Document 259621

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE COURSE PROPOSAL OR REVISION,
Cover Sheet (10/02/2002)
Course Number/Program Name: INED 7785 Curriculum and Instruction in Teacher Leadership
Department Inclusive Education
Degree Title (if applicable) MEd., Ed.S., & Ed.D. in Teacher Leadership
Proposed Effective Date Summer 2013
Check one or more of the following and complete the appropriate sections:
X New Course Proposal
Course Title Change
Course Number Change
Course Credit Change
Course Prerequisite Change
Course Description Change
Sections to be Completed
II, III, IV, V, VII
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
I, II, III
Notes:
If proposed changes to an existing course are substantial (credit hours, title, and description), a new course with a
new number should be proposed.
A new Course Proposal (Sections II, III, IV, V, VII) is required for each new course proposed as part of a new
program. Current catalog information (Section I) is required for each existing course incorporated into the
program.
Minor changes to a course can use the simplified E-Z Course Change Form.
✓
Approved
Not Approved
Approved
Not Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
Approved
A
,
Jo a Hicks
Faculty Membiir
Joya Hicks
Department C c um Co
Susan Brown
Department Chair
(
Submitted by:
its
7/6/12
Date
7/6/12
'nee Date
Date
Not Approved
College Curriculum Committee
Date
College Dean
Date
GPCC Chair
Date
Dean, Graduate College
Date
Not Approved
Not Approved
Not Approved
Not Approved
Vice President for Academic Affairs Date
Approved
Not Approved
President
Date
7/74 2---
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE COURSE/CONCENTRATION/PROGRAM CHANGE
I.
II.
Current Information (Fill in for changes)
New course, so not listed
Page Number in Current Catalog
Course Prefix and Number
Course Title
Class Hours
Laboratory Hours
Credit Hours
Prerequisites
Description (or Current Degree Requirements)
Proposed Information (Fill in for changes and new courses)
Course Prefix and Number
INED 7785
Course Title
Curriculum and Instruction for Teacher Leaders
Class Hours
3
Laboratory Hours 0
CreditHours
3
Prerequisites None
Description (or Proposed Degree Requirements)
Candidates who complete this course are teacher leaders who demonstrate a comprehensive understanding
of curriculum and apply this knowledge to the alignment of curriculum, instruction, and assessment to
standards. This course provides models for (1) relating to school board policy; 2) collecting and using
demographic data to create a plan for improved student performance; (3) designing and managing
curriculum and; (4) constructing effective professional development. Additional attention is paid to the
Georgia Performance Standards/Common Core alignment as it continues to unfold from the Georgia
Department of Education.
III.
Justification
Changes to Georgia's Professional Standards Commission rules and the creation of a Teacher
Leadership area of certification necessitate a Substantive Change to the Ed.S. and Ed.D. in Teacher
Leadership for Learning so that those programs align with new standards. This course is needed in
those revised programs because GaPSC standards requires a focus on curriculum.
GaPSC Rule 505-2-.41 restricts the degrees that result in a certificate upgrade to degrees with
names closely aligned with an area of certification. For our existing Ed.S. and Ed.D. degrees in
Teacher Leadership to continue to be recognized as beneficial for Georgia educators, both degrees
must be aligned with the GaPSC standards for Teacher Leadership (GaPSC Rule 505-3-.53)
established in October 2011. The proposed changes are the result of our review of the learning
outcomes of the courses and their alignment with the GaPSC standards in this area.
IV.
Additional Information (for New Courses only)
Instructor: Dr. Joya Hicks
Text:
English, Fenwick J. (2010). Deciding What to Teach and Test: Corwin Press. [3rd edition]
Jacobs, Hayes H. (2010) Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World
Alexandria,VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD)
Tomlinson, C.A. & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating Differentiated Instruction +
Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development.
McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development
Workbook Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd Ed). Alexandria, VA:
ASCD.
* Other readings as assigned and provided by instructor (handouts or online) during the
course.
Prerequisites: None
Objectives:
The GaPSC specifies the following learning outcomes in their Teacher Leadership
Standards (505-3-.53, #3):
The teacher leader:
(i)Possesses an in-depth knowledge of his/her discipline, and is knowledgeable
about the structure of the curriculum;
(ii)Understands how the program of studies from various disciplines and grade
levels are related and sequenced in order to design and deliver meaningful and
relevant professional learning and instructional strategies;
(iii)Uses a variety of processes to engage and focus teachers in collaborative
planning to improve teaching and learning;
(iv)Uses appropriate, research-informed protocols to audit curriculum and analyze
student work to assure high expectations for all students;
(v)Demonstrates deep understanding of the curriculum and is able to use a variety
of appropriate protocols and organizing frameworks to engage in discussions
about what students should know, understand, and do in each instructional unit
based on those standards;
(vi)Identifies and recommends content specific resources that are important in the
curriculum implementation process; and
(vii)Leads others in prioritizing, mapping, and monitoring the implementation of
the curriculum.
Instructional Method:
Course activities will include, but are not limited to:
1. Lecture
2. Student projects
3. Class exercises
4. Presentations
5.
6.
7.
8.
Class and group discussions
Reading assignments
Simulations/Case studies
Field Experiences
Method of Evaluation
A:
B:
C:
F:
92% - 100%
84% - 91%
75% - 83%
74% or lower
915 - 1000 points
835 - 914 points
745 - 834 points
744 points or less
The student's work will exhibit the following:
For a grade of A:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All parts of the assignments
are complete as defined by
the instructor.
Topics are fully developed.
Knowledge of subject
matter is clear and work is
focused on assigned topics.
Additional information
beyond requirements is
included if appropriate.
Work shows a clear match
between theory and practice.
Work shows evidence of
critical thinking.
Work contains few or no
errors in writing.
Citations and references are
used correctly and
consistently.
For a grade of B:
•
•
•
•
•
All parts of the
assignments are addressed,
but one or two may be
incomplete or unclear (i.e.,
perhaps examples are not
sufficient or are not
explained in sufficient
detail for the reader to
form a clear picture.
Knowledge of subject
matter is clear.
Work shows a clear match
between theory and
practice.
Work contains several
errors in writing.
Citations and references
are used correctly and
consistently.
For a grade of C or below:
• Assignments do not
address all requirements
or do not meet some
criteria specified.
• Topics may be only
partially developed.
• No clear match between
theory and practice.
• Contains numerous
errors in writing.
• Errors in citations and
references or no citations
and references where
needed.
V.
Resources and Funding Required (New Courses only)
Resource
Amount
Faculty
Other Personnel
Equipment
Supplies
Travel
0
0
0
0
0
New Books
New Journals
Other (Specify)
0
0
0
TOTAL
0
Funding Required Beyond
Normal Departmental Growth
$0
VI. COURSE MASTER FORM
This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the
Registrar once the course has been approved by the Office of the President.
The form is required for all new courses.
DISCIPLINE
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL
Leaders
(Note: Limit 30 spaces)
CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS
Approval, Effective Term
Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U)
If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas?
Learning Support Programs courses which are
required as prerequisites
APPROVED:
Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee
VII Attach Syllabus
Teacher Leadership
INED 7785
Curriculum & Instruction for Teacher
3-0-3
Summer 2013
Regular
N/A
N/A
I.
COURSE NUMBER:
INED 7785
COURSE TITLE:
Curriculum and Instruction for Teacher Leaders
COLLEGE OR SCHOOL:
Bagwell College of Education
SEMESTER/TERM & YEAR:
II.
INSTRUCTOR:
TELEPHONE:
FAX:
E-MAIL:
III.
CLASS MEETINGS:
IV.
REQUIRED TEXTS:
OFFICE:
English, Fenwick J. (2010). Deciding What to Teach and Test: Corwin Press. [3rd edition]
Jacobs, Hayes H. (2010) Curriculum 21: Essential Education for a Changing World
Alexandria,VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD)
Tomlinson, C.A. & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating Differentiated Instruction + Understanding
by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
McTighe, J. & Wiggins, G. (2004). Understanding by Design: Professional Development
Workbook. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd Ed). Alexandria, VA: ASCD.
V.
CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Candidates who complete this course are teacher leaders who demonstrate a comprehensive
understanding of curriculum and apply this knowledge to the alignment of curriculum, instruction,
and assessment to standards. This course provides models for (1) relating to school board policy;
2) collecting and using demographic data to create a plan for improved student performance; (3)
designing and managing curriculum and; (4) constructing effective professional development.
1
Additional attention is paid to the Georgia Performance Standards/Common Core alignment as it
continues to unfold from the Georgia Department of Education.
VI.
PURPOSE/RATIONALE
The purpose of this course is to strengthen the knowledge, skills and dispositions of teacher leaders
as instructional leaders and managers in schools serving students with a full range of abilities and
those who are culturally and linguistically diverse. Teacher leaders possess advance abilities to
design, implement and evaluate curricula that promote learning amongst all students. Additional
attention is paid to the Georgia Performance Standards/Common Core alignment as it continues to
unfold from the Georgia Department of Education.
VII.
CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK & RELATED STANDARDS AND REQUIREMENTS
Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning and Leadership
“The Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning and Leadership” is the
basis for all of Kennesaw State University’s teacher education programs. Working from a solid
content background, the teacher as facilitator demonstrates proficient and flexible use of different
ways of teaching to actively engage students in learning. Teachers as facilitators are well versed in
the characteristics of students of different ages, abilities and cultural backgrounds. They are skilled
in integrating technology into instruction and create an environment in which students can be
successful and want to learn. Teachers as facilitators know when and how to assess learning by
means of various forms of traditional and authentic assessments. They are well prepared for
successful careers in teaching and are expected to act in a professional manner in all circumstances
with colleagues, parents, community members and their own students. As a professional educator,
the teacher facilitator values collaboration and seeks opportunities to work with other
professionals and community members to improve the educational experiences for children and
youth. This course contributes to the candidates’ understanding of their developing role as a
professional facilitator by supporting their educational growth as they learn to effectively teach
students.
Knowledge Base
Teacher development is generally recognized as a continuum that includes four phases:
pre-service, induction, in-service, renewal (Odell, Huling, and Sweeny, 2000). Just as Sternberg
(1996) believes that the concept of expertise is central to analyzing the teaching-learning process,
the teacher education faculty at KSU believes that the concept of expertise is central to preparing
effective classroom teachers and teacher leaders. Researchers describe how during the continuum
phases, teachers progress from being Novices learning to survive in classrooms toward becoming
Experts who have achieved elegance in their teaching. We, like Sternberg (1998), believe that
expertise is not an end-state but a process of continued development.
The knowledge base for methods of teaching students learning English continues to develop
rapidly. Current directions include multiple intelligence models, content-based instruction, and
L1/L2 approaches to teaching and learning. The field draws on research literature in the areas of
2
second language acquisition, bilingualism and cognition, L1/L2 literacy, and social justice.
Diversity Statement
A variety of materials and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the needs of the
different learning styles of diverse learners in class. Candidates will gain knowledge as well as an
understanding of differentiated strategies and curricula for providing effective instruction and
assessment within multicultural classrooms. One element of course work is raising candidate
awareness of critical multicultural issues. A second element is to cause candidates to explore how
multiple attributes of multicultural populations influence decisions in employing specific methods
and materials for every student. Among these attributes are age, disability, ethnicity, family
structure, gender, geographic region, giftedness, language, race, religion, sexual orientation, and
socioeconomic status. An emphasis on cognitive style differences provides a background for the
consideration of cultural context.
Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons
defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of services are available to support students with disabilities
within their academic program. In order to make arrangements for special services, students must
visit the Office of Disabled Student Support Services (ext. 6443) and develop an individual
assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is required. Please be aware there are
other support/mentor groups on the campus of Kennesaw State University that address each of the
multicultural variables outlined above.
Field Experiences
Leadership and School-based Activities & Graduate Field Experience Requirements: While
completing your graduate program at Kennesaw State University, you are required to be involved
in a variety of leadership and school-based activities directed at the improvement of teaching and
learning. Appropriate activities may include, but are not limited to, attending and presenting at
professional conferences, actively serving on or chairing school-based committees, attending
PTA/school board meetings, leading or presenting professional development activities at the
school or district level, and participating in education-related community events. As you continue
your educational experiences, you are encouraged to explore every opportunity to learn by doing.
Technology
Technology Standards & Use: Technology Standards for Educators are required by the
Professional Standards Commission. Telecommunication and information technologies will be
integrated throughout the master teacher preparation program, and all candidates must be able to
use technology to improve student learning and meet Georgia Technology Standards for
Educators. During the courses, candidates will be provided with opportunities to explore and use
instructional media, especially microcomputers, to assist teaching. They will master use of
productivity tools, such as multimedia facilities, localnet and Internet, and feel confident to design
multimedia instructional materials, create WWW resources, and develop an electronic learning
portfolio. Candidates in this course will be expected to apply the use of educational technology in
their classrooms. Candidates will have access to the ERIC CD-ROM database, TRAC and the
Educational Technology Center. Library research required in this course is supported by the
Galileo system.
GeorgiaVIEW is a tool available to use for use and will be the primary mode of
3
communication, especially in case of weather related notices regarding class. Course materials
will be posted on GeorgaVIEW two to three weeks before they are discussed in class.
VIII. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The KSU teacher preparation faculty is strongly committed to the concept of teacher preparation
as a developmental and collaborative process. Candidates in this course are expected to perform at
the Advanced or Teacher Leader level on the Advanced Proficiencies approved by the Bagwell
College of Education and the Professional Teacher Education Unit of Kennesaw State University.
For the purposes of the Teacher Leadership program, course goals and objectives are aligned with
GaPSC Teacher Leadership 505-3-.53.
The Teacher Leader:
(i) Possesses an in-depth knowledge of his/her discipline, and is knowledgeable about the structure
of the curriculum;
(ii) Understands how the program of studies from various disciplines and grade levels are related
and sequenced in order to design and deliver meaningful and relevant professional learning and
instructional strategies;
(iii) Uses a variety of processes to engage and focus teachers in collaborative planning to improve
teaching and learning;
(iv) Uses appropriate, research-informed protocols to audit curriculum and analyze student work
to assure high expectations for all students;
(v) Demonstrates deep understanding of the curriculum and is able to use a variety of appropriate
protocols and organizing frameworks to engage in discussions about what students should know,
understand, and do in each instructional unit based on those standards;
(vi) Identifies and recommends content specific resources that are important in the curriculum
implementation process; and
(vii) Leads others in prioritizing, mapping, and monitoring the implementation of the curriculum.
IX.
COURSE ASSIGNMENT EVALUATION: The Professional Teacher Education Unit prepares
experts teachers and leaders who understand their disciplines and principles of pedagogy, who
reflect on practice, and who apply these understandings to making instructional decisions that
foster the success of all learners. As a result of the satisfactory fulfillment of the requirements of
this course, the student will be evaluated:
4
Course Requirement
X.
Points
Course Objectives
(PSC) T&L Standard
T& L 3.1,3.2,3.3, & 3.7
Policy for Curriculum
100
investigate the components of a
well-formed BOE policy on
curriculum development/
evaluation and apply that
knowledge to solve a problem
either at a specific grade level
or content area
Analysis of Assessment Data
100
demonstrate the ability to audit
school demographic and
assessment data and use the
same to create an action plan to
improve student performance in
one critical area
T& L
1.5, 3.1,3.2,3.3,3.4,3.5,3.6,
3.7, 5.1,& 5.2
UbD Multi-level Unit
100
demonstrate an in-depth
knowledge of curriculum
design, development and
evaluation and connect all parts
to GPS/CC standards in the
design [and presentation] of a
multi-level unit
T& L 3.1,3.2,3.3,3.4,3.5,3.6,
3.7, 4.1,4.2,4.3, 4.4,4.5,& 4.6
PD for Curriculum Improvement
100
identify an
emerging/controversial
issue in curriculum
development/evaluation and
create a professional
development plan to serve
as a guide for educators to
fully understand it
T& L 3.1,3.2,3.3,3.5,3.6,
3.7,7.2,7.3,7.5,7.6,7.10,&7.11
TOTAL
400
ASSIGNMENTS
1. Policy for Curriculum
As teacher leaders, it is important that we have a clear understanding of the educational policies developed by our school boards, and
our responsibility to implement them. This assignment will challenge candidates’ ability to investigate a particular policy adopted
by a chosen school board and examine its impact on student learning and achievement. (PSC TL 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, & 3.7)
Instructions:
 Prepare at minimum a 3 -5 page, double spaced document that investigates one chosen school board policy and analyze its
components in relation to the needs of a specific curriculum area,i.e. content, grade. Candidates will conduct interviews
with administrators and/or stakeholders in order to gain detailed knowledge of the policy and its impact at the local school
level.
2. Demographic Analysis of Assessment Data
Schools evaluate their programs through data-driven, research-based practices. The Georgia Assessment of Performance on School
Standards (GAPSS) Analysis is intended to provide a process of data collection and verification of a school’s status and offer
specific direction for school improvement” (GaDoE, 2012, p.5). “Most schools engage in some process of analyzing their success in
eight strands: http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/School-Improvement/Documents/GAPSS%20FINAL%203-13-12.pdf
Candidates in this course will complete a Demographic Analysis with a focus on Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment strands
in one content/grade-level area based on school-wide Data and create an action plan to help teachers improve student
performance. (PSC TL 1.5, 3.1,3.2,3.3,3.4,3.5,3.6, 3.7, 5.1,& 5.2)
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Instructions:






Review, analyze and describe recent assessment results from your selected school. Locate the most recent AYP data for
NCLB sub-groups. Consider one specific curriculum area, i.e.specific content/grade.
Evaluate the curriculum map and pacing guide against the Common Core/Georgia Performance Standards. Specify
evidence that supports the standards met, and suggestions for addressing standards that could be contributing to areas
identified. Provide the rationale for your suggestions, including support from the literature and course content.
Pedagogical content issues should be specifically addressed.
Describe the school culture in the school you select.
Describe and analyze the cultural diversity in your school (race, ethnicity, ESL, SPED, SES and gender)
Create an “action plan” to target the specific content/grade level area you selected for improving student achievement.
Consider examining existing site-based “action plans” focusing on strengths and weaknesses that target the
content/grade-level area you have selected for improving student achievement. Action Plans should identify specific
resources needed for implementation.
Prepare, at minimum, a three page report utilizing the analysis of demographic and test data from your school. Attach the
action plan for helping teachers improve student performance based on your data analysis.
3.
UbD Multi-Level Unit
Using the practices and procedures defined by Backwards-Design, Understanding By Design (UbD, each candidate must
develop a comprehensive one month unit in addressing the curriculum area identified in Assignment #2. The unit must be
differentiated and describe how the content, process, product and assessments are altered to meet the needs of students
who are gifted, developing normally and either displaying disabilities or learning English. Differentiation must be
conducted by means of a pyramid depicting what all, most, and a few will learn and how they will be taught and assessed.
Candidates will use the following unit development model recommended by Wiggins & McTighe (2005). (PSC TL
3.1,3.2,3.3,3.4,3.5,3.6, 3.7, 4.1,4.2,4.3, 4.4,4.5,& 4.6)

Stage 1: Desired Results. To be successful at this stage, the candidate must develop seamless instruction to assist
all learners in meeting the established CC/GPS, as well as the appropriate IEP goals and objectives and learning
goals of diverse learners. At this stage each candidate must assure that students are engaged in higher-order
thinking by clearly articulating the Enduring Understandings and Essential Questions. In terms of the pyramid,
the content must be differentiated to delineate what all, most, and a few will learn or be able to do.

Stage 2: Assessment Evidence. At this stage, the candidate must develop an assessment plan with a variety of
evidence, including performance tasks, academic prompts, quiz and test items and informal checks for
understanding. While an authentic performance task must be the major indicator of student success, the other
types of assessment are necessary to monitor the success of diverse learners in meeting their individualized
goals. In terms of the pyramid, the assessment must be differentiated to delineate how performance learning or
skill development of all, most, and a few will be assessed.

Stage 3: Learning Plan. At the final stage, the candidate must develop a learning plan that delineates what the
teacher and students will do throughout the experience. In this section, Tomlinson’s differentiated practices (e.g.
tiered assignments, flexible groups, curriculum compacting for gifted) must be incorporated. In terms of the
pyramid, the instructional process for all, most, and few must be delineated. The learning plan must incorporate
appropriate instructional methodologies and technologies for diverse learners.
Your final curriculum unit will include 5 consecutive, coherent, lesson plans that exemplify the implementation of your
curriculum and assessment plans.
4.
Professional Development for Curriculum Improvement
Teacher leaders are frequently faced with instructional issues directly related to the written/taught curriculum, and the challenge of
presenting them to peers. The purpose of this assignment is to demonstrate the teacher leader’s ability to deliver a PD session on a
curriculum topic identified in Assignment #2 and #3 or a current controversial curriculum issue, utilizing the tenets of the taught
6
curriculum & Backward Design[UbD]. Relationships will be explained between various disciplines and grade levels. (PSC TL
3.1,3.2,3.3,3.5,3.6, 3.7,7.2,7.3,7.5,7.6,7.10,&7.11)
Instructions:
Identify a current/future curriculum issue and create a PD plan that serves as a guide for educators [can be an issue
identified in Assignment #2 and #3]. Candidates may use a variety of information gathering methods including interviews
with peers, administrators and/or central office personnel; you may also wish to obtain information from the text as well
as curriculum guides. Prepare a 10 to 15 minute PD presentation that is designed to assist educators in their understanding
of the curriculum issue, and which utilizes the format of the Taught Curriculum & ‘backward design’ [UbD].
PLEASE NOTE: There is a program area key assessment associated with this course. The Curriculum Instruction
Assessment (CIA) uses an integrated assessment rubric that contains key elements from each course assignment.
XI.
EVALUATION & GRADING
A = 100-90 %
B = 89-80%
C = 79-70%
Failing= Below 70%
XII.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
Students are expected to attend all class sessions and be active participants and in the learning process. Active
Participation requires that candidates come to class prepared and participate in class discussions and activities by sharing
his/her ideas within both large and small groups, as well as respectfully listening to the ideas of others. This class includes
presentations by professionals from other disciplines and class attendance is essential for participation in development of
a multi-disciplinary perspective. Class activities will include discussion, role-playing and group collaborative activities
requiring the participation of all students. Students have many experiences and skills, which they can share to facilitate
everyone's learning. It is also expected that you will read the syllabus to determine what assignments are due and when.
Questions will be answered in class regarding assignments, but it is the candidate’s responsibility to be sure (s) he has the
information necessary to complete required assignments. Evaluation will include attendance, communication and
collaboration skills demonstrated during class. Each absence will result in a four-point reduction on your grade and more
than three absences will lead to a letter grade drop. We are a community of learners and as such, when one of us absent,
we are all diminished. Make every effort to be in class for each meeting. Contact instructor if you must be absent.
General Guidelines and Standards for Written Assignments
1.
All individual assignments must be typed, single spaced, with 1” margins on both sides so we can provide you with
feedback.
2. Be sure to maintain confidentiality of student, settings, and teachers. All identifying names and information should be
omitted from your written work and discussions. Any report containing confidential information will not be graded.
3. Late assignments are unacceptable without making prior arrangements with us.
4. We will be looking for quality writing not quantity. Eliminate jargon and hyperbole and focus on clearly stating your
point.
Examine the language you use within your assignments. Please remember to remove the focus on a person’s
behavior or disability by stating the person first, i.e., “a person with a disability” is preferable to “a disabled person.” This
does not apply to English Language Learners (ELLs). Be careful to avoid judgmental statements and focus on the facts
when writing about students. As teachers we need to put our own biases and opinions aside and view each student as a
capable and valuable human being.
XIII.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Every KSU candidate is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, as published in the
Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of Conduct addresses the University's policy on
7
academic honesty, including provisions regarding plagiarism and cheating, unauthorized access to University materials,
misrepresentation/ falsification of University records or academic work, malicious removal, retention, or destruction of
library materials, malicious/intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or services, and misuse of student identification
cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled through the established procedures of the University
Judiciary Program, which includes either an "informal" resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment,
or a formal hearing procedure, which may subject a student to the Code of Conduct's minimum one semester suspension
requirement.
The student is reminded to consult the KSU Graduate Catalog for the University's policy. Any strategy, which has the
appearance of improving grades without increasing knowledge, will be dealt with in accordance with the University's
policy on academic honesty. In addition, students in the graduate program in special education are held accountable by
the Georgia Professional Code of Ethics for Educators (http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/informationresources/ethics.html) and
the Council for Exceptional Children's (CEC) Code of Ethics for Educators of Persons with Exceptionalities
(http://www.cec.sped.org/ps/code.htm#1).
Academic Honesty Statement
The KSU Graduate Catalog states “KSU expects that graduate students will pursue their academic programs in an ethical,
professional manner. Any work that students present in fulfillment of program or course requirements should reflect their
own efforts, achieved without giving or receiving any unauthorized assistance. Any student who is found to have violated
these expectations will be subject to disciplinary action.”
Disruptive Behavior
The University has a stringent policy and procedure for dealing with behavior that disrupts the learning environment.
Consistent with the belief that your behavior can interrupt the learning of others, behavior that fits the University's
definition of disruptive behavior will not be tolerated. (See Campus Policies and Procedures in the KSU Graduate
Catalog).
Professionalism
Students will adhere to the highest professional standards in the ways they conduct themselves.
Human Dignity
The University has formulated a policy on human rights that is intended to provide a learning environment, which
recognizes individual worth. That policy is found in the KSU Graduate Catalog. It is expected, in this class, that no
Professional should need reminding but the policy is there for your consideration. The activities of this class will be
conducted in both the spirit and the letter of that policy.
XIV.
COURSE OUTLINE
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Course Overview
Philosophies and Ideologies of Curriculum
Politics of Curriculum
Assessment of Curriculum
Curriculum Design and Delivery
Professional Learning
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References
Banks, J. (2006). Cultural Diversity and Education: Foundations, Curriculum, and Teaching (5th
ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Burden, P. & Byrd, D. (2010). Methods for Effective Teaching: Meeting the needs of all students.
(5th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Cartledge, G., Gardner, R., & Ford, D. (2009). Diverse Learners with Exceptionalities: Culturally
Responsive Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom. Boston: MA: Pearson.
Coyne, M., Carnine, D. & Kame’enui. (2011). Effective teaching strategies that accommodate
diverse
learners (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River. NJ: Merrill.
Echevarria, J., & Graves, A. (2011). Sheltered Content Instuction: Teaching English Language
Learners
with Diverse Abilities (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Gipe, J. (2010). Multiple Paths to Literacy: Assessment and Differentiated Instruction for Diverse
Learners (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Herrera, S., Murry, K. & Cabral, R. (2013). Assessment Accomodations for Classroom Teachers
of
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon,
Hoover, J. (2009). Differentiating Learning Differences from Disabilities: Meeting Diverse Needs
through Multi-Tiered Response to Intervention. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Hoover, J. (2013). Linking Assessment to Instruction in Multi-Tiered Models: A Teacher’s Guide
to
Selecting Reading, Writing, and Mathematics Interventions. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Merrill.
Kritikos, E. (2010). Special Education Assessment: Issues and Strategies Affecting Today’s
Classrooms.
Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.
Overton, T. (2012). Assessing learners with Special needs: An applied approach (7th ed.). Upper
Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.
Sousa, D.A. & Tomlinson C.A. (2010). Differentiation and the brain: How neuroscience supports
the learner-friendly classroom. Solution Tree Publishers.
Sousa, D. (2011). How the ELL brain learns. Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks: CA.
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Taylor, L. & Whittaker, C. (2009). Bridging Multiple Worlds: Case Studies of Diverse
Educational
Communities (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Vaughn, S., Bos, C., Schumm, J. (2012). Teaching Students who are exceptional, diverse, and at
risk in the general education classroom (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.
Wiggins, G. & Tighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design II. Alexandria, VA: Association for
Curriculum & Development.
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