
South
Asian
studies
?
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
The MPhil in Modern
South Asian Studies is a
postgraduate course
with a substantial
research component. It
is designed both for
students who want to
enhance their
understanding of the
social, cultural, political
and economic history
and present condition
of South Asia and for
those who want to go
on to further primary
research. It provides
intensive research and
language training for
those who wish to go
on to prepare a
doctoral dissertation,
but it is also a
freestanding
postgraduate degree
course in its own right.
http://www.admin.cam
.ac.uk/offices/gradstud
/prospec/studying/qual
ifdir/courses/hssa/
The core course will consist
of twelve weeks of lectures
or seminars, outlined
below, which will take place
during the Michaelmas
Term and the first half of
the Lent Term. The
language element of the
degree will run throughout
the year, while the options
will be taught during the
eight weeks of Michaelmas
Term and in two-hour
lecture /seminars, the
format variable according
to what individual teachers
consider most appropriate.
In addition, there will be a
strong element of research
training, some of which will
also be assessed.
Assessment consists of
two parts: coursework
and a dissertation. Both
parts must be passed.
The coursework will
count for 50% of the final
mark. Students will
submit one essay of no
more than 5,000 words
for the core course (20%)
by the last day of the Lent
Term and option(s) taken
(15% ) on the first day of
Lent Term. The 15%
allocated to language
training will be assessed
by an oral and a threehour written examination
in the Easter Term. The
dissertation will count for
50% of the final mark.
http://www.sasian.cam.ac.uk/assessm
ent.html
Intellectual – dissertation
supervision - The
supervisor's role is to help
students clarify and
develop their own ideas,
not impose his or her
own interests on the
subject. Students should
not expect to be 'spoonfed' by their supervisors.
Graduate students in
Cambridge are expected
to have the capacity and
enthusiasm for organizing
their own research and
working largely on their
own initiative.
http://www.sasian.cam.ac.uk/assessm
ent.html
Intellectual - provides a
structured introduction to
key debates in South Asian
history, development
economics, politics and
sociology through a variety
of intensive courses; offers
close supervision in
undertaking an original
research project.
The second half of the Lent
Term and the Easter Term
will be devoted to the
production of a
dissertation, which must be
between 15,000 and 20,000
words http://www.sasian.cam.ac.uk/course.htm
l
(See also http://www.sasian.cam.ac.uk/handboo
k.pdf )
Subject-based - The
MPhil aims to introduce
students to the latest
research topics, methods
and debates in South
Asian studies at an
advanced level.
http://www.admin.cam.a
c.uk/offices/gradstud/pro
spec/studying/qualifdir/c
ourses/hssa/
Subject-based practical - It
provides training in the use
of printed, manuscript and
other sources relevant to
South Asian studies. It
provides essential language
training in Hindi and Urdu.
Transferable - offers
training in the advanced use
of library and archival
facilities and the
appropriate use of
electronic databases for the
location, identification and
evaluation of source
materials.
http://www.admin.cam.ac.
uk/offices/gradstud/prospe
c/studying/qualifdir/course
s/hssa/
23
UNI
Oxford
COURSE
MSt
Chinese
Studies
(although
here
based in
A&H)
WHAT IS
SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
? See the
Faculty of
Oriental
Studies
website at
http://ww
w.orinst.o
x.ac.uk/
for general
info on the
faculty,
but not
much on
individual
courses
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
LEARNING OUTCOMES
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
?
The website only has a 1page summary with course
outline / details.
http://www.orinst.ox.ac.uk/
ea/chinese/mst_chinese_gu
ide.html
3 course essays and a
15,000 word dissertation.
The written assessments
may also be assessed
orally.
http://www.orinst.ox.ac.
uk/ea/chinese/mst_chine
se_guide.html
?
?
24
UNI
COURSE
UCL
SSEES
MA
Russian
Studies
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
The Russian Studies MA draws on the
unique area studies expertise at The UCL
School of Slavonic and East European
Studies (SSEES) to offer a choice of
courses unparalleled in depth and
breadth, ranging from Russia's medieval
history to its contemporary politics, from
19th-century literature to 21st-century
film.
The programme is designed for students
who have little or no prior experience of
the study of Russia as well as those who
have undertaken Russian studies at BA
level, who wish to develop their
knowledge and understanding of Russia
from a multidisciplinary perspective.
The UCL School of Slavonic and East
European Studies (SSEES) is one of the
world's leading specialist institutions, and
the largest national centre in the UK, for
the study of Central, Eastern and SouthEast Europe and Russia.
Located on the edge of Bloomsbury,
SSEES offers an ideal location for
scholars. The British Library, British
Museum, University of London Library
and other similar research centres are all
close by.
The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain
for the depth and breadth of its
collections, the majority of which are on
open access in the SSEES building.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospectivestudents/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMARUSSING01
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
With their specialist
knowledge and language
skills, SSEES Masters
graduates can be found in
business, finance, the media,
international agencies,
charities, diplomacy,
international security
organisations, the law, and
academe.
Recent employer destinations
include: Independent
Television News; The Financial
Times; The Foreign and
Commonwealth Office; The
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
(OECD); NATO; Government
Communication Headquarters
(GCHQ); Amnesty
International;
PricewaterhouseCoopers;
Chase Manhattan; The Bank
of England; The European
Union
Some graduates advise the
Russian, Polish, American, and
other governments, and the
European Commission.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospec
tive-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMARUSSI
NG01
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
Students
undertake
courses to the
value of 180
credits.
The programme
consists of one
language course
(40 credits),
optional courses
(80 credits) and
a research
dissertation (60
credits).
See for further
programme
details
http://www.ucl.
ac.uk/prospectiv
estudents/gradua
testudy/degrees/p
gt/TMARUSSING
01
(And also for
further course
details see
http://www.ssee
s.ucl.ac.uk/prosp
ect/ma_rus.htm)
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Assessment is
carried out
through
unseen
examinations,
long essays,
course work
and the
research
dissertation.
http://www.uc
l.ac.uk/prospe
ctivestudents/grad
uatestudy/degrees
/pgt/TMARUS
SING01
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
Russian culture
is explored from
a variety of
perspectives.
Students
specialise in
literature and
culture, social
sciences or
history, or
combine courses
into an
interdisciplinary
programme.
They are
encouraged to
develop their
research skills,
and many
choose to learn
Russian, or
improve their
command of
Russian, through
a language
course.
http://www.ucl.
ac.uk/prospectiv
estudents/gradua
testudy/degrees/p
gt/TMARUSSING
01
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual - . Students
are also encouraged to
take a methodology
course to develop their
research skills.
http://www.ssees.ucl.ac.uk
/prospect/ma_rus.htm
Subject-specific - The
programme is delivered
through a combination of
lectures, seminars,
laboratory sessions,
workshops, film viewings,
tutorials and specialist
language courses.
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prosp
ective-students/graduatestudy/degrees/pgt/TMARUS
SING01
Students can choose to
explore Russian culture
from a variety of
perspectives, whether by
specialising in literature
and culture, social
sciences or history, or by
combining more than one
discipline into an
interdisciplinary degree. In
addition, many MA
students choose to learn
Russian for the first time,
or to improve their
existing command of
Russian, by taking one of
the three Russianlanguage courses offered
within the MA.
http://www.ssees.ucl.ac.uk
/prospect/ma_rus.htm
25
UNI
COURSE
LSE
MSc Gender
Studies
(Gender
Institute)
WHAT IS SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
The opportunity
to study within a
specialist
Institute located
in the only UK
university
devoted entirely
to the social
sciences.
http://www2.lse.
ac.uk/study/grad
uate/taughtProgr
ammes2011/MSc
Gender.aspx
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
Our students go on to
work in varied career
paths: research and
consultancy for
government and nongovernmental
organisations (NGOs)
in developed and less
developed countries,
international
organisations,
personnel work, the
legal profession and
in education.
http://www2.lse.ac.u
k/study/graduate/tau
ghtProgrammes2011/
MScGender.aspx
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
For the Gender core
course, you will have
one and a half hour
blocks of lectures
followed by linked
seminars. There will be
a series of compulsory
dissertation workshops
in the Lent term. The
Gender Institute holds
public lectures and
workshops with
eminent academics
visiting London
throughout the year.
All students on the MSc
Gender will have an
academic adviser who
will be allocated upon
arrival. Dissertation
supervision is allocated
in the Lent term.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/
study/graduate/taughtP
rogrammes2011/MScG
ender.aspx
(See also for more
details of programme
structure
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/
genderInstitute/study/
mastersprogrammes/H
ome.aspx )
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Dissertation
and ?
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
The opportunity
to develop
expertise in the
fullest possible
range of gender
theories, and
stress the
significance of
gender for
knowledge and
research design.
http://www2.lse.
ac.uk/study/grad
uate/taughtProgr
ammes2011/MSc
Gender.aspx
TEACHING, LEARNING, ASSESSMENT
Intellectual - The MSc Gender
(Research) degree combines a
thorough grounding in
contemporary theories of gender
with advanced training in
quantitative and qualitative
research methodologies. You will
take part of your degree
programme in LSE's Methodology
Institute, which is a base for crossdisciplinary research and teaching
in the broad area of social science
methodology.
Subject – specific - Our
interdisciplinary approach enables
students to consider theories of
gender from a range of
perspectives, develop a critical
appreciation of different theories
of gender and its application, and
use the analysis of gender relations
as a basis of research.
We emphasise global gender
relations. Globalisation, war and
conflict, sexuality, migration,
postcoloniality, representation,
employment, media, history - all
these are gendered phenomena
and deepen our understanding of
gender in turn.
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/study/grad
uate/taughtProgrammes2011/MSc
Gender.aspx
26
UNI
COURSE
KCL
MA Late
Antique and
Byzantine
Studies
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
The holdings of King's
Burrows Library of Byzantine
Studies (at the Maughan
Library) are among the
strongest outside Greece.
World leading research and
teaching.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospec
tus/graduate/index/name/lat
e_antique_and_byzantine_stu
dies/alpha/ABC/header_searc
h//keyword/byzantine_studie
s
Leads to careers in
research or teaching,
cultural management,
general management,
civil service and banking.
The MA in Late Antique and
Byzantine Studies offers the
opportunity to specialize in an
exciting and multi-faceted
field of study that covers the
history and culture of the
Eastern Mediterranean world
during the long millennium
from the foundation of
Constantinople (modern
Istanbul) in 324 to the fall of
the Byzantine empire in 1453.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospec
tus/graduate/details/name/la
te_antique_and_byzantine_st
udies/alpha/ABC/header_sear
ch//keyword/byzantine_studi
es
Student destinations Research in our
department and
elsewhere in the UK, EU
and US; teaching, cultural
management, general
management, civil
service, banking.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/pro
spectus/graduate/index/
name/late_antique_and_
byzantine_studies/alpha/
ABC/header_search//key
word/byzantine_studies
For students whose
previous training has
been in a related subject
in the humanities. To give
a grounding in the
subject, with a languagetraining element in
medieval Greek or Latin.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/pro
spectus/graduate/details/
name/late_antique_and_
byzantine_studies/alpha/
ABC/header_search//key
word/byzantine_studies
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
Study core
modules in
Medieval Greek or
Latin Language,
Methods &
Techniques, with
further choice of
modules taught at
King’s, Birkbeck,
Royal Holloway
and UCL.
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/prospectus/gra
duate/index/name
/late_antique_and
_byzantine_studies
/alpha/ABC/heade
r_search//keyword
/byzantine_studies
(See also
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/prospectus/gra
duate/structure/na
me/late_antique_a
nd_byzantine_stud
ies/alpha/ABC/hea
der_search//keyw
ord/byzantine_stu
dies for a very
detailed
description of the
courses and
structure)
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Taught core and
optional
modules
assessed by
coursework
and/or
examination plus
a compulsory
dissertation
which accounts
for 25 per cent
of the total
marks.
http://www.kcl.a
c.uk/prospectus/
graduate/structu
re/name/late_an
tique_and_byzan
tine_studies/alp
ha/ABC/header_
search//keyword
/byzantine_studi
es
LEARNING OUTCOMES
International expertise
in the fields of, the
language and history of
the Late Roman and
Byzantine periods;
particular areas of
current research are
charity and
remembrance in the
Palaiologan period,
material culture of
Cyprus in the Byzantine
period, archaeology
and epigraphy of Asia
Minor, middle
Byzantine literary
culture.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/p
rospectus/graduate/ind
ex/name/late_antique_
and_byzantine_studies
/alpha/ABC/header_se
arch//keyword/byzanti
ne_studies
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Intellectual and Subjectspecific - The degree
allows students, through
the numerous modules
on offer, to acquire
expertise in the necessary
research skills (ancient
languages, palaeography,
epigraphy, papyrology)
and in a variety of
disciplines (history,
literature, material
culture, philosophy).
A research skill, to be
chosen from: Language
(medieval Greek or Latin),
Greek Palaeography,
Elementary Greek
Palaeography, Latin
Paleography, Latin
Epigraphy, Greek
Epigraphy, Greek
Papyrology, an
appropriate module from
the MA in Digital
Humanities, another
language);
*A special subject.
*A dissertation.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/pro
spectus/graduate/details/
name/late_antique_and_
byzantine_studies/alpha/
ABC/header_search//key
word/byzantine_studies
27
UNI
COURSE
KCL
MA Modern
Greek Studies
(Literature)
WHAT IS SPECIAL ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT SUIT
Four pathways are available
each with a different
specialism. Unique
combination of facilities for
research and learning
including premier collection of
Greek publications in
Maughan Library and the
Centre for Hellenic Studies.
The only programme in the
UK, and one of the few in the
world, that provides this level
of specialist teaching in the
field of Modern Greek
Literature within a one-year
format. Unique combination
of facilities for research and
learning in the subject:.Major
lectures, seminars and an
international conference
every 2 years organised by the
Centre for Hellenic Studies
bring scholars from Greece,
Cyprus, or other countries,
providing an unrivalled
research environment for the
aspiring student.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospec
tus/graduate/index/name/mo
dern_greek_studies__obr_lite
rature_cbr_/alpha/ABC/heade
r_search//keyword/byzantine
_studies
Ideal for further academic
study; work in civil
service, teaching,
journalism.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/pro
spectus/graduate/index/
name/modern_greek_stu
dies__obr_literature_cbr
_/alpha/ABC/header_sea
rch//keyword/byzantine_
studies
PROGRAMME
STRUCTURE
No Core content.
Optional modules
may include:
Practical criticism
(40 credits); Greek
poetry in the
twentieth century
(40 credits); Cavafy
reader and read
(40 credits);
Additional/alternat
ive modules may
be selected from
one or more of the
following
programmes,
subject to
availability:
MA Comparative
Literature
MA Modern Greek
Studies
(interdisciplinary)
http://www.kcl.ac.
uk/prospectus/gra
duate/structure/na
me/modern_greek
_studies__obr_lite
rature_cbr_/alpha/
ABC/header_searc
h//keyword/byzant
ine_studies
ASSESSMENT
SUMMARY
Dissertation;
coursework
written in
students' own
time; written
examinations
http://www.kcl.a
c.uk/prospectus/
graduate/structu
re/name/moder
n_greek_studies
__obr_literature
_cbr_/alpha/ABC
/header_search/
/keyword/byzant
ine_studies
LEARNING OUTCOMES
This programme leads
to a discipline-based
degree with specialism
in Greek literature
(poetry and fiction), in
comparative and
historical context, with
a primary focus on the
19th and 20th
centuries, studied in
relation to the theory
and practice of literary
criticism and analysis.
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/p
rospectus/graduate/de
tails/name/modern_gr
eek_studies__obr_liter
ature_cbr_/alpha/ABC/
header_search//keywo
rd/byzantine_studies
TEACHING, LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
Subject-specific - Major
topics covered: poetry
and fiction of the 20th
century;
Intellectual
(Transferable?)- close
reading of texts;
comparative literary
context
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/pro
spectus/graduate/details/
name/modern_greek_stu
dies__obr_literature_cbr
_/alpha/ABC/header_sea
rch//keyword/byzantine_
studies
28
UNI
COURSE
Cambridge
MPhil
Linguistics
WHAT IS
SPECIAL
ABOUT IT
WHO WOULD IT
SUIT
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
The MPhil caters
both for students
who want a course in
linguistics generally,
and for those who
wish to specialise in
particular subdisciplines of
linguistics or in the
linguistics of certain
language areas. For
the latter, there are
several 'pathways', as
explained below. All
students are required
to follow courses in
'Research Methods'
and 'Linguistic
Theory'. Beyond that,
each student will
follow his or her own
'Study Plan', which
allows the individual
interests, needs, and
strengths of the
student to be met.
http://www.mml.ca
m.ac.uk/ling/courses
/pgrad/mphil.html
The course structure allows
great flexibility in combining
areas. It provides for
flexible combinations of
work in any of the core
areas of theoretical and
descriptive linguistics,
ranging for instance from
formal syntax to
experimental phonetics
(including speech
production and perception).
A piece of work may have
as its focus the
development of an
argument in linguistic
theory, the description of
some aspect of a language
or its use, an issue in
historical linguistics, a
psycho-phonetic
experiment, and so on. The
various pieces of work may
relate to any language or
combination of languages
subject to adequate advice
being available for the topic
in question. The majority of
students will follow this
course structure. However,
some students may wish to
ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
LEARNING
OUTCOMES
TEACHING,
LEARNING,
ASSESSMENT
The scheme of examination for the
one-year course of study in
Linguistics for the degree of Master
of Philosophy shall consist of:
(a) a thesis not exceeding 20,000
words in length, including footnotes,
but excluding tables, appendices,
and bibliography, on a subject
approved by the Degree Committee
for the Faculty of Modern and
Medieval Languages;
(b) three essays of which two shall
be no more than 2,000 words in
length, and one shall be no more
than 4,000 words in length, each
including footnotes, but excluding
tables, appendices, and bibliography,
on subjects either approved or
prescribed by the Degree
Committee;
(c) an oral presentation on the topic
of the second seminar in Lent Term.
The examination shall include an oral
examination on the thesis and on
the general field of knowledge in
which it falls, and, at the discretion
of the Examiners, on the essays
submitted by the candidate; save
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specialise and opt for a
'pathway' in a particular
field. Pathways allow the
compulsory element of the
course (General Seminar) to
be combined with a
focussed programme of
study in a specific
subdiscipline of linguistics
or a specific language area.
The following pathways will
normally be available. See
furtehr details at
http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk
/ling/courses/pgrad/mphil.
html
that the Examiners may, at their
discretion, waive the requirement
for an oral examination.
http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/ling/cou
rses/pgrad/mphil.html
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EXAMPLES OF TRANSFERABLE SKILLS GOOD PRACTICE
UNI
FACULTY / PROGRAMME
UCL
ARTS AND HUMANITIES MA ARCHAEOLOGY
The MA in Archaeology programme is highly flexible, and the skills you can gain will depend upon the options you choose, perhaps
involving very practical skills derived from object handling, or computational competencies developed by working with GIS or other
analytical software. In general, though, the MA programme provides training in four main areas:
Research skills: finding, compiling, filtering and synthesising information from disparate sources is a key part of the dissertation
element of the programme. The taught options also encourage you to acquire the ability to read selectively, to prioritise
information, and to organise oral and written presentations of work. The assessed coursework elements of the programme support
you in your writing skills: they help you to write concisely, and to argue your case clearly.
Personal effectiveness: time-keeping and time-management are important to the successful completion of the programme, and
the ability to manage several projects at the same time will be a skill you gain through organising different course readings and
written assignments. Throughout the programme, as you engage in class discussions, produce critical writing, and plan your
research for essays and your dissertation, you will build up your flexibility, open-mindedness, self-discipline, and self-motivation.
Communication skills: written and oral communication skills are vital elements in the programme. In seminars, you will refine your
ability to engage in debate, which entails careful listening as well as speaking. You will also gain formal presentation skills. The
construction of arguments in different contexts and within different time-constraints is a major part of academic training. Writing
in critically-sophisticated but clear language in assignments of different lengths is fostered throughout the programme.
Liverpool
ESCR DOCTORAL
GUIDELINES
MA Cinema and Politics
Teamworking and networking: the seminars of an MA degree have a variety of structures. They involve a high proportion of
collaborative learning: the ability to work with others on shared problems or to debate alternative viewpoints is constantly
developed. Some taught options also involve group projects, involving more in-depth co-operation on a presentation or on a
written assignment. Building up networks of contacts is also a key professional skill that the sheer breadth of teaching at the
Institute facilitates. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/studying/masters/degrees/ma_archaeology/skills
• qualitative analytical and critical contextual skills
• skills in research planning
• organisation and project based analytical skills
• advanced written and oral communication skills
• advanced information literacy skills.
http://www.liv.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught_courses/cinema-and-politics-ma.htm
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/_images/Postgraduate_Training_and_Development_Guidelines_tcm8-2660.pdf
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