Perkins IV Consortium Application FY12 (2011-2012) COVER SHEET NORTHEAST METRO

Perkins IV Consortium Application FY12 (2011-2012)
COVER SHEET
NORTHEAST METRO
Please complete the following:
CARL PERKINS - Secondary
Contact Person: Deanne DeGraff
Address: 3300 Century Ave North
CARL PERKINS - Postsecondary
Contact Person: Mary Klein
Address: 3300 Century Ave. North
White Bear Lake, MN 55110
Phone: 651-415-4610 FAX: 651-415-5515
E-Mail: [email protected]
White Bear Lake, MN 55110
Phone: 651-779-5790
FAX: 651-415-5779
E-Mail: [email protected]
CARL PERKINS - Secondary
Fiscal Agency: Northeast Metro 916
Business Manager: Kristine Carr
Address: 2540 East County Road F
CARL PERKINS - Postsecondary
Fiscal Agency: Century College
Business Manager: Patrick Opatz
Address: 3300 Century Ave. North
White Bear Lake, MN 55110
Phone: 651-415-5650 FAX:651-415-5510
E-Mail: [email protected]
*District # 916
District Type_________
White Bear Lake, MN 55110
Phone: 651-773-3279FAX:______________
E-Mail: [email protected]
(*for electronic payment purposes)
District/Agency Name/College Name
Secondary
Type &
Number
Century College
Centennial
Columbia Heights
Fridley
#12
#13
#14
North Branch
#138
St. Anthony
#282
Mounds View
#621
North Saint Paul
#622
South Washington County
#833
Stillwater
# 834
Spring Lake Park
#16
Roseville
#623
White Bear Lake
#624
Forest Lake
#831
Mahtomedi
#832
(*Use extra rows or sheets if necessary)
Chisago
#2144
Northeast Metro Career and Technical Center
#916
Paladin Charter School
Chisago
#2144
Northeast Metro Career and Technical Center
#916
Paladin Charter School
Consortium Plan Summary Narrative
1. Describe how the career and technical education programs will be carried out with the funds received. [Sec.134 (b)(1)]There will be continued support
of state approved programs with appropriately vocationally licensed teachers who are focused on the grant goals. The overall consortium goals and
strategies in each major grant goal area will guide individual member district strategies. We have our leaders, a leadership team, and member
organization representatives who oversee our programs. The Consortium Leadership Team provides oversight.
2. Describe how career and technical education activities supported by Perkins funds will assist the consortium in meeting State and local adjusted levels
of performance. [Sec. 134 (b)(2)]
Data indicators and state negotiated targets have been defined with those in need of attention identified and they will be the focus of consortium goals.
More discussion, planning and action about the data may affect the results in a positive way. The goals direct consortium initiatives, as well as
individual district activities considering the overall consortium data, and individual strengths and weaknesses of programs.
3. Describe how students participating in CTE, are provided programs of sufficient size, scope and quality that include academic and technical education
components through a coherent sequence of courses with rigorous content aligned with challenging standards, and that CTE students are taught to the
same challenging academic standards expected for all students. [Sec. 135 (b)(8)]
The viability of programs with sufficient size and scope has been affected by school budgets and funding. A coherent sequence of courses is enhanced
with the programs offered through the Career and Technical Center to its member districts. Quality is being guided by the Program of Study
initiatives. Differentiation and accommodations in curriculum address student ability levels and academic standards. Rigorous standards are
reinforced with the emphasis on the integrated academics.
The Career and Technical Center (CTC) programs have two required advisory meetings per year—usually shared with the college. The consortium
has a joint advisory committee that meets twice per year. All approved programs across the member district schools have representation. The
committee agendas considers skills certification, standards, and assessments seeking the input of the business and industry members. Some district
programs have own advisory committees. All Century CTE programs include an advisory committee which meets a minimum of twice a year.
4. Describe how students are provided with strong experience in, and understanding of, all aspects of the industry. [Sec.134 (b)(3)(C)]
The activities of the consortium include all aspects of the industry (AAI)— works skills days, student organizations, fieldtrips, tours, Career Day,
community service, and professional development. In addition, as students from both the secondary and post secondary participate in the programs of
study, individual planning for the future includes career exploration. This may include utilizing the GPS life plan as an organizing tool for the
students’ planning. Exploration also occurs in transition workshops provided at the secondary level.
5. Describe how comprehensive professional development for appropriate personnel promotes integration of standards as described in Item 3, above.
[Sec.135 (c)(8)]
The professional development activities are planned around the primary goals of the Perkins grant; POS, integration of academics, transition to post
secondary or work. There are connections drawn between the activities with reinforcement of the major concepts at all of them. Participants are asked
to reflect and engage in the new learning. The emphasis on academic standards has moved to the forefront with the new enhanced focus on the data
indicators related to 1S1 and 1S2. The TSA focus enhances the programs of study and helps to validate the integration of standards in the CTE
curriculum. Continuous program improvement is supported through the staff development supported activities.
6. Describe efforts to improve the recruitment and retention of technical teachers, faculty, counselors (including individuals in groups underrepresented
in the teaching profession) and the transition to teaching from business and industry. [Sec.135 (b)(5)(A-D)]
The CTC continues with a district sponsored mentor program that works closely with the CTE teachers for three years. There are also curriculum and
staff development specialists who are brought in on a as needed basis to assist teachers with instructional planning and strategies. In addition,
professional learning communities (PLC’s) are ongoing to assist with instructional strategies and identification of student learning. The college also
has a new faculty institute to help acclimate, and ultimately retain, new faculty. Mentor relationships are set up matching new hires to UFT
representatives or department chairs. Recruitment of underrepresented into the teaching profession remains a challenge for both entities. At the
college increased efforts are in place to communicate vacant positions to underrepresented populations. Diversity appreciation is part of the orientation
for the search committees, and Century has added a welcoming communication on its webpage to encourage diversity of applicants to open positions
7. Describe the data analysis and process that will be used to evaluate student performance and continuously improve programs. List technical skill
assessments you have chosen to use for each state-approved program of study for which assessments have been identified. [Sec.134 (b)(7)]
The consortium leadership continues to analyze math test data—MCA results, Accuplacer, and math content in CTE programs. A self developed math
assessment related to the grad test and Accuplacer is used at the CTC pre and post test to help to validate the math supported in the CTC programs. An
online math programs and math lessons is used as a part of an accepted math intervention. The math coach will reach out to the college programs and
member district CTE teachers next year. The math initiatives have been secondary/postsecondary collaborative efforts. The TSAs used in FY11 were:
AYES-Automotive Technology; NOCTI-Law Enforcement, Medical Careers and Computer and Support Specialist, Accounting (consortium school
and Century College). The math coach has spear headed the implementation of the TSA program. We continue to work with our members for better
comprehension of the grant indicators. Data analysis takes place with the leadership, at member meetings, and through summer institutes.
8. Describe how evaluation of the POS process affects the planning outcomes. [Sec. 135 (b)(1)]
As a result of our POS process, we have a POS coordinator in each member district responsible to build a POS for each pathway from their district
courses. The coordinators received training and will continue to update and maintain POS information. This year we will begin to develop our
consortium implementation plan for adoption of the POS process. The counselors and career specialists are critical stakeholders in implementing the
use of POS among students and parents. The POS development process has led to ongoing communications among postsecondary and secondary
staff. It has also led to the expansion of the roles of our advisory committees.
Goal 1: Designing & Implementing Programs of Study: Goals, Objectives and Strategies
Topics Required for Inclusion
Program of Study (POS) Design and Implementation – It is recommended that each
consortia have at least 1 POS in each career field. POS are encouraged to be
developed in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations [State requirement;
Sec 134 (b) (3) and (b)(8C)]
Secondary teacher and postsecondary faculty and counselor involvement [State
requirement; Sec. 134 (b) (5)]
Professional development needs of teachers and faculty in POS as well as other
programs [Sec. 134 (b) (4)]
Addressing the needs of adult learners through adult basic education and/or noncredit training in Adult Career Pathways [State Plan; Sec. 135 (c)]
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES:
Secondary $126,745.21, Secondary Reserve $37,819.08
Postsecondary $177,431.12, Postsecondary Reserve $39,777
Opportunities for early college credit [Sec. 135. (c) (10)]
Improvement of academic and technical skills of CTE learners [Sec. 134 (b) (3)
Assessment of core technical skills across high school and college that use valid (measures
the content) and reliable (consistent over time and among students) assessments [Sec. 134
(b) (3 B.) and Sec. 135 (c) (19)]
All Aspects of the Industry included in all POS [Sec. 134 (b) (3 C.)]
Goal 1 Narrative: Through collaboration between secondary and postsecondary the NE Metro Consortium will formally implement the use of POS
to provide students information and direction to make sound career and college decisions to attain own career pathways goals. This will include the
presentation of adult career pathways. Technical skills attainment will grow with the 2011-12 plan. Research of Best Practices and support for
curriculum and professional development will be used to address these goals.
Objective(s)
1-1 Every CTE program in the
Career and Technical Center
(CTC) and member districts
has a POS that has been
developed, is on the MNPOS
website, and aligns with a
college POS. Every Career and
Technical program in the
college has a POS.
Strategies
1-1-1 One individual from the CTC and each
member district serves as its POS coordinator.
1-1-2 Provide a coordinator of the Consortium
POS system.
1-1-3 Support curriculum development for POS
that address Perkins indicators and goals for
Outcomes and Measures (FY12)
1-1-1 Five of 16 POS coordinators complete a POS
for all pathways.
All member districts have completed a POS for every
pathways for which they have a CTE respective
course.
1-1-2 All CTC programs are included in member
district POS’s on the MNPOS website
Programs of study have been completed in member
schools in 100% of situations where applicable CTE
courses exist.
1-1-3 18 participants are supported by the consortium
to attend these national events.
Projected
Budget by
Objective
Secondary
$155,811.62
Actual Secondary
Goal 1
$126,745.21
Secondary
Reserve:
$39,606.00
Secondary
Reserve
$37,819.02
integration of academics and CTE through
professional development opportunities (NTPN,
Careers Conference, SREB, ACTE, state
organizational meetings/conferences).
Secondary staff participated in the following national
conferences:
19 SREB High Schools That Work
2 NCPN National Career Pathways Network
2 Wisconsin Careers Conference
8 ACTE
Members of the secondary/postsecondary Perkins
Leadership Team attended the Perkins webinars as a
group in September and October. The joint
attendance, with several new members, provided an
opportunity to clarify concepts.
Klein, Castillo, Gross, Rystrom, DeGraff, and
Sowles attended the state CTE leadership meeting in
November.
Klein, Ruhland, and McBride Bibby attended the
Technical Skills Assessment meeting in St. Cloud in
February.
A post-secondary team of Klein, McBride-Bibby,
and Castillo attended the National Career Cluster
Institute in June in Washington DC.
1-1-4 Formalize the process of updating and
publishing the POS for Century programs.
1-1-4 The process of collecting and keeping current
the POS at the college level will be documented.
Perkins was represented with two members of
Century’s Program Information Group (PIG
Committee). This group re-designed the program
guides for each program so each one has a consistent
look and content. A Model Course Sequence for
every award as been created. The course offerings
catalog is being developed and will be published in
fall 2013.
1-1-5 POS include the appropriate articulation
agreements through the highest possible
educational level in the field.
1-1-5 All programs will include the POS within the
student success plans.
The Model Course Sequences were published on
Century’s website in June 2012. A link to the
documents in placed on each program’s website.
1-1-6 Integrate the college POS within the
coursework and student success plans of each
program.
1-1-6 MnSCU website reflects current, relevant,
articulation agreements.
The agreements are on the MnSCU websites and are
Post Secondary
Reserve
$39,777
Post Secondary
Reserve
$39777
Post Secondary
$142,680
Post Secondary
$142,680
Lehet present at
NCPN on math
being extensively used in ITT 1020, MKT Principles,
OFFT- CAPL, VCT, and ENGR 1020.
1-1-7 Math presentation submitted for
presentation at NCPN.
1-1-7 Presentation at NCPN.
The Consortium math coach and collaboration
coordinator presented at the NCPN Conference on
the identification and integration of math
competencies in CTE programs.
1-1-8 Involve business in the development and
maintenance of POS through advisory
committee.
1-1-8 A minimum of one meeting per career field
area is held.
Each program at the Career and Technical Center has
2 advisory meetings per year. Several of the
programs in member districts have individual
advisory committees that meet at least 2 times per
year. The Consortium has a joint advisory
committee that meets 2 times per year. Over 150
people attended joint advisory meetings. POS are an
agenda item at each advisory meeting.
Century utilizes its advisory committees to ensure
alignment with employers’ needs for competent,
high-performing employees who enter the workforce
with both technical expertise and fundamental jobsuccess knowledge. The advisory committees are
active and engaged. Many of the programs consult
the advisory committee members outside of meetings
as well.
1-1-9 Utilize the business and industry review
of POS to identify gaps in offerings at the
course or program level. Inclusion of all aspects
of the industry is essential.
1-1-9 New courses and/or programs are developed as
identified.
A new PLTW program with a STEM focus was
established in White Bear Lake. The Perkins
Consortium supported the effort with grants and
advisory capacity.
Century’s program advisory committees review the
POS’s and make recommendations for curriculum
updates annually.
 Based on worker need information, Century
designed an HIT Program, but it was denied.
 Century worked to unite the Law
Enforcement Community in Minnesota,




creating a panel of experts to take part in the
DACUM process. Century hosted a
successful DACUM, which reviewed and
updated the core competencies by
completing a comprehensive Task Analysis
for Law Enforcement. The Law
Enforcement Program at Century is working
with Peggy Strand and Neil Melton (POST
Board) and Mylan Masson (Hennepin Tech
Skills) to plan and execute a three phase
process:
o Phase I: Complete a comprehensive
Task Analysis for Law Enforcement.
(Completed in FY12)
o Phase 2: Review and revise
learning objectives that can be
measured through skill attainment
and have statewide applicability
.(Planned for FY13.)
o Phase 3: Develop rubrics to help
with the measureable part of the
objectives and also create
opportunities for curriculum
development and instructor training.
A committee was formed to re-design
Century’s Public Safety Program. The
results of the work will be submitted to the
Academic Affairs and Standards Committee
in Fall 2012.
Digital photography has become increasingly
complex in regards to equipment and post
processing. Century’s VCT department
compiled a panel of experts and hosted a
DACUM, in partnership with Hennepin
Tech, and completed a comprehensive Task
Analysis for a Digital Technologist.
The AST and Welding instructor
collaborated to develop a revised version of
the course: Introduction to Oxyacetylene
Welding.
Within the Crime Analysis Certificate

Program, (NEW- CIP created in 2010), a
faculty member is delivering the courses
both live and via Adobe Connect. Many
people that take this program are from small
LE offices around the state. They are
currently administrators or dispatchers, but
can do this work if they have the education.
As a result of an iPad trial, the EMS advisory
committee approved requiring iPads for the
program commencing Fall 2012. The
paramedic faculty supported the advisory
Committee’s recommendation.
1-1-10 Continue annual articulated college
credit meetings
1-1-10 Increase the participation in POS meetings by
10% (FY11=49).
48 staff participated in articulation and POS meetings
in fy12. Two meetings were held to review and
update articulation agreements.
1-1-11 All member districts develop and
enhance Programs of Study for all of the
Pathways.
1-1-11 15 Member districts have completed their
initial development of POS for all Pathways.
All member districts have completed their
development of POS’s. All have either been entered
into the MnSCU website, or were ready for
uploading at the time the site was closed.
1-2 Secondary teachers,
postsecondary faculty, and
counselors collaborate in the
development of an
implementation model to
promote utilization of POS.
1-2-1 Develop a model with strategies, timeline
and tools to promote the use of POS; consider
current practices.
1-2-1 List of current practices of POS use.
The Consortium supported the implementation of
POS through inclusion in the registration process in
the member schools. Best practices in the use of
POS are shared at the Consortium representative
meetings.
1-2-2 Develop and provide training tools to
facilitate the use of POS with counselors and
CTE teachers.
1-2-2 Meetings occur to allow for input and
understanding of POS model.
22 Consortium meetings were held with various
stakeholders during the year. Articulation meetings
are joint meetings of secondary and postsecondary.
1-2-3 Develop a timeline with stages of
implementation expectations for POS use.
1-2-3 Training for member district Perkins
representatives and college support services is
delivered and evaluated.
Each member district has a Perkins representative
and a POS coordinator. The representatives meet 4
times per year. The coordinators meet as a group
once per year, and then as needed with the Perkins
collaboration coordinator.
1-2-4 Encourage and support POS related best
practice projects and dissemination.
1-2-4 Record each district’s progress on
implementation timeline.
Time is allocated at each Perkins representatives
meeting for presentations and discussion of best
practices taking place within the Consortium.
Examples of presentations fy12 are the White Bear
Lake PLTW program, Irondale HS work readiness
program, Apprenticeship Exploration at Oak Grove,
and Building Skills USA at Mounds View. Such
exemplary programs are recognized and provided
support for dissemination across the Consortium.
1-2-5 Integrate the POS into the College’s
student success initiatives for new students.
1-2-5 Document the distribution of the POS as part
of the new student initiatives.
The first phase of the POS implementations was the
creation of a uniform program guide for each
program. This was done in conjunction with
Century’s Program Information Group whose
members were drawn from Counseling and Advising,
ITS, Marketing Department, and Postsecondary
Perkins. In FY12, a Model Course Sequence was
designed and completed in conjunction with the
program faculty, for each CTE award at Century.
These were published on the website in June 2012.
Over the summer and this fall, the course offerings
document has been created for each program and will
be published in late fall.
1-2-5 College programs provide evidence of the
integration.
It used extensively in ITT 1020, MKT Principles,
OFFT-CAPL, VCT, and ENGR 1020, having been
integrated into the syllabi of these courses.
1-3 CTE curriculum projects
are reviewed and developed to
encourage POS and integration
of academic into t he classroom
1-3-1POS coordinators continue to support POS
development in the districts.
1-3-1 5 POS coordinators complete a POS for all
pathways.
All schools have developed POSs where applicable
courses exist.
1-3-2 District projects develop POS utilization
and implementation.
1-3-2 A consortium best practices showcase of the
exemplary programming is offered as an Institute
during summer 2012. Presenters are invited to apply
for additional initiative funding for 2013.
35 CTE staff participated in a two-day Institute that
was offered this summer. Best practices were a
highlight of the Institute. Three presentations of
products of our mini grants were shared. Member
district staffs are encouraged/ supported by the
Consortium to replicate successful projects. An RFP
has gone out to persons interested in taking their
programs to the next level.
1-3-3 Professional development (such as
Perkins Summit and Nat. Career Cluster)
highlights Best Practice for integration of POS
plans into coursework and college programs.
1-3-3 College programs provide evidence of the
integration of POS.
At the postsecondary this is a major part of the
content of the annual Perkins Summit, as it is for the
secondary Perkins Institute.
1-3-4 Professional development such as Perkins
Summit includes sharing of Best Practice
regarding the identification and implementation
of new technology- appropriate to the career
field and to education.
1-3-4 Best Practices are shared within the consortium
community.
1-3-4 Integration plans are published and presented.
The Perkins Summit was held this year on May15
and 16. 21 Postsecondary faculty, 6 Perkins staff and
3 CTE academic deans attended. Presentations and
sharing of Best Practices included:
 The Northeast Perkins Consortium Prezi.
 Introduction of the NE Perkins Consortium
Team, with each staff member introducing
themselves to the faculty and talking about what
they offer for CTE students.
 Data Driven Decisions presentation by Debra
Hsu.
 Report out from the iPad Project-what we
learned and sharing of Best Practices.




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

Perkins impact – Performance Indicators, TLC
funding, Conferences, DACUM projects, and
Softchalk support.
D2L update – new tools for faculty
Adobe Connect Project – Intelligence and Crime
Analysis Certificate Program
Best Practice – Work Keys in OFF- impact and
applications to other programs
Best Practice - Erick the Math Guy-contextual
math in CTE – services available to CTE
programs
Best Practice – The new and improved eFolio
and GPS Lifeplan
Scott Simenson – ITT Program Chair – “The
New Normal” - where technology is going.
1-4 Technical skill attainment
(TSA) and academic
integration are the major
focuses for curriculum and staff
development for the Perkins
year.
1-4-1 Technical Skill assessment is incorporated
in consortium CTE programs and continued at
the CTC including assessment of basic
technologies essential to the Career Field.
1-4-1 Three CTC programs use TSA and report
results and three consortium programs implement
TSA.
The following CTC programs offered technical skills
assessments:
Medical Careers
Foods
Auto Technology
Child Development
EMT
Law Enforcement
Computer Design
1-4-2 Approved POS stakeholders decide on the
implementation of TSA to CTE concentrators.
1-4-2 Instrument, process, and timeline are
documented for TSA.
A process for TSA implementation has been initiated
for member district high schools. It was
implemented by two schools:
Tartan HS
Accounting
Irondale HS
Work Readiness
1-4-3 Develop a TSA implementation plan for
each member district for each of the MnSCU
approved TSA areas.
1-4-3 15 member district TSA implementation plans
are approved by the consortium. TSA’s are
administered to concentrators in applicable program
areas.
The plan had been put on hold with the emphasis
placed on the completion of POSs.
1-4-4 The TSA implementation plan extends to
the appropriate college programs.
1-4-4 Implementation of the TSA tests are
administered, results reviewed, and recommended
changes made.
A CTEDDI initiated plan between the VCT college
course and the Design CTC course entailed the
piloting of Adobe certification tests resulting in the
awarding of credit. 4 secondary students completed
the test & 1 passed.
1-5 Communications within the
15 member districts and with
the college is improved
regarding CTE issues, i.e.
licensure, standards,
curriculum and program
review to ensure programs are
in compliance with state
regulations and
recommendations, and data
reporting programs.
1-5-1 Provide CTE program leadership
throughout the Consortium to ensure that
Perkins and state CTE rules and regulations are
met.
1-5-1 All member districts will have regular
representation at Perkins consortium meetings,
including SRC meetings for members of the
Intermediate, to be considered for access to
leadership funds.
Participation in Perkins activities give member
districts/schools head-up on the design and support
for development of initiative grants. We have had
90% member district attendance at Perkins
representative meetings.
1-5-2 Establish and maintain a collegial team
approach among member district representatives
for shared consideration of CTE issues and
initiatives.
1-5-2 16 of 16 district member representatives attend
100% of consortium meetings.
There has been an effort to involve all member
districts in consortium meetings. We have averaged
85% attendance at representative meetings.
1-5-3 Establish core teacher/faculty/staff group
as advisors to the program leadership team.
1-5-4 Establish a communication plan
including technology as a resource to provide
access to both internal and external
stakeholders.
1-5-3 Meeting minutes will be available.
Staff members have been used in an advisory
capacity to Consortium initiatives, such as network
planning, advisory committee meeting planning,
student organization retreat development, and
professional development workshop design. A
survey was conducted of professional development
offerings this summer.
1-5-4 Brief survey pre and post to determine the
utilization and satisfaction with the communication
plan.
Preliminary development of a website took place.
However, it was not completed, nor launched.
Monthly Northeast Metro Perkins Team meetings
were held throughout the school year. Minutes are
available.
A Perkins Prezi was created and presented to the
Vice Presidents and Deans at the college.
Use of Funds: Highlight or Bold the
required and permissible activities
addressed above ( “R” for required
and “P” for permissible).
Required
R1 Academic Integration
R9 Special Populations
P4 Additional Special Populations
R2 Programs of Study
R10 Collaboration
P5 Student Organizations
R3 All Aspects of an Industry
R11 Articulation
P6 Mentoring/Support Services
R4 Develop/Improve/Expand the
use of Technology
P7 Equipment
Leasing/Purchasing/Upgrading
R5 Professional Development
Permitted
P8 Teacher Preparation
R6 Assessment
P1 Advisory Committees
P9 Alternative Formats
R7 Initiate/Improve/Modernize
Technology
P2
Counseling
P10 Student Transition
R8 Size/Scope/Quality
P3 Work-Based Experiences
P11 Entrepreneurship
Goal 2: Effectively Utilize Employer, Community, and Education Partnerships
All Aspects of the Industry, including work-based experiences and internships [Sec.
134 (b) (3 C.)]
Program advisory committees involved in identifying high-skill, high-wage, or highdemand occupations within the region [Sec.134. (b)(8 C.)]
Program advisory committees that are involved in continuous program improvement
and are established consortium-wide, where feasible, including movement to joint
secondary-postsecondary advisory committees [Sec. 134 (b)(5)]
Partnerships with other initiatives or providers that support transitions for high school
and adult students. Examples: ABE, business, labor, WorkForce Centers,
customized training, programming conducted under NCLB, and alternative high
school programs (Area Learning Centers, alternative high schools, charter schools,
etc.) [Sec. 135 (b)(5)]
Collaboration that leads to improving CTE programs (e.g., Work Force Center, nonprofits, service organization, Chambers) [Sec.134. (b) (5)]
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES:
Secondary $145,994.37
Postsecondary $110,335.62
Goal 2 Narrative: The consortium will continue to build on the effectiveness of the advisory committee structure as directed by the new state
framework. Through the advisory committees and student organizations, the consortium will provide opportunities for students and faculty to
become involved in contextual workplace activities, business/industry practice, and with other external stakeholder groups regarding technical
skills, standards, and opportunities.
Objective(s)
Strategies
Outcomes and Measures (FY12)
Projected
Budget by
Objective
2-1 Contextual learning
experiences in CTE classes are
increased by enhancing the
knowledge and skills of staff
through opportunities to become
involved in contextual workplace
activities.
2-1-1 Provide resources and professional
development for a CTE curriculum plan for each
member district which is built around the local
standards that have been adopted.
2-1-1 25 member district staff participate in the
summer institute.
35 CTE staff members participated in the 2-day
summer institute.
2-1-1 100 staff participate in the educator
industry tours.
112 staff participated in Industry Tours for
Educators.
2-1-1 Five teachers participate in regional, state,
and national professional development activities.
600 students are affected in the programs for
which the teachers are trained. #4 & #5
The Consortium sponsored the attendance of 31
staff to national conferences, excluding
attendance at national student youth organization
conferences. 54 staff participated in state
conferences, excluding the state Pathways
conference.
2-1-2 Develop and expand staff opportunities for
increasing technical skills and industry
knowledge through CTE professional
development conferences and experiences.
2-1-2 Three staff per member high school will
attend the state Best Practices Conference.
51 Consortium members participated in the
Conference.
2-1-3 Provide funds for Perkins leadership to
attend CTE and Perkins related conferences and
to join professional associations.
2-1-3 Consortium is represented at all
MDE/MnSCU Perkins/CTE conferences and
meetings.
The Consortium was represented by at least 2
leadership staff at all MDE/MnSCU called
events. In addition it was represented at
MACTA and MnACTE meetings.
 Members of the Perkins Team attended the
Perkins webinars together as a group in
September and October.
 Klein, Castillo, Gross, Rystrom, DeGraff,
and Sowles attended the State CTE Meeting
in November.
Sec.
$161,058.60
Secondary
$145,994.37
Post SEC
$113,376
Post Sec.
Actual:
$110,335.62


2-1-4 Develop a program guide for member
district use in developing work-based learning
options using our extensive advisory committee
structure.
Klein, Ruhland, and McBride Bibby
attended the Technical Skills Assessment
meeting in St. Cloud in February.
A postsecondary team of Klein, McBrideBibby, and Castillo attended the National
Career Cluster Institute.
2-1-4 Work-based learning staff meet at least
twice per year to network in the implementation
of the guide. Each of the 15 districts has
appointed a representative to the planning
committee.
The work-based network met once during the
year. The Consortium facilitates the first
meeting per year of the networks and then relies
on the to call any additional meetings. 14
coordinators participated in the initial meeting.
2-2 Advisory committees, formed
to gain input on business and
industry technology and work
behavior needs in the CTE
program areas, are expanded to a
collaborative model with sources
in and outside the CTE system
including but not limited to:
parents, students, district staff and
administration, Business and
Industry, labor, and special
populations.
2-2-1 Review CTE approved course curriculum
to recommend upgrades and/or purchase of
industry-standard software, equipment and
instructional materials.
2-2-1 Equipment purchases recorded on a district
inventory and tagged as Perkins Grant
purchased.
All equipment that is purchased has received
prior approval and must meet criteria of being
CTE specific and not supplanting. Upon receipt
all equipment is permanently marked as being
purchased with Perkins funds. In addition, it
must appear on both the Consortium and district
inventories.
2-2-2 Organize a consortia-wide advisory
committee with broad representation of labor and
business organizations.
2-2-2 Minimum of 2 meetings per year with at
least 50% of membership outside of education.
2 joint advisory committee meetings are held.
There is a planning committee that guides the
development of the agenda. Every CTE licensed
staff person is required to put 2 community
members on the advisory committee. Although
we strive for at least a 50/50 split of
staff/business attendance, we are experiencing
approximately 67/33. We continue to work on
our business representative attendance. We also
give a significant role in the advisory meetingst
to our student organization leadership.
2-2-3 Support CTC program participation with
college advisory committees.
2-2-3 100% of CTC programs participate in
Century advisory committee meetings. #1
All 10 CTC programs with parallel college
programs attend their respective college advisory
committees. Two other CTC programs attend
other college committees. 100% of the
committees have business industry
representatives.
2-2-4 Advisory committee training is provided
at the 2-day summer Institutes.
The state Advisory Committee Manual is
distributed to all committees and is used in
training.
2-2-4 Provide training for advisory committee
staff and coordinators
2-3 Transitions for high school
and adult students are created
through collaboration and
partnerships with such
organizations as Workforce
Centers, Chambers of Commerce,
ABE, ALC’s, and charter schools.
2-2-5 Create business and industry partnerships
in member districts. Support partnerships with
resources for their meetings.
2-2-5 Five member districts create partnerships
that have met at least twice and have submitted
an action plan to the consortium.
8 districts had programs with individual advisory
committees in addition to the Consortium Joint
Advisory Committee.
2-3-1 Coordinate a Career Day for member
district sophomore students.
2-3-1 650 students participate in a Career Day.
Approximately 1,200 students participated in
Career Days activities—either in the Day
sponsored by the Consortium or those in their
districts.
2-3-2 Support service learning projects in CTE
programs.
2-3-2 Establish baseline data on number of
projects and participants.
238 projects took place in the member schools.
2-3-3 Expose all transition students to employers
and transition activities through participation in
Work Skills Days. Provide transition services for
all students.
2-3-3 300 students participate in Work Skills
Days. Ten career specialists have developed and
implemented transition services for all seniors in
their high schools.
All students receiving special education services
have completed transition plans.
2-3-4 Participate in Workforce Investment
Act/DEED and local area Chamber of Commerce
committees.
2-3-4 Consortium representatives to the WIB’s
Education Committee and local chambers will
attend meetings and report back to the
Leadership Group.
The secondary Perkins director and the
postsecondary Perkins grant director belong on
the Washington County and Ramsey County
education committees of their WIBs.
2-4 All Aspects of Industry
activities will be infused into
learner experiences to enhance
student understanding.
2-4-1Provide funds for fieldtrips, work
experiences and student organizations to increase
students’ experiences and understanding of AAI.
2-4-1 100% of member organizations provide
opportunity for students to learn about AAI
through community-based experiences, including
student organization activities, fieldtrips and
shadowing.
31 member student organizations are supported
in the Consortium. 660 students participate in
those organizations. AAI is a part of the
curriculum in all of the program related classes.
63 career fieldtrips took place—2,657 students
participated. 711 students participated in a job
shadow.
2-4-2 College field trips, service learning
opportunities and internships will be expanded
specifically in POS areas.
2-4-2 Participants from three career fields avail
themselves of these experiences.
AST--auto students toured Lexus in White Bear
Lake. Lexus approves of our curriculum and
likes our graduates. A number of students were
able to obtain part-time work experience as they
completed their program.
Interior Design imbeds a Service Learning
Assignment within INTD 2030 Design Sales.
The student puts in 16 hours at Bridging Inc., a
resource for underprivileged people to furnish
her homes. Students help them make the best
decisions possible, acting as their personal
shopper to help them select large and small
furniture pieces. They may be working with
clients who cannot speak English, can’t make up
their mind, or have just had a bad day, just like
real clients. It is an excellent experience in
determination, creativity and problem solving.
OFFT – Medical Office Assistant – HSCI 1000 –
Introduction to Medical Careers – Service
Learning is imbedded as an assignment. Student
must perform 20 hours in a volunteer setting in
places like the American Red Cross, Hospitals,
or respite care.
Thompson-Reuters was on campus to promote
internships in 5 specialties as part of the UNITE
Program.
2-4-2 Develop consistent process for service
learning and internship experiences
2-4-3 Facilitate additional interactions between
students and industry such as ITT panel, VCT
lecture series
2-5 Communications within the 15
member districts and with the
college is improved regarding
CTE issues, i.e. licensure,
standards, curriculum and
program review to ensure
programs are in compliance with
state regulations and
recommendations, and data
reporting programs.
2-5-1 Provide CTE program leadership
throughout the Consortium to ensure that Perkins
and state CTE rules and regulations are met.
2-4-2 Process documentation and suggested
forms will be available.
During program visits,Perkins Coordinator
discussed service learning and internship
experiences with program faculty. A list of
opportunities for students will be generated from
these meetings as a starting point to the process.
2-4-3 Satisfaction surveys regarding the
interactions
An ITT event was planned for June 2012, but
had to be moved to September 2012 because of
conflicts.
2-5-1 All member districts will have regular
representation at Perkins consortium meetings,
including SRC meetings for members of the
Intermediate, to be considered for access to
leadership funds.
Participation in Perkins activities give
districts/schools head-up on the design and
support for development of initiative grants.
2-5-2 Establish and maintain a collegial team
approach among member district representatives
for shared consideration of CTE issues and
initiatives.
2-5-2 16 of 16 district member representatives
attend 100% of consortium meetings.
There has been an effort to involve all member
districts in consortium meetings. We have
averaged 85% attendance at representative
meetings.
2-5-3 Establish core teacher/faculty/staff group
as advisors to the program leadership team.
2-5-3 Meeting minutes will be available.
Meeting minutes are prepared for all Perkins
meetings.
Use of Funds: Highlight or Bold the required and permissible activities addressed above ( “R” for required and “P” for permissible).
Required
R1 Academic Integration
R9 Special Populations
P4 Additional Special Populations
R2 Programs of Study
R10 Collaboration
P5 Student Organizations
R3 All Aspects of an Industry
R11 Articulation
P6 Mentoring/Support Services
R4 Develop/Improve/Expand the use of Technology
P7 Equipment Leasing/Purchasing/Upgrading
R5 Professional Development
Permitted
P8 Teacher Preparation
R6 Assessment
P1 Advisory Committees
P9 Alternative Formats
R7 Initiate/Improve/Modernize Technology
P2 Counseling
P10 Student Transition
R8 Size/Scope/Quality
P3 Work-Based Experiences
P11 Entrepreneurship
Goal 3: Improve Service to Special Populations
Topics Required for Inclusion
Access to and success of students in programs of study nontraditional by gender
[Sec. 134 (b) (10)]
Identification and adoption of strategies and outcomes to overcome barriers for
special populations and increase rates of access and success in CTE programs. [Sec.
134 (b) (8 A.) and [Sec. 134 (b) (8 B.)]
High-Skill, High-Wage or High-Demand occupations that lead to self-sufficiency
[Sec. 134 (b) (8 C.)]
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES:
Secondary $49,679.16
Postsecondary $96,620.40
Plan showing connections to local, regional and state wide initiatives that support
special populations, e.g. STEM Equity Pipeline, Employment First, etc. Sec.134 (b)
(3) (8A &B)]
Description of how individuals in special populations will not be discriminated against
based upon their status. [Sec. 134 (b) (9)]
Plan showing that expectations are consistent for all learners in high school and
college including members of special populations [Sec. 134 (b) (3)]
Goal 3 Narrative: The consortium will continue to emphasize access to and success of students in nontraditional programs, special populations, and
underserved students through curriculum modifications and accommodations, direct services including individual completion of POS, and events such as
Career Days, Young Women’s Conference, and STEM events.
Objective(s)
Strategies
Outcomes and Measures (FY12)
Projected
Budget by
Objective
3-1 Special population students
are provided opportunities for
career exploration and technical
skill training with equipment and
materials in CTE programs are
modified as appropriate to allow
participation of learners with
disabilities.
3-1-1 Provide programs for special needs
students with curriculum modification,
accommodations, equipment/materials and
support services.
3-1-1 25 staff participate in a summer institute
where curriculum modification and best
practices are addressed.
35 staff participated in the summer institute.
Best practices were shared. Topics of the 2-day
event included discussion of student organization
development for special needs programs. Nontraditional programming was discussed in terms
of the Consortium’s need to develop and
improvement plan. Other topics included
CTEDDI, POS, TSAs, legislation, and
MCIS/GPS.
One-on-one resume help at Century:
Fy11 166
Fy12 270
Career Sevices provides presentations such as
resumes, teamwork, interviewing, and various
GPS topics, as well as working with individual
students on resumes, job applications and job
searches.In addition she runs and participates in
a number of career-related events.
 Visited 33 classrooms, presenting to 497
students.
 Presented 11 GPS workshops to 64 students
 270 individual appointments with students
 Presented 8 Student Success Day Workshops
to 123 students
 Presented 3 workshops at Welcome Days to
36 students
 Presented at Young Women’s and Young
Men’s events
 Presented at Century Open House
 Planned and executed the Business Etiquette
Dinner – 51 students
 Co-chair of Career Day (Century/916 CTC).
Managed Industry Career Exhibit (38
industry professionals– 400+ high school
sophomores from NE Metro consortium
attended.)
 Partner in MnSCU Job Fair – 40 Century
students attended
Secondary
$55,269.20
Secondary
Actual:
$49,679.16
Post SEC
$110,824
Post
Secondary
Actual:
$96,620.40
3-1-2 Expose students to employers and
transition activities through participation in Work
Skills Day.
3-1-2 300 students participate in Work Skill
Days.
Three Work Skills Days were held. All member
districts participated with the exception of four
in the northwest quadrant of the Counsortium.
Approximately 250 students participated.
3-1-3 Include special populations in career
development activities that are created for all
students, including career plan development.
3-1-3 All special population students have
completed a career plan utilizing MCIS and
Naviance as resources.
MCIS and GPS are available to all member
districts without cost. Naviance is utilized by 11
member districts in their career planning.
3-1-4 Implementation of POS system will
include special population students.
3-1-4 Special population transition plans include
POS for potential career exploration.
All students receiving special education services
have a transition plan that includes POS.
3-1-5 Provide opportunities for special
population students to explore careers through
work-based learning options.
3-1-5 Special population students in ten member
districts have career plans that specify workbased learning students have had and are
planned.
All member districts have transtion plans,
including career planning, for special education
students.
3-2 Assist special populations,
including adult learners, in their
transition from classroom to
career.
3-2-1 Provide direct services to students in the
areas of resume and cover letter development,
job search resources and interviewing skills.
3-2-1 Establish baseline data regarding number
of
students served. Increase the number of students
served by 10% over the baseline.
Approximately 250 students were engaged in
programs which provide job seeking/keeping
skills as a part of their work experience classes.
3-2-2 Partner with outside agencies including
area workforce centers and community work
readiness programs to offer placement, industry
information and resources to students through
functioning career centers.
3-2-2 Establish baseline data regarding number
of students served. Increase the number of
served through these partnerships by 10% over
the baseline. Career specialists document
specific strategies that are provided to special
population students.
3-2-3 Partner with Workforce Centers to explore
Work Keys certification as part of the transition
planning using office technology as a pilot.
3-2-3 Pilot group of students completes
coursework and WorkKeys certification
The Work Keys Certification test was
administered to the OFFT Capstone class in the
spring. The program chair presented the process
and results to Century CTE faculty at the Perkins
Summit in May 2012. The NOCTI Work
Readiness assessment was used at Irondale HS.
3-2-4 Increase the Etiquette Dinner’s(or similar
initiative) impact to assist special populations in
their transitions through the expansion of
opportunities to the CTE H. S. seniors and
partnering with area businesses.
3-2-4 Increase number of students served by
10% and area business representation by 25%.
Increase the ratio of secondary to postsecondary
participants.
Six CTC students were given the opportunity to
attend as a reward for volunteering at the Young
Women’s Conference and Career Day.
Fy11 – 55 students, 4 businesses
Fy12 – 51 students, 5 businesses
Increase in student attendance not accomplished.
This was due to amount of money allocated for
the event.
3-3 Students are provided with
exposure to non-traditional
training and employment
information as a part of each
school’s career development
curriculum and services and
encouraged to participate in nontraditional CTE programs.
3-3-1 Provide resources for CTE staff and
advisors with professional development
opportunities regarding the participation in nontraditional programs.
3-3-1 The Perkins rep and one other participant
from each member district will attend a one-day
workshop provided by the consortium on gender
equity.
College staff will participate in professional
development specific to gender equity.
Several members of the Northeast Metro
Consortium Leadership team participated in the
webinar “How Gender Stereotypes Influence
Emerging Career Aspirations.” Then at the
Perkins Team Meeting on January 30, 2012, the
webinar information was shared and discussed.
3-3-2 Infuse awareness activities within the
curriculum (fieldtrips, job shadows, career fair,
and class speakers) and in program registration
recruitment.
3-3-2 Increase the number of non-traditional
participants in CTE classes to 60% (6S1).
Number actually decreased. We are developing
interventions to remediate.
3-3-2 6S1 Non-traditional consortium score will
increase by 5%.
Not accomplished.
3-3-3 Capitalize on NorthSTAR STEM and
other STEM initiatives to promote nontraditional career with emphasis on adults.
3-3-3 Document resources utilized in STEM and
other non-traditional initiatives including student
satisfaction.
 Dean Bell did a held an Allied Health Event
in June 2012 for the Latino Community.
 Dean Bell did a presentation at Scrubs Camp
at Augsburg College in June.
 EMS career event for Hispanic Community.
3-3-3 Promote non-traditional with conferences
such as Young Women’s Conference and a
Young Men’s Activity.
3-3-3 Increase non-traditional career options at
the Young Women’s Conference. Increase
diversity of participants.
A strategic plan was put in place to increase nontraditional participation (economically
disadvantaged and students of color) for the
Young Women’s Event.
 Offer fee-waivers to qualified students(those
eligible for free and reduced school lunches).

Target schools that have college readiness
programs in place, specifically utilizing the
list of career specialists in the consortium
high schools.)
 Research educational equity offices and
programs within our consortium.
 Prioritize registration for new attendees.
To increase and diversify non-traditional career
options:
 Worked with institutional research to collect
data during the registration process
 Redid the conference schedule to make it
more presenter friendly
The session offerings were revised, and 7 of the
25 sessions offered were new. Over 200 girls
attended.
25 students from the Dental Assisting Program at
Century and 6 secondary students from the
Career and Tech Center, served as student
volunteers guiding the groups from session to
session.
The keynote speakers were carefully chosen with
a focus on non-traditional students who
described their journey to successful degree
completion.
3-3-4 Conduct staff development regarding the
implementation of non-traditional courses and
services for the Perkins representatives.
3-3-4 Increase the non-traditional data elements.
Non-traditional strategies for programming and
content were a major agenda for the Perkins
Institute that attracted 35 participants.
3-3-5 Develop strategies that enable all students
to choose to access non-traditional career
exploration activities.
3-3-5 Through a survey of career planning
activities conducted by career specialists, 75% of
seniors indicate that they had an opportunity to
explore non-traditional career areas.
120 students reported having had non-traditional
career explorations through shadowings and
fieldtrips.
3-4 Academic and technical
support is provided for special
population students, both in the
classroom and in a work-based
learning environment.
3-4-1 Access vocational evaluation in the
NEMetro 916’s SERVE program for special
population learners.
3-4-1 All 916 member districts address access to
916 SERVE in their local plans.
The 916 SERVE program has been replaced with
PAES. Some of the districts conduct their own
PAES programs, and thus, don’t access 916.
3-4-2 Provide classroom support to assist special
population students in achieving program
expectations that are set for all students.
3-4-2 All CTC programs have access to
education assistants to assist in serving special
population students. General education CTE
staff participate in professional development that
addresses modification and accommodation to
meet special needs.
Three education assistants are assigned to serve
special needs students at the CTC. Inservice
topics includes accommodations and
modifications.
3-4-3 Develop/Improve/Expand the use of
Technology to supplement support for special
population students.
3-4-3 In collaboration with the College Access
Center, document students use of technology and
satisfaction as appropriate.
iPads are used in PAES and have been
introduced in Construction Occupations where
they are used for onsite visual instruction and
math assistance.
The new CTE Career Specialist, whose focus is
students with disabilities worked to get an
overview of our assistive equipment inventory,
on both West Campus, in the College Access
Center and on East Campus in the East
Academic Support Center. To give students on
East (CTE students) access to assistive
equipment on this campus, two Copies of Read:
OutLoud 6 were purchased and installed in the
East Academic Support. This software has textto-speech and other study support features. Two
noise reduction headphone sets were purchase
for use with the software. In addition, a 27-inch
3-5 CTE staff are aware of
resources beyond the school that
are available to support special
population student career
development.
3-5-1 Expose Perkins reps and faculty to
resources that are available through local,
regional and state initiatives, such as STEM
Equity Pipeline, Employment First, Workforce
Centers, etc.
computer monitor for the accessible computer
station was purchase, making it easier for student
using magnification features. Three Live Scribe
Pens and three packets of LiveScribe notebooks
were also purchased.
The CTC specialist is preparing a survey for
students with disabilities to learn more about the
assistive technologies that students are using
here and at home.
3-5-1 One of the respective entities is introduced
at each of the bi-monthly Perkins representative
meetings.
STEM Equity was presented at the summer
institute. Workforce projects are brought to the
meetings.
3-5-1 Develop a resource directory for Perkins
reps and faculty.
Was not completed.
3-5-2 Partner with outside agencies including
area workforce centers and community work
readiness programs to offer placement, industry
information and resources to students.
3-5-2 Local plans show evidence of access to
resources available beyond the schools.
A large number of outside resources not only
participate in the 3 Work Skills Day, but provide
a leadership role in the planning and
implementation of the Days.
3-5-3 Provide access to mainstream student
organizations for students with special needs.
3-5-3 Each student organization will submit an
annual report of participants and activities as a
requirement of receiving consortium grants.
Reports describe increasing levels of
involvement by students with special needs.
Student organization grant awardees are required
to participate in a spring session where the year’s
activities are assessed and input to the next
year’s planning is gathered. This is followed by
a daylong retreat of student organization advisors
who submit grant applications for the next
school year. 690 students participated in student
organizations.
3-6 Communications within the 15
member districts is improved
regarding CTE issues, i.e.
licensure, standards, curriculum
and program review to ensure
programs are in compliance with
state regulations and
recommendations, and data
reporting programs.
3-6-1 Provide CTE program leadership
throughout the Consortium to ensure that Perkins
and state CTE rules and regulations are met.
3-6-1 All member districts will have regular
representation at Perkins consortium meetings 16
of 16 district member representatives attend
100% of consortium meetings, including SRC
meetings for
members of the Intermediate—considered for
access to leadership funds.
Participation in Perkins activities give
districts/schools head-up on the design and
support for development of initiative grants.
3-6-2 Establish and maintain a collegial team
approach among member district representatives
for shared consideration of CTE issues and
initiatives.
1-5-2 16 of 16 district member representatives
attend 100% of consortium meetings.
There has been an effort to involve all member
districts in consortium meetings. We have
averaged 85% attendance at representative
meetings.
Use of Funds: Highlight or Bold the required and permissible activities addressed above ( “R” for required and “P” for permissible).
Required
R1 Academic Integration
R9 Special Populations
P4 Additional Special Populations
R2 Programs of Study
R10 Collaboration
P5 Student Organizations
R3 All Aspects of an Industry
R11 Articulation
P6 Mentoring/Support Services
R4 Develop/Improve/Expand the use of Technology
P7 Equipment Leasing/Purchasing/Upgrading
R5 Professional Development
Permitted
P8 Teacher Preparation
R6 Assessment
P1 Advisory Committees
P9 Alternative Formats
R7 Initiate/Improve/Modernize Technology
P2 Counseling
P10 Student Transition
R8 Size/Scope/Quality
P3 Work-Based Experiences
P11 Entrepreneurship
Goal 4: Provide a Continuum of Service Provision for Enabling Student Transitions
Topics Required for Inclusion
Flexibility in scheduling and formats that provide access for students [Sec. 135 ©
(9)]
Student services that enhance student transition [State Plan]
Continuum of Service Provisions/Brokering with other consortia [State Plan]
Implementation of CSP relative to (a) programs of study; (b) early college credit
opportunities [Sec. 135 (c) (10)]
Transition of adult learners into the workforce [Sec. 135 © (9)]
Improvement of enrollment, retention and completion for military veterans,
underemployed, and unemployed adults [Sec. 135 © (9)]
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES:
Secondary $116,677.34
Postsecondary $90,461.03, Postsecondary Reserve $11,924
Goal 4 Narrative: Continue consortium work with the established collaborative to expand, strengthen and document the continuum of services
which will promote smooth student transitions. College readiness will be a focus of the programming activities which will encourage and
develop district programs and promote partnerships between districts.
Objective(s)
Strategies
Outcomes and Measures (FY12)
Projected
Budget by
Objective
4-1 Academics in the CTE
curriculum, both secondary and
post secondary is a key to the
success of students as they
transition to their next career level.
4-1-1Secondary and post secondary CTE
instructors will review math standards and
identify them in their curriculum.
4-1-2 Math coach provides data to validate the
feasibility for math credit to be given for CTC
program.
4-1-1 One meeting will be coordinated to
review math standards and discuss a process
for identification.
Three meetings were conducted by the math
coach to evaluate how math standards are
imbedded in CTE curriculum. These led to
the development of strategies that have been
shared across the Consortium. The math
coach has also consulted to several of the
member district schools.
4-1-2 One school agrees to give math credit
for participation in the CTC programs.
Information was presented to the 916 School
Relations Committee (SRC) that shows other
similar sites that do give academic credit and
where is falls in the courses. It has been
difficult to break historic practices against
CTE offering core credits. The math coach
is currently allowed to present math
intervention through CTE programs for one
member high school.
4.1.3 Math coach guides college faculty through
math concept identification and program
enhancement exercises.
The co-funded (secondary/postsecondary)
math coach is beginning to work with
college faculty on the identification and
integration of math skills into curriculum.
4.1.4 The development of math enhancement in
the consortium district CTE programs will be
initiated.
4.1.4 1S2 Academic Attainment Math
consortium score will increase by 5%.
Two member school districts worked with
the math coach in the integration of
curriculum. The member districts are
working with the Consortium in the
identification of math in CTE. Member
schools have reported having done an
assessment for math in 210 courses.
Baseline data are being gathered.
Secondary
$145,260.31
Secondary
Actual:
$116,677.34
Post
Secondary
$124,528
Post
Secondary
Actual:
$90,461.03
Post
Secondary
Reserve:
$11,924
Reserve
Actual:
$11,924
4-1-5 STEM and PLTW initiative is enhances
with POS sequence from high school to CTC to
College programs.
4-1-5 Two programs develop the STEM
POS to include the CTC and Century
college.
Math enhanced activities have been
incorporated into CTE curriculum in two
member school districts.
WBL has fully developed the STEM POS
and is partnering with Century Fab Lab and
Engineering program. Mahtomedi has on
site college related courses. Work continues
to build this area.
4-1-6 Increase the amount of academy core
curriculum that is imbedded in member district
CTE coursework.
4-1-6 Assessments are developed and
implemented to periodically measure the
levels of academics in CTE content. Base
level data are established.
Not developed.
\
4.2. Students are given the
opportunity to earn college credit
between secondary and postsecondary career and technical
education programs in consortium
and central regional consortia
through Articulated College Credit
agreements, concurrent enrollment
and other options.
4-2-1 College in the schools is investigated for
addition to the CTC.
4-2-1 Process is reviewed for potential
program offering for FY13
The CIS process is completed for Law and
EMT. The two were offered for Fy13 as
CIS. Unfortunately, there were no
enrollments.
4-2-2 Coordination of an annual POS/articulation
meeting including promotion of regional/brokered
agreements with Regional Consortium and
provision of an opportunity for postsecondary and
secondary career and technical education
instructors to align curriculum and standards.
4-2-2 Increase attendance of secondary and
post secondary instructors at annual meeting
by 10% (FY10 – 49).
50 secondary staff attended.
4-2-3 Training and requirement for use of
resources on the website is reinforced.
4.2.3 Track the number of hits on the pages
of the website resources
The new pilot for students to print their own
certificates from the TechPrep website was
initiated. There were problem with the site
and with people following the procedure.
4-2-4 A new procedure for Articulated College
Credit (ACC) dissemination will be implemented
4.2.4 Baseline established for number of
ACC requests by students
The new process was explained at the annual
meeting and in an email later in the year.
4-2-5 Promote postsecondary CTE options that
are created within the NE Metro Perkins
Consortium. Prepare a guidebook that identifies
options and the means of accessing them.
4-2-5 A guidebook of options is distributed
among member schools. Career specialists
are involved in the development of the guide
and in getting the information out to students
and parents. Baseline data are established to
measure growth for this longer term goal
area.
The guidebook concept was changed after
the Perkins Coordinator attended the
National Career Clusters Conference in
Atlanta, GA in June 2012. Rather than a
book, this tool will be patterned after a piece
created by the Georgia Department of
Education.
4-3 Secondary career and technical
education students enrolled at the
Career and Technical Center take
steps in their transition from
secondary to postsecondary
programs through a partnership
between Century College and the
NE Metro Intermediate Consortium
High Schools.
4-3-1 Complete transition career plans to
postsecondary CTE programs or other options for
senior CTC students.
4-3-1 100% of senior students complete
transitions plans with the assistance of
Education Assistants at CTC.
All CTC seniors have transition plans.
Approximately 150 students with disabilities
in member schools have transition plans.
4-3-2 Follow-up on Century College enrollment
and postsecondary attendance of CTC students
using new MARSS system
4-3-2 Baseline established for number of
CTC students who attend Century College .
Although transition plans inquire regarding
plans to attend Century, there is no formal
tracking system that has been implemented.
4-3-3 Incorporate college readiness groups to
impart information for transition planning—both
at the CTC and in member schools.
4-3-3 Increase the number of participants in
college readiness groups at CTC by 10% 09-10 - total 1124 duplicated student 09-10 total 631 unduplicated—
FY12 CTC students were required to
participate in at least 2 of the 4 college
readiness sessions, number of participants –
100% of CTC students 850-900
4-3-4 Offer Accuplacer preparation and testing at
CTC and member districts when requested.
4-3-4 students who meet college cut scores
on one test improves by 10%.
426 students completed 1612 Accuplacer
tests administered at CTC. 72% passed
subject area test & 8% improved math scores
4-3-5 GPS Lifeplan is incorporated in monthly
group sessions
4-3-5 Four of eight monthly sessions include
information on GPS.
4 sessions were offered with GPS mentioned
at all 4 and used as a content for the Reality
Check session
4-3-6 Century in a Day is offered at the CTC
4-3-6 Baseline number of applications
completed
Century in a Day produced 27 applications
May 2012 Transition Plan self-report – 84
applications for Century –and 98
applications for 4 year college and 91
applications for 2 year or technical college
4-4 Secondary education students
are provided career planning
activities and programs of study to
assist in their transition from
secondary to post-secondary
programs.
4-4-1 Support and encourage career planning
services, such as annual career plan development
and modification, industry tours, fieldtrips, and
shadowing; use career planning process to
promote attainment of high school diploma,
associate-level degree, professional certification,
and work readiness for transfer to further
learning.
4-4-1 All students in grades 9-12 participate
in an annual review and/or creation of an
individual career plan.
It was reported that all students have a plan
that is visited annually during the scheduling
process. Some schools provide more
guidance with this process. Activities that
are provided include: field trip, job shadows,
elective classes, career fairs, etc. 6 districts
report sponsorship of a Career Fair. 9
reported having a Career Class.
4-4-1 Number high schools who program
Career Fair.
Several of the schools participate in career
fairs, in addition to the Consortium fair. One
has a full Career Fair on its own.
4-4-2 Support career planning process and POS
with Web based systems (MCIS, Naviance,
Efolio, GPS, etc.), career development resources
and portfolios for continuous career planning.
Number of high schools who provide Career
Classes.
2/3 of the districts offer a Career Class for
students. For most, it is an elective. In
addition, most high schools offer career
development activities delivered by career
specialist or counselors.
4-4-2 100% of districts have a MCIS license.
The Consortium pays for a site license for
each member high school. Districts are
encouraged to purchase supplemental
resources, as well as to equip their middle
schools and alternative programs.
Best practices use of the tool and training are
offered. Career specialists meet 3 times per
year, each for a half day and at one of high
school career centers. The CTC Law,
Design, and Education & Human Services
students complete portfolios.
4-4-3 Provide information on articulated college
credit as part of the communication to parents,
students, career advisors, counselors and
especially to adult learners.
4-4-3 Include the articulation website on all
Perkins marketing communications.
This information was distributed through the
CTE teachers who have articulation
agreements. No formal marketing occurred.
4-4-5 Provide resources to assist counselors,
deans and career specialists in accessing POS in
the consortium, or absent from the consortium
through MnPOS.
4-4-5 one half day training on MNPOS is
provided.
MNPOS was presented at consortium
meetings. There were 2 meetings to work on
the MNPOS templates directly on the
website.
4-4-6
There were 5 Visitor Days for students to
explore the programs at the CTC with 195
students participating.
4-4-6 CTC Visitor Day is offered to high school
students
4-5 Postsecondary students are
provided student success planning
activities including programs of study,
inescapable interactions with faculty
regarding progress, and timelines to
review own progress to assist the
students own enrollment management
efforts
4-5-1 Provide professional development
opportunities regarding student success strategies
using the Achieving the Dream initiative of the
college as the backbone.
4-5-1 Increase the number of career and
technical faculty participating in the student
success initiatives.
100% of CTE faculty participated in Student
Success Initiatives.
4-5-2 Integrate the programs of study as part of
the student advising resources.
4-5-2 Web presence documents 100% of
programs of study for the college.
The Model Course Sequences were
completed in Spring 2012, validated by
faculty and published on the program pages
of Century’s website in June 2012.
4-5-3 Publish Best Practices of integrated
planning activities within programs.
4-5-3 Best Practice Show Case for integrated
planning becomes part of the Perkins
Summit.
See Goal 1-3-4 for description of Perkins
Summit.
4-5-4 Require students to formulate their own
plan academic plan.
4-5-4 All new students participate in
development of an individual academic plan.
Academic planning has been integrated into
the New Student Seminar.
4-5-5 Formalize the sequence of review of
student majors and provisions for changes
4-5-5 Publish procedure for validation of
students’ majors and provisions for changes.
Tutors linked to classes were expanded to
CTE, focusing on the gateway classes that
students are often not successful in.
4-5-6 Integrate general education and career
technical supplemental strategies in high attrition
courses
4-5-6 Monitor success initiatives and record
progress.
A combined Secondary/Post-secondary
workshop is planned for FY13. This will be
open to Secondary and post-secondary
advisors and college admissions staff. The
focus will be career pathways, programs of
study and CTE advising.
4-6 Communications within the 15
member districts and with the
college is improved regarding CTE
issues, i.e. licensure, standards,
curriculum and program review to
ensure programs are in compliance
with state regulations and
recommendations, and data
reporting programs.
4-6-1 Provide CTE program leadership
throughout the Consortium to ensure that Perkins
and state CTE rules and regulations are met.
4-6-1 All member districts will have regular
representation at Perkins consortium
meetings. 16 of 16 district member
representatives attend 100% of consortium
meetings, including SRC meetings for
members of the Intermediate to be
considered for access to leadership funds.
We have experienced 90% attendance by the
member district representatives at their
meetings.
4-6-2 Establish and maintain a collegial team
approach among member district representatives
for shared consideration of CTE issues and
initiatives.
4-6-2 16 of 16 district member
representatives attend 100% of consortium
meetings.
Attendance was 90% for Fy12.
4-6-3 Increase communication through district
representative to interested and affected
stakeholders in the high schools.
4-6-3 Survey of CTE teachers and faculty on
Perkins events
A survey was conducted of those who
participated in our summer professional
development activities.
4-6-4 CTC Career Specialist connects with
districts.
4-6-4 67% of consortium high schools are
visited.
The consortium College and Career
Specialist visited 84% districts.
4-6-1 See 1-5-1
for results
4-6-2 See 1-5-1
for results
4-6-5 College faculty and advisors connect with
districts.
Use of Funds: Highlight or Bold the required and permissible activities addressed above ( “R” for required and “P” for permissible).
Required
R1 Academic Integration
R9 Special Populations
P4 Additional Special Populations
R2 Programs of Study
R10 Collaboration
P5 Student Organizations
R3 All Aspects of an Industry
R11 Articulation
P6 Mentoring/Support Services
R4 Develop/Improve/Expand the use of Technology
P7 Equipment Leasing/Purchasing/Upgrading
R5 Professional Development
Permitted
P8 Teacher Preparation
R6 Assessment
P1 Advisory Committees
P8 Alternative Formats
R7 Initiate/Improve/Modernize Technology
P2 Counseling
P10 Student Transition
R8 Size/Scope/Quality
P3 Work-Based Experiences
P11 Entrepreneurship
Goal 5: Sustain the Consortium of
Secondary and Postsecondary Institutions
Topics Required for Inclusion
Self-assessment of consortium systems and operations,
including fiscal and administration [Sec 135 (c) (20)
Shared responsibility among all partners for collaboration and
accountability for success [State Plan]
Collaborative initiatives between the consortium and
stakeholders [Sec. 134 (b) (5)]
ACTUAL EXPENDITURES:
Secondary $10,634.08
Postsecondary $25,944.81
Use of data for evaluation of student success and continuous
program improvement [Sec. 134 (b) (2 & 7) and Sec.135 (c)
(19)]
Collaborative budget development [State Plan]
Promotion of consortium CTE vision [State Plan]
Goal 5 Narrative: Utilize the organizational structure to continue to enhance programs and services for
CTE students. The current practice of having K-12 and college students currently enrolled in classes at colocated facilities will be further used to its greatest advantage in bringing consortium members together—
administration, faculty, and students.
Projected
Objective(s)
Strategies
Outcomes and Measures
(FY12)
5-1 The Northeast Metro
Perkins consortium
develops and implements a
communication plan with
all stakeholders.
5-1-1 Identify the stakeholders.
5-1-2 Create the process for
information dissemination among
the stakeholders
5-1-1 Schedule of activities,
meeting agenda and minutes and
participation numbers.
The Consortium maintains an
annual calendar of meetings and
activities. Agendas and minutes
are available.
The partnership
secondary/postsecondary team
meets monthly. Agendas include
collaborative projects, updates on
individual secondary and postsecondary initiatives, new tools,
and team building.
5-1-2 A minimum of one formal
interaction with each of the
identified stakeholder groups
takes place.
The Leadership Team created a
Prezi. We are also working on
an efolio site. Information is
disseminated at the
postsecondary Perkins Summit
and the secondary Institute.
Secondary networks meet in four
curriculum areas. Advisory
committees are the responsibility
of all program areas. They meet
a minimum of twice per year.
43
Budget by
Objective
Secondary
$16,803.20
Secondary
actual:
$10,634.08
Post SEC
$35,000
Post
Secondary
Actual:
$25,944.81
\
5-1-3 Periodic newsletters are
prepared for print and web
distribution.
The D21 site is used to
disseminate information. A
website is being developed for
the Consortium.
5-1-4 Brief annual report is
published.
Annual participate information is
provided to the member districts
in an attempt to promote greater
involvement in Perkins activities
across the Consortium. Each
district completes a report on
their data that supports the grant
goals. This is shared at an end of
the year wrap-up meeting.
5-2 Connections among all
of the partners advance the
goals of the Perkins
Consortium plan.
5-2-1 Plan collaborative activities
and events focused on grant goals—
POS, Career Days, Work Skills
Days, summits, professional
development, and advisory
committees.
5-3 Perkins leadership
collaborate to establish and
strengthen the bridge of
transition from secondary to
postsecondary and beyond!
5-3-1 Provide college readiness
programming services at CTC and to
member districts.
5-3-2 Provide career readiness
services.
44
5-2-1 Student career plans show
evidence of influence of these
events.
All 9-12 students in member
students develop and/or modify
their career plans at least
annually.
5-2-2 Surveys of event
participants indicate value of the
collaborative strategies that we
used.
The survey of professional
development activities provides
direction for staff needs and
future programming.
5-3-1 A College and Career
Readiness Specialist connects
with students, CTC, member
high schools, and the College on
transition activities.
Various activites throughout the
grant support this goal. Goal 4 is
very specific to the role of this
position. Data is shared under
that goal.
Valerie and Shelli collaborated to
redesign and present the college
readiness series. Group
presentations and meetings with
individuals on college transitions
are presented by all three Career
and Technical Education
Specialists.
5-4 The Consortium Perkins
vision reflects promotion
and support of student
success through CTE
programs and services.
5-4-1 Utilized broad-based
stakeholder input and leadership in
the development of a vision
statement.
5-5 Consortium success is
monitored through several
vehicles—student surveys,
member district data
5-5-1 Evaluate the responses and
collected data to inform the
development of the annual plan.
45
Career Services provides
presentations such as resumes,
teamwork, interviewing, and
various GPS topics, as well as
working with individual students
on resumes, job applications and
job searches.In addition she runs
and participates in a number of
career-related events.
 Visited 33 classrooms,
presenting to 497 students.
 Presented 11 GPS workshops
to 64 students
 Had 270 individual
appointments with students
 Presented 8 Student Success
Day Workshops to 123
students
 Presented 3 workshops at
Welcome Days to 36
students
 Presented at Young
Women’s and Young Men’s
events
 Presented at Century Open
House
 Planned and executed the
Business Etiquette Dinner –
51 students
 Co-chair of Career Day
(Century/916 CTC).
Managed Industry Career
Exhibit (38 industry
professionals– 400+ high
school sophomores from NE
Metro consortium attended.
 Partner in MnSCU Job Fair –
40 Century students attended
5-4-1 The vision is shared with
all stakeholders.
The vision of the Consortium is
discuss and shaped at
Consortium Leadership Team
(monthly) and Representative
meetings (4 per year). The
overarching goal is the expansion
of CTE program options for
learners.
5-5-1 State indicators on local
and consortium data are used to
assess progress on the annual
plan and reflect future direction.
collection, stakeholder
input, participant
evaluations, etc.
5-6 Provide professional
development opportunities
for administration, faculty,
staff, and external
constituents regarding state
and national trends
Consortium data is reviewed at
each representative meeting to
build awareness and ownership.
Based on the Performance
Indicators released last year, and
with the advent of some
retirements, the East Academic
Support Center (serving CTE
students at Century) was reorganized and restructured. All
three CTE Specialist positions
have been filled. These positions
are focused on increasing student
success in CTE, as described in
Goals 3 and 4.
5-6-1 Host speaker/best practice
opportunities to raise the profile of
the K-16 efforts and the career and
technical education issues
5-5-2 Perkins member district
representatives meet annually to
report local plan data and
cooperatively assess the
consortium plan.
Each member district completes
and annual report of their data
that support the grant goals. This
is shared at the year-end wrap-up
meeting.
5-6-1 Continue to develop the
host speaker program.
Document increased
participation.
A major initiative of our career
centers is scheduling career
speakers, either from
postsecondary institutions or
business. Ofter students visit
with speakers during lunches.
We are in the process of
developing directories of
shadowing and fieldtrip
opportunities.
At the postsecondary the
following resources have been
provided for students:
Amy Lindgren: Launching a
Successful Job
Search in Challenging Times.
VCT Lecture Series
Community Speaker Series
5-6-1 Schedule of activities,
meeting agenda and minutes and
participation numbers.
A schedule of our Perkins
activities, notes are kept, and
46
5-7 Build on strength of
shared campus; secondary
with post secondary.
5-7-1 Increase faculty to faculty
interactions by development of
workplan of shared ownership.
5-7-2 Increase staff interactions
especially regarding services
provided to support student
transitions
participation data are maintained
and disseminated.
5-6-1 Action plan
implementation documentation.
The Consortium Perkins plan is
disseminated and the basis of our
funded activities.
5-7-1 A record of activities
completed from the workplan.
Such a record is maintained (see
above) with a purpose of sharing
and increasing participation.
Use of Funds: Highlight or Bold the required and permissible activities addressed above ( “R” for required and “P” for
permissible).
Required
R1 Academic Integration
R9 Special Populations
P4 Additional
Special Populations
R2 Programs of Study
R10 Collaboration
P5 Student
Organizations
R3 All Aspects of an Industry
R11 Articulation
P6
Mentoring/Support Services
R4 Develop/Improve/Expand the use of Technology
P7 Equipment
Leasing/Purchasing/Upgrading
R5 Professional Development
Permitted
P8 Teacher
Preparation
R6 Assessment
P1 Advisory Committees
P9 Alternative
Formats
R7 Initiate/Improve/Modernize Technology
P2 Counseling
P10 Student
Transition
R8 Size/Scope/Quality
P3 Work-Based Experiences
P11
Entrepreneurship
47
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