Organisational Details Cover Sheet University of Ballarat ORGANISATION DETAILS

University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
Organisational Details Cover Sheet
(This information is confidential and will be removed from any Public Report)
ORGANISATION DETAILS
Legal name of your organisation:
University of Ballarat
Total No. of employees:
ABN: 51 818 692 256
843: Post School Education: 8431 Higher Education; 8432 Technical
and Further Education
ANZSIC Code AND Industry Description
(refer www.abs.gov.au):
University Drive, Mt Helen
Physical address:
Switchboard No: 03 9327 9000
Postal address:
PO Box 663, Ballarat
State:
Facsimile No:
State:
VIC
Postcode:
3350
03 5327 9704
VIC
Postcode:
3353
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University of Ballarat
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CONTACT INFORMATION
Title:
First Name:
Family Name:
CEO Details
Report Contact Details
Professor
Ms
David
Barbara
Battersby
Webb
Vice-Chancellor
Manager, Equity and Equal Opportunity
[email protected]
[email protected]
Telephone:
03 5327 9500
03 5327 9357
Facsimile:
03 5327 9544
03 5327 9779
Job Title:
E-mail Address (or PA for CEO):
Address (if different to above):
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events, programs or publications. If you DO NOT want EOWA to send your Report Contact or CEO this information please advise EOWA by email at [email protected] or by
phone on (02) 9448 8500.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A PUBLIC DOCUMENT AND THEREFORE WILL BE PUBLISHED ON EOWA’S WEBSITE
Page 1
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
1. WORKPLACE PROFILE
The University’s workplace profile data, and other relevant data, as at the commencement of the reporting
period (April 2006), along with data collected at the end of the reporting period (March 2007) is included
in Tables 1 to 19.
2. ANALYSIS - at beginning of reporting period (1 April 2006)
•
•
•
•
Data from 2005/2006 was analysed and compared to previous years.
1 April 2005 to 31 March 2006 actions were evaluated.
Consultations were held with relevant managers and areas.
Informal consultation occurred with female staff through a wide variety of fora, including the
[email protected] email listing.
3. ISSUES PRIORITISED for 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
(summarised from last year’s Report to EOWA)
1. Recruitment and Selection
• Implement an E-recruitment system which will improve recruitment data gathering and
analysis.
2. Promotion, Transfer and Termination
Initiate a mentoring model to formalise a career development strategy for staff. The initial project
using this approach will be directed at working with female staff at Academic Levels B and C to
formalise training and support in relation to Academic promotions.
•
3. Training and Development
• Design and implement a 2 year leadership for women program across all groups and levels.
• Continue sponsorship by the Vice-Chancellor of staff attendance at the AVCC Women in
Leadership programs.
• Continue to offer research development to female Academic Staff who are in the early stages
of their research careers through the Early Career Researcher Development Program.
4. Work Organisation
• Review current job sharing arrangements and develop guidelines and case studies to assist
managers and staff to further utilise this work arrangement, particularly for staff returning from
Maternity Leave at a reduced fraction.
5. Conditions of Service
• Through a staff Collective Agreement, make improved conditions of service relevant to
work/family balance, which are already available to staff on AWAs, available to staff not on
AWAs.
• In planning for a new Collective Agreement for TAFE Teachers, consider improvements to
work/family conditions of service.
• Given the widespread introduction of AWAs, consider the nature of the statistics which can be
collected and monitored in this regard.
• Continue to monitor use of conditions that aim to enable staff to balance work and family
responsibilities.
• Following final assessment of the pilot programs for organisational health, review the
possibility of offering similar services to other units within the University.
6. Dealing with Sex-based Harassment
• Review the University’s Equal Opportunity Policy and Harassment Policy and Procedure.
7.
•
•
Dealing with Pregnant and Potentially Pregnant Employees and Employees who are
Breastfeeding
Through a new Collective Agreement, increase Maternity Leave provisions.
Extend the return-to-work bonus to staff on AWAs.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A PUBLIC DOCUMENT AND THEREFORE WILL BE PUBLISHED ON EOWA’S WEBSITE
Page 2
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
•
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
In planning for a new Collective Agreement for TAFE Teachers, consider improvements to
Parental Leave.
8. Other
• Continue to monitor gender composition of major University decision-making or promotionenhancing committees and gender data on honorary appointments made by University
Council.
4. ACTIONS TAKEN - 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
1. Recruitment and Selection
• Developed and launched a new E-recruitment system which allows for greatly improved
recruitment data gathering and analysis.
• Included wording on advertisements for Professorial vacancies encouraging applications from
women.
2. Promotion, Transfer and Termination
Developed and launched the ‘Mentoring for Success’ Pilot Program directed at female staff at
Academic Levels B and C. Women at these levels were surveyed about attitudes to making
applications for promotion and about what range of mentoring support would be useful. A register of
mentors was established and a six-session program was commenced focussing on supporting those
wishing to apply for promotion.
•
3. Training and Development
• Progressed the development of a leadership for program for female staff through consultations
with female staff across the University; establishment of a Steering Group; appointment of a
consultant – with the aim to commence the program in mid-2007.
• Through the Early Career Researcher Development Program, continued to offer research
development to female Academic Staff who are in the early stages of their research careers eg
through being newly appointed, having just completed doctorates, having had an interrupted
career, or through difficulties in pursuing research interests,.
4. Work Organisation
• On a one-to-one basis, assisted managers with staff returning from Maternity Leave to
understand and implement University expectations on enabling return to the incumbent’s
position on a part-time basis.
• Commenced work on a “Job Share/Job Split/Job Support toolkit” to provide guidelines and
case studies to assist managers and staff in better utilising these work arrangements,
particularly for staff returning from Maternity Leave at a reduced fraction.
5. Conditions of Service
• Made improved conditions of service already available to staff on AWAs, available to more
staff through a Collective Agreement - including increasing paid Maternity Leave and improved
return to work provisions (see part 7 below); increasing paid Adoption Leave to 14 weeks;
strengthening the expectation of approval of an additional year of unpaid leave, and
strengthening return to work expectations to return to their existing position and to a reduced
fraction until the child reaches school age, if desired; increasing paid partner leave from 5 to
10 days and making this leave available to female partners; introducing 2-3 weeks paid Foster
Parent Leave; increasing the amount of leave available for Personal and Carer’s Leave and
extending use of this leave from care for sick family members to a wide range of
circumstances relating to the personal lives of staff.
• Continued to monitor use of conditions that aim to enable staff to balance work and family
responsibilities.
• Whilst there is an increased use of AWAs at the University, at this stage no analysis has been
undertaken from a gender perspective, given the limited amount of variation/negotiation in the
agreements to date. This will be monitored over the coming year.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A PUBLIC DOCUMENT AND THEREFORE WILL BE PUBLISHED ON EOWA’S WEBSITE
Page 3
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
6. Dealing with Sex-based Harassment
• Revised and promulgated the University’s Harassment Policy and Harassment Complaint
Procedure and appointed 25 new Harassment Contact Officers across all University
campuses.
7.
•
•
•
Dealing with Pregnant and Potentially Pregnant Employees and Employees who are
Breastfeeding
Through a new Collective Agreement, increased Maternity Leave provisions for staff with
twelve months or more service, from 12 weeks paid leave to 14 weeks paid leave (already
available to staff on AWAs), plus an additional return-to-work bonus of up to the equivalent of
twelve weeks salary.
Made the return-to-work bonus available to staff on AWAs.
Through a new Collective Agreement, provided eligible casual staff with Maternity and Partner
Leave provisions.
8. Other
• Continued to monitor gender composition of major University decision-making or promotionenhancing committees and gender data on honorary appointments made by University
Council.
5. EVALUATION OF ACTIONS TAKEN – 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
Data on the University’s workplace profile 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007 and other relevant data was
collected and analysed, and compared to previous years’ data. This data is presented in Tables 1 to
19. Drawing on this analysis, the following is an evaluation of the actions undertaken during the
reporting period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007 and an identification of issues for the next reporting
period 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008.
Staff Profile – Overview as at 31 March 2007 compared to 31 March 2006
Overall, there was a continued rise in the number of University staff, the number of female staff and
the proportion of female staff.
General Staff (see Tables 1 and 2)
The overall representation of women in HEW levels 9 and above dropped from 43% in 2006 to 35%
(compared to 33% in 2005). The percentage changes for each level in this range between 2002 and
2007 were: HEW 9 - 38% to 46% (after a rise to 50% in 2006); HEW 10 - 33% to 40% (after a rise to
67% in 2006); HEW 11 and above - 27% to 25% (after a rise to 33% in 2006). Some care is
necessary in interpreting these figures given low numbers at these levels. The proportion of women
at HEW Level 8 rose from 43% in 2006 and 2005 to 54% (having risen from 33% in 2002).
The representation of women a HEW 1-7 levels dropped slightly from 73% to 72%
Overall, the representation of female General Staff dropped slightly from 69% to 68%
Academic Staff (see Tables 3 and 4)
The representation of women at Academic Levels D, E and Above E rose from 24% to 33%.
Representation at Level D rose from 31% to 42%; Level E rose from 19% to 31%, and Above Level E
remained at 0%. Again, it should be noted that there are low numbers at these levels.
At Academic Level C, female representation dropped from 40% to 36%, Level B rose from 43% to
49%, and Level A rose slightly from 68% to 69%.
Overall, the representation of female Academics rose from 45% to 47%.
TAFE Teaching Staff (see Tables 5 and 6)
The proportion of women in managerial positions (SE2 and above) continued to drop; from 43% in
2006 and 56% in 2005, to 41%. However, representation at SE2 remained steady at 47% after a
drop from 62% in 2005.
At SE1 level, representation dropped from 62% to 52%; at AST level it remained steady at 25%, and
at T1-T4 levels representation rose slightly from 37% to 38%.
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Page 4
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
Overall, the representation of female TAFE Teachers continued to decline, from 40% in 2006 (47% in
2004) to 39%.
2. Recruitment and Selection
• Increased attention on encouraging applications from women for senior academic positions
saw an increase in application and success rates. Of the 6 Level E positions recruited 50%
were female (with women representing 53% of applicants). This contributed to the rise in
representation of women at Level E from 19% in 2006 to 31%.
• Due to the implementation of the new e-recruitment system during this reporting period,
comprehensive recruitment data is not included in this report due to difficulties in combining
data from the old and new systems.
3. Promotion, Transfer and Termination
• The 2006 Academic promotion round saw a return to higher success rates for female staff after
a sharp drop in 2005. The application rate for females was higher than males to Levels B, C
and D, and overall the female success rate was higher (female 70% and male 50%). Of the 9
women and 5 men seeking promotion, 7 women and 3 men were successful. This round saw
the first female applications to Level D since 2003, with a 50% success rate, contributing to the
overall rise in representation of women at Level D (from 31% in 2006 42%). There continued to
be no female applications for Level E promotion. (see Table7)
• Whilst the overall number of General Staff seeking reclassification dropped (from 26 to 12),
78% of successful applicants were women. The female success rate dropped slightly from
85% in 2006 to 78% but was higher than the male success rate (67%). At the point where
female over-representation (72% at HEW 7 and below) changes to under-representation (45%
at HEW 8 and above) there were 4 female applications, 3 successful, from HEW Level 7 to 8,
contributing to the overall increase in female representation at HEW 8 from 43% to 54%. (see
Tables 8, 9 and 10)
• Overall there was a small increase in separations, with a total of 131 staff separating,
compared to 124 in the previous year, and 84 and 75 in the two preceding years. The
representation of women amongst staff separating from the University dropped to 59%
compared to 62%, 58% and 63% in the previous reporting periods, which is only slightly higher
than their overall representation rate in the University workforce (56%). With General Staff, the
female separation rate rose to 75% of separations and 80% of resignations, which remained
higher than the overall 68% female representation rate. With Academic Staff, female separation
rates rose to 35% of separations and 39% of resignations, which remained lower than the
overall 47% representation rate. With TAFE Teaching Staff, female separation rates dropped
to 38% of separations and 41% of resignations (compared to 48% and 50% last year), which is
close to the overall 39% representation rate. No analysis is done as yet on the reasons for staff
resignations. (see Tables 11, 12 and 13)
4. Training and Development
•
The Early Career Researcher Development Program continues to build upon the positive evaluations
of previous years, and is an important development program for female Academics wanting to gain
the skills and strategic knowledge needed to become active researchers. In 2006 the participation of
women continued to be strong, with 9 of the 15 participants being women. Of these, one has since
gained promotion to Level C. In 2005, 10 of the 13 participants were women, one of whom since
gained promotion to Level C and 2 to Level B. In 2004, 4 of the 11 participants were women, two of
whom since gained promotion to Level C.
5. Work Organisation
• Early data analysis indicates an increase in uptake of reduced fraction by women on return
from Maternity Leave. Of the 10 women who returned after leave which commenced in
2003/04, 40% reduced their time fraction on return. Of the 16 women who returned to
permanent/contract work after leave which commenced in 2004/05, 56% reduced their time
fraction. Of the 15 women who returned after leave which commenced in 2005/06, 64%
reduced their time fraction. It is too early to get the full picture for 2006/07, as a large number
are still on Maternity Leave. However, of the 7 who have returned, 6 reduced their time
fraction (80%). This would indicate an increased awareness amongst staff and managers of
PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A PUBLIC DOCUMENT AND THEREFORE WILL BE PUBLISHED ON EOWA’S WEBSITE
Page 5
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
the expectation of the University that staff be enabled to access flexible arrangements if they
desire. (see Table 14)
• The use of extended leave options afforded under 48/52 and related arrangements has
continued to rise gradually. In this reporting period 15 women and 4 men used these options
(compared to 14:2 last year). (see Table 15)
• The number of staff using the option to convert to part-time from full-time work dropped from 40
to 28, with 21 of these being women (75%). No research has been undertaken as yet into
reasons for neither conversion nor duration of conversion; however one main reason appears
to be for parenting purposes for women returning from Maternity Leave. Additionally, this data
does not fully capture staff changes in fraction, as it does not reflect reduction in fraction of
those already part-time. (see Table 16)
6. Conditions of Service
• Through a staff Collective Agreement, the amount of leave available for Personal and Carer’s
Leave was increased for staff not on AWAs (the increase already being available to staff on
AWAs); increasing and extending use of this leave from care for sick family members to a wide
range of circumstances relating to the personal lives of staff. Due to recording changes, the
data for this period may not reflect all use of such leave, as the data shows a drop in the
number of staff utilising such leave to 58 from 88 in the last year and 111 staff in the year
before that. The proportion of women using this form of leave continued to drop, to 67%
compared to 72%, 74% and 78% in the preceding 3 years, although still remaining above the
representation of women in the workforce (56%). The drop in apparent use will be monitored
as it was thought that use would increase with the increase in reasons for which such leave
could be taken and the removal of the requirement for a medical certificate for only one day’s
absence in the case of an ill family member. (see Table 17)
• There has been an increased use of AWAs at the University, and the uptake is higher amongst
females (61% of AWAs are held by women). At this stage no analysis has been undertaken
from a gender perspective, given the limited amount of variation/negotiation in the agreements
to date. This will be monitored over the coming year.
7. Dealing with Sex-based Harassment
• One complaint of sexual or sex-based harassment involving staff was dealt with under the
University’s formal procedures, in the reporting period. Two relevant concerns about behaviour
were brought to the Equal Opportunity Manager and were either dealt with by the person
themself, or informally through a Manager.
• The revision of University Harassment Policy and Harassment Complaint Procedure and
appointment 25 new Harassment Contact Officers was aimed at further improving the ability of
staff to resolve concerns effectively. Further awareness activity is planned for 2007 in addition
to on-going initiatives.
8. Dealing with Pregnant and Potentially Pregnant Employees and Employees who are
Breastfeeding
• Whilst still much higher than the average of 13 over the 2000 to 2004 period, there was a slight
decrease in the number of women taking Maternity Leave in the reporting period; 17 compared
to 19 last year and 21 in the year before. To provide a basis for comparison, rudimentary
analysis was undertaken on retention of staff commencing Maternity Leave in the years 2000 to
2004, which showed a ‘loss’ of approximately 14%. This rate rose for staff commencing
Maternity Leave in 2004/05, with 4 resigning at the end of Maternity/related Leave (19%) and
dropped to 16% for staff commencing Maternity Leave in 2005/06, with 3 resigning at the end
of Maternity/related Leave. No research has been done on reasons for resignation, but
anecdotally we understand that some of the women are choosing not to work at all at this time.
(see Table 14)
• Early indications are that the aim to encourage return to work through the ability to return parttime is being achieved, and that this is a popular option. The proportion of women reducing
their time fraction upon return increased from 40% in 2003/04 to 56% in 2004/05 and 64% in
2005/06. A preliminary analysis of the 2006/07 data indicates one woman leaving at the end of
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Page 6
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
Maternity Leave and six reducing their time fraction on return from leave (80%). However, 9
staff members are still on Maternity Leave/related Leave. (see Table 14)
•
Feedback on the initiatives of the Work/Family Balance project has continued to be positive.
Both managers and staff have provided positive feedback on the Maternity Leave Toolkit.
9. Other
•
Continued focus on gender composition on major Decision-making Committees/ Groups has
seen a relatively steady picture, which will continue to be monitored. Female representation
on the University’s Council rose to 58% compared to 55% last year and 48% the year before
(noting 3 vacancies at the time of data gathering). Female representation on Council’s
Standing Committees is generally lower, with the average female representation remaining
steady at 36%. The representation of women on Buildings and Infrastructure Committee
remained at 20%. Female representation on Academic Board dropped to 45% from 52%
(noting 2 vacancies).
•
Data analysis of the honorary appointments made by Council continues to be undertaken given
the gravity and modelling of these appointments. These fall into 3 categories, with differing
levels of female representation: Emeritus Professors (no female); Honorary Doctorates (rose
to 24% from 20% female) and Fellows of the University (remained 11% female). Over all, 48
honorary appointments have been made, 8 to women (17%). In the reporting period, of the 7
Honorary Doctorate appointments, 2 were to women and 5 to men. The one Emeritus
Professor appointment was male.
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Page 7
University of Ballarat
Public Report to EOWA
Reporting Period 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007
6. FUTURE ACTIONS – for 1 April 2007 to 31 March 2008
1. Recruitment and Selection
• Undertake detailed recruitment data analysis on application and success rates by gender.
• Continue to include wording on advertisements for Academic Level E positions encouraging
women to apply.
2. Promotion, Transfer and Termination
• Complete and evaluate the pilot academic mentoring program in order to consider future programs.
3. Training and Development
• Implement and evaluate a pilot Women in Leadership program, open to all continuing/fixedterm female staff.
• Investigate the establishment of a University Institute of Professional and Organisational
Development, which would provide (amongst other goals) greater focus on and coordination of
training and development activity.
• Implement a new on-line training program for all staff focussing on equal opportunity,
discrimination and harassment.
4. Work Organisation
• Develop a 3 rd toolkit under the Work/Family/Personal Life Balance program focussing on job
share, job support, job split options for staff who wish to reduce their fraction. This will provide
guidelines and case studies to assist managers and staff to further utilise these work
arrangements, particularly for staff returning from Maternity Leave at a reduced fraction.
5. Conditions of Service
• Given the widespread introduction of AWAs within the University, and the higher proportion of
women who are employed under AWAs, no system is yet in place to monitor the positive or
negative impact on women. Human Resources staff will consider the nature of the statistics
which can be collected and monitored in this regard.
6. Dealing with Sex-based Harassment
• Review the University’s Equal Opportunity Policy.
• Develop a new poster campaign on harassment and widely publicise the new Harassment
Contact Officer network.
7.
•
Dealing with Pregnant and Potentially Pregnant Employees and Employees who are
Breastfeeding
Increase focus on information provisions to staff and their managers once the staff member
has applied for Maternity Leave – with a focus on the Maternity Leave toolkit, return to work
options and expectations, and the upcoming Job Share/Job Split/Job Support Toolkit.
8. Other
• Conduct a Staff Climate Survey, which will provide information on many of the above areas,
including work and family balance, harassment, equal opportunity for women, workloads,
training and development.
• Continue to monitor gender composition of major University decision-making or promotionenhancing committees and gender data on honorary appointments made by University
Council.
This report has been prepared by Barbara Webb, Manager, Equity and Equal Opportunity.
It is authorised by Professor David Battersby, Vice-Chancellor.
REPORTS ARE ACCEPTED BY EOWA AS A TRUE AND ACCURATE RECORD AND AS HAVING
BEEN APPROVED BY THE CEO OR HIS/HER REPRESENTATIVE.
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Page 8
Tables 1 to 19 follow
Table 1
Employment Basis General Staff at 31 March 2006
Table 2
Employment Basis General Staff at 31 March 2007
Table 3
Employment Basis Academic Staff at 31 March 2006
Table 4
Employment Basis Academic Staff at 31 March 2007
Table 5
Employment Basis TAFE Teachers at 31 March 2006
Table 6
Employment Basis TAFE Teachers at 31 March 2007
Table 7
Gender Analysis of Promotions 2000 – 2006
Table 8
General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2004 – 31 March 2005
Table 9
General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2005 – 31 March 2006
Table 10
General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2006 – 31 March 2007
Table 11
General Staff Separations 1 April – 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Table 12
Academic Staff Separations 1 April – 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Table 13
TAFE Teachers Separations 1 April – 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Table 14
Maternity Leave Commencements and Retention
Table 15
Use of 48/52 or 44/52, 46/52, 50/52
Table 16
Staff Conversion from Full-time to Part-time
Table 17
Use of Family Leave / Personal Leave
Table 18
Gender Composition of Major Decision-making Committees/Groups
Table 19
Council Honorary Appointments
Table 1 Employment Basis General Staff at 31 March 2006
General Staff
Contract
Permanent
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
Total
FTE
Level by Sex 2006
General Staff
HEW 1
HEW 2
HEW 3
HEW 4
HEW 5
HEW 6
HEW 7
HEW 8
HEW 9
HEW10
HEW11 & above
Total
f
56
30
86
175
86
261
347
302
m
25
4
29
108
16
124
153
145
Total
81
34
115
283
102
385
500
447
%f
69
88
75
62
84
68
69
68
%m
31
12
25
38
16
32
31
32
f
2
14
62
104
76
35
26
15
6
2
5
347
m
4
19
16
15
20
18
24
20
6
1
10
153
Total
6
33
78
119
96
53
50
35
12
3
15
500
%f
33
42
79
87
79
66
52
43
50
67
33
69
%m
67
58
21
13
21
34
48
57
50
33
67
31
%f
59
84
67
62
86
69
68
66
%m
41
16
33
38
14
31
32
34
Table 2 Employment Basis General Staff at 31 March 2007
General Staff
Contract
Permanent
Total
FTE
Level by Sex 2007
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
f
66
43
109
173
91
264
373
322
m
46
8
54
106
15
121
175
166
Total
112
51
163
279
106
385
548
488
f
m
Total
%f
%m
4
9
31
69
13
HEW 1
18
16
53
47
34
HEW 2
62
21
75
25
83
HEW 3
107
18
86
14
125
HEW 4
82
21
80
20
103
HEW 5
43
25
63
37
68
HEW 6
23
24
49
51
47
HEW 7
22
19
54
46
41
HEW 8
6
7
46
54
13
HEW 9
2
3
40
60
5
HEW10
4
12
25
75
16
HEW11 & above
Total
373 175
548
68
32
Notes: 1 Above figures include staff on unpaid leave.
2 Although all VPs are recorded internally as Academics, they have been included here in
General Staff data.
3 Where a staff member occupies more than one position, they are counted more than once.
4 Casuals data for 2006 & 2007 has not been included due to system and data constraints.
General Staff
Table 3
Academic
Employment Basis Higher Education Academics 2006
Contract
Permanent
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
Total
FTE
f
12
5
17
76
10
86
103
97
m
23
6
29
95
4
99
128
123
Total
35
11
46
171
14
185
231
220
%f
34
45
37
44
71
46
45
44
%m
66
55
63
56
29
54
55
56
f
30
46
19
5
3
0
103
m
14
60
28
11
13
2
128
Total
44
106
47
16
16
2
231
%f
68
43
40
31
19
0
45
%m
32
57
60
69
81
100
55
Level by Sex 2006
Academic
Level A
Level B
Level C
Level D
Level E
Above Level E
Total
Table 4
Academic
Employment Basis Higher Education Academics 2007
Contract
Permanent
Total
FTE
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
f
24
5
29
77
9
86
115
109
m
31
8
39
83
6
89
128
122
Total
55
13
68
160
15
175
243
231
%f
44
38
43
48
60
49
47
47
%m
56
62
57
52
40
51
53
53
f
31
51
20
8
5
0
115
m
14
54
36
11
11
2
128
Total
45
105
56
19
16
2
243
%f
69
49
36
42
31
0
47
%m
31
51
64
58
69
100
53
Level by Sex 2007
Academic
Level A
Level B
Level C
Level D
Level E
Above Level E
Total
Notes:
1 Above figures include staff on unpaid leave.
2 Casuals data for 2006 & 2007 has not been included due to system and data constraints.
3 Although all VPs and DVCs are recorded internally as Above ACAD E, they are not all
included here. The VPs have been included in General Staff data and the DVC
(Vocational and Further Education) has been included in TAFE data.
4 Where a staff member occupies more than one position, they are counted more than once.
Table 5 Employment Basis TAFE Teachers 2006
Teacher
Contract
Permanent
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
Total
FTE
f
10
13
23
37
33
70
93
77
m
35
12
47
80
15
95
142
134
Total
45
25
70
117
48
165
235
211
%f
22
52
33
32
69
42
40
36
%m
78
48
67
68
31
58
60
64
f
2
3
11
50
2
16
7
0
2
93
m
5
16
30
63
6
10
8
1
3
142
Total
7
19
41
113
8
26
15
1
5
235
%f
29
16
27
44
25
62
47
0
40
40
%m
71
84
73
56
75
38
53
100
60
60
Level by Sex 2006
Teacher
T1
T2
T3
T4
AST
SE1
SE2
SE3
Above SE3
Total
(mgt)
(mgt)
(mgt)
Table 6 Employment Basis TAFE Teachers 2007
Teacher
Contract
Permanent
Full
Part
Total
Full
Part
Total
Total
FTE
f
6
18
24
38
34
72
96
79
m
37
10
47
77
24
101
148
139
Total
43
28
71
115
58
173
244
217
%f
14
64
34
33
59
42
39
36
%m
86
36
66
67
41
58
61
64
f
3
7
8
55
2
12
8
0
1
96
m
10
22
24
62
6
11
9
1
3
148
Total
13
29
32
117
8
23
17
1
4
244
%f
23
24
25
47
25
52
47
0
25
39
%m
77
76
75
53
75
48
53
100
75
61
Level by Sex 2007
Teacher
T1
T2
T3
T4
AST
SE1
SE2
SE3
Above SE3
Total
(mgt)
(mgt)
(mgt)
Notes:
1 Above figures include staff on unpaid leave.
2 Casuals data for 2006 & 2007 has not been included due to system and data constraints.
3 Although the DVC (Vocational and Further Education) is recorded internally as Above
ACAD E, that position has been included here in TAFE Teaching staff data.
4 Where a staff member occupies more than one position, they are counted more than once.
Table 7 Gender Analysis of Promotions 2000 – 2006
Levels
A to B
B to C
C to D
D to E
F
M
F
M
F
F
2006
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
2
1
3
67
1
0
1
3
0
3
100
1
1
2
2
2
4
50
2005
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
0
2
2
0
2004
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
3
1
4
75
2003
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
1
0
1
100
2002
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
1
0
1
100
100
50
1
2
3
33
100
2
0
2
2
0
2
100
100
0
1
1
1
1
2
50
0
1
2
3
1
1
2
3
0
3
100
1
1
2
50
1
0
1
100
M
Total
0
1
1
7
3
10
70
2
2
4
9
5
14
1
0
1
60
100
100
1
1
2
3
0
3
50
100
1
3
4
2
1
3
67
2
2
4
2
0
2
3
4
7
43
1
4
5
20
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
4
2
6
67
1
0
1
50
100
0
6
1
7
11
2
13
45
55
1
5
6
5
7
12
80
20
17
1
1
2
0
1
1
10
90
86
4
0
4
100
5
5
10
9
5
14
44
56
50
1
2
3
33
0
2
1
3
67
10
8
16
82
5
1
6
83
0
1
1
0
1
1
9
2
11
3
2
5
4
4
8
25
75
60
8
2
10
80
4
5
9
44
Overall % of
successful
applications
78
22
50
0
100
3
1
4
75
F
2
0
2
0
0
0
50
50
3
0
3
100
3
2
5
M
0
25
33
2001
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
2000
Successful
Unsuccessful
Total
F success %
M success %
3
0
3
M
All
12
7
19
67
33
Table 8 General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2004 – 31 March 2005
HEW
Level
Female
Applied
Female
Approved
Male
Applied
Male
Approved
% Female
Approved
% Female
Approved
% Male
Approved
(of female
applicants)
(of male
applicants)
3 to 4
3
2
1
0
100
67
0
4 to 5
1
1
1
1
50
100
100
5 to 6
2
1
2
1
50
50
50
6 to 7
1
0
7 to 8
2
2
0
100
100
8 to 9
2
1
50
7 to 9
1
1
100
7
4
Total
9
6
60
67
57
Table 9 General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2005 – 31 March 2006
HEW
Level
Female
Applied
Female
Approved
Male
Applied
3 to 4
7
7
4 to 5
5
5
1
5 to 6
3
1
6 to 7
3
3
6 to 8
7 to 8
1
1
8 to 9
1
0
Total
20
17
Male
Approved
% Female
Approved
% Female
Approved
% Male
Approved
(of female
applicants)
(of male
applicants)
100
100
1
83
100
100
1
1
50
33
100
1
1
75
100
100
1
1
0
2
2
33
100
100
100
0
6
6
74
85
100
Table 10 General Staff Reclassification 1 April 2006 – 31 March 2007
HEW
Level
Female
Applied
Female
Approved
3 to 4
2
2
3 to 5
1
4 to 5
Male
Applied
% Female
Approved
% Female
Approved
% Male
Approved
(of female
applicants)
(of male
applicants)
67
100
1
100
100
1
1
100
100
5 to 6
1
0
0
0
7 to 8
4
3
100
75
9 to 10
Total
9
7
1
Male
Approved
1
1
1
1
0
3
2
100
100
0
78
78
67
Table 11
General Staff – Separations 1 April - 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Female
Male
% Female
% F in
w’force
Apr-07
31
53
75
86
80
63
49
54
46
40
25
Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2004 2005 2006 2007 2004 2005 2006 2007
Hew 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
100
Hew 2
2
0
4
1
2
0
67
0
100
3
4
43
Hew 3
6
8
8
1
0
4
86
100
67
7
1
88
Hew 4
11
10
19
2
0
1
85
100
95
17
0
100
Hew 5
3
7
11
2
1
2
60
88
85
14
1
93
Hew 6
4
2
8
0
4
4
100
33
67
5
4
56
Hew 7
5
1
7
1
1
4
83
50
64
4
3
57
Hew 8
3
1
3
0
5
3
100
17
50
4
4
50
Hew 9
0
1
0
2
0
2
0
100
0
1
0
100
Hew 10 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Hew 11 1
0
0
3
0
2
25
0
0
1
1
50
&
above
30
60
12
13
22
74
70
73
TOTAL 35
57
19
75
68
Of the 82 separations in 05/06, 78 were resignation/no reason recorded (F 76%); 3 were redundancy; 1 was
retirement/ill health.
Of the 76 separations in 06/07, 65 were resignation/no reason recorded (F 80%); 4 were redundancy; 7 were
retirement/ill health/death
Table 12 Academic Staff – Separations 1 April - 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Female
Male
% Female
2004
2005
2006
2007
2004
2005
2006
2007
2004
2005
Level A
4
4
3
1
3
4
1
2
57
Level B
0
6
1
4
4
5
4
13
Level C
3
1
0
3
1
2
5
Level D
0
0
1
1
0
0
Level E
0
0
0
0
0
Above
level E
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
7
11
5
9
Year
% F in
w’force
Apr-07
2006
2007
50
75
33
69
0
55
20
24
49
0
75
33
0
100
36
1
0
-
-
50
100
42
0
0
2
-
-
-
0
31
0
0
1
0
-
-
0
-
0
8
11
12
17
47
50
29
35
47
Of the 17 separations in 05/06, 13 were resignation/no reason (F 31%); 4 were retirement/ill health/death
Of the 26 separations in 06/07, 18 were resignation/no reason (F 39%); 8 were retirement/ill health/death
Table 13 TAFE Teachers – Separations 1 April - 31 March 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007
Female
Male
% Female
2004
2005
2006
2007
2004
2005
2006
Levels
1-4
6
5
9
8
7
6
12
Above
Level 4
0
3
3
3
1
5
TOTAL
6
8
12
11
8
11
Year
% F in
w’force
Apr-07
2004
2005
2006
2007
14
46
45
43
36
38
1
4
0
38
75
43
43
13
18
43
42
48
38
39
2007
Of the 25 separations in 05/06, 22 were resignation/no reason (F 50%); 3 were retirement/ill health/death
Of the 29 separations in 06/07, 27 were resignation/no reason (F 41%); 2 were retirement/ill health/death
Note:
For all 3 Tables above, expiry of contract is not included
Table 14 Maternity Leave Commencements and Retention
Number
Commenced
Retention at
3 months
from end of
ML
Notes
One changed from permanent p/t to
casual on return.
1/4/2000 – 31/3/2001
1/4/2001 – 31/3/2002
13
13
11
11
One resigned 3 months after return
from ML, and one resigned prior to
return from additional Leave without
Pay
Two changed from contract to casual
and one changed from permanent to
casual on return.
Two resigned at the end of unpaid
ML.
1/4/2002 – 31/3/2003
14
12
One resigned at the end of paid ML,
and the other 3 months after return
from ML.
One resigned at the end of unpaid
ML.
1/4/2003 – 31/3/2004
11
10
Four (40%) reduced their time fraction
on return from Leave (retaining their
permanent/contract status).
One changed from permanent p/t to
casual on return.
1/4/2004 – 31/3/2005
21
17
Four resigned at the end of
ML/related leave.
Nine (56%) reduced their time fraction
on return from Leave (retaining their
permanent/contract status).
At time of writing, one is still on related
Leave.
1/4/2005 – 31/3/2006
19
16
Three resigned at the end of unpaid
ML/related leave.
Nine (64%) reduced their time fraction
on return from Leave (retaining their
permanent/contract status).
At time of writing, nine are still on
ML/related Leave.
1/4/2006 – 31/3/2007
17
16
One resigned at the end of ML/related
leave.
Six (80%) reduced their time fraction
on return from Leave (retaining their
permanent/contract status).
Table 15 Use of 48/52, or 44/52, 46/52, 50/52
Female
Male
Total
%
Female
1
0
1
100
50/52
2
0
2
100
Total 2002/03
3
0
3
100%
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
100
4
0
4
100
50/52
3
0
3
100
Total 2003/04
8
1
9
89%
0
2
2
0
2
0
2
100
9
0
9
100
50/52
3
0
3
100
Total 2004/05
14
2
16
88%
44/52
0
2
2
0
46/52
1
0
1
100
48/52
11
0
11
100
50/52
2
0
2
100
Total 2005/06
14
2
16
88%
44/52
0
2
2
0
46/52
1
0
1
100
48/52
13
2
15
87
50/52
1
0
1
100
Total 2006/07
15
4
19
79%
1 April 2002 – 31 March 2003
48/52
1 April 2003 – 31 March 2004
44/52
46/52
48/52
1 April 2004 – 31 March 2005
44/52
46/52
48/52
1 April 2005 – 31 March 2006
1 April 2006 – 31 March 2007
Table 16 Staff Conversion from Full-time to Part-time
Female
Male
Total
% Female
12 month
periods
Fraction
reduced:
to 0.9 - 0.92
03
to
04
04
to
05
05
to
06
06
to
07
03
to
04
04
to
05
05
to
06
06
to
07
03
to
04
04
to
05
05
to
06
06
to
07
03
to
04
04
to
05
05
to
06
-
-
4
2
-
-
0
0
-
-
4
2
-
100
100
to 0.8 – 0.88
4
7
8
5
2
1
3
3
6
8
11
8
67
88
73
63
to 0.7 – 0.75
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
100
100
0
0
to 0.6
1
2
10
10
0
1
3
2
1
3
13
12
100
67
77
83
to 0.5
8
5
6
4
5
3
2
0
14
8
8
4
64
63
75
100
to 0.4
1
-
3
0
1
-
0
1
2
-
3
1
50
-
100
0
TOTAL
Notes:
15
15
31
21
8
5
9
7
23
20
40
28
65
75
78
75
•
these figures do not reflect subsequent changes to fraction eg back to full-time
Table 17 Use of Family Leave / Personal Leave
Female
Male
Total
%
Female
44
19
63
70
940
616
1,556
60
68
19
87
78
1,335
464
1,799
74
82
29
111
74
1,577
787
2,364
67
1 April 2002 – 31 March 2003
Number of staff using Family Leave
Hours of Family Leave Used
1 April 2003 – 31 March 2004
Number of staff using Family Leave
Hours of Family Leave Used
1 April 2004 – 31 March 2005
Number of staff using Family Leave
Hours of Family Leave Used
1 April 2005 – 31 March 2006
Number of staff using Family Leave
Hours of Family Leave Used
63
25
88
72
1,335
450
1,785
75
39
19
58
67
1,192
1,104
2,296
52
1 April 2006 – 31 March 2007
Number of staff using Family
Leave/Personal Leave
Hours of Family Leave/Personal
Leave Used
06
to
07
-
Table 18
Gender Composition of Major Decision-making Committees/Groups
(as at June 2007)
Female
11
Male
8
Total
19
%
Female
58
%
Male
42
3
5
8
38
63
M
3
6
9
33
67
M
2
8
10
20
80
M
4
2
6
67
33
F
1
2
3
33
67
M
13
23
36
36
64
Total Council & Standing
Committees
24
31
55
44
56
17%f
Academic Board
14
17
31
45
55
M
1
5
6
17
83
M
39
53
92
42
58
13% f
University Council
Council Executive Committee
Finance Committee
Buildings and Infrastructure
Committee
Audit Committee
Remuneration Committee
Total Standing Committees
Vice-Chancellor's Senior Team
Total - Major Decision-making
Committees/Groups
Chair
M or F
M
Table 19
Council Honorary Appointments as at June 2007
Emeritus Professors
Honorary doctorates
Fellows of the University
Total Council Honorary
Appointments
Female
0
Male
4
Total
4
% Female
0
% Male
100
6
19
25
24
76
2
17
19
11
89
8
40
48
17
83
Note: Of the seven Honorary Doctorate appointments in the last reporting period, two were
female and 5 were male; and the one Emeritus Professor was male.
Vacancy
3
1
2
6