EXTRAORDINARY CABINET - 20 AUGUST 2010 PUBLIC FORUM BUSINESS

EXTRAORDINARY CABINET - 20 AUGUST
2010
PUBLIC FORUM BUSINESS
A.
QUESTIONS RELATING TO AGENDA ITEMS - ANSWERS WILL BE
AVAILABLE AT THE MEETING
(i)
B.
PUBLIC FORUM REPRESENTATIONS RELATING TO AGENDA ITEMS
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
C.
Councillor Kiely
J & N Bett
Councillor Beynon
GMB Union
NUT Union
St Ursula's Parents' Action Group
PETITIONS RELATING TO AGENDA ITEMS
(i)
St Ursula's Parents' Action Group
Cabinet Meeting
20 August 2010
Questions from Councillor Kiely (with answers)
ST URSULA'S
Q1: Can you confirm that if the Cabinet decide to proceed with a bid for St
Ursula's that capital 'earmarked' for the rebuild of Whitehall school will be
unaffected?
Answer : The funding of the purchase of St Ursula's can be contained within
the current capital programme.
Q2: We have been told that the buildings need 'updating' will this involve
expenditure from the Council?
Answer: No. The Council has not agreed to carry out any work to St
Ursula's in the first year. Thereafter, a decision will be made with Oasis, as
to the future of the school, including expenditure.
Q3: If yes, how much? and where will this money come from?
Answer: Not yes.
Cabinet Meeting
20 August 2010
Statement from Councillor Beynon
ST URSULA'S
It is difficult to comment in detail on these proposals without having seen the
report. However, the Labour Group does appreciate the time constraints the
Cabinet is faced with on this issue. The comments below set out our general
position on the issue of St Ursula's – we look forward to being kept closely
informed of developments as they progress.
As a point of principle, we have no objections to a state primary school on the
St Ursula's site. Need has previously been identified in this part of Bristol,
and it is understandable that the Council is looking further into how the St
Ursula's site could be used. It is a large site, and it seems possible that the
Council could, in time, dispose of some of the land. Given its location, this is
clearly a site of high potential value.
While understanding the Cabinet's wish to press ahead with this proposal, the
Labour Group would like to make the following points, and hope that they will
be considered and addressed by Cabinet.
1. We support the principle of extra primary provision in this area of Bristol.
We do not, however, accept that a case has been made for a state secondary
school on the site. It is important that the Council shows that it supports
neighbouring schools which are improving but still have surplus places.
2. We have every sympathy with the teachers who risk losing their jobs if St
Ursula's closes, and with the young people currently attending the school.
However, this can not be a material consideration in the Council's decision
making. The authority should not, and can not, be in a position where it is
seen to subsidise a private school.
3. Members of the public will rightly be surprised that the Council is making
millions of pounds of cuts, yet can seemingly find money to pay for this large
site. The Cabinet need to make it clear, as a matter of urgency, where the
funding for this purchase will come from, and what projects will be delayed or
cancelled to pay for it.
4. This needs to be a strategic decision. Pressures on primary school places
are, we know, around the corner in other areas of Bristol. The Council must
not find itself in a position in several years time where there is no money to
invest in other areas of the city because it has already been spent purchasing
St Ursula's. Given the uncertainty about Government funding ahead of the
Comprehensive Spending Review, the Cabinet needs to think extremely
carefully before committing to a large capital project that could have
repercussions for the whole of the city.
5. The land deal is certain to be a complex one, and it is important that
covenants can be removed so that the Council can dispose of any excess
land at the site at a commercial rate. We would also wish to ensure that any
covenants restricting the use of the land specifically to Catholic education be
removed.
6. We trust that the Cabinet will continue to keep all parties informed of this
issue as negotiations progress.
Sean Beynon.
Labour Spokesperson for Children, Young People and Skills.
South Western Region
18 August 2010
GMB Submission to Bristol City Council Children’s Scrutiny
Commission and Cabinet Meeting – 20th August 2010
The GMB wish to make the following submission to the Emergency
Agenda Item relating to the proposal by Bristol City Council to
purchase St Ursulas School:
It would appear the current Administration has surpassed itself!
The constant mantra of this Council has been ‘openness and
transparency’ yet if you go to the website for both of these very
important committee meetings to obtain a copy of the report there
is nothing! Therefore how can either interested members of the
public or the trade unions (who have not been consulted on this)
make any informed statement if the information is being withheld
from them? Given the deadline for submission is 12 noon on the
19th August.
This latest debacle comes on the back of many Bristol teaching
and school support staff having to take a reduction in hours or not
having their contracts extended due to lack of funding.
Yet Bristol City Council appear to be able to ‘buy’ St Ursula’s
School in order to hand it over to Oasis as another ‘sell off’ of our
schools – how? Clearly this is speculation on behalf of the GMB
as we can only go by what we have read or heard in the media but
clearly, as we saw from the last ‘consultation’ on the budget cuts
and potential job losses and attacks upon our members terms and
conditions – entitled the ‘Big Debate’ the Council prefer to inform
the media first and their staff and their representatives last.
The GMB would like to know before any school is ‘bought’ what
impact will this have upon the surrounding schools in that part of
the City – Portway, Redland Green and Henbury? Clearly
Redland Green is over subscribed (as expected), Portway is
another school given to Oasis so presumably they will have the
funds to carry on but what about Henbury? Will they go the way
as Merrywood Girls and Boys, Lawrence Weston and Penn Park?
The GMB is not against the Council saving jobs and we actively
promote improved education for Bristol children but what the
Council is proposing appears to have been done hastily and ‘on
the back of an envelope’ approach yet again.
It the Council can ‘buy’ St Ursula’s then it can ensure all school
support and teaching staff do not have to take reduced hours or
have their contracts renewed!
In the Autumn the Cabinet will be deciding upon the future of
residential care for one of the most vulnerable groups of our
community – older people. Will they now keep all the residential
care homes open and continue to fund and provide care in the
community or will they tell us they cannot ‘afford’ to continue to
provide this level of care across the City?
If this Council can afford to ‘buy’ a school they can afford to ensure
the older people of Bristol are able to have a choice and are
confident they will receive a high level of care provided by in-house
services!
Staff are now being informed the Council will ‘cap’ redundancy
payments in order to save money; those same staff are being told
the pay protection will be reduced and other changes to council
policy affecting staff’s terms and conditions.
The consultation is being undertaken over the holiday period
(August/early September) with a report being put to the HR
committee on 24th September. Yet another example of the ‘bull
dozer effect’ which is now the new culture of Bristol City Council
who spend millions of pounds of tax payers money on consultants
and yet pay their apprentices £2.71 per hour. The response from
the Council to the GMB ‘if the council paid their apprentices any
more, managers would not offer them jobs’. Yet some
apprentices are undertaking significant range of duties and
responsibilities graded at a much higher pay rate but not paid the
rate for the job.
The GMB therefore ask the City Council via the Scrutiny
Commission and the Cabinet how they can afford to ‘buy’ a school
in a leafy suburb of Bristol?
The GMB would also like to ask the City Council via the Scrutiny
Commission and the Cabinet why they cannot fund an elderly
people’s home in Hartcliffe (Hollybrook) which closed last year and
is lying empty because they cannot afford to carry out the
proposed update.
Why can’t the Council re-open it as an elderly people’s home – or
is it because it is not on the right side of Bristol and is therefore not
considered ‘leafy’ enough!
Rowena Hayward
Organisation Officer
Bristol Office: 4 Hide Market, Waterloo Street, Bristol, BS2 0BH
Telephone: (0117) 9554470
Fax: (0117) 9554409
BRISTOL TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION
Secretary: Nina Franklin
56 Rousham Road Eastville Bristol BS56XL
Tel : 0117 9510009 Mobile : 07816686232
e-mail : [email protected]
website : http://local.teachers.org.uk/bristol
18th August 2010
RESPONSE TO THE CHILDREN’S SERVICES SCRUTINY COMMISSION AND THE CABINET ON
FRIDAY 20TH AUGUST
The Bristol Branch of the National Union of Teachers is concerned to learn via reports which have appeared in
the local media that Bristol City Council is discussing the purchase of St.Ursulas School. There has been
absolutely no consultation with any of the Trade Unions about this and no consultation with tax payers or the
electorate about this proposal. At the time of writing this submission there are no papers available with any
explanations or costings related to this proposal. Reports in the Press seem to suggest that the City Council
proposes to purchase this to enable Oasis, an independent Christian organisation, to run it as a fee paying
school prior to opening some sort of academy on the site. Why is Council tax payers’ money being spent in this
way when our own community schools are strapped for cash and could really do with this kind of money being
spent on them ? If the Council has this money available to them can we have a guarantee that an equal
amount will be made available to the City’s community schools ?
The Union has members at St.Ursulas who have not been paid since June 2010 and have been issued with
redundancy notices by Grant Thornton who are the receivers and who have started the process of claiming
redundancy pay capped at £380 per week from the Government scheme. Whilst welcoming the fact that
members at St.Ursulas may have jobs in September and presumably can look forward to Bristol City Council
reimbursing them with the money they have lost we have grave concerns about this proposal as it relates to
an independent school.
There are many schools within the local authority who have struggled with deficit budgets this year and have
had to make redundancies. In one case, mismanagement by City Council officers of the energy bills at the
school have led to the school facing a huge deficit in order to cover the costs of unpaid energy bills of which
they had no knowledge. The Council has also closed several good local community schools over the years, the
most recent being Stockwood Green, on the grounds that they were too small to be economically viable.
Through its actions the Council has ripped the hearts out of local communities. Several pupils who have had to
move to other schools at crucial times in their careers have suffered greatly and been unable to achieve good
results at GCSE due to the disruption caused by school closures. The most recent example of this being the
closure of St.Thomas More where pupils in Year 10 were forced to spend two terms at the old Fairfield
buildings prior to the new school being built on the old St.Thomas More site. Despite agreeing to monitor
progress of such pupils the Council has never admitted to the consequences of its actions for these pupils
although it was clear for all to see in the eventual results.
The Council has further supported the ‘selling off ‘ of several community schools to the private sector so that
they have become academies. Improved results have been claimed by the massaging of examination results
and the inclusion of vocational examinations. The reality is that that these results have been improved only
marginally when English and Maths have been taken into account and also that the existing teachers have
remained in the schools and contributed by their consistent hard work to the raising of standards which they
were already working towards anyway. These schools and their land and their resources have been placed by
the Council in the hands of the private sector, they have received millions of pounds of tax payers money over
which taxpayers have no democratic control.
Now we see these meetings urgently convened to consider whether the Council uses council tax payers money
to buy an independent school where parents have rejected the education provided by the Council’s own
schools and, if we can believe all that we have read in the media, in order that it can support Oasis, to open
an academy on the site in the future. It is ironic that this comes only a few weeks after the closure of
Stockwood Green school. How must the parents and pupils in that school community be feeling when they
hear this news ? I am sure we will hear lots of fine explanations and criticisms of the NUT today for making
these statements, lots of fine words from councillors in justification of their proposed actions but how can
these actions be justified in the minds of the communities in the poorer areas of Bristol who have lost their
local schools ?
If we look at the history of school closure in this city all of the schools which have been closed have been in
the most needy areas of the city certainly not in leafy Westbury on Trym. Have Councillors even considered
the effect that a school in this area could have on local community schools ? It is unbelievable when we look
back at all the studies which were commissioned for the ill fated Primary Review and for previous school
closures to justify the Council’s actions and yet here we have committees convened with no notice and no
reports available in advance of the deadline for making submissions. This is a grossly irresponsible decision
making.
Only last week Trade Unions were invited to a consultation meeting, once again convened in a hurry, in
August when many people are on holiday. This meeting was convened because the Council officers want to
rush through proposals to cap the amount of redundancy pay they pay to council workers losing their jobs in
anticipation of the Government spending cuts which will be announced in October. We already know that
Bristol City Council faces some very harsh decisions on funding in the next few months and we know that
many loyal council workers will lose their jobs.
Why should council workers be facing redundancy and communities facing cuts to vital services while the
Cabinet members decide whether or not to spend the City’s money on purchasing St,Ursulas ?
On behalf of the NUT I say to the Council that if you can afford this purchase then you have the money not to
impose jobs cuts on the workforce and not to attempt to callously save money by attacking our terms and
conditions. On behalf of many of my colleagues in sister trade unions and the growing group of people who
are working across all sectors in the Bristol Anti Cuts Alliance I ask you to consider whether you can justify
spending our money this way when you have closed other schools and face making this workforce redundant.
Nina Franklin
STATEMENT OF SUPPORT
From St. Ursula’s Parents’ Action Group
19th August 2010
Bristol City Council
Democratic Services
Room 211
The Council House
College Green
Bristol BS1 5TR
This statement of support is from the Parents’ Action Group that was formed when
we heard the devastating news that St Ursula’s School was taken into administration.
The group’s purpose is to work positively with all parties to maintain continuity of
education at the school, and a long-term solution that meets children’s needs.
Parents, teachers, pupils and supporters have worked together to help secure the
future of the school. We would like to show our support for Bristol City Council’s bid
to purchase St Ursula’s School land and premises, with Oasis Community Learning
running the school as fee-paying in 2010/11, and intended academy status in due
course (probably starting in September 2011).
Our e-petition (located at http://save2010.epetitions.net/ ) has to date reached 572
signatures, and we have well over 300 paper signed signatures. This demonstrates a
wide level of support for the school remaining open, well beyond current school
members, and across the local community.
Along with the St Ursula’s site comes an existing, functioning school, with infrastructure, staff,
pupils and a strong community ethos. It has remained a consistently good performer in academic
and social terms.
Oasis are a tried-and-tested education provider, with a track record of transforming schools.
Their management and resources are well-equipped to migrate the school from independent
status to a state entity. With the council’s intended actions in purchasing the school site, this will
provide vital ongoing education, whilst preparing for a long-term solution.
Notably, the current St Ursula’s population represents a wide social and academic spectrum and
also accommodates many students with special needs – unusual traits for any school. Of course
many St. Ursula’s pupils don’t have these needs, or they have particular gifts or talents, perhaps
in academic, sporting or artistic disciplines. The school nurtures the talents of each child, to the
best of their ability, which gives each one of them a sense of achievement.
Whilst currently a fee-paying school, it is not the preserve of the well-off, and many families
make significant financial sacrifices because they can’t find a suitable alternative solution for their
child’s education. Without St. Ursula’s, it’s difficult to see an educational future for many of these
children. Any interruption of education on the site would lead to the displacement of all current
pupils, which would be very unsettling, especially to the more vulnerable.
The clear intent from the school community to keep the St. Ursula’s open is shown by large
numbers committing to places for September 2010, and there is strong interest from new
parents. It is likely that with a clear plan for Oasis management and academy status that pupil
numbers will rise considerably in the coming months.
The site is situated in an area where the need for additional school spaces at both primary and
secondary level is demonstrable not just now, but for many years into the future. Local primary
schools are heavily oversubscribed, and the council has taken steps to address an unprecedented
demand for places. This will in time lead to an even higher demand for secondary places, and
the success of the council-founded Redland Green School demonstrates the potential for success
at St. Ursula’s.
If the school becomes an academy, its unique ethos will be made available to the wider
community for many years to come.
Whilst the Bristol City Council’s plan to purchase the site might be seen as unconventional, it is
surely a cost-effective way to maintain education for St. Ursula’s children in the short term, and
in future, help provide much needed education in this area of Bristol, as part of their city-wide
plan.
We are pleased that the council are responding positively and decisively to this opportunity and it
agrees with some of the principles set out in the Council’s own ‘Greater than the sum of the
parts: developing the school system in Bristol - June 2010’ head teachers’ discussion paper on
schools:
-
‘However much remains to be done to consolidate changes made, build capacity
throughout the system ...’ (p. 1)
-
‘Within the present economic climate there is an imperative to secure the best use of
existing resources.’ (p. 5)
-
‘Maximise capacity, efficiency and sustainability’ (p. 7)
This is not a question of ‘saving St Ursula’s’ with taxpayers money. It is a question of taking
action now to secure a site in northwest Bristol, with some of the most favourable circumstances
(and lowest costs) it is possible to imagine, for the future of educating Bristol’s children.
We are committed individually and collectively to ensuring St. Ursula’s long-term future as an
excellent school.
For and behalf of the Parents’ Action Group
St Ursula’s School
Accompanying documents:
-We are arranging with Democratic Services to deliver our paper petition either at, or before
Friday’s council meeting
-Print-out of e-petition
Parents’ Action Group Contact details:
Chris Thurling (Chair)
Shelly Hill
Andy White
Sara Achha
Andrew Thatcher
07976160903
07950374565
07971544709
07798822889
07788148223
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
BRISTOL TEACHERS’ ASSOCIATION
Secretary: Nina Franklin
56 Rousham Road Eastville Bristol BS56XL
Tel : 0117 9510009 Mobile : 07816686232
e-mail : [email protected]
website : http://local.teachers.org.uk/bristol
18th August 2010
RESPONSE TO THE CHILDREN’S SERVICES SCRUTINY COMMISSION AND THE CABINET ON
FRIDAY 20TH AUGUST
The Bristol Branch of the National Union of Teachers is concerned to learn via reports which have appeared in
the local media that Bristol City Council is discussing the purchase of St.Ursulas School. There has been
absolutely no consultation with any of the Trade Unions about this and no consultation with tax payers or the
electorate about this proposal. At the time of writing this submission there are no papers available with any
explanations or costings related to this proposal. Reports in the Press seem to suggest that the City Council
proposes to purchase this to enable Oasis, an independent Christian organisation, to run it as a fee paying
school prior to opening some sort of academy on the site. Why is Council tax payers’ money being spent in this
way when our own community schools are strapped for cash and could really do with this kind of money being
spent on them ? If the Council has this money available to them can we have a guarantee that an equal
amount will be made available to the City’s community schools ?
The Union has members at St.Ursulas who have not been paid since June 2010 and have been issued with
redundancy notices by Grant Thornton who are the receivers and who have started the process of claiming
redundancy pay capped at £380 per week from the Government scheme. Whilst welcoming the fact that
members at St.Ursulas may have jobs in September and presumably can look forward to Bristol City Council
reimbursing them with the money they have lost we have grave concerns about this proposal as it relates to
an independent school.
There are many schools within the local authority who have struggled with deficit budgets this year and have
had to make redundancies. In one case, mismanagement by City Council officers of the energy bills at the
school have led to the school facing a huge deficit in order to cover the costs of unpaid energy bills of which
they had no knowledge. The Council has also closed several good local community schools over the years, the
most recent being Stockwood Green, on the grounds that they were too small to be economically viable.
Through its actions the Council has ripped the hearts out of local communities. Several pupils who have had to
move to other schools at crucial times in their careers have suffered greatly and been unable to achieve good
results at GCSE due to the disruption caused by school closures. The most recent example of this being the
closure of St.Thomas More where pupils in Year 10 were forced to spend two terms at the old Fairfield
buildings prior to the new school being built on the old St.Thomas More site. Despite agreeing to monitor
progress of such pupils the Council has never admitted to the consequences of its actions for these pupils
although it was clear for all to see in the eventual results.
The Council has further supported the ‘selling off ‘ of several community schools to the private sector so that
they have become academies. Improved results have been claimed by the massaging of examination results
and the inclusion of vocational examinations. The reality is that that these results have been improved only
marginally when English and Maths have been taken into account and also that the existing teachers have
remained in the schools and contributed by their consistent hard work to the raising of standards which they
were already working towards anyway. These schools and their land and their resources have been placed by
the Council in the hands of the private sector, they have received millions of pounds of tax payers money over
which taxpayers have no democratic control.
Now we see these meetings urgently convened to consider whether the Council uses council tax payers money
to buy an independent school where parents have rejected the education provided by the Council’s own
schools and, if we can believe all that we have read in the media, in order that it can support Oasis, to open
an academy on the site in the future. It is ironic that this comes only a few weeks after the closure of
Stockwood Green school. How must the parents and pupils in that school community be feeling when they
hear this news ? I am sure we will hear lots of fine explanations and criticisms of the NUT today for making
these statements, lots of fine words from councillors in justification of their proposed actions but how can
these actions be justified in the minds of the communities in the poorer areas of Bristol who have lost their
local schools ?
If we look at the history of school closure in this city all of the schools which have been closed have been in
the most needy areas of the city certainly not in leafy Westbury on Trym. Have Councillors even considered
the effect that a school in this area could have on local community schools ? It is unbelievable when we look
back at all the studies which were commissioned for the ill fated Primary Review and for previous school
closures to justify the Council’s actions and yet here we have committees convened with no notice and no
reports available in advance of the deadline for making submissions. This is a grossly irresponsible decision
making.
Only last week Trade Unions were invited to a consultation meeting, once again convened in a hurry, in
August when many people are on holiday. This meeting was convened because the Council officers want to
rush through proposals to cap the amount of redundancy pay they pay to council workers losing their jobs in
anticipation of the Government spending cuts which will be announced in October. We already know that
Bristol City Council faces some very harsh decisions on funding in the next few months and we know that
many loyal council workers will lose their jobs.
Why should council workers be facing redundancy and communities facing cuts to vital services while the
Cabinet members decide whether or not to spend the City’s money on purchasing St,Ursulas ?
On behalf of the NUT I say to the Council that if you can afford this purchase then you have the money not to
impose jobs cuts on the workforce and not to attempt to callously save money by attacking our terms and
conditions. On behalf of many of my colleagues in sister trade unions and the growing group of people who
are working across all sectors in the Bristol Anti Cuts Alliance I ask you to consider whether you can justify
spending our money this way when you have closed other schools and face making this workforce redundant.
Nina Franklin
Save St. Ursula’s School Parents’ Action Group
e-petition
This is a copy of the 572 names collected at http://save2010.epetitions.net/ in support of St.
Ursula’s School, up to 11:50 on Thursday 19th August 2010
The statement that all names on this e-petition support is:
“St Ursula's school in Bristol has been placed in administration, but there is still
hope that the school can be saved and turned into a free all-through academy by
Sept 2011. Unless the school can be saved almost 200 children face the prospect of
not having a place for September. St Ursula’s is a non-selective school that serves
the needs of a wide variety of children – both the highly gifted and those with
particular educational and social challenges.
The parents come from a wide variety of backgrounds. It is not the preserve of the
really well off. Many families make significant financial sacrifices because they can’t
find a suitable alternative solution in Bristol. If the school becomes an all-through
academy its unique ethos will be made available to the wider community.
This petition has been setup by the Parent's Action Group who are coordinating
efforts to save the school. Please lend us your support by signing the petition.
People power can make a huge difference.”
1 Chris Thurling
2 Caren Mitchell
3 Paul Woolley
4 Angela James
5 Tanya Ball
6 lizzy westney
7 Andrew White
8 Janet McBride
9 Sara Achha
10 Frances Cox
11 Shannon Pincott
12 Bryan Nutter
13 Melvyn Wright
14 Angela Nutter
15 Andrew Thatcher
16 Clare Thatcher
17 Paula Obery
18 Hilton Obery
19 gemma buchan
20 david buchan
21 caroline bayford
22 Jayne Anstis
23 Stephanie Forge
24 magda krzyzewska
25 Debbie Penfold
26 Anna Eddy
27 Sarah Milsom
28 Margarita Lianeri
29 rachel luck
30 Sally Wytchard
31 Yasmin Thatcher
32 George Thatcher
33 Kate Jones
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Esther White
John Whiter
Hannah Pincott
Emily Batty
Debbie Bees
Sophie White
Rach Ashton
Liam Shaw
Dan Masters
libby thompson
Fran Simmons
Susan Smith
Jane Heron
krystyna abdulgader
Caroline Sharp
Maisie Thurling
Caroline Wheeler
Shelly Hill
Brenda Hamblin
Emily Culverhouse
Jane Robinson
Paul Tucker
Laura Meredith-Hobbs
Elaine Graham
glyne archer
Robert Graham
jacqui shepcott
DAVID ANTONIO SMITH
Amanda Apple
Elizabeth Beavis
Helen Hart
cari steffel
Andrew Beavis
67 salina roe
68 stuart mcpherson
69 hasan abdulgader
70 Valerie Williams
71 natasha mahesan
72 jasmine mahesan
73 chelian mahesan
74 anastasia corellis
75 Hollie Eden
76 Stew Eddy
77 karen trueman
78 Joanna Plant
79 catherine morris
80 Marissa Rojas
81 Genevieve Burton-Hussain
82 Rosie Thurling
83 Lin Ashurst
84 jayne wright
85 June Roost
86 TANYA LEWIS
87 Anna Sudlow
88 Melissa Tothill
89 sarah barnett
90 Stewart North
91 Sonya Nutter
92 Olena MacNichol
93 Ros Peters
94 lloyd thomas
95 Andie Chuang
96 Sarah Hazell
97 Claire Bridgewater
98 Lis Durbin
99 Debbie Woolley
100 carol koundakjian
101 RICCARDO NAYIM SMITH
102 Adrian Wheeler
103 VITA FRANCESCA SMITH
104 Jack MACMILLAN
105 Kathryn Johnson
106 Nicola Williams
107 Tamar Hankinson
108 Jack Bamford
109 Craig Jones
110 louise cavender
111 Janet Fletcher
112 Nick Hamer
113 Niamh Hamer
114 Reuben Hamer
115 David Round
116 Esther Round
117 Stephen Coles
118 steve liles
119 Claire Gillespie
120 rob manns
121 Alexandra Bryant
122 Elizabeth Stuczyk
123 Olivia Vandyk
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Darren Birch
Helene Birch
Angela Knowles
Sophie Birch
Nadine Rimmer
Julian Millward
Julie Cutler
Janis Smith
elisa allan
Tazz Johnson
Ian James
Stephanie Duffield
magda szczepanska
Lydia Pincott
Renie Shaw
scott morgan
Kathryn allen
Jackie Aquilina
Julie Owens-Powell
Jeni Davis
Martina Helene Welander
Neil Bett
Nick Raven
Narindar Kaur
Lisa Carlisle
Lucie Spaight
Ria Ball
Iwein Dekoninck
Patric Bulmer
Mandi Wilson
Andrew Arnott
Laura Fletcher
Elisabeth Drewry
Jessica Bett
kate shaw
Andreas Themis
Jean Upward
Biren Minhas
Kheng Ong
Sarah Down
Keith Ruby
Kate Hardstaff
louise jones
Wendy Skuse
marta bolognani
Helen Banham (nee Fox)
kim lucas
John Morrish
Lisa Harbridge
Angie Ryan
Naj Rymarz
Martin Froud
Barbara Whitchurch
Christopher Blackford
Kirsty Roberts
Johanna Barton
Richard Lloyd
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
Emily Wheeler
tony thurling
Mark Mason
Dr. Sean MacBlain
bekki manning
Melanie Wyatt
Jim Goddard-Jones
Paula Robinson
Elaine Day
Rachel Finn
tony colliver
Ian Lambert
Shaun McHale
Helen Wills
Hazel Rolston
Sarah Bawn
Josh Bryan
Sally Tullett
bridget kennerley
Sue McCarthy
John Kennedy
Jeremy Brooks
Tina Ayers-Hunt
chris york
Becky McCarthy
Katie McCarthy
Andrew Hackman
Angela Bowling
Lili Roth
sarah burgess
Faheem Pervez
Sarah O'Neill
Ailsa Hesketh
Kathryn Spencer
Faye Davis
Peter Allchorne
Sue Richardson
Sue Evans
Harriet Evans
Emily Tanner
stephen favali
Angie Douglas
Oliver Williamson
Katrina Davies
Paul Flower
Jane Weston
Cathy Pearce
John Pearce
Sheila White
jo cunio
Anna Zielinska
kathryn harper
Victoria Themis
Joanna Sibbald
Jane McKimm
sarah wells
Nicola Ward
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
3
Jessica Haynes
Martin Mills
Zac Jones
peter finch
Jaqueline Parsons
Sharifa Naqui
mat leaver
Elizabeth Wilson
Teresa Regini
Marc Genin
Nigel Evans
Julian Bryant
ananda 0'kelly
Stephanie Hughes
Jenni Fortescue
ian wells
Frank Shaw
w briggs
Nigel Harding
steven blackmore
Tracey Henniker
Gregory Moor
Lin Clements
Liz Sarsfield
Gillian Evans
Mark Robinson
Rapinder Judge
sarah smith
Julie Bassett
kim stokes
Damian O'Donovan
Ali Twigg
Miriam Davies
Roberta Johnson
denis watling
Sarah Dunbavand
Ann McGhee
Anna Sutton
Sian Parry
Chris Lester
Nathalie Lemmy
nigel fletcher
Mary Pincott
Maria Vahdati
Ambz IQ
Kathryn Newport
Alison Lawrence
Liz Blakeborough
roger bartlett
Aileen Murray
kath smith
suzie jeenes
Jayne Ball
jane marks
Ellesha Irving
Chris Dance
Neil Welton
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
jemma iles
caro marshall
Jamie Plumley
Ellinor Bourdeaux
Victoria Hartland
Richard Vernon
Dave North
Paul Boobyer
Andrew Brace
peter wells
Tom Redfern
Matthew Cunio
pathikrit banerjee
Rick Moore
Tim Sinclair
Dennis Ryan
Andi Ford
Amanda Norman
Matt French
Elizabeth Edmunds
Ruth Jackson
mary chater
warweick fortescue
helen chope
Denise Howard
Lauren Grist
Paul Howard
Jeremy Rimmer
Oliver Pinnock
Anna Derrick
Gill Jones
Susan Millington
Melanie Steadman
Bernard Rugg
Katie Brake
Valerie Brake
Nick Kennerley
Craig Ruff
Tarna Hillier
Emma Houghton
Paul Vickery
beverley king
Sarah Jamieson
Mitch Sullivan
sam white
Nigel Williams
Mary Lawrence
Adrian Morse
Steven Grant
richard freeman
anne Wells
Felix Wright
aniekan akpan
Nikki Ingram
Suzannah McGavin
sharon webb
Elaine Brown
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
4
Robert Tapper
Carole Tapper
phil oliver
Ashleigh Skuse
Vikki Miller
Alan Bannister
chrissie barlow
Louise Stephens
Rachael Scrase
Laura Cook
Keith Pitches
Leslie Rowe
Jake Tucker
Brendon Windget
Stewart Bailey
Darren McKimm
Rebecca Oxenham
Lorraine Lewis
Sagren Rajh
Matt Cooper
Christopher Rata
Magda Dering
Miranda-Jane Pinder
Hazel Rugg
Jeffery Wright
Kala Punniyamoorthy
Geethaa Moorthy
Christopher Hyland
Fiona Hyland
Patrick Hyland
Jayne Wood
Moorthy Arumugam
Neethan Punniyamoorthy
Kalaichselvi Punniyamoorthy
Charlotte Jones
nicolette melliti
debra palmer
Jill d'Esterre
Ola Adetola
Lis Wolfe
Phillip Steadman
Ian Crowthetr
Rich Stevens
Linda Coles
John Formby
Mark Woodman
Sachin Somaiya
lisa campioni-norman
Claire Matthews
justin brett
anita mckimm
Cath Johansen
Julia Whitehead
Julie Waters
Stewart Martin
Aime Southgate
sarah bain
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
Mary Knapman nee Woodman
Igor Khaliulin
Julia Skinner
Mike Andrews
Lindsay Andrews
Carol Laslett
Maria Lucia Baroni
Kate Lane
Corinne Winter-Alsop
Julie Turner
Tracey Abrahams
Jane Jackson
David Abrahams
Thomas Abrahams
Mia Abrahams
John McGill
Lorraine Ashbury
Andrew Murley
austin kwentua
Margarida R. da Silva
Alex Calder
juliet oakhill
Helen Hickling
Julie Lawrence
Carmel O'Hara
Anthony Willis
Tara Gillam
Dan McKimm
Heather Lewington
Charlotte Laurence
Sarah Cording
Martin Luck
Merryn Gillam
Victoria Owens
Inge Dowden
Nick Dowden
Stephanie Weston
Cllr. Alex Pearce
sarah brown
Kim Hicks
anna carus-wilson
Gaye Matthews
Deirdre Bett
Dan Gould
Robert Bett
nicky mitchell
Adam Woodroffe
Gabriel Hutchinson
Emma Redstone
Tony Laurence
Jennifer Willis
Lynette Carter
Suzette Worthington
Graham Marshall
Caroline Hunt
Aleksandra Furmanczyk
Ollie Neale
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
5
Mark Belger
Jane Belger
clare rata
Caroline Morris
Mary Carr
Sylvain Fabre
oma kwentua
Rachel Jones
Miriam Snape
Georgina Ayers-Hunt
Quintin Dawson
Carl Melegari
Deborah Mason
Penelope Jamieson
Mark Compton
Jacqui Melegari
Zoe Melegari
Louis Melegari
andrea mannion
Kenrina Thomas
Robert Daszkiewicz
Ian Lovelock
victoria gee
matthew hickling
Jo Williams
andrea hamilton
Celia Wrighton
antoinette jackson
Katie Johnson
Edmund Bett
chris perks
Simon Greener
Clive Benton
Keith Jackson
Hayley Thomas
rebecca mitchell
Sarah Harris
Rosemary Rodwell
honora farley
Tania Hindmarch
Phoebe Howie
Andy Cole
Terry Cording
Rachel Birch
Susan Wilkinson
Susan du Kamp
kathryn Brackley
Faustina Titus-Glover
Shaun Parker
Dominic Mafham
Laureen Clew
Elizabeth Jones (nee Bright)
Abida Bashir
John Willis
Jennifer Cording
Emma Jeffrey
Claire Hall
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
546
547
Isabella Clarke
Judith Badmin
michael henry
faigie kopelman
Wayne Pincott
margaret henry
Michael Adler
selina whitehead
Alison Gibson
susan mcarthur
meryn eden
Sue Fyvel
jerry eden
Jon Beardmore
joanna snowden
Claire Whitney
Chris Jones
Pete Fairhurst
Hilary Sayer
Caroline Hall
Alison Moore
Marcus Pugh
Jackie Brookes
Tania Jane Rawlinson
Nick Rawlinson
548
549
550
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
561
562
563
564
565
566
567
568
569
570
571
572
End of current e-petition signatures
6
Joe Bullock
jon waring
Lauren White
ross mackenzie
Jennifer Boyd
Fiona Calvert
Lisa Ferrari
Nadia Chauvin
Caroline Price
Robin Carr
Claudia Mann
William Harwin
Teresa Mazzotta
Kathryn McManus-Jones
Peter Jackson
Yuliya Bashmakova
Patrick Callaghan
Becky Rowe
Chris Emery
sasha fearon
Bridget Hedaux
Maria Polledri
Nick Wray
Barbara Walshe
Jill Brain
`