new moves conference e-book and program APA CONFERENCE 2013 MELBOURNE, 17–20 OCTOBER

conference e-book and program
new moves
APA CONFERENCE 2013
MELBOURNE, 17–20 OCTOBER
MELBOURNE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE
physiotherapy.asn.au/conference2013
APA Physiotherapy Conference Committees 2013
Conference Advisory Committee
Scientific Program Committee
Craig Bosworth
(Chair)
Anne Sammells
Acupuncture and Dry Needling
Lucy Chipchase
Brooke Marsh
Animal
Paul Coburn
Nicki Doyle
Amy Fagan
Charles Flynn
Henry Wajswelner
APA Staff
Kylie Bierman
Conference & Events
Cynthia de Fazio
Conference & Events
Vicki Smith
General Manager, Learning and
Development Division
Ruth Heenan
General Manager, Marketing and
Communications and External Relations
Maree Whittingham
Senior Advertising and Business
Development Coordinator
Anne Daly
Aquatic
Michael Dermansky
Physiotherapy Business Australia
Catherine Granger
Cardiorespiratory
Libby Oldfield
Continence and Women’s Health
Katherine Maka
Emergency Department
Maureen McEvoy
Educators
Jan Taylor
Gerontology
Adam Govier
Physiotherapy Leadership
Management Group
Leanne Bisset
Musculoskeletal
Suzanne Kuys
Neurology
Alicia Spittle
Paediatric
Richard Fuller
Occupational Health
Henry Wajswelner
(Scientific Program Chair)
Sports
2
Welcome message
Chair, APA Conference 2013 Advisory Committee
Welcome to the APA Conference
2013 Melbourne.
We hope you find the fourth National
APA Conference is both a stimulating and
entertaining forum.
This year’s conference, ‘New Moves’ is all about new
moves in physiotherapy: new ideas, new debates,
new ways of looking at things, and of course, new
ways of doing them.
With a terrific line up of international and Australian
speakers; and an expected audience of almost 2000
physiotherapists, ‘New Moves’ will also be a great
networking opportunity to meet new colleagues
and re-engage with past ones.
Members from the profession’s National groups
have worked diligently over the last 12 months to
develop an innovative and stimulating program for
delegates. While the program will focus on new
research and developments; this will not just be
debating the theory but translating how individuals
and the profession as a whole, can use them to
benefit our clients. This year there has been a
concerted effort across groups to share speakers
and topics to enhance knowledge sharing across
the profession. We believe this has resulted in both
a more sophisticated and embracing program for all
conference delegates.
While you are here in Melbourne, discover why it
is regularly awarded the title of ‘The World’s Most
Liveable City’. Whether it be sampling many of
Melbourne’s world-class food and retail experiences;
joining us on one of the many social events planned;
or simply discovering your own unique part of the
city, you will find your stay a most enjoyable one.
Thank you to the representatives of the APA
National groups, the members of the Conference
Advisory Committee and the Conference Organising
Committee, who have collectively spent many hours
bringing this conference to life.
A special thank you to Henry Wajswelner; who has
managed the unenviable task of both chairing the
National groups committee and being an integral
part of the Conference Advisory Committee.
We all look forward to seeing you in Melbourne.
Craig Bosworth
Chair, APA Conference 2013 Advisory Committee
3
Welcome message
CEO, Australian Physiotherapy Association
It is a privilege to welcome you to the APA
Conference ‘New Moves’ 2013
This is Australian physiotherapy’s flagship event.
It provides an opportunity for physiotherapists to
listen to each other and to be heard, to learn and
to educate, and to challenge and be challenged by
colleagues and ideas from across the country and
abroad. Above all, these four days empower us all
to improve; in doing so, we advance the health and
wellbeing of our patients.
During this year’s Conference, we are exploring
new moves in physiotherapy: we seek to highlight
ground-breaking achievements, expand on the
current body of knowledge, reflect on global
innovation, set goals, and equip physiotherapists
with the knowledge and capabilities to advance
healthcare, now and into the future.
This year, we are pleased to host some of the
biggest names and brightest minds from Australia
and abroad. Our speakers will present cuttingedge research evidence, translate their findings
into clinical practice, and create a forum for robust
discussion about the future of physiotherapy.
I must acknowledge and thank all members
involved in the development of the scientific and
conference programs.
A big thank you to all the members of the
Conference Advisory Committee:
• Craig Bosworth (Chair)
• Lucy Chipchase
• Paul Coburn
• Nicki Doyle
• Amy Fagan
• Charles Flynn
• Henry Wajswelner
4
Our national groups play a huge role creating
this event, and their committees in particular
have worked exceptionally hard to develop
groundbreaking and inspiring scientific programs.
We appreciate your essential contributions.
I also want to thank the APA Conference staff who
do so much of the hard work behind the scenes to
make this happen. In particular, Vicki Smith, Kylie
Bierman, Cynthia De Fazio and Maree Whittingham,
have worked tirelessly to ensure the APA
Conference 2013 serves your needs.
Welcome again. I look forward to meeting you, and
learning with you, during the days ahead.
Cris Massis
CEO, Australian Physiotherapy Association
Table of contents
APA Physiotherapy Conference Committees 2013 ............................................................... 2
Welcome messages.....................................................................................................................3
Program at a glance.....................................................................................................................6
Pre conference workshops.......................................................................................................17
Breakfast sessions....................................................................................................................32
Programs.....................................................................................................................................33
Keynote speakers......................................................................................................................97
Invited speakers...................................................................................................................... 101
APA Conference 2013 ‘New Moves Green Moves’............................................................. 128
Exhibitors................................................................................................................................. 130
Exhibitor Listing...................................................................................................................... 131
APA Conference 2013 Awards.............................................................................................. 137
General information............................................................................................................... 139
Map of Melbourne................................................................................................................... 143
Venue floorplans..................................................................................................................... 144
BOOTH FO
R
UR
E
AL
F ER
OF
ALL LO
L
LOPI
N
DU DUCTS
PRO
CE
SP
CI
OFF
5
2
%
A
VISI
TO
Sponsors................................................................................................................................... 149
C O NFERE
N
5
APA conference 2013 Dunlopillo Advert_OUTLINES.indd 1
13/09/13 8:14 AM
Program at a glance – Pre-Conference Workshops
Wednesday 16 October 7.30
onwards
Room
207
Off-site
212
204
218
219
8.30 –
10.00am
Acupuncture & Dry
Needling
Animal
Business
Cardiorespiratory
Continence &
Women’s Health
ED Network
Animal
Business
Cardiorespiratory
Continence &
Women’s Health
ED Network
10.00 –
10.30am
10.30am –
12.30pm
12.30 –
1.30pm
1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
6
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
Morning Tea
Acupuncture & Dry
Needling
Lunch
Acupuncture & Dry
Needling
Animal
Business
Cardiorespiratory
Continence &
Women’s Health
ED Network
Animal
Business
Cardiorespiratory
Continence &
Women’s Health
ED Network
Afternoon Tea
Acupuncture & Dry
Needling
Wednesday 16 October
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
213
Educators
Musculoskeletal
Educators
209
208
210
Occupational
Health
Paediatric
Occupational
Health
Musculoskeletal
Paediatric
217
Sports
Musculoskeletal
Neurology
(1.00pm start)
Occupational
Health
Paediatric
Musculoskeletal
Neurology
Occupational
Health
Paediatric
8.30 –
10.00am
10.00 –
10.30am
Sports
10.30am –
12.30pm
Sports
Afternoon Tea
Educators
Room
Morning Tea
Lunch
Educators
214
Sports
Speakers Prep
215
7.30
onwards
12.30 –
1.30pm
1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
7
Program at a glance
Thursday 17 October 7.30
onwards
Room
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC) Exhibition Hall
210
211
Plenary 2
218
207
8.30 –
10.00am
Opening Plenary – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) 10.00 –
10.30am
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary Session 1 Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
(This session
Session 1
will be in room
10.30am –
12.30pm
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 2
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 3
209
208
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 4
Leadership
Plenary
Session 1
12.30 –
1.30pm
1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
5.30 –
7.30pm
8
Exhibition
210/211)
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory Cardiorespiratory
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Concurrent
Plenary Session 1
Session 1
Session 2
Leadership
Plenary
Session 2
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory Cardiorespiratory Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Concurrent
Concurrent
Session 3
Session 4
Session 5
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 6
Welcome Reception (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 7
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 8
Leadership
Plenary
Session 3
Thursday 17 October
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
220
Neurology
Plenary
Session 1
(10.30 – 11.30)
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 1
206
216
217
212
213
214
8.30 –
10.00am
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
10.00 –
10.30am
Occupational
Health
Plenary 1
Sports
Plenary
Session 1
Paediatric
Plenary
Session 1
10.30am –
12.30pm
(This session
will be in room
212/213)
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 2
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 3
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 4
(2.00 – 3.00)
Occupational
Health
Plenary 2
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 1
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 2
Sports
Concurrent
Session 1
Sports
Concurrent
Session 2
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 5
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 6
Room
Opening Plenary – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
Speakers Prep
219
7.30
onwards
Occupational
Health
Plenary 3
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 3
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 4
Sports
Concurrent
Session 3
Sports
Concurrent
Session 4
Welcome Reception (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
12.30 –
1.30pm
1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
5.30 –
7.30pm
9
Program at a glance
Friday 18 October
7.30
onwards
Room
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
Exhibition
Hall
10.00 –
10.30am
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
5.30 –
7.30pm
10
220
207
209
Continence
& Women’s
Health
Plenary
Session 1
Educators
Plenary
Session 1
208
Plenary 2
Gerontology
Plenary
Session 1
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 2
Gerontology
Plenary
Session 2
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 9
218
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary
Cardiorespiratory
Session 3
Concurrent
(10.30 – 11.45)
Session 6
Concurrent
(11.45 – 12.30)
Session 5
(11.45 – 12.30)
Exhibition
10.30 –
12.30pm
1.30 –
3.00pm
211
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary
Session 2
8.30 –
10.00am
12.30 –
1.30pm
210
Continence
& Women’s
Health
Plenary
Session 2
(11.00 –
12.30)
Educators
Concurrent
Session 1
Musculoskeletal
Members Forum
12.30–1.30pm
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory Cardiorespiratory
Concurrent
Concurrent
Session 7
Session 8
Continence
& Women’s
Health
Plenary
Session 3
Educators
Concurrent
Session 2
Educators
Concurrent
Session 3
Educators
Concurrent
Session 4
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 10
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 1
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 3
Gerontology
Plenary
Session 3
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 4
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Cardiorespiratory Cardiorespiratory
Concurrent
Concurrent
Session 9
Session 10
GROUP COCKTAIL FUNCTIONS
Continence
& Women’s
Health
Plenary
Session 4
Educators
Plenary
Session 2
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 2
(Joint session
with Neuro –
Room 219)
CARDIO
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
CONTINENCE & WOMEN’S HEALTH
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
GERONTOLOGY
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
(OFF SITE AT BOATBUILDERS BAR)
(ROOM 209)
(ROOM 215)
Friday 18 October
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
205
219
217
206
216
212
213
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 7
Neurology
Concurrent
Session 8
Occupational
Health
Plenary 4
Paediatric
Plenary
Session 2
Sports
Concurrent
Session 5
Sports
Concurrent
Session 6
215
214
10.00 –
10.30am
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 11
Occupational
Health
Plenary 5
Paediatric
Plenary
Session 3
Sports
Concurrent
Session 7
Sports
Concurrent
Session 8
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Animal
Workshop
Neurology
Plenary
Session 3
Neurology
Plenary
Session 4
(3.30 – 5.15)
MUSCULOSKELETAL
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
(ROOM 213)
Occupational
Health
Plenary 6
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 6
Occupational
Health
Plenary 7
NEUROLOGY
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
(ROOM 218)
Sports
Concurrent
Session 9
10.30 –
12.30pm
Workshop
“Grant writing
and what the
Physiotherapy
Research
Foundation
is looking
for” (12.30 –
1.00pm)
Speakers Prep
Neurology
Plenary
Session 2
Room
8.30 –
10.00am
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Musculoskeletal
Concurrent
Session 12
7.30
onwards
12.30 –
1.30pm
Workshop
JoP Writing for
Publication
(1.30 – 2.30)
1.30 –
3.00pm
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
3.00 –
3.30pm
Paediatric
Plenary
Session 4
Paediatric
Concurrent
Session 5
(Joint session
with
MusculoRoom
Plenary 2)
Sports
Concurrent
Session 10
Sports
Plenary
Session 2
3.30 –
5.00pm
OCC HEALTH
COCKTAIL FUNCTION
SPORTS COCKTAIL
FUNCTION
(OFF SITE AT WHARF HOTEL,
SOUTH WHARF)
(OFF SITE AT MELBOURNE
PUBLIC BAR)
5.30 –
7.30pm
11
Program at a glance
Saturday 19 October
7.00 –
8.15am
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
Breakfast sessions
6.30
onwards
Room
Room
Animal
Breakfast
6.45am start
6.45am start
Neurology
Breakfast
Paediatric
Breakfast
Sports
Breakfast
208
216
206
215
213
207
209
205
208
210/211
220
218
Opening Joint Plenary – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) 10.00 –
10.30am
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
10.30 –
12.30pm
Joint Plenary Session – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) 1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
Exhibition and “Weekend Warriors” Consumer Expo
8.30 –
10.00am
12.30 –
1.30pm
12
Exhibition Hall
Cardiorespiratory Cardiorespiratory
Breakfast 1
Breakfast 2
206
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Joint Plenary Session – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Acupuncture &
Dry Needling
Plenary
Session 1
Animal Plenary
Session 1
Aquatic
Plenary
Session 1
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary
Session 4
Continence &
Women’s Health
Plenary Session
5
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 3
Gerontology
Concurrent 4
(Joint session
with Sports –
Room 212)
5.00 –
6.00pm
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) 7.00 –
11.30pm
Conference Dinner (Melbourne Room, Melbourne Convention Centre)
Theme: Masquerade
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 5
Workshop 1
Saturday 19 October
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
6.30
onwards
7.00 –
8.15am
Room
215
217
219/220
216
212
213
214
Room
Opening Joint Plenary – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
8.30 –
10.00am
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
10.00 –
10.30am
Joint Plenary Session – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
10.30 –
12.30pm
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
12.30 –
1.30pm
Joint Plenary Session – All Groups (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
1.30 –
3.00pm
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 5
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 5
Musculoskeletal
Plenary
Session 5
Workshop 2
Workshop 3
Workshop 4
Neurology
Plenary
Session 5
Paediatric
Plenary
Session 5
Sports
Concurrent
Session 11
Sports
Concurrent
Session 12
Speakers Prep
207
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
5.00 –
6.00pm
Conference Dinner (Melbourne Room, Melbourne Convention Centre)
Theme: Masquerade
7.00 –
11.30pm
13
Program at a glance
Sunday 20 October 7.30
onwards
Room
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
Exhibition
Hall
209
205
208
210/211
Aquatic
Plenary Session 2
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary Session 5
(9.00 start)
Animal
Plenary 2
(8.30 – 9.00)
Acupuncture
& Dry Needling
8.30 –
10.00am
Plenary Session 2
(Joint session with
Sports – Room
212/213)
Animal
Plenary 3
(9.05 – 10.00)
10.00 –
10.30am
Plenary Session 3
10.30 –
12.30pm
Plenary Session 4
Exhibition
11.30 – 12.30
Aquatic
Plenary Session 3
(Joint session with
Musculoskeletal Room
Plenary 2)
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary Session 7
(11.30 – 1.00)
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
12.30 –
1.30pm
College General Meeting – (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre) 3.30 –
5.00pm
14
Animal
Plenary 4
Cardiorespiratory
Plenary Session 6
(10.30 – 11.30)
12.30 –
1.30pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
Continence & Women’s
Health Plenary
Session 6
(Joint session with
Musculoskeletal
Room Plenary 2)
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Acupuncture &
Dry Needling
1.30 –
3.00pm
220
Acupuncture &
Dry Needling
Plenary Session 5
Animal
Plenary 5
Aquatic
Plenary Session 4
Continence & Women’s
Health Plenary
Session 7
Continence & Women’s
Health Plenary
Session 8
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Acupuncture &
Dry Needling
Plenary Session 6
Animal
Plenary 6
Aquatic
Plenary Session 5
Continence & Women’s
Health Plenary
Session 9
Sunday 20 October
Registration (Ground Level of MCEC)
218
217
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 5
(9.00am start)
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 6
Plenary 2
Musculoskeletal
Plenary Session 6
212/213
215
Sports
Plenary 3
(8.30 – 9.00)
Gerontology
Plenary Session 4
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 8
Musculoskeletal
Plenary Session 7
Sports
Plenary Session 5
Room
8.30 –
10.00am
Sports
Plenary 4
(9.05–10.00)
Morning Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
Gerontology
Concurrent
Session 7
7.30
onwards
Workshop
JoP Writing
for Publication
(10.30 – 11.30)
10.00 –
10.30am
10.30 –
12.30pm
Lunch (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
12.30 –
1.30pm
College General Meeting – (Plenary Hall 2, Ground Floor, Melbourne Convention Centre)
12.30 –
1.30pm
Musculoskeletal
Plenary Session 8
Sports
Plenary Session 6
(Joint session with
Musculo- Room
Plenary 2)
Afternoon Tea (Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Exhibition Centre)
1.30 –
3.00pm
3.00 –
3.30pm
3.30 –
5.00pm
15
APA Member Insurance Program
Nobody understands your needs more than the APA, and that means
your hands are in good hands. The Australian Physiotherapy
Association (APA) in partnership with Insurance House, are excited
to present the APA Member Insurance Program, an exclusive
membership that includes insurance, tailored specifically for you.
This incredible offer combines market leading liabilities insurance cover with all
the essential benefits and services of an APA membership, at an unbeatable price.
•
•
•
•
•
•
One of the best covers in the market, at a highly competitive rate.
Fully compliant with AHPRA and PBA insurance registration requirements.
Ease of a combined membership and insurance option.
Feel secure with a policy underwritten by Lloyds of London.
Expert claims service on hand 24/7.
Trust in regular expert policy review.
What’s included in my policy?
Professional Indemnity
The APA Member Insurance Policy provides you with $20 million
Professional Indemnity cover as standard for any one claim.
Public Liability
If a customer takes a tumble in your practice, or injures themselves on equipment,
you can relax knowing the policy covers $20 million for any one claim.
Goods Sold and Advice
If you sell a defective product or provide incorrect advice on a product
you’ll be covered for $20 million for any one claim.
Two reinstatements
There are two reinstatements for each individual policy limit, meaning you
have access to an annual aggregate amount of $60 million cover.
Unparalleled claims service
Members have access to a 24/7 claims hotline, staffed by Insurance House’s
team of dedicated, highly trained experts.
Want to know more?
16
For information on policy details and more than 30 additional benefits,
visit insurance4physios.com or call 1300 306 622
Pre conference workshops
The Pre-Conference Workshops will be held on Wednesday 16 October 2013 from
9.00am until 5.00pm, at the Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre (unless otherwise
stated below).
Acupuncture & Dry Needling
Seeing the forest and the trees:
Broadening your dry needling approach
to consider indirect structures and
physiological factors contributing to
pain sensitivity.
Doug Cary, dry needling educator and
Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Specialist and
Andrew Hutton, dry needling educator and titled
Sports Physiotherapist have between them over 40
years experience incorporating dry needling in the
physiotherapy clinic. Both active clinicians and dry
needling teachers, they bring with them expertise
in anatomical trigger point needling, dnp: integrated
neuro-myofascial dry needling and traditional
oriental acupuncture approaches.
With a lumbopelvic and lower quadrant focus, this
1 day workshop incorporates surface and depth
anatomy, palpation skills refreshment, advanced
needling techniques and a series of live case studies
in which the immediate physiological and functional
effects of needling will be demonstrated. This will
provide a platform for discussion to consider the
different dry needling approaches or acupuncture
techniques in different clinical presentations.
Physiotherapists with experience in any of the
dry needling/acupuncture disciplines will find
this workshop offers opportunity to ask clinical
questions and expand both needling and clinical
reasoning skills.
Animal
The equine athlete – neurological
examination and imaging.
This half day workshop will provide animal
physiotherapists with an overview of the
neurological examination of the equine athlete from
a veterinary perspective. There will be a lecture
(including video) and practical session. There will
also be a demonstration of ultrasound imaging of
the equine back and pelvis.
Dr Cathy McGowan will be presenting this workshop.
She is a highly experienced Veterinarian and a
Diplomate of the European College of Equine
Internal Medicine. She is an RCVS recognised
specialist in equine internal medicine and is
currently Director of Veterinary CPD at the
University of Liverpool in the UK. This will be a
great practical opportunity to learn and share
knowledge with fellow animal physiotherapists and
presenting veterinarian.
Pre-requisite: Masters / Animal Level 1
Venue: University of Melbourne, Equine Centre –
250 Princes Highway, Werribee
Time/Date: Afternoon session 1.00 – 4.00pm
(Friday 18 October)
Business
Building a 21st Century practice.
In this year’s Business Pre-conference workshop,
we aim to provide you insights into business
practices from great leaders, both outside and
inside the Physiotherapy industry, to foster
thinking larger, bigger and beyond our current
practices, to really look at the potential of building
the 21st Century Practice.
Speakers include:
• Tim Costello, AO – CEO, World Vision
• Mike McCarthy – CEO, Barry Plant
• Mark Werman – Managing Director, Wentworth
• Tristan White – CEO, PhysioCo
Topics covered will include:
• Marketing from the front line
• Current changes to HR legislation and the award
• Managing staff
• Customer Journey management
• Social Media in heavily regulated industries
• “The Great Debate – Are preferred provider
schemes lethal for the profession”, debated
by leaders in the Physiotherapy profession,
such as Marcus Dripps, President APA and
Sue Vincent.
Cardiorespiratory
Get your sick patients fit!
This one day workshop is primarily focused
on exercise training and principles for
clinical cardiorespiratory practice bringing
together both current clinical and evidence
based recommendations.
17
The workshop will encompass (but is not limited to):
• Physiological and training principles behind
exercise prescription and the effect on the
cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal systems
• Exercise training in different patient populations
across the continuum of care and strategies for
rehabilitation of the very weak through to higher
functioning individuals
• Outcome measures for the evaluation and
progression of exercise training in the
cardiorespiratory patient
8.30am – 5.00pm
Sponsored by:
ED Network
Emergency physiotherapy in practice.
This one day workshop will provide emergency
physiotherapists and those with an interest in
emergency physiotherapy with an overview of the
latest management of the lumbar and thoracic
spine, acute and sub acute hand injuries and the
shoulder. This workshop will teach participants how
to manage the acute dizzy patient in ED and will
provide the latest update from HWA regarding their
current expanded scope of practice projects. The
workshop will have a large focus on the practical
management skills for common musculoskeletal
conditions in ED, clinical tests, pathology, differential
diagnosis and cases not to miss. Case studies will
be utilised to assist with the clinical reasoning
behind effectively managing patients in the
emergency department.
Educators
Part one – Translating education into
practice: Bridging the great divide.
Continence & Women’s Health
Persistent Pelvic Pain – a biopsychosocial
and pain science approach to management.
This one day workshop aims to provide continence
and women’s health physiotherapists with an
understanding of the physiotherapy management
of persistent pelvic pain (PPP) within a
biopsychosocial framework.
Professor Lorimer Moseley, will explore some of
the pertinent concepts of modern pain science and
interpret the evidence for the management of PPP
from a pain science perspective.
Mr Mark Jones, Director of Physiotherapy Postgraduate
Coursework Masters Programs at UniSA, will present
the importance of a biopsychosocial approach to
PPP and the theory of its application.
Dr Trish Neumann and Dr Judith Thompson, CWHPA
Specialists, will develop an understanding of the
diagnostic and psychosocial clinical reasoning
required to manage PPP within a biopsychosocial
and pain science framework through the
presentation and discussion of case studies.
Participants will explore a range of management
options for PPP and learn to apply a clinically
reasoned approach to their implementation. This is
not a hands-on workshop.
Please note: Available to group members only.
18
Sponsored by:
Advantage Health
Speakers: Caroline Bills and Janette Gale
Part two – Clinical Assessment: What
works, what doesn’t.
This workshop will review various approaches
to clinical assessment, with a view to using the
evidence about reliability and validity to make
informed choices among different methods.
Professor Norman will discuss methods both old
(essay, viva, multiple choice, global ratings (ITER))
and new (Key Features, OSCE, mini-CEX) and
examine a) whether each is effective in assessing
students and residents, and b) what are the
important underlying characteristics that contribute
to its effectiveness .
Participants should, at the end of the workshop,
have a better understanding of how to design an
assessment system.
Musculoskeletal
Differential Diagnosis: Which clinical tests
are the best?
In clinical practice, physical therapists use tests and
measures for a probabilistic approach to clinical
decision making. This decision making approach
requires that the tests and measures provide tangible
value and can alter the post-test probability of
diagnosis or prognosis. Recent evidence also dictates
that selected tests should be used either early in the
examination process to rule out contenders or late
in the examination process to confirm hypotheses.
Use of diagnostic accuracy values such as sensitivity,
specificity, and positive likelihood ratios has improved
our ability to discriminate tests’ strengths. The focus
of this course is to provide those tests and measures
and the appropriate order within an examination that
improves probability of a correct diagnosis or outcome.
Speaker: Professor Chad Cook
Neurology
Moving mountains: Translating evidence
into practice.
This half-day workshop will provide participants
with an understanding of evidence implementation
relevant to their clinical setting. At the end of the
workshop participants will have a well thought out
implementation plan, and be ready to commence a
practice improvement project.
Workshop content will include:
• An overview of strategies for implementing
evidence into clinical practice
• Work modules to address the various stages of
implementation: identifying the need for change,
forming the implementation team, identifying
broader stakeholders, designing the development
& roll-out of the project, potential barriers
& strategies to overcome them, measuring
outcomes, building ongoing management
and sustainability
Speaker: Dr Julie Luker
Occupational Health
Ergonomics 2013 – Challenging Issues,
Emerging Opportunities.
Speaker: Alan Hedge
Future implications of changing work
organizational arrangements on the
physical and psychological needs of
the workforce.
Speaker: David Caple
Paediatric
Putting the ‘early’ into early intervention.
Whilst there is increasing evidence that
commencing intervention early for at-risk infants
is important due to brain plasticity, many infants
are not receiving intervention in a timely manner
due to limited services. This session will focus on
assessment tools to identify those infants most at
risk of motor problems very early in development,
with a strong focus on preterm infants. Professor
Suzann Campbell, author of the Test of Infant Motor
Performance (TIMP), will introduce her assessment
tool and discuss how it can be used in clinical
decision making.
The role of other assessment tools and research
on early intervention for preterm infants will be
presented, followed by a panel discussion.
Speakers: Professor Suzann Campbell, Dr Alicia
Spittle and Jane Orton
Sports
The athlete’s shoulder.
The SPA Shoulder Workshop brings together
the World’s best Shoulder Physiotherapy Expert
Clinician/ Researchers, including:
Dr Ann Cools, Belgium
Ann is our conference keynote and will take
us through New Moves for the Scapula in
Overhead Sports
Lyn Watson, Melbourne
Lyn is one of Australia’s most recognized shoulder
experts and will explore Multi-directional
shoulder instability in athletes from a clinical and
research perspective.
Dr Craig Boettcher, Newcastle
Craig’s workshop will focus on swimmer’s shoulder,
from biomechanical and physical assessment, to
rehabilitation and current and future directions of
research. Craig was on the 2102 London Olympic
Team with swimming.
Dr Rod Whiteley, FACP ASPETAR, Qatar
Bruce Rawson, FACP, Gold Coast
The Throwing Athlete’s Shoulder: the disabled
thrower’s shoulder presents a number of
difficulties in management and especially in
ensuring successful and durable return to play.
The workshop will include:
• Throwing (pitching) mechanics assessment
(theory/prac)
• Key features of the musculoskeletal
examination of the healthy and injured
throwing shoulder (theory/prac)
• Routine care exercises for throwers
(theory/prac)
• A special live demonstration of throwing
technique by elite athletes.
19
20
Pre-Conference Workshops
Pre conference workshop – Acupuncture
Theme: Seeing the Forest and the Trees
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
Doug gives an overview of his background and evolution as a Physiotherapist using dry needling and the way this has been
integrated into his practice.
Lumbo Pelvic Anatomy and Needling
This practical session includes a review of surface (boney muscular) anatomy of lumbar spine/pelvis. Treatment options
including needling will be discussed and demonstrated. As this is a practical session please bring appropriate clothing, pillow.
Speaker: Doug Cary
Assistant: Andrew Hutton
Chair: Anne Sammells
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 207
Morning tea
Session 2
11.00 – 12.30
Andrew gives an overview of his background and evolution as a physiotherapist using dry needling and the way this has been
integrated into his practice.
An overview of the rationale for palpation and movement based needling and its importance.
How its indication and effectiveness are assessed.
Speaker: Andrew Hutton
Chair: Anne Sammells
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 207
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
This practical session will focus on anatomically non-specific (palpation and movement guided) dry needling.
Speaker: Andrew Hutton
Assistant: Doug Cary
Chair: Anne Sammells
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 207
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 4.30
Clinical Case Studies and Discussion
This session will focus on a mix of live case studies from participants with ‘problems’ or prepared case studies with
an emphasis on clinical reasoning and management. Discussion regarding incorporation of oriental medicine into the
musculoskeletal clinic.
Speaker: Doug Cary
Assistant: Andrew Hutton
Chair: Anne Sammells
Room: 207
21
Pre conference workshop – Animal
Theme: The equine athlete, Neurological examination and imaging.
Venue: University of Melbourne, Equine Centre – 250 Princes Highway, Werribee
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 – 1.30pm
12.30 – 1.30
Registration
Lunch
Session 1
1.30 – 3.00
3.00 – 3.30
Pre requisite: Masters or Level 1
This half day workshop will provide animal physiotherapists with an overview of the neurological examination of the equine
athlete from a veterinary perspective. There will be a lecture (including video) and practical session. There will also be a
demonstration of ultrasound imaging of the equine back and pelvis.
Speaker: Cathy McGowan
Afternoon tea
Session 2
3.30 – 5.00
Pre requisite: Masters or Level 1
This half day workshop will provide animal physiotherapists with an overview of the neurological examination of the equine
athlete from a veterinary perspective. There will be a lecture (including video) and practical session. There will also be a
demonstration of ultrasound imaging of the equine back and pelvis.
Speaker: Cathy McGowan
Pre conference workshop – Business
Theme: Building a 21st Century practice.
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
9.00 – 10.00
Health Services on the frontier and how do you sell it to the public.
At every level from the local to the global communities make choices about how health care is
organised and resourced. In many parts of the world resources are scarce and the choices are
difficult. Everywhere communities face ever-growing demand and competing priorities. Good
solutions are not always easy to sell to governments or citizens.
Based on his extensive experience both at the grassroots community level and at the tables of
power, Tim Costello will explore some of the dilemmas facing decision-makers both in Australia and
in the developing world. He will connect the questions surrounding health care provision to wider
issues of human development and the wellbeing of future generations.
Speaker: Tim Costello
Chair: Darrin Neumann
10.00 – 10.15
Room: 212
Morning tea
Session 2
10.15 – 12.45
10.15 – 11.15
They just don’t do what I ask. How often have you felt this about staff, children – perhaps even your partner?
Spend a valuable 60 minutes:
• Understand up-to-date psychological findings about the human brain and why these research insights are so important for a
leader to embed in her/his communication approach?
• Learn and practise straight forward, practical communications techniques that you can apply immediately to make your
leadership communication far more effective.
• Discuss cases from real life where communication challenges have been replaced by co-operation and
mutual understanding.
It’s not complicated theory – just insightful observations. The practices are based on world leading research from, among
others, our own Monash university but, most importantly IT REALLY WORKS.
Speaker: Simon Moss
11.15 – 12.15
A Day in the Life of an APA member: A Case Study of the Workplace Issues & Human Resource Challenges Impacting Members.
Speaker: Mark Werman
22
12.15 – 12.45
The Ideal Patient Journey – The 7 keys for maximising patient satisfaction and improving average return visits.
Speaker: Justin Steer
Chair: Michael Dermansky
Room: 212
12.45 – 1.15
Lunch
Session 3
1.15 – 1.45
Advocacy
Speaker: Marcus Dripps
1.15 – 3.15
1.45 – 2.45
Marketing from the front line.
All businesses rely on sales and sales are driven by marketing. Whilst residential real estate is a huge industry with sales of
around $180 billion generating nearly $4 billion in commissions, most real estate businesses are small, privately owned and
face the same challenges of every small business
There are few industries that are more competitive than real estate. When it comes to selecting an agent, you have an
abundance of choice and they are continuously clamoring for your business . . . even if you don’t want them to! So what makes
one stand out over another? When you come to sell your home – why do you invite some agents to give you an appraisal and
not others?
The key to an agent being on your mental ‘shopping list’ is marketing. But what is marketing? What are the marketing
activities that real estate agents undertake to get on to your ‘shopping list’ and win your business? How does this relate to
your business and how you can improve your marketing and sales? The best practices adopted by the leading agents will apply
for any business and we will share those with you in this presentation.
Speaker: Mike McCarthy
2.45 – 3.15
Marketing – Marketing for the recruitment and retention of staff
Speaker: Tristan White
Chair: Jason Smith
3.15 – 3.30
Room: 212
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 4.30
Using Social Media and Content Marketing to Build Your Brand (and Your Practice).
The advent of social media and simple-to-use online publishing tools has changed the marketing landscape forever. Today,
rather than get your message out through the media (or worse, not at all), practices can become their own TV channel
(YouTube), their own radio station (podcast) and online magazine (blog).
In this special presentation, Trevor Young (aka The PR Warrior) will explain how practice owners can develop their own
platform as a way of growing their personal brand as well as the profile of their business. The session will cover the ‘twin
towers’ of new marketing – content creation and social media participation, and include examples of small businesses that are
‘doing’ social media well.
Speaker: Trevor Young
3.30 – 5.30
4.30 – 5.30
The Great Debate – Preferred Provider Schemes.
This formal debate involves two teams of three, who will discuss the pros and cons of Preferred Provider Schemes (PPS).
These schemes can work well for some practices where in others they are dead against them. Why is this so?
Not sure whether to be a preferred-provider? Here is an opportunity to hear both sides of the story from experienced
physiotherapists. Why would you join or why wouldn’t you? More importantly, what are PPS’s doing to our profession – good
or bad?
Find out answers to all those questions and more by attending “The Great Debate”.
Convenor: David Hall
Speaker: Marcus Dripps, Jon Ford, Craig Allingham, Tony Schneider, Sue Vincent and Michael Vediveloo
Chair: Mark Latimer
Room: 212
23
Pre conference workshop – Cardiorespiratory
Meeting room 204
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 – 8.30am
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
8.30 – 9.15
Understanding physiological principles of exercise
Speaker: Alison Harmer
9.15 – 10.00
Exercise prescription and training – designing a program to achieve your aims
Speaker: Adam Bryant
10.00 – 10.30
Morning tea
Session 2
10.30 – 10.35
Sponsor Presentation
10.35 – 11.00
The importance of nutrition and metabolic demands of illness
Speaker: Kate Fetterplace
10.30 – 12.30
11.00 – 11.30
Exercising the very weak patient and the critically ill
Speaker: Sue Berney
11.30 – 12.00
Exercise with ECMO
Speaker: George Ntoumenopoulos
12.00 – 12.25
Exercise in End Stage Liver Disease
Speaker: Jacqui Luke
12.25 – 12.30
Sponsor Presentation
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.00
The importance of exercise in cancer
Speaker: Catherine Granger
2.00 – 2.30
Exercise in cardiac conditions
Speaker: Andrew Hirschhorn
2.30 – 3.00
Exercise in the elderly comorbid medical patient – considerations and implementing culture change
Speaker: Cathy Said
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 5.00
3.30 – 4.15
Measuring outcomes in the acute setting
Speaker: Claire Baldwin
4.15 – 5.00
New technologies and advances in measurement techniques
Speaker: TBA
24
Pre conference workshop – Continence and Women’s Health
Chronic Pelvic Pain: Integrating modern pain science and clinical reasoning to optimise
assessment and treatment – from theory to case studies
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
Introduction
Speaker: Patricia Neumann
8.30 – 10.00
Pain science and its relevance in chronic pelvic pain
Speaker: Professor Lorimer Moseley
Overview of the evidence for physiotherapy management of CPP interpreted through the prism of neuroscience
Speaker: Professor Lorimer Moseley
Chair: Shan Morrison
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 218
Morning tea
Session 2
Clinical reasoning – Biopsychosocial assessment theory
Speaker: Mark Jones
Application to CPP
Speaker: Judith Thompson
11.00 – 12.30
Case study 1: Provoked vestibulodynia: subjective & objective assessment
Speaker: Judith Thompson and Mark Jones
Case study 2: Bladder pain syndrome: subjective & objective assessment
Speaker: Patricia Neumann and Mark Jones
Discussion
Chair: Shan Morrison
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 218
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
Management options for CPP – Physiotherapy & Multidisciplinary
Speaker: Judith Thompson and Patricia Neumann
Chair: Shan Morrison
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 218
Afternoon tea
Session 4
Clinical Case Studies and Discussion
Case study 1: Management
Speaker: Judith Thompson and Mark Jones
3.30 – 4.30
Case study 2: Management
Speaker: Patricia Neumann and Mark Jones
Discussion
Chair: Shan Morrison
Room: 218
25
Pre conference workshop – Emergency Department Network
Theme: Emergency physiotherapy in practice
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
Thoracic and low back pain – management in ED.
Comprehensive assessment to exclude pathology, Differential diagnosis of low back pain in ED and the acute management of
common conditions.
‘Do not miss cases”
Speaker: Rob Laird
Chair: Matt Woronczak
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 219
Morning tea
Session 2
10.30 – 12.30
Management of acute and subacute hand injuries in ED.
Carmel will discuss the anatomy, common mechanisms of injury and principles of management of conditions such as mallet
finger, PIP Joint sprains and dislocations and Skiers Thumb. Hand Fractures such as Bennett’s and Boxer’s fractures will also be
presented. Indications for a surgical opinion will be discussed.
Speaker: Carmel Bohan
Chair: Leanne Roddy
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 219
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
The Management of Shoulder Injuries in the Emergency Department
This workshop will provide physiotherapists with a detailed and systematic approach to assessing, diagnosing and managing
acute shoulder injuries in the emergency setting.
Speaker: Tania Pizzari and Ross Lenssen
Chair: Su Thomson
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 219
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 4.15
Assessment and management of the acute dizzy patient in ED.
Speaker: Arimbi Winoto
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 5.00
HWA Update
Professional issues: presentation by the APA or HWA. Where are we up to with advocacy for the emergency physiotherapist,
where to from here. HWA project update.
Speaker: Etienne Scheepers
Chair: Katherine Maka
26
Room: 219
Pre conference workshop – Educators
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
9.00 – 10.00
Translating education into practice: Bridging the great divide. (Part One)
Speakers: Caroline Bills and Janette Gale
Chair: Elizabeth Molloy
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 215
Morning tea
Session 2
10.30 – 12.30
Translating education into practice: Bridging the great divide. (Part Two)
Speaker: Caroline Bills and Janette Gale
Chair: Elizabeth Molloy
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 215
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
Clinical Assessment: What Works, What Doesn’t. (Part One)
Speaker: Professor Geoff Norman
Chair: Andrea Bialocerkowski
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 5.00
Clinical Assessment: What Works, What Doesn’t. (Part Two)
Speaker: Professor Geoff Norman
Chair: Andrea Bialocerkowski
Room: 215
27
Pre conference workshop – Musculoskeletal
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 – 9.00
Registration
Session 1
9.00 – 9.20
Defining Differential Diagnosis.
In this session, the process of decision making is de-constructed and the components of each are described in terms of critical
decision making
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
Session 2
9.20 – 9.45
How does study design influence test metrics?
Dr. Cook describes how diagnostic accuracy designs are often riddled with bias which can elevate the influence of the
individual test and measure’s abilities in decision making. He categorizes the necessary elements for a high quality study and
outlines the most notable areas of bias.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
Session 3
9.45 – 10.00
The language of diagnostic accuracy.
In this session, the statistical metrics that are used in defining the diagnostic accuracy of a test and measure are discussed.
The role of these measures toward influencing post-test decision making are presented; with tangible examples.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 213
Morning Tea
Session 4
10.30 – 10.45
A rating system for “best” test.
Dr. Cook provides a comprehensive rating system for defining best tests. The system includes 1) strong internal diagnostic
metrics, 2) strong bias control, 3) potential influence in clinical practice, 4) potential to influence post-test decision making,
and 5) abundance of evidence to support concepts.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Session 5
10.45 – 11.30
Best Tests using Patient History/Subjective Examination.
In this session, the most diagnostic tests used during a typical patient history/subjective interview, which meet the majority
of the criteria from session 4 are discussed.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
Session 6
11.30 – 12.30
Best Tests for Medical Screening.
In this session, the most diagnostic tests used to rule out general medical conditions that are often beyond the scope of
physiotherapists are introduced.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 213
Lunch
Session 7
1.30 – 2.00
Best Test for Neurological Screening
In this session, the most diagnostic tests used to rule out and rule in neurological conditions are introduced and described.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
Session 8
2.00 – 3.00
Best Tests for Orthopaedic Conditions
In this session, the most diagnostic tests used to rule out and rule in orthopedic related conditions are described.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea
3.30 – 4.00
Best Tests for Orthopaedic Conditions
In this session, the most diagnostic tests used to rule out and rule in orthopedic related conditions are described.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
Room: 213
Session 9
4.00 – 5.00
Clinical Decision Making in Physiotherapy
Dr. Cook introduces the multiple forms of clinical decision making models including treatment by guidelines, classification,
patient-response mechanisms, heurism and other forms of modelling.
Speaker: Chad Cook
Chair: Leanne Bisset
28
Room: 213
Pre conference workshop – Neurology
The: Moving Mountains -Translating Evidence into Practice
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
12.00 – 1.00
Registration
Session 1
1.00 – 3.00
Identifying the need for change – measuring the problem
Implementation teams & broader stakeholders
Strategies for translating evidence into clinical practice (project examples)
Practical: drafting your project aims, project team, steering group.
Speaker: Julie Luker
Chair: Suzanne Kuys
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 209
Afternoon Tea
Session 2
3.30 – 5.00
Identifying potential barriers & strategies to overcome them
Measuring outcomes
Developing & rolling out your project
Building-in sustainability
Practical: applying these to your project draft
Speaker: Julie Luker
Chair: Suzanne Kuys
Room: 209
Pre conference workshop – Occupational Health
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
Ergonomics 2013 – Challenging Issues, Emerging Opportunities – Part 1
This workshop will summarize current trends for Ergonomics in the USA, with some contrast to the practice of the discipline
in the UK and Australia. It will also address a series of issues that are presenting challenges to the future development of
ergonomics, including the role of ergonomics in healthcare information technology, ergonomic concerns for new computer
interfaces (e.g. gestural input), and the implications of the move to dynamic working (sit-stand, mobile work etc.). In addition
it will explore the opportunities that “green ergonomics” presents for expanding the role of ergonomics in facilities design and
in promoting the value of comprehensive ergonomics programs and services.
Speaker: Alan Hedge
10.00 – 10.30
Morning tea
Chair: Cassandra Zaina
Room: 205
Session 2
10.30 – 12.30
Ergonomics 2013 – Challenging Issues, Emerging Opportunities – Part 2
Speaker: Alan Hedge 2
Chair: Cassandra Zaina
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 205
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
Future implications of changing work organizational arrangements on the physical and psychological needs of the
workforce – Part 1
The transition of ergonomics into practice for office based work in driven by the opportunities provided by new technologies
that enable remote access to the internet and new approaches to work organization arrangements. This is most evident with
new corporate buildings in major cities. These are now moving away from Open Plan designs to Activity Based Workplaces
(ABW). These provide a range of work settings based on the functions required. These include individual work points in
quiet areas together with collaborative work spaces for small or large groups; teleconferencing and computer based group
interaction areas. The focus of ergonomics is on the suitability of the holistic work environment and not to a specific work
point design. Evaluation of the suitability of the work environment is based on the psychosocial needs of the workers as well
as the function performance of the systems of work. This workshop will explore the future implications of changing work
organizational arrangements on the physical and psychological needs of the workforce.
Speaker: David Caple
Chair: Maree Webber
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 205
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 5.00
Future implications of changing work organizational arrangements on the physical and psychological needs of the
workforce – Part 2
Speaker: David Caple
Chair: Maree Webber
Room: 205
29
Pre conference workshop – Paediatrics
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
Overview of the TIMP (Test of Infant Motor Performance) including video demonstration
Speaker: Professor Suzann Campbell
Chair: Alicia Spittle
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 210
Morning tea
Session 2
11.00 – 12.30
The evidence base for the TIMP
Speaker: Professor Suzann Campbell
Chair: Jane Orton
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 210
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 2.15
Neurobehavioural evaluation in the pre-term and term infant
Speaker: Dr Alicia Spittle
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 3.00
The role of assessment in clinical decision making
Speaker: Professor Suzann Campbell
Chair: Alicia Spittle
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 210
Afternoon tea
Session 4
3.30 – 4.00
Early intervention experiences of very preterm children up to two years – the lucky dip
Speaker: Dr Jane Orton
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.30
Rethinking the key worker and transdisciplinary model – what do families really want from early childhood intervention
service?
Speaker: Sarah Foley
4.30 – 5.00
Panel
Speakers: Professor Suzann Campbell, Dr Alicia Spittle, Jane Orton, Sarah Foley, Laura Morell
Chair: Alicia Spittle
30
Room: 210
Pre conference workshop – Sports
Theme: The Athlete’s Shoulder: New Moves
WEDNESDAY 16 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Session 1
8.30 – 10.00
New Moves for Rehabilitation of the Shoulder in Overhead Athletes
Anne will take you through New Moves for the Scapula in Overhead Sports.
Speaker: Professor Ann Cools
10.00 – 10.30
Morning tea
Chair: Henry Wajswelner
Room: 217
Session 2
10.30 – 12.30
Swimming: New Moves for Shoulder Injury in Elite Swimmers
This workshop will focus on swimmer’s shoulder, from biomechanical and physical assessment, to rehabilitation and current
and future directions of research. Craig was on the 2012 London Olympic swimming team.
Speaker: Craig Boettcher
Chair: Marilyn Webster
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 217
Lunch
Session 3
1.30 – 3.00
Multi-directional instability in Athletes: New Moves
This workshop will explore multi-directional shoulder instability in athletes from a clinical and research perspective.
Speaker: Lyn Watson
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon tea
Chair: Henry Wajswelner
Room: 217
Session 4
3.30 – 5.00
Throwing Athletes: New Moves to Optimise Shoulder Function in Throwers
The Throwing Athlete’s Shoulder: the disabled thrower’s shoulder presents a number of difficulties in management and
especially in ensuring successful and durable return to play. This workshop will include throwing mechanics assessment,
routine care exercises for throwers, a live demonstration of throwing technique by elite athletes, and more.
Speaker: Rod Whiteley and Bruce Rawson
Chair: Marilyn Webster
Ph: 1300 770 921 Fax: 1300 770 945
Email: [email protected]
Room: 217
Australian Owned and Run
Specialists in Physiotherapy Equipment and Supplies
“Helping customers deliver better patient outcomes through
innovative, reliable and quality products.”
Australian Medical Supplies is a leading manufacturer and distributor of top
branded medical products and equipment to the hospital, physiotherapy, sports
medicine and other allied health sectors.
We are the manufacturer of:







AMSportz Rigid Tape and EAB Tape
AMS Cansin Fix Tape and AMSensifix Tape
AMSole Insoles
AMS Compression Bandages and Fleb Sets
AMS Resistive Exercise Band and Tubing by Sanctband
AMS Hot/Cold Packs
AMSportz Foam Rollers and Exercise Equipment
These products are backed by an experienced team with a genuine
commitment to customer service
31
Breakfast sessions
All breakfast sessions will be held at the Melbourne Convention Centre, Saturday 19 October
2013, 7.00 – 8.15am (unless otherwise stated below).
Animal
Paediatric
Humans to animals: Kinesio taping and
its applications.
New perspectives for functional hand use
in children with hemiplegia.
The Kinesio Taping Method has been used on
humans for a more than 30 years.
Manual ability is not simply the way by which we
move our arms and hands but is a complex interplay
between the task, individual and environment. This
session will focus on significant developments in
knowledge relating to factors impacting on a child’s
ability to use their upper limbs. It will explore the
influence of the ICF, the Manual Ability Classification
System and other assessments. With a particular
focus on upper limb bimanual performance, the
session will provide understanding on what is
the role of an effective assisting hand and what
constitutes functional hand use for children with
unilateral disability.
As the knowledge base and deeper understanding
of the “hows and whys” behind Kinesio Tape
grew, it was realised that the basic applications of
muscle relaxation and activation could readily be
transferred from humans to other animals.
In recent years specific equine courses in the
Kinesio Taping Method have been delivered around
the world.
This lecture will discuss the basic principles of
Kinesio Tape and how it can apply to:
– restoring muscle imbalances or deficiencies
– the flow-on effect for targeting specific muscles
during training in both humans and animals.
Speakers: Dr Brian Hoare and Dr Susan Greaves
Sponsored by:
Speaker: Thuy (Twee) Bridges
Cardiorespiratory
OPTION 1 – Developments and challenges
in physical activity assessment in
chronic disease.
Sports Physiotherapy Titling and
Specialisation update.
OPTION 2 – Dyspnoea: Old dog, new tricks.
“A Career in Sports Physiotherapy – all
the Right Moves”
Time: 6.45 – 8.15am
Neurology
It’s your move: Getting started in
clinical research
‘From clinical hunch to research question’
The best clinical research often comes from astute
clinical observations. In fact every clinical encounter
is probably a mini-research study in itself: “ how
is this person today – lets try something – how
have they changed?”. That is the basic research
paradigm. So if you have some burning clinical
hunches or curiosities, how can you turn this into an
answerable research question? Come to breakfast
with your ideas and find out.
Speaker: A/Professor Susan Hillier
32
Sports
This session will bring together a number of
Physiotherapists who have walked the various
journeys in Sports Physiotherapy. Speakers will
present on where they are in their career path,
reflecting on how they arrived at this point, and a
personal plan for their future in our profession.
From a starting point in the Titleholder program
through the interim pathway to Specialization
and the Olympic Team, to the Trainees currently
doing the Program, the first cohort of Trainees to
successfully complete the program, and end with a
Sports Fellow on the College Board of Censors.
A panel session Q&A will conclude the session,
giving delegates an opportunity to interact with
the speakers.
Sponsored by: Lifecare
Programs
APA Conference 2013 ‘New Moves’ offers
more than 150 invited speakers and a variety
of thought-provoking sessions developed by
your peers to inform, educate and inspire.
Leadership
With 13 groups offering 13 programs over the four
days, delegates have the opportunity to attend any
stream / session / presentation of interest.
• Acupuncture and
• Leadership
Dry Needling
• Gerontology
• Animal
• Musculoskeletal
• Aquatic
• Neurology
• Cardiorespiratory
• Occupational Health
• Continence and
• Paediatric
Women’s Health
• Sports
• Educators
Cardiorespiratory
(Business and Emergency Department groups are
represented at the Pre-Conference Workshops on
Wednesday 16 October.)
Aquatic
Neurology
Occupational Health
Paediatric
Musculoskeletal
Sports
Educators
Continence & Women’s
Health
Gerontology
Acupuncture & Dry
Needling
Animal
Thursday 17 October
Thursday 17 –
Saturday 19 October
Thursday 17 –
Sunday 20 October
Friday 18 October
Friday 18 –
Sunday 20 October
Saturday 19 –
Sunday 20 October
33
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Acupuncture and Dry Needling
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
*Video link up
8:30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based Coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 13.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice - ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
34
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 1
3.30 – 3.35
Opening Address
Speaker: Anne Sammells
3.30 – 5.00
3.35 – 4.10
Keynote Address – Acupuncturist’s Trial Collaboration
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Andrew Vickers
4.10 – 4.35
Can acupuncture treatment affect acute inflammation
Speaker: Hamish Ashton
4.35 – 5.00
Dry needling as a treatment for lateral epicondylalgia
Speaker: Danielle O’Sullivan
Chair: Anne Sammells
Room: 209
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
8.30 – 9.00
The future of clinical trials. “How should we be doing clinical trials on acupuncture or other physical therapy interventions?”
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Andrew Vickers
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.25
Needling for Plantar Fasciitis.
Invited Speaker: Matthew Cotchett
9.25 – 9.50
Acupuncture and Dry Needling to the Deep Posterior Compartment
Invited Speaker: Leigh McCutcheon
9.50 – 10.00
A systematic review of acupuncture and dry needling for Phantom limb pain.
Speaker: Paula O’Neill
Chair: David Kelly
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 209
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
10.30 – 11.25
10.30 – 11.05
The RCT of dry-needling for chronic WAD
Invited Speaker: Professor Michelle Sterling
11.05 – 11.25
Needling for neck ROM
Speaker: Philip Gabel
Chair: Rebecca Fagan
Room: 209
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
Room: 215
Plenary Session 4
Combined Session with Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Group
11.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 12.30
Panel discussion: The role of Acupuncture and Dry needling in the Management of Whiplash Associated Disorders
Invited Speaker: Michelle Sterling and Leigh McCutcheon
Chair: Peter Selvaratnam
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
1.30 – 3.00
1.30 – 2.00
Relationship of Autonomic Nervous System and Dry needling
Speaker: Doug Cary
2.00 – 3.00
Panel Discussion- Incorporating needling into the management of chronic LBP
Panel Members: Stuart Canavan, Doug Cary and Nick Economous
Chair: Peter Selvaratnam
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
3.30 – 5.00
Plenary Session 6
Room: 209
35
3.30 – 5.00
Lecture and Practical session: Needling in Tendonopathies
Invited Speaker: Leigh McCutcheon
Chair: Jane Rooney
Room: 209
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Animal
THEME: The Sporting Animal
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
7.00 – 8.15
Registration
Breakfast Session
7.00 – 8.15
Humans to animals: Kinesio Taping and its applications
Invited Speaker: Thuy Bridges
Chair: Brooke Marsh
Room: 208
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based Coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10:00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Invited Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
36
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
3.30 – 3.35
Welcome – Brooke Marsh
3.35 – 4.35
Training the competition horse
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Cathy McGowan
3.30 – 5.00
4.35 – 4.40
Fibrotic Contracture of infraspinatus in canines
Speaker: Annette Bowen
4.40 – 5.00
The Importance of Fitness
Speaker: Jeff Coombes
Chair: Lesley Goff
Room: 205
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
Combined Session with National Sports Physiotherapy Group
8.30 – 9.00
8.30 – 9.00
Integration of sports science / sports medicine and coaching in high performance equestrian sport
Invited Speakers: Victoria Kahn and Julia Battams
Chair: Katrina Varcoe-Cocks
Room: 212/213
Plenary Session 3
The Canine Sporting Shoulder
9.05 – 9.50
Canine and sporting shoulder
Invited Speaker: James Simcock
9.05 – 10.00
9.50 – 9.55
Use of functional electrical stimulation in spinal injured dogs
Speaker: Louise Steinman
9.55 – 10.00
Physiotherapy rehabilitation of a great dane following snake bite
Invited Speaker: Lesley Goff
Chair: Katrina Varcoe-Cocks
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 205
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
37
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 4
10.30 – 11.00
Stem cell therapy in equine tendon injury
Invited Speaker : Lesley Goff
11.00 – 11.45
Diagnosing lameness in the equine athlete
Invited Speaker: Chris Whitton
10.30 – 12.30
11.45 – 12.15
Common conditions in agility dogs
Invited Speaker: Charlotte Steed
12.15 – 12.20
Review of post-graduate training in UK for animal physiotherapy
Speaker: Annette Bowen, Fiona Winchester
12.20 – 12.25
Update of animal physiotherapy practice in Australia
Speaker: Brooke Marsh
12.25 – 12.30
Question time
Chair: Brooke Marsh
Room: 205
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
1.30 – 3.00
Plenary Session 5
Room: 215
1.30 – 2.30
Difficult to diagnose causes of poor performance
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Cathy McGowan
2.30 – 3.00
The impact of sport on equine joints
Invited Speaker: Kirsten Neil
Chair: Michelle Monk
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
3.30 – 5.00
Plenary Session 6
Room: 205
3.30 – 4.00
Physiotherapy management of the equine athlete
Invited Speaker: Katrina Varcoe-Cocks
4.00 – 4.30
The use of custom orthotics and prosthetics to restore mobility in the small animal patient
Invited Speaker: Michelle Monk
4.30 – 5.00
Rehabilitation of working dogs.
Invited Speaker: Brooke Marsh
Close and Thanks
Invited Speaker: Brooke Marsh
Chair: Charlotte Steed
38
Room: 205
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Aquatic
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based Coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based Postoperative Rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a Physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Illes
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
39
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 1
Physiology of Immersion: clinical implications related to sensory input, sympathetic nervous system and complex
interactions
3.30 – 3.35
Welcome
3.30 – 5.00
3.35 – 4.10
To dip or not to dip in acute, chronic and neuropathic pain – does one size fit all?
Invited Speaker: Lorimer Moseley
4.10 – 4.45
Immersion and the Autonomic Nervous System: Effects and Clinical Implications
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Bruce Becker
4.45 – 5.00
Questions
Chair: Anne Daly
Room: 208
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
Clinical practice in Aquatic Physiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Video observations of upper limb Aquatic Physiotherapy
Invited Speaker: Jenny Geytenbeek
8.55 – 9.00
An Ai Chi based aquatic group improves balance and reduces falls in community dwelling adults: an observational cohort study
Speaker: Melissa Hewitt
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.05
A Neuro Developmental Treatment approach in aquatic physiotherapy: a paediatric case study
Speaker: Shayna Gavin
9.05 – 9.35
Parkinson’s disease and water based therapy. Lessons from Venice
Speaker: Meg Morris
9.35 – 9.55
Aquatic Practices Across the Globe-Is It the Water or The Culture?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Bruce Becker
9.55 – 10.00
Questions
Chair: Ross Piper
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 208
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
How to work with pain: research, hypothesis and clinical ideas
10.30 – 10.35
Introduction
10.35 – 11.05
The biology and implementation of graded exposure for pain
Invited Speaker: Professor Lorimer Moseley
11.05 – 11.10
A comparison of land exercise and aquatic physiotherapy in the treatment of chronic low back pain
Speaker: Juliet Massarany
10.30 – 12.30
11.10 – 11.15
Does aquatic physiotherapy reduce low back/pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy?
Speaker: Claire Oaten
11.15 – 11.20
Commitment to prescribed aquatic exercises assisted pain management and function in diffuse degenerative condition of
peripheral joints and spine
Speaker: Judy Shepherd
11.20 – 11.50
How to successfully integrate a pain management approach into an aquatic physiotherapy program
Speaker: Anne Daly
40
11.50 – 12.20
Brain boosting for therapy: enhancing brain plasticity in and out of the water
Invited Speaker: Siobhan Schabrun
Questions
Chair: Diana Howell
Room: 208
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 215
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
Aquatic cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, cardiovascular fitness and management of arthritic conditions in aquatic
physiotherapy.
1.30 – 1.35
Introduction
1.35 – 1.55
Aquatic cardiopulmonary rehabilitation: Evidenced based practice and clinical implications
Invited Speaker: Renae McNamara
1.55 – 2.15
Practical considerations for aqua fitness: working with groups, planning and clinical progressions
Invited Speaker: Lisa Westlake
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
Early aquatic physical therapy improves function and does not increase risk of wound-related adverse events for adults after
orthopaedic surgery
Speaker: Elizabeth Villalta
2.30 – 2.45
The benefits of aquatic exercise for people with arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions: A systematic review with
meta-analysis
Speaker: Anna Barker
2.45 – 2.50
The effectiveness of pre-operative aquatic therapy for hip and knee joint replacements
Speaker: Cath O’Brien
2.50 – 2.55
In patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis does aquatic physiotherapy make a difference to pain, stiffness and fatigue?
Speaker: Wendy Philpotts
2.55 – 3.00
Characteristics of Arthritis and Osteoporosis Victoria’s peer led warm water exercise program – A model that works!
Speaker: Christopher Eastham
Chair: Sophie Heywood
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 208
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
Aquatic research, education and professional guidelines
3.30 – 3.35
Introduction
3.35 – 3.55
APA aquatic physiotherapy guidelines for physiotherapists working in and/or managing hydrotherapy pools (2013)
Speaker: Maureen MacMahon
3.30 – 5.00
3.55 – 4.15
Aquatic physiotherapy professional development: modifying core concepts to new education interfaces, evolving clinical
priorities and improving risk management awareness
Speaker: Sophie Heywood
4.15 – 4.30
Research Needs in Aquatic Therapy: What do we know and what do we need to know?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Bruce Becker
4.30 – 4.45
Awards
Chair: Miriam Fletcher
Room: 208
41
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Cardiorespiratory
THEME: Exercise across the trajectory of cardiorespiratory illness
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by a Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young, and Deputy Chair of the
Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 10.40
Welcome: Catherine Granger, Cardiorespiratory Scientific Committee
10.30 – 12.30
10.40 – 11.35
Why should patients with cardiorespiratory impairment exercise?
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Thierry Troosters
11.35 – 12.30
An overview of physiotherapy and exercise intervention in cardio-respiratory patient populations – what is the evidence,
where have we come from and what needs to be done in the future?
Invited Speaker: Linda Denehy
Chair: Catherine Granger
12.30 – 13.30
Room: 210/211
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
Intensive Care Exercise and Delirium
1.30 – 2.00
Intensive care year in review
Invited Speaker: Jennifer Paratz
2.00 – 2.15
Trial of Early Activity and Mobility in Intensive Care: Prospective Observational Study Preliminary (Interim) Results
Speaker: Carol Hodgson
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
Early exercise in patients with sepsis syndromes improves tissue oxygenation
Speaker: Jennifer Paratz
2.30 – 2.45
Functional electrical stimulation-assisted cycling in the critically ill: a pilot case-matched control study of safety, feasibility
and effectiveness
Speaker: Selina Parry
2.45 – 3.00
An investigation of sedation, agitation and delirium levels in general intensive care patients
Speaker: Elizabeth Skinner
Chair: Sue Berney and Lisa Beach
42
Room: 210
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
Respiratory Conditions
1.30 – 1.45
Patients Expectations and Experiences of rehabilitation after lung transplantation: a qualitative study
Speaker: Lou Fuller
1.45 – 2.00
A quantitative and qualitative examination of the impact of home mechanical in-exsufflation in children with neuromuscular
disease and their families
Speaker: Fiona Moran
2.00 – 2.15
The effect of positive expiratory pressure for airway clearance on ventilation inhomogeneity in individuals with stable COPD
and chronic sputum expectoration
Speaker: Christian Osadnik
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
Minimal important difference in six-minute walk distance and incremental shuttle walk distance in non-cystic fibrosis
bronchiectasis
Speaker: Anne-Marie Lee
2.30 – 2.35
Patient and physiotherapist reported adherence to airway clearance therapy, inhalations and exercise together with lung
function outcomes in cystic fibrosis
Speaker: Erica Kotowicz
2.35 – 2.40
Using EZPAP positive pressure device as a respiratory physiotherapy treatment within a district general hospital (DGH)
Speaker: Sarah Elliott
2.40 – 2.45
Pressures generated by the bubble positive expiratory pressure device: a bench-top study
Speaker: Mary Santos
2.45 – 3.00
Discussion
Chair: Mark Elkins and Ruth Dentice
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 211
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 3
Respiratory Disease
3.30 – 4.00
Respiratory: Year in Review
Invited Speaker: Anne Holland
4.00 – 4.15
Adherence to Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines for inpatients with acute exacerbation
of COPD
Speaker: Clarice Tang
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Upper limb strength and lung function are determinants of upper limb work capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Speaker: Jennifer Alison
4.30 – 4.45
Four years after the completion of a maintenance exercise program: have quality of life and exercise capacity been
maintained?
Speaker: Lissa Spencer
4.45 – 5.00
Sensation of breathlessness: Associations between severity of impairment, the Dyspnoea-12 and the Multidimensional
Dyspnoea Profile
Speaker: Marie Williams
Chair: Anne Holland and Christian Osadnik
Room: 210
43
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 4
Education/Simulation Training
3.30 – 4.10
Simulation Training – Evidence based update
Invited Speaker: Felicity Blackstock
4.10 – 4.25
The reliability of an audit tool to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of cardiorespiratory weekend interventions of junior
physiotherapists
Speaker: Christine Polmear
3.30 – 5.00
4.25 – 4.30
Does a structured training program improve junior physiotherapists’ confidence, safety and effectiveness in cardiorespiratory
skills for weekend work?
Speaker: Christine Polmear
4.30 – 4.45
The use of simulated learning to enhance cardiorespiratory acute paediatric physiotherapy
Speaker: Sarah Wright
4.45 – 4.50
Acute care weekend physiotherapy at a major metropolitan teaching hospital
Speaker: Kimberley Haines
4.50 – 5.00
The development of education in cardiopulmonary physiotherapy in China
Speaker: Alice Jones
Chair: Laura Browning and Elizabeth Skinner
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 211
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
Physical Activity and Wellness
8.30 – 9.10
Boosting physical activity – new insights and remaining challenges
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Thierry Troosters
8.30 – 10.00
9.10 – 9.35
Sedentary behaviour and health outcomes
Invited Speaker: David Dunstan
9.35 – 10.00
Using E-Health in cardiorespiratory patient care
Invited Speaker: Julie Redfern
Chair: Catherine Granger
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 210/211
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3 Jill Nosworthy Award for Excellence in Research Prize
10.30 – 10.45
Mobilisation during renal replacement therapy via vascath in patients who are critically ill is safe and feasible
Speaker: Yi Tian Wang
10.45 – 11.00
A new two-tier approach for measurement of strength in critically ill patients
Speaker: Selina Parry
10.30 – 11.45
11.00 – 11.15
Low physical activity levels and functional decline in individuals with non-small cell lung cancer
Speaker: Catherine Granger
11.15 – 11.30
Does short-form Sun-style Tai chi improve exercise capacity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)? A
single-blind, randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Regina Leung
11.30 – 11.45
Pulmonary rehabilitation versus self-management for people with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease: a randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Allison Mandrusiak
Chair: Julie Redfern and Linda Denehy
44
Room: 210
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 5
Exercise Training in COPD
11.45 – 12.00
Pulmonary rehabilitation: can we predict who responds if the program includes an education component?
Speaker: Felicity Blackstock
12.00 – 12.05
Are equipped home-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs superior to non-equipped programs for clients with severe
respiratory disease? A systematic review
Speaker: Sharon Kwiatkowski
11.45 – 12.30
12.05 – 12.10
The effects of pulmonary rehabilitation block programs in a community setting
Speaker: Mr Chi-Keung Lee
12.10 – 12.15
Unwell inpatients admitted to hospital with acute exacerbation of COPD have positive experiences of exercise
Speaker: Clarice Tang
12.15 – 12.20
Acceptability of short-form Sun-style Tai Chi in people with COPD
Speaker: Regina Leung
12.20 – 12.30
Discussion
Chair: Doa El-Ansary
Room: 210
Concurrent Session 6
Validity of Outcome Measures in Respiratory Conditions
11.45 – 12.00
Reliability and validity of the Multimedia Activity Recall in Children and Adults in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease
Speaker: Marie Williams
11.45 – 12.30
12.00 – 12.15
The validity of three commonly used physical activity questionnaires as compared with accelerometry in patients with Chronic
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Speaker: Quan Nguyen
12.15 – 12.20
Validation of the chronic respiratory disease questionnaire in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis
Speaker: Domagoj Vodanovich
12.20 – 12.30
Discussion
Chair: Lisa Beach and Helen Seale
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 211
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 7
Surgery
1.30 – 2.00
Surgery Year in Review
Invited Speaker: Doa El-Ansary
2.00 – 2.15
Physical activity in the inpatient period after cardiac surgery: an observational study
Speaker: Andrew Hirschhorn
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
An investigation of mobilization practices in abdominal, cardiothoracic and general surgical patients
Speaker: Bill Zafiropoulos
2.30 – 2.45
Is ultrasound a reliable measure of sternal micromotion during functional tasks in patients following cardiac surgery?
Speaker: Sulakshana Balachandran
2.45 – 3.00
Inspiratory muscle training before cardiothoracic and upper abdominal surgery to prevent post-operative pulmonary
complications: a systematic review
Speaker: Mark Elkins
Chair: Doa El-Ansary and Laura Browning
Room: 210
45
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 8
Physical Activity in Respiratory Disease
1.30 – 1:45
Physical activity in obesity hypoventilation syndrome
Speaker: Angela Burge
1.45 – 2:00
Global positioning system tracking in non-small cell lung cancer: comparison of physical activity behaviour to healthy controls
Speaker: Catherine Granger
2.00 – 2:15
Sedentary behaviours in adults with and without chronic disease: How much time is spent and what are they doing?
Speaker: Lucy Lewis
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.20
Physical activity levels in people hospitalised with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Speaker: Ling Tsai
2.20 – 2.35
Physical activity levels improve in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following hospitalisation for an acute
exacerbation
Speaker: Ling Tsai
2.35 – 2.50
Like sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Speaker: Marie Williams
2.50 – 2.55
Laying down the truth – sedentary behaviour in people with COPD with physical comorbidities
Speaker: Renae McNamara
2.55 – 3.00
Discussion
Chair: Jennifer Allison and Norman Morris
Room: 211
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 9
Intensive Care
3.30 – 3.45
Translating strength to function in survivors of a critical illness: an observational investigation of dynamometry, mobility and
discharge destination
Speaker: Claire Baldwin
3.45 – 4.00
The distribution of muscle weakness in patients recently discharged from intensive care
Speaker: Jenny Mackney
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.15
Discordance between distance ambulated as part of usual care and functional exercise capacity in critical illness survivors
Speaker: Angela Ricardo
4.15 – 4.30
The six-minute-walk-distance: a useful metric for inpatient rehabilitation
Speaker: Jenny Mackney
4.30 – 4.45
The impact of physical activity levels and sedation on physical function and strength at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge
Speaker: Lisa Beach
4.45 – 5.00
The physical and psychological outcomes of Australian survivors of intensive care at five years: preliminary results
Speaker: Kimberley Haines
Chair: Jennifer Paratz and Selina Parry
46
Room: 210
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 10
Cardiorespiratory Conditions
3.30 – 3.45
Effect of exercise training on vascular health in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Speaker: Ben Noteboom
3.45 – 3.50
Cardiopulmonary responses during six minute walk test differentiates functional in pulmonary arterial hypertension: a
tertiary centre experience
Speaker: Helen Seale
3.50 – 3.55
The effect of a reduction in exercise sessions on 6-minute-walk-test outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation
Speaker: Nicole Bellet
3.30 – 5.00
3.55 – 4.00
Discussion
4.00 – 4.15
Cardiopulmonary responses during six minute walk test are related to echocardiographic measures of disease severity in
pulmonary hypertension
Speaker: Norman Morris
4.15 – 4.30
Falls, falls risk and musculoskeletal pain in older adults with chronic heart failure
Speaker: Rita Hwang
4.30 – 4.45
Screening Education And Recognition in Community pharmacies of Atrial Fibrillation to prevent stroke (SEARCH-AF stroke
prevention study)
Speaker: Nicole Lowres
4.45 – 5.00
Discussion
Chair: Julie Redfern and Helen Seale
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 211
Cardiorespiratory cocktail function proudly sponsored by Fisher and Paykel Healthcare
Venue: Boatbuilders Yard, South Warf
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Breakfast Session 1
6.45 – 8.15
Developments and challenges in physical activity assessment in chronic disease
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Thierry Troosters
Chair: Catherine Granger
6.45 – 8.15
Room: 216
Breakfast Session 2
6.45 – 8.15
Dyspnoea: Old dog, new tricks
Description: Dyspnoea is a perceptual experience and as such, the way this symptom is experienced differs between people.
This session will present current thinking concerning mechanisms underpinning the sensation of breathlessness, how
dyspnoea might be assessed and implications for management.
Invited Speaker: Marie Williams
Chair: Fiona Moran
Room: 206
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: * Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
* Video link up
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10:00 – 10.30
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
47
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice - ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4 – Intensive Care
3.30 – 3.45
Ventilator hyperinflations – lessons learnt from a bench-top analysis
Speaker: Peter Thomas
3.45 – 4.00
The effect of chest physiotherapy on regional lung volume changes in ventilated children using electrical impedance
tomography
Speaker: Bronagh Mcalinden
4.00 – 4.15
Treatment of potential organ donors using lung management protocols increases the incidence of successful lung
transplantation
Speaker: Cassandra Raios
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Psychological morbidity of Australian informal caregivers at five year following intensive care unit discharge is low: preliminary
results
Speaker: Kimberley Haines
4.30 – 4.45
Health-related quality of life in mechanically ventilated Australasian survivors of H1N1 influenza is comparable to population
norms one-year following discharge
Speaker: Elizabeth Skinner
4.45 – 5.00
How well can intensive care clinicians predict longer-term outcomes for their patients?
Speaker: Kimberley Haines
Chair: George Ntoumenopoulos
and Selina Parry
48
Room: 210/211
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 5
Evidence Translation and Service Re-design
9.00 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.40
Synthesizing best evidence and translation within cardiorespiratory physiotherapy
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
9.40 – 10.00
Transforming an outdated service into a contemporary and sustainable one: A practical tale of survival and new found
opportunities
Invited Speaker: Kylie Houlihan
Chair: Elizabeth Skinner and Andrew Hirschhorn
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 210/211
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 6
PRF Orations and Nicole Turney Recipient presentation
10.30 – 10.45
Use of the Bottle/Bubble Positive Expiratory Pressure (PEP) device by Physiotherapists in Australian hospitals
Speaker: Nicole Turney Recipient Mary Santos
10.30 – 11.30
10.45 – 11.00
PRF one: A multi-centre, randomised controlled trial of positive expiratory pressure therapy for inpatients with acute
exacerbations of COPD and sputum expectoration
Speaker: Christian Osadnik
11.00 – 11.15
PRF two: Responses to supplemental oxygen in obesity hypoventilation syndrome: before and after positive airway pressure
Speaker: Carly Hollier
11.15 – 11.30
PRF three: Smallest worthwhile effect of ultrasound for sinusitis in people with cystic fibrosis
Speaker: Mark Elkins
Chair: Shane Patman and Ruth Dentice
Room: 210/211
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
Room: 215
Plenary Session 7
11.30 – 12.15
Debate: ‘The weakest link: functional rehab is superior to specificity’’
Speakers: TBC
11.30 – 1.00
12.15 – 12.30
Update from National CRPA Chair
Speaker: Ruth Dentice
12.30 – 1.00
Prizes and closing remarks
Speaker: Ruth Dentice and Catherine Granger
Chair: (no Chair for this session)
12.30 – 1.30
College General Meeting – Plenary Hall 2
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: 210/211
49
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Continence and Women’s Health
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 1
8.30 – 8.32
Welcome
Speaker: Heather Pierce, Acting Chair of CWHG
8.30 – 10.00
8.32 – 9.15
Continence and Womens Health Physiotherapy: Through the Looking Glass
Invited Speaker: Pauline Chiarelli
9.15 – 10.00
Association between pelvic girdle pain and pelvic floor muscle function
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Britt Stuge
Chair: Heather Pierce and Libby Oldfield
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 220
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
10.30 – 11.00
Badly Behaved Bladders
Invited Speaker: Rebekah Das
11.00 – 11.15
A vaginal tampon in situ reduces female stress incontinence leakage, patient-reported symptoms and bladder neck mobility
during physical activities.
Speaker: Margaret Sherburn
11.15 – 11.30
Do dimensions of sensation differ between individuals with and without overactive bladder?
A pilot study.
Invited Speaker: Rebekah Das
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 11.45
Strategy of urethral/bladder neck motion during a voluntary contraction is related to that during an evoked, but not
voluntary cough
Speaker: Paul Hodges
11.45 – 12.00
An investigation of the barriers to implement continence screening and pelvic floor muscle training guidelines in primary
maternity care.
Speaker: Helena Frawley
12.00 – 12.15
The effect of pool temperature on body temperature during aqua-aerobic exercise in pregnancy.
Speaker: Amanda Brearley
12.15 – 12.30
Expectation, fears and pain experience: identifying external and internal threats to perceived safety of women in two
birthing environments.
Speaker: Lester Jones
Chair: Ginny Gill and Pauline Chiarelli
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 220
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
1.30 – 2.10
Movement and Physical Activity– the Physiotherapist’s Role in promoting Health and Well-being for the Oncology Patient
Invited Speaker: Robyn Box
2.10 – 2.15
Does low level laser therapy reduce pain from cracked or grazed nipples in breastfeeding Western Australian women?
Speaker: Anne Andrews
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.20
Effective implementation of an exercise program post breast cancer surgery
Speaker: Dragana Ceprnja
2.20 – 2.25
The barriers and facilitators to physical activity participation in women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Speaker: Nikki Milne
2.25 – 2.30
Physical activity and anthropometry of women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Speaker: Nikki Milne
50
2.30 – 3.00 PeArLS Presentation
Working with female survivors of torture.
Speaker: David Kelly
Chair: Debra Virtue and Taryn Hallam
Room: 220
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
3.30 – 4.00
Interpreting the evidence on chronic pelvic pain from a neuroscience perspective
Invited Speaker: Lorimer Moseley
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.30
Biopsychosocial assessment in continence and women’s health – understanding the person and the problem
Invited Speaker: Mark Jones
4.30 – 5.00 PeArLs Presentation
Pelvic pain: developing a tool to enhance education and assist clinical reasoning
Speaker: Lester Jones
Chair: Trish Neumann and Anne Andrews
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 220
Continence and Women’s Health cocktail function proudly sponsored by TENA
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre (Room 209)
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: * Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
* Video link up
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10:00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
51
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
Men and pelvic floor dysfunction
3.30 – 3.50
Male Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome; outcomes of a clinical audit
Invited Speaker: Shan Morrison
3.50 – 4.10
New insight into the male pelvic floor: moving towards a better understanding
Invited Speaker: Ryan Stafford
3.30 – 5.00
4.10 – 4.25
A multicomponent theory-based intervention improves uptake of pelvic floor muscle training before radical prostatectomy
Speaker: Andrew Hirschhorn
4.25 – 4.45
Pre-operative radical prostate surgery: do men ‘get it’ with verbal pelvic floor muscle instructions?
Invited Speaker: Trish Neumann
4.45 – 5.00
Early pelvic floor motor control training utilising RTUS for biofeedback in men with prostate cancer – a new protocol.
Speaker: Stuart Doorbar-Baptist
Chair: Melissa Martin and Tara O’Reilly
52
Room: 220
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 6
Combined Session with Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Group
8.30 – 9.00
Development and measurement properties of the condition–specific pelvic girdle questionnaire
International Keynote speaker: Dr Britt Stuge
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.15
Should women with pelvic floor dysfunction do sit-ups?
Invited Speaker: Judith Thompson
9.15 – 9.30
Sleep, catastrophising and disturbed body schema are related to disability in chronic pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain
Speaker: Darren Beales
9.30 – 10.00
New Moves in Musculoskeletal assessment: what value can a PF physio add?
Panel: Trish Neumann, Judith Thompson, Margaret Sherburn
Chair: Gen McGlashan and Martin Rabey
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 7
10.30 – 11.30
To treat or not to treat pelvic girdle pain with stabilizing exercises?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Britt Stuge
11.30 – 11.35
Pregnancy-related disability is related with lumbopelvic pain and facilitates the outcome of the active straight leg raise test
Speaker: Darren Beales
11.35 – 11.40
Incontinence, body image, pelvic floor dysfunction and lumbo-pelvic pain in post-natal women with diastases of the
rectus abdominus.
Speaker: Alesha Southy
11.40 – 11.45
How should we measure diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle (DRAM): a systematic review and reliability meta-analysis
Speaker: Deenika Benjamin
10.30 – 12.30
11.45 – 11.50
Effects of exercise on diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscle (DRAM) in the ante-natal and post-natal period: a systematic review.
Speaker: Deenika Benjamin
11.50 – 11.55
Wearing a simple abdominal support garment postnatally reduces associated bother in women with Rectus
Abdominis Diastasis
Speaker: Tracey Cragg
11.55 – 12.15
Physiotherapy for pelvic organ prolapse: the Australian ‘POPPY’ experience
Invited Speaker: Helena Frawley
12.15 – 12.20
Changing clinical practice to include support pessaries for the management of pelvic organ prolapse: the impact of a one-day
training program
Speaker: Ali Burnett
12.20 – 12.25
Barriers to the provision of pessary care in Australian Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapy practice following a
pessary training workshop.
Speaker: Anna Scammell
Chairs: Margaret Sherburn and Alex Lopes
Room: 220
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 215
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
53
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
College General Meeting – Plenary Hall 2
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch Plenary Session
1.00 – 1.30
1.00 – 1.30 PeArLs Presentation
Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: Thinking from the outside in
Speaker: Margaret Sherburn
*This session is for Titled and Specialist members only
Plenary Session 8
1.30 – 1.50
When Nature Calls: The effects of nutrients and natural chemicals on gut function
Invited Speaker: Alyssa Tait
1.50 – 2.10
Physiotherapy in Adult Chronic Constipation
Invited Speaker: Angela Khera
1.30 – 3.00
2.10 – 2.30
Management of constipation in children, preventive medicine?
Invited Speaker: Janet Chase
2.30 – 2.45
Whole-body vibration versus proprioceptive training on postural and neuromuscular performance in post-menopausal
osteopenic women
Speaker: Daniel Belavy
2.45 – 3.00
Panel Discussion
Chair: Helena Frawley and Marita Davis
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 220
Afternoon tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 9
3.30 – 3.55
Implementing pelvic floor muscle training clinical practice guidelines into practice: a translational research experience
Invited Speaker: Helena Frawley
3.30 – 5.00
3.55 – 4.20
“MOVES for Life” – putting evidence into practice for the management of physical sequelae of treatments for Oncology
Patients.
Invited Speaker: Robyn Box
4.20 – 4.45
Osteoporosis: a new slant on an old problem
Invited Speaker: Pauline Chiarelli
4.45 – 5.00
Presentation of paper prizes
Chair: Judith Thomson and Helen Edwards
54
Room: 220
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Educators
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary session 1
8.30 – 10.00
The role of experience in clinical expertise
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Geoff Norman
Chair: Suzanne Snodgrass
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 207
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
10.30 – 10.45
An effective and efficient blended learning approach for supporting practical skill development of the adult learner
Speaker: Stephen Maloney
10.45 – 11.00
Student and educator experiences with using a remotely accessed simulated learning environment during musculoskeletal
clinical education placements: a pilot study
Speaker: Andrea Bialocerkowski
11.00 – 11.15
Working with patients and technology to promote clinical reasoning and assessment skills in student seminars
Speaker: Marilyn Webster
10.30 – 12.30
11.15 – 11.30
Using technology to enhance clinical supervision: The Electronically-Facilitated Feedback Initiative (EFFI)
Speaker: Suzanne Snodgrass
11.30 – 11.45
Simulated learning in paediatric physiotherapy – targeting paediatric capability in the emerging workforce
Speaker: Meg Moller
11.45 – 12.00
The characteristics of a well prepared student for clinical learning: A Delphi study of clinical educators
Speaker: Lucy Chipchase
12.00 – 12.15
Promoting Resilience to enhance Physiotherapy Clinical Learning and Performance; an Action Research Project
Speaker: Clare Delany
12.15 – 12.30
Traditional versus peer-assisted models of clinical education for paired physiotherapy students: a randomised trial
Speaker: Samantha Sevenhuysen
Chair: Elizabeth Molloy
Room: 207
55
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
10.30 – 10.45
Constructively aligned subject evaluation: The CASE for evaluation of student learning
Speaker: Louisa Remedios
10.45 – 11.00
A systematic review of instruments for the assessment of professional competence of physiotherapy students
Speaker: Megan Dalton
11.00 – 11.05
An evaluation of the delivery of stream-specific clinical training to junior physiotherapists in a tertiary Australian public
hospital
Speaker: Emma Bastick
11.05 – 11.10
How do physiotherapy students spend their time on clinical placement?
Speaker: Katrine Nehyba
11.10 – 11.15
Targeted simulation training to improve teaching skills of physiotherapy clinical educators
Speaker: Clare Holdsworth
11.15 – 11.20
New technologies in physiotherapy education
Speaker: Leo Ng
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 11.35
What should be reported when describing educational processes to teach EBP: a delphi survey
Speaker: Anna Phillips
11.35 – 11.40
Diminishing effect sizes with repeated exposure to evidence based practice training in health professional undergraduates
Speaker: Lucy Lewis
11.40 – 11.45
The New South Wales Allied Health Workplace Learning Study: Barriers and enablers to learning in the workplace
Speaker: Bradley Lloyd
11.45 – 11.50
Changes in back pain beliefs in post-graduate Masters musculoskeletal physiotherapy students
Speaker: Darren Beales
12.00 – 12.05
Lead or be led? Should electrotherapy be taught in a contemporary entry-level physiotherapy curriculum?
Speaker: William Gibson
12.05 – 12.10
Use of electrophysical agents by physiotherapists in Papua New Guinea: a developing country context.
Speaker: Karthikeyan P Ramalingam
12.10 – 12.15
Use of the ICF in Indigenous healthcare and for understanding people’s experiences with chronic conditions from the person
perspective
Speaker: Vanessa Alford
12.15 – 12.20
Patient satisfaction in a student-run physiotherapy clinic
Speaker: Alan Reubenson
Chair: Maureen McEvoy
12.30 – 1.30
56
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: 209
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 3
1.30 – 2.00 PeArLs Presentation
Supervising students with fitness to practice issues – how do we support clinicians more effectively?
Speaker: Kristin Lo
2.00 – 2.30 PeArLs Presentation
ersitas 21 UNMDG group; Collaborative Millennium Development Goals project
Speaker: Jessica Lees
2.30 – 3.00 PeArLs Presentation
Reflective and effective: theory, tools and experiences to support learner||physiotherapists
Speaker: Sarah Barradell
Chair: Sara Carroll
Room: 207
Concurrent Session 4
1.30 – 3.00
1.30 – 1.45
Evaluating patients’ attitudes towards being assessed and treated by undergraduate physiotherapy students in a
rehabilitation centre
Speaker: Kathy Stiller
1.45 – 2.00
Attitudes of physiotherapy students towards mental health, psychiatry and the||undergraduate curriculum
Speaker: William Gibson
2.00 – 2.15
Patient and educator perceptions of student involvement in private practice||consultations
Speaker: Fiona Kent
2.15 – 2.30
Decision making for assessment: factors impacting on physiotherapy educators’assessment practice
Speaker: Elizabeth Molloy
2.30 – 2.45
Physiotherapy clinical educators and students spend the majority of clinical||education time providing patient treatment and
completing administrative tasks
Speaker: Elizabeth Skinner
2.45 – 3.00
Community moves: enhancing physiotherapy students experiences on clinical placement through community engagement
Speaker: Luke Wakely
Chair: Megan Dalton
Room: 209
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
Embedding indigenous perspectives into entry level physiotherapy curricula
3.30 – 5.00
Panel session
Speaker: Sue Jones, Shaun Ewen, Vanessa Alford, Candice Liddy
Chair: Gillian Webb
Room: 207
57
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Gerontology
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 1
Evidence based management of Arthritis
8.45 – 10.00
8.45 – 9.00
Welcome
Speaker: Jan Taylor and Stephanie Fu
9.00 – 10.00
Updating the evidence for management of osteoarthritis & rheumatoid arthritis.
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Lucie Brosseau
Chair: Stephanie Fu
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 208
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
Key Issues for aging Australia
10.30 – 11.30
The Opportunities and Challenges of Ageing Australia
National Keynote Speaker: Professor Hal Kendig
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 12.00
Meeting the imminent challenges in gerontology and physiotherapy
Invited Speaker: Terry Haines
12.00 – 12.30
The ageing foot and ankle: implications for treatment
Invited Speaker: Hylton Menz
Chair: Jan Taylor
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 208
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
Rehabilitation
1.30 – 1.45
Additional Saturday rehabilitation improves functional independence and quality of life and reduces length of stay in
inpatient rehabilitation
Speaker: Casey Peiris
1.45 – 2.00
Age did not influence improvement in gait performance among older adults undergoing in-hospital rehabilitation for
orthopaedic conditions
Speaker: Stephen McPhail
2.00 – 2.15
Aetiology influences outcomes following lower limb amputation
Speaker: Heather Batten
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
Gender influence on physical functioning and recovery among older people after hip fracture
Speaker: Lynda Woodward
2.30 – 2.45
A case study comparing usual care exercise and brain training exercises in the management of knee osteoarthritis
Speaker: Anton Harms
2.45 – 2.50
Differences in outcomes for clinical diagnostic groups undertaking an inpatient rehabilitation program
Speaker: Rachael Williams
2.50 – 2.55
Providing timely home based rehabilitation to improve functional independence and ability to manage at home following
hospital discharge
Speaker: Jessica Gale
Chair: Jenny Nitz
Room: 208
Concurrent Session 2
1.30 – 3.00
National Disability Insurance Scheme Panel
Speaker: Barby Singer, Liz Shannon, Kirsten Deane, Michael Burke via video
See National Neurology Group Program
This session is now scheduled for Friday 18th October 3.30pm – 5.15pm, Room 219.
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
58
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: 215
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 3
Falls and E Health
3.30 – 4.00
Falls in people with dementia and cognitive impairment
Invited Speaker: Morag Taylor
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.30
Tele-rehabilitation in cardiorespiratory disease – new ways to deliver effective therapies
Invited Speaker: Anne Holland
4.30 – 5.00
Tele-health and physiotherapy assessment in the primary care sector
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
Chair: Cathie Sherrington
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 208
Gerontology cocktail function
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre (Room 215)
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 18 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop
* Video link up
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a Physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice - ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
59
Room: Plenary Hall 2
SATURDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 3
Falls Prevention
3.30 – 3.45
Tailored education for older patients to facilitate engagement in falls prevention strategies after hospital discharge–a pilot
randomized controlled trial
Speaker: Anne-Marie Hill
3.45 – 4.00
Falls in the first month following discharge from rehabilitation
Speaker: Catherine Said
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.15
Physiological function modifies the effect of cognitive function on the risk of multiple falls – a population-based study
Speaker: Michele Callisaya
4.15 – 4.30
Increased falls with home exercise for older people after hospital stays: exploration of an unexpected finding from a
randomised trial
Speaker: Cathie Sherrington
4.30-4.45
Preparing people at high risk of falls for discharge home following rehabilitation: Do we meet the guidelines?
Speaker: Catherine Said
4.45 – 5.00
Home exercise for older people after hospital stays: exploration of intervention dose mobility and falls in a randomised trial
Speaker: Cathie Sherrington
Chair: Ting Lio
Room: 218
Concurrent Session 4
Combined session with National Sports Group – The Masters Athlete
3.30 – 3.50
Rotator cuff degeneration in the Masters Athlete
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Ann Cools
3.50 – 4.10
Injuries in Athletes at the Australian Masters Games
Invited Speaker: Geoff Thompson
3.30 – 5.00
4.10 – 4.30
Sports Physiotherapy at the Australian Masters Games
Invited Speaker: Pippa Tessman
4.30 – 4.40
Consumer Presentation: The role of physiotherapy in sustained performance
Speaker: Pat Galvin and Chris Wardlaw
4.40 – 5.00
Panel
Chair: Shylie Mackintosh
Room: 212
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Workshop 1
8.00 – 9.00
Understanding and undertaking research
Panel and discussion session
Speakers: Terry Haines, Cathie Sherrington and Ann-Marie Hill
Chair: Sze-Ee Soh
Room: 218
Concurrent session 5
Physiotherapy delivery and participation
9.00 – 9.15
Evaluation of a physiotherapy service delivered to post-acute community rehabilitation clients through a Transition Care
Program
Speaker: Samantha Goodwin
9.00 – 10.00
9.15 – 9.30
Physical activity behaviour in older people living in retirement villages
Speaker: Frances Moran
9.30 – 9.45
Factors limiting adherence to a 12-month home exercise intervention as reported by participants and therapists
Speaker: Catherine Kirkham
60
9.45 – 10.00
Physiotherapy provided by carers can improve patient outcomes: a systematic review
Speaker: Katherine Lawler
Chair: Ileanne Au
Room: 218
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
Concurrent session 6
Outcome measures
9.00 – 9.15
Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of ultrasound measures of lateral abdominal and lumbar multifidus muscle thickness in
older adults
Speaker: Anitra Wilson
9.00 – 10.00
9.15 – 9.30
Systematic review of the literature on abdominal and multifidus muscle function, assessment methods and their
measurement reliability in older adults
Speaker: William Cuellar
9.30 – 9.45
The Berg Balance Scale has high intra- inter-rater reliability, but absolute reliability varies across the scale: a
systematic review
Speaker: Stephen Downs
9.45 – 10.00
Normal values of the Berg Balance Scale in healthy elderly people: a systematic review
Speaker: Stephen Downs
Chair: Sarah Tan
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 217
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy
Chair: Mark Elkins
Room: 215
Concurrent Session 7
Aged Care, community and the older person’s perspective
10.30 – 10.45
Does the Aged Care Funding Instrument (ACFI) lead physiotherapy away from evidenced based practice?
Speaker: Amy Hill
10.45 – 11.00
Physiotherapy student clinical placements in the aged care setting: practitioner attitudes and support needs
Speaker: Clint Newstead
11.00 – 11.05
Nursing home residents’ preferences and perceptions when engaging in semi-structured activity with student volunteers.
Speaker: Alana Charron
11.05 – 11.10
Does physiotherapy (directed towards mobility) improve function in older people with dementia?
Speaker: Shakira Simon
10.30 – 12.30
11.10 – 11.15
Factors effecting participation rates in chronic disease self-management programmes
Speaker: Allan Abbot
11.15 – 11.30
Strategies used to stand up: comparisons between older people with and without dementia
Speaker: Urszula Doleka
11.30 – 11.45
Older people’s perspectives on participation in exercise: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative literature
Speaker: Marcia Franco
11.45 – 12.00
Patient-reported decision support software for monitoring global status and functional recovery in a stroke patient from
inpatient to home
Speaker: Philip Gabel
12.00 – 12.15
Patient perceived readiness for discharge from hospital based rehabilitation to home
Speaker: Sarah Mattin
Chair: Rik Dawson
Room: 218
61
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
Concurrent session 8
Balance and functional ability
10.30 – 10.45
Does balance strategy training improve function in people with myasthenia gravis?
Speaker: Katrina Williams
10.45 – 11.00
Pilates exercise for improving balance and decreasing falls risk
Speaker: Anna Barker
11.00 – 11.05
PRIME : improving the journey to hip and joint arthroplasty for the elderly with co-morbidities and higher risk of
complications 5x5
Speaker: Edmund Leahy
11.05 – 11.10
Falls trends within physiotherapy: a retrospective analysis
Speaker: Julie Lam
10.30 – 12.30
11.10 – 11.15
Comparing balance outcomes of adding a home-based exercise program to a group exercise program in Community
Therapy Services
Speaker: Kenneth Koh
11.15 – 11.30
Health and community services in older adults recently discharged from hospital: utilisation, costs and impact of a homeexercise intervention
Speaker: Inez Farag
11.30 – 11.45
Effects of early standing and walking on function, mobility and walk-speed at discharge, for people following surgery for
hip fracture
Speaker: Rebecca Ferrier
11.45 – 11.50
Developing a discharge predictor tool for fractured neck of femurs
Speaker: Catherine Senserrick
11.50 – 11.55
Commitment to prescribed aquatic exercises assisted pain and function in diffuse degenerative condition of peripheral joints
and spine
Speaker: Judith Shepherd
Chair: Anne-Marie Hill
12.30 – 1.30
12.30 – 13.30
Room: 217
College General Meeting – Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
Arthritis and Dizziness
1.30 – 2.00
The use of the Knowledge-To-Action Cycle model to implement the Ottawa Panel clinical practice guidelines in the
management of arthritis.
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Lucie Brosseau
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.30
Differential diagnosis of dizziness in older
Invited Speaker: Kate Murray
2.30 – 3.00
Cervicogenic dizziness and sensorimotor problems in older adults
Invited Speaker: Julia Treleaven
Chair: Nancy Low Choy
Close
62
3.00 – 3.30
Conclusion and awards
Speaker: Jan Taylor and Stephanie Fu
3.30 – 4.00
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: 218
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Leadership
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by a Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8:30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young, and Deputy Chair of the
Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 11.30 (+ 10 minutes of question time)
Activity Based Funding – The Impact on Physiotherapy
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Deputy Chair from Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
10.30 – 12.30
11.40 – 11.55
Building capacity and leadership in physiotherapy research: the Tasmanian Physiotherapy Research Group
Speaker: Tania Wizenberg
11.55 – 12.10
An investigation of physiotherapy research activity in Australian tertiary hospitals.
Speaker: Elizabeth Skinner
12.10 – 12.25
Trial of a computer-based program that provides length of stay benchmark figures at a rehabilitation centre.
Speaker: Kathy Stiller
Chair: Jim Sayer
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
5.30 – 7.30
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre - Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
Room: 208
63
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 2
1.30 – 1.50
Developing Sustainable Models for Extended Scope of Practice – the ED experience
Invited Speaker: Pat Maher – Health Workforce Australia
1.50 – 2.05
Providing a framework for the planning, implementation, evaluation and integration of Advanced Musculoskeletal
Physiotherapy services within a health service.
Speaker: Paula Harding & Jonathon Prescott
1.30 – 3.00
2.05 – 2.20
Extended scope physiotherapy services in ACT Health Directorate: Key stakeholder perspectives
Speaker: Joanne Morris
2.20 – 2.35
Advanced Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Clinical Education Framework
Speaker: Andrea Pearce & Paula Harding
2.35 – 2.50
Predictors of prolonged emergency department length of stay (over 4 hours) in patients presenting with musculoskeletal
back pain.
Speaker: Peter Schulz
Chair: Debbie Schulz
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 208
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
3.30 – 3.45
Developing future roles for Physiotherapy Assistants
Speaker: Lisa Somerville
3.45 – 4.00
Physiotherapy department workplace culture: can you measure it and is a workplace charter useful?
Speaker: Lisa Gilmore
4.00 – 4.15
Is culture change in intensive care possible? The experience of one physiotherapy department in implementing evidence
based practice
Speaker: Vince Mazarno
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Group clinical supervision : demonstrating high levels of satisfaction with an ongoing innovative program for physiotherapists
at Sydney Children’s Hospital Randwick
Speaker: Debra Grech
4.30 – 4.35
The influence of a short message service appointment reminder system on failure to attend rates in an outpatient
physiotherapy department
Speaker: Chris Barnett
4.35 – 4.50
The national Clinical Framework demonstrates physiotherapy leadership in healthcare delivery
Speaker: Paul Coburn
Chair: Bill Brennan
64
Room: 208
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Musculoskeletal
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by a Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young, and Deputy Chair of the
Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
Cervical spine
10.30 – 10.45
The effect of selected manual therapy interventions for mechanical neck pain on vertebral and internal carotid arterial blood
flow and cerebral inflow
Speaker: Lucy Thomas
10.45 – 11.00
Investigation of the effective dose of mobilisation for patients with chronic non-specific neck pain
(The DOSE Study)
Speaker: Suzanne Snodgrass
11.00 – 11.15
Characteristic features of headache in chronic whiplash
Speaker: Julia Treleaven
11.15 – 11.30
The treatment of cervicogenic dizziness with Mulligan sustained natural apophyseal glides and Maitland mobilisations: which
is more effective?
Speaker: Sue Reid
11.30 – 11.35
How do you and your colleagues treat cervical radiculopathy? A nationwide survey of MPA members.
Speaker: Michel Coppieters
10.30 – 12.30
11.35 – 11.40
Recognition of patients presenting with or at risk of craniocervical arterial dissection: Preliminary results of a prospective
study.
Speaker: Lucy Thomas
11.45 – 12.00
Is a 12-week comprehensive physiotherapy exercise program more effective than||advice for people with a chronic whiplash
injury?
Speaker: Zoe Michaleff
12.00 – 12.05
Limited effect of inhibitory taping on upper trapezius muscle activity during a standardized typing task.
Speaker: Blane Delbridge
12.05 – 12.10
The effect of neck torsion on joint position error in subjects with chronic neck pain.
Speaker: Julia Treleaven
12.15 – 12.20
Outcome and prediction questionnaires: What are the optimal musculoskeletal tools for clinical use? How do we know
what is appropriate?
Speaker: Philip Gabel
12.20 – 12.25
‘The Calendar Test’: a simple clinical test to facilitate assessment and management of deficient cervical proprioception post
whiplash associated disorder.
Speaker: Philip Gabel
Chair: Amy Hiller
Room: Plenary Hall 2
65
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
Orthopaedics
10.30 – 10.45
Quadriceps muscle force control is related to knee function 12 months after||anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction
Speaker: Luke Perraton
10.45 – 11.00
Physical activity following total hip and knee arthroplasty: a quantitative study
Speaker: Paula Harding
11.00 – 11.15
Orthopaedic in-patients’ ability to reproduce partial weight bearing orders:factors influencing this and effect on clinical
outcomes
Speaker: Serena Yu
11.15 – 11.30
The relationship of physical and psychosocial impairments to stair climbing ability in patients following total knee arthroplasty
Speaker: Tara Whitchelo
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 11.35
Timing of active range of motion commencement following open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures: An
observational study.
Speaker: Steven McPhail
11.35 – 11.40
Prognosis of physical function following ankle fracture – a systematic review with meta-analysis.
Speaker: Paula Beckenkamp
11.40 – 11.45
Life impacts following ankle fractures: Analysis of patient and clinician experiences for development of an ankle-fracture
specific patient reported outcome
Speaker: Steven McPhail
11.45 – 12.00
Patients with knee replacement adopt abnormal movement strategies to negotiate stairs
Speaker: Jodie McClellan
12.00 – 12.15
Lower limb strength following total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.
Speaker: Margie Schache
12.15 – 12.30
Physical activity perceptions and beliefs following total hip and knee arthroplasty: a qualitative study
Speaker: Paula Harding
Chair: Adam Culvenor Room: 218
Concurrent Session 3
Pain and psychosocial function
10.30 – 10.45
Cervical facet joint nociception modulates physical and psychological features of chronic whiplash symptoms
Speaker: Ashley Smith
10.45 – 11.00
Clinical ratings of pain sensitivity correlate with quantitative measures: A comparison between patients with chronic neck
pain and healthy controls.
Speaker: Trudy Rebbeck
11.00 – 11.15
Question time
11.15 – 11.30
Primary motor cortex function in complex regional pain syndrome: a systematic review & meta-analysis
Speaker: Flavia Di Pietro
11.30 – 11.35
Sensory characteristics of chronic non-specific low back pain: a subgroup investigation
Speaker: Peter O’Sullivan
10.30 – 12.30
11.40 – 11.45
Can targeting body perception reduce pain? The effect of multisensory illusions in painful knee osteoarthritis
Speaker: Tasha Stanton
11.45 – 12.00
Identification of psychosocial factors in musculoskeletal pain subjects: physiotherapists versus the Short Form Orebro questionnaire.
Speaker: Darren Beales
12.00 – 12.15
Survivors of torture: where is the pain coming from?
Speaker: Melanie Block
12.15 – 12.20
“I’m just scared of the pain.” A qualitative investigation of avoidance behaviour in chronic low back pain.
Speaker: Samantha Bunzli
12.20 – 12.25
Low patient recovery expectations in low back pain: pessimism or a realistic appraisal?
Speaker: Ross Iles
66
12.25 – 12.30
Physiotherapists and insurance workers perceptions and beliefs of roles in the West Australian Workers’ Compensation System.
Speaker: Darren Beales
Chair: Bernadette Brady
Room: 207
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 4
Lumbar Spine
10.30 – 10.45
Classification based cognitive functional therapy for nonspecific chronic low back pain: what explains the reductions in
disability?
Invited Speaker: Peter O’Sullivan
10.45 – 11.00
Predicting rapid recovery from acute low back pain: a validation study
Speaker: Mark Hancock
11.00 – 11.15
A physiotherapy program with specific manual therapy versus advice for patients with subacute low back pain: a randomised
controlled trial
Speaker: Sarah Slater
11.15 – 11.30
Multimodal physiotherapy functional restoration versus advice for people with subacute lumbar disc herniation and
associated radiculopathy: A randomised controlled trial.
Speaker: Andrew Hahne
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 11.35
Do levels of leisure time physical activity predict clinical outcomes in people seeking care for chronic and persistent low
back pain?
Speaker: Rafael Zambelli Pinto
11.35 – 11.40
Do people who report low back pain with sitting, sit in a different posture to those without pain? An observational study
Speaker: Andrew Claus
11.45 – 12.00
Efficacy of epidural injections in the management of sciatica: a systematic review with meta-analysis
Speaker: Rafael Zambelli Pinto
12.00 – 12.15
Subgroup specific physiotherapy versus advice for people with subacute low back disorders: a randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Jon Ford
12.15 – 12.20
Care Track Australia – How appropriate is low back pain care in Australia?
Speaker: Chris Maher
12.20 – 12.25
The validity of assessment of low back pain via telerehabilitation in a clinical setting
Speaker: Piers Truter
12.25 – 12.30
The complex nature of clinical interview data: learning from acute low back pain accounts
Speaker: Carol McCrum
Chair: Tom McMillan
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 209
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
1.30 – 1.40
MPA Conference Opening
1.40 – 2.10
Navigating the troubling waters of differential diagnosis
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Chad Cook
1.30 – 3.00
2.10 – 2.30
From motor units to movement, what’s new in neuroscience of moving well?
Invited Speaker: Paul Hodges
2.30 – 3.00
What is the evidence of stratified care for low back pain?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Jonathan Hill
Chair: Leanne Bisset and James Debenham
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
67
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 5
Orthopaedics and Osteoarthritis
3.30 – 3.45
Physiotherapist-delivered exercise and pain coping skills training is more effective than either intervention alone in knee
osteoarthritis.
Speaker: Yasmin Ahamed
3.45 – 4.00
Recommended performance-based tests to assess physical function in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis
Speaker: Fiona Dobson
4.00 – 4.15
An Australian consensus statement: exercise for ankylosing spondylitis
Speaker: Errol Lim
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.20
Does the level of activity in an acute inpatient admission following surgical intervention of a fractured neck of femur vary
across days of the week
Speaker: Meaghan Arnold
4.20 – 4.25
Knee osteoarthritis pain and the weather.
Speaker: Robin Haskins
4.25 – 4.30
Moving from anterior cruciate ligament deficiency to knee osteoarthritis. Which factors influence this development?
Speaker: Susan Keays
4.30 – 4.45
Exploring barriers to accessing treatment for hip and knee osteoarthritis in Australia
Speaker: Ilana Ackerman
4.45 – 5.00
The effect of prehabilitation compared to usual care on functional outcome and health service resource use in clients eight
weeks following total knee or hip arthroplasty: a pilot randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Elisabeth Skinner
Chair: Drew Dewan
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Concurrent Session 6
Upper Limbs
3.30 – 3.45
A novel way to train subscapularis
Speaker: Charlotte Ganderton
3.45 – 4.00
The effect of exercise based management for multidirectional instability of the glenohumeral joint: A systematic review
Speaker: Sarh Warby
4.00 – 4.15
The Shoulder Function Index (SFInX): a new way to measure function after shoulder fracture
Speaker: Alexander Van De Water
4.15 – 4.20
Cold hyperalgesia predicts slower recovery in lateral epicondylalgia: a 12-month prospective study of prognosis
Speaker: Leanne Bisset
3.30 – 5.00
4.20 – 4.25
Wrist and finger extensor muscle activity during resisted middle and index finger extension in non-symptomatic people: a
repeated measures laboratory study
Speaker: Luke Heales
4.30 – 4.45
Diagnostic utility of ultrasound imaging in people with lateral epicondylalgia: A case control study.
Speaker: Luke Heales
4.45 – 4.50
Movement and pain patterns in early stage primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis
Speaker: Sarah Walmsley
4.50 – 4.55
Validation of a set of clinical identifiers for the early stage of primary/idiopathic adhesive capsulitis
Speaker: Sarah Walmsley
4.55 – 5.00
Isolation of infraspinatus in clinical test positions
Speaker: Phillip Hughes
Chair: Judith Henderson
68
Room: 218
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 7
Spinal physiology and cortical control of movement
3.30 – 3.45
Differential changes in muscle composition exist in traumatic and non-traumatic neck pain
Speaker: Shaun O’Leary
3.45 – 4.00
Changing movement/motor control patterns using biofeedback with motion sensor technology in people with back pain – a
pilot trial
Speaker: Rob Laird
4.00 – 4.15
The influence of neck posture on dorsal neck muscle activity when lifting.
Speaker: Anneli Peolsson
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.20
New insights into neck pain-related postural control using wavelet analysis in older adults.
Speaker: June Quek
4.20 – 4.25
Sensory innervation of the thoracolumbar fascia, erector spinae and transversospinales muscles.
Speaker: Christine Barry
4.30 – 4.45
Cervical movement sense: Normative data for a clinical tool.
Speaker: Michelle Pereira
4.45 – 5.00
The effectiveness of directional preference management versus advice for subacute reducible discogenic low back pain: a
randomised controlled trial.
Speaker: Luke Surkitt
Chair: Nicola Hutchinson Room: 207
Concurrent Session 8
Lumbar Spine
3.30 – 3.45
Features indicative of discogenic low back pain: survey of an international physiotherapy expert panel with the Delphi
technique
Speaker: Jon Ford
3.45 – 4.00
Understanding the brain in the transition from acute to chronic low back pain
Speaker: Siobhan Schabrun
4.00 – 4.15
Systematic review of red flags to screen for cancer and fracture in patients with low-back pain.
Speaker: Aron Downie
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.20
Intra and inter-rater agreement of lumbar palpation technique for diagnosis of vertebral rotation.
Speaker: Marcos De Noronha
4.20 – 4.25
The provision of weight management and healthy lifestyle advice by physical therapists
Speaker: Suzanne Snodgrass
4.30 – 4.45
Recruiting patients to large clinical trials of low back pain
Speaker: Jane Latimer
4.45 – 5.00
Combined brain and back stimulation improves pain and function in chronic low back pain
Speaker: Siobhan Schabrun
Chair: Sam Abbaszadeh 5.30 – 7.30
Room: 209
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre – Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
8.30 – 10.00
Great debate – To manipulate or not, that is the question!
Affirmative: Darren Rivett
Negative: Andrew Leaver
Legal perspective: DLA Piper representative
Chair: Zoe Michaleff
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
69
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 9
Orthopaedics
10.30 – 10.45
How do we define radiographic knee osteoarthritis? A comparison between the Kellgren & Lawrence classification and OARSI atlas
Speaker: Adam Culvenor
10.45 – 11.00
Day of surgery physiotherapy post joint replacement surgery – what is the evidence and the challenge of implementation.
Speaker: Catherine Senserrick
11.00 – 11.15
Impact of mobilisation on the day of surgery on readiness for discharge and hospital stay following elective hip replacement
Speaker: Ryan Ridley
11.15 – 11.20
Method of patient education prior to orthopaedic arthroplasty can influence healthcare outcomes
Speaker: Joanne Kenny
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.25
ACL graft tensioning for optimal function. A randomised controlled trial.
Speaker: Garry Kirwan
11.30 – 11.45
Postural activity of the psoas major and quadratus lumborum muscles differs between muscle regions based on the
mechanical advantage
Speaker: Rachel Jihyun Par
11.45 – 12.00
Predictors and prognosis of ankle syndesmosis injury
Speaker: Katherine Rae
12.00 – 12.15
Health-related quality of life and health care utilisation and costs in severe hip and knee joint disease: A national study
Speaker: Ilana Ackerman
12.15 – 12.20
What proportion of people with hip and knee osteoarthritis meet physical activity guidelines? A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Speaker: Jason Wallis
12.20 – 12.25
Improving access to elective joint replacement surgery: a waitlist cohort
Speaker: Danella Hackett
Chair: Edmund Leahy
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Concurrent Session 10
Physiotherapy Services and Outcomes
10.30 – 10.45
Streamlining the selection of patients for management within the Orthopaedic Physiotherapy Screening Clinic and
Multidisciplinary Service in Queensland Health
Speaker: Shaun O’Leary
10.45 – 11.00
An examination of the patient-physiotherapist interaction in private practice
Speaker: Amy Hiller
11.00 – 11.15
Patients in the emergency department receive less imaging and medications, and are more satisfied when seen by
a physiotherapist
Speaker: Peter Schulz
11.15 – 11.20
Physical inactivity, health conditions and health-related quality of life in patients with musculoskeletal disorders accessing
ambulatory hospital services
Speaker: Steven McPhail
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.25
Advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapy in public hospitals: competency based learning and assessment resource
development – a qualitative study
Speaker: Paula Harding
11.30 – 11.45
Do pain management programs keep working for compensable patients? A three year follow up.
Speaker: Anne Daly
11.45 – 12.00
Evaluating the impact of introducing a physiotherapist led shoulder clinic
Speaker: David Harding
12.00 – 12.05
Are physiotherapy led screening clinics cost effective?
Speaker: Maree Raymer
12.05 – 12.10
Physiotherapists require professional development in order to provide safe and effective care to consumers with rheumatoid arthritis
Speaker: Robyn Fary
12.15 – 12.20
What physiotherapist and general practitioner really want during inter-professional communication
Speaker: Christopher Hayward
70
12.20 – 12.25
the painHEALTH initiative: development, evaluation and implementation of an evidence-based interactive web platform for
Australian consumers with musculoskeletal pain
Speaker: Helen Slater:
Chair: Mark Matthews
Room: 218
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 11
Lumbar Spine
10.30 – 10.45
Proprioceptive deficit at the ankle joint correlates with limb laterality recognition
Speaker: Fereshteh Pourkazemi
10.45 – 11.00
Advice for subacute low back disorders: the patient’s perspective
Speaker: Jon Ford
11.00 – 11.15
Upper limb neurodynamic testing: an observation of median, radial and ulnar nerve strain during variations of upper limb
positioning.
Speaker: Sue Reid
11.15 – 11.20
The left/right judgement task in people with & without shoulder pain: a pilot study
Speaker: John Breckenridge
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.25
Digital photography is reliable for shoulder range of motion measurement
Speaker: John Breckenridge
11.30 – 11.45
Improvement in Achilles tendon structure in elite Australian football players during preseason training.
Speaker: Sean Docking
11.45 – 12.00
The process of change: a qualitative study investigating patient pathways through cognitive functional therapy for chronic
low back pain
Speaker: Samantha Bunzli
12.00 – 12.15
Barriers and facilitators relating to exercise rehabilitation among people with lumbar disc herniation and associated
radiculopathy: A qualitative study.
Speaker: Andrew Hahne
12.15 – 12.20
Searching for risk factors in low back pain: insights from a new twin case-control study
Speaker: Alexandra Griffin
12.20 – 12.25
“My Back on Track, My Future”: developing story based patient information for Aboriginal people with low back pain.
Speaker: Ivan Lin
Chair: Luke Heales
Room: 217
Concurrent Session 12
Cervical Spine
10.30 – 10.45
Is driving-related performance in persons with chronic whiplash-associated disorders sufficiently impaired to recommend
fitness to drive assessment?
Speaker: Hiroshi Takasaki
10.45 – 11.00
Dizziness and unsteadiness in patients with cervical disc disease, comparison of symptoms and signs pre and post-surgery.
Speaker: Julia Treleaven
11.00 – 11.15
Interpreting a normal response to rotation stress testing for the alar ligaments.
Speaker: Peter Osmotherly
11.15 – 11.20
The effect of three different exercise regimes on neck muscle endurance for chronic whiplash associated disorders. A
randomised control trial.
Speaker: Gunnel Peterson
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.25
Multidimensional assessment of pain related disability after Surgery for Cervical Disc Disease
Speaker: Allan Abbott
11.25 – 11.30
Inter-rater Reliability of a Pilates Movement-Based Classification System
Speaker: Kwan Kenny Yu
11.30 – 11.45
Derivation and validation of a clinical prediction rule to identify both chronicity and full recovery following whiplash injury
Speaker: Michelle Sterling
11.45 – 12.00
The construct validity of the anterior shear and distraction tests for craniocervical instability.
Speaker: Peter Osmotherly
12.00 – 12.15
Cervical kinematic training with and without interactive virtual reality training for chronic neck pain.
Speaker: Hilla Sarig Bahat
12.15 – 12.30
Is neck-specific exercise better than general physical activity when managing chronic whiplash and is a behavioural approach
of additional benefit?
Speaker: Anneli Peolsson
Chair: Karen Richards
Room: 205
71
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
12.30 – 1.30
MPA Members Forum (Room 219)
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
Combined Session with Sports Physiotherapy Group
The Knee
1.30 – 1.50
Knee and the use of Doppler Ultrasound in painful OSD in adolescents
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Maitthieu Sailly
1.30 – 3.00
1.50 – 2.10
Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis: consequences and costs
Invited Speaker: Kay Crossley
2.10 – 2.30
Rehabilitation after ACL injury – surgery or rehab alone?
Invited Speaker: May Arna Risberg
2.30 – 3.00
Geoffrey Maitland Oration – Musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice: what is its core business?
Invited Speaker: Gwendolen Jull
Chair: Natalie Collins
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
3.30 – 4.00
What are the implications of stratified care for back pain services?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Jonathan Hill
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.20
The Importance of Fitness
Invited Speaker: Jeff Coombes
4.20 – 4.40
Load, complexity, and context: How similar are different exercise approaches for low back pain?
Invited Speaker: David MacDonald
4.40 – 5.00
High Intensity Interval Training for Chronic Disease
Invited Speaker: Jeff Coombes
Chair: Andrew Claus
5.30 – 7.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Musculoskeletal cocktail function & awards, acknowledge Gwen Jull
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre (Room 213)
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: * Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
* Video link up
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
72
10:00 – 10.30
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation– HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5 (Workshops 1 – 4)
3.30 – 5.00
Workshop 1 – Clinical Prediction Rules: An Unbiased Critical Appraisal
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Chad Cook
Chair: Bill Vicenzino
Room: 206
3.30 – 5.00
Workshop 2 – Stratified Care for Back Pain
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Jonathan Hill
3.30 – 5.00
Chair: Rebecca Tweedy Room: 207
3.30 – 5.00
Workshop 3 – Rehabilitation program for patients with ACL injury – the NAR algorithm
Invited Speaker: May Arna Risberg
Chair: Kay Crossley
Room: 215
3.30 – 5.00
Workshop 4 – Assessing and managing patient perspectives of their chronic pain experience (i.e. psychosocial status) – an
interactive workshop using a videotaped case study
Speaker: Mark Jones
Chair: David MacDonald Room: 217
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
73
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 6
Combined Session with Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapy Group
8.30 – 9.00
Development and measurement properties of the condition – specific pelvic girdle questionnaire
International Keynote speaker: Dr Britt Stuge
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.15
Should women with pelvic floor dysfunction do sit-ups?
Speaker: Judith Thompson
9.15 – 9.30
Sleep, catastrophising and disturbed body schema are related to disability in chronic pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain
Speaker: Darren Beales
9.30 – 10.00
New Moves in Musculoskeletal assessment: what value can a PF physio add?
Panel: Trish Neumann, Judith Thompson, Margaret Sherburn
Chair: Gen McGlashan and Martin Rabey
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 7
10.30 – 10.50
Masqueraders – looking under the mask
Specialist 1: Doug Cary, MSK Specialist
10.50 – 11.10
Multidimensional Pain Profiles in People with Axial Low Back Pain: An Examination of Four Differing Cases
Specialist 2: Martin Rabe, MSK specialist
10.30 – 12.30
11.10 – 11.30
Kinesiophobia in chronic low back pain – differentiating ‘fear of harm’ and ‘avoidance of pain’ in management.
Specialist 3: Peter O’Sullivan, MSK specialist
Combined session with Acupuncture and Dry needling Physiotherapy Group
11.30 – 12.30
Panel discussion: The role of Acupuncture and Dry needling in the Management of Whiplash Associated Disorders
Speaker: Michelle Stirling and Leigh McCutcheon
Chair: Peter Selvaratnam
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
12.30 – 1.30
College General Meeting – Plenary Hall 2
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: 215
Plenary Session 8
Combined session with the Sports Physiotherapy Group
Back Injuries in Rowing: New Moves for Prevention
Ivan Hooper – APA Sports Physiotherapist – QLD
1.30 – 3.00
Kellie Wilkie – APA Sports Physiotherapist – TAS
JP Caneiro – APA Sports Physiotherapist – WA
Australian Olympic Team Rowers: Kim Crowe and Josh Dunkley-Smith
Live Demonstration of Corrections to Rowing Ergometer Techniques to Prevent Back Injury
Australian Olympic Rowing Team Members Kim Crow & Josh Dunkley-Smith, Fergus Pragnall from Sykes Racing & Concept 2
Rowing Ergometers.
Chair: Henry Wajswelner
3.00 – 3.30
74
Afternoon tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Neurology
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by a Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8:30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young,
and Deputy Chair of the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 11.30
Welcome to NNG conference
Movement and brain: how does practice influence neuroplastic changes.
International Keynote Speaker: A/Professor Lara Boyd
Chair: Paul Bosisto and Barby Singer
Room: 219
Concurrent Session 1
Practice
11.30 – 11.45
Do stroke survivors spend more time in active task practice in circuit class therapy session versus individual physiotherapy
sessions?
International KeynoteSpeaker: Dr Coralie English
11.30 – 12.30
11.45 – 12.00
Priming the brain: A single bout of aerobic exercise promotes motor cortical neuroplasticity.
Speaker: Michelle McDonnell
12.00 – 12.15
Feedback received whilst practicing everyday activities during rehabilitation after stroke: an observational study
Speaker: Rosalyn Stanton
12.15 – 12.20
What do people with stroke think about increasing intensity of rehabilitation?
Invited Speaker: Susan Hillier
12.20 – 12.30
Question time
Chair: Sheila Lennon and Sandra Brauer
Room: 219
75
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
Professional Education and Practice
11.30 – 11.45
Demystifying dizziness: electronic learning to educate physiotherapists
Speaker: Elizabeth Talbot
11.45 – 12.00
The quality of reports of randomised controlled trials in neurological physiotherapy
Speaker: Anne Moseley
11.30 – 12.30
12.00 – 12.15
Barriers and facilitators to EBP use by physiotherapists working in stroke rehabilitation – development and implementation of
a tool
Speaker: Joanne Pugh
12.15 – 12.20
Does English proficiency impact on health outcomes for inpatients undergoing stroke rehabilitation?
Speaker: Sarah Davies
12.20 – 12.25
Short-term outcomes of a student-assisted, inter-professional community rehabilitation service in regional Australia.
Speaker: Kelsey Thorne
12.25 – 12.30
Physiotherapy eSkills Training Online resource improves performance of practical skills: a controlled trial
Speaker: Elizabeth Preston
Chair: Cathy Said and Julie Luker
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 220
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 3
Novel Games and New Approaches
1.30 – 2.00
Alternative therapies – is there a role?
Invited Speaker: Susan Hillier
2.00 – 2.15
Will computer games revolutionise physical rehabilitation after stroke? Investigating the clinical feasibility of a suite of
custom-designed games
Speaker: Kelly Bower
2.15 – 2.30
Clinical feasibility of the Nintendo Wii for balance training post-stroke: A pilot randomised controlled trial in an inpatient
rehabilitation setting
Speaker: Kelly Bower
1.30 – 3.00
2.30 – 2.45
The use of Nintendo Wii as a physiotherapy intervention for people with intellectual disability
Speaker: Alison Chung
2.45 – 2.50
A novel intervention to improve balance and activity participation for adults with intellectual disability: a feasibility study
Speaker: Leigh Hale
2.50 – 2.55
Evaluation of a meditation based stress reduction (MBSR) program during acquired brain injury rehabilitation in an inpatient
setting: a preliminary study
Speaker: Maggie Killington
2.55 – 3.00
Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, is there a role for physiotherapists in management?
Speaker: Ryan Gallagher
Chair: Prue Morgan and Leanne Cormack
Room: 219
Concurrent Session 4
Community Engagement
2.00 – 2.15
Family-supervised exercise programs for improving physical function of neurological inpatients: a systematic review
Speaker: Caroline Fryer
2.00 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
Self-management programmes for people post stroke: a systematic review.
Speaker: Sheila Lennon
2.30 – 2.45
Does a focus on participation and personal goal achievement have an impact on depression in the first year after stroke?
Speaker: Chris Graven
2.45 – 3.00
Physical activity frequency and risk of incident stroke in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke
(REGARDS) study
Speaker: Michelle McDonnell
76
Chair: Fran Moran and Elizabeth Shannon
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 220
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall current Session 4 – Community Engagement
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 5
Parkinson’s Disease
3.30 – 4.00
Investigating the efficacy of individualised interventions based on the Bobathobath concept.
Invited Speaker: Kim Brock
4.00 – 4.15
Predictors of health-related quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease
Speaker: Sze-Ee Soh
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Evidence of efficacy of leg muscle power training in Parkinson’s disease: a randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Serene Paul
4.30 – 4.45
A 6-month exercise program for people with Parkinson’s disease: the participants’ perspective
Speaker: Christine O’Brien
4.45 – 5.00
Does a 4-week dual-task walking training program in people with Parkinson’s disease improve actual mobility levels?
Speaker: Sandra Brauer
Chair: Ettie Ben Shabat and Niru Mahendran
Room: 219
Concurrent Session 6
Physical Activity
3.30 – 4.00
Investigating the efficacy of individualised interventions based on the Bobathobath concept.
Invited Speaker: Kim Brock
*Should you wish to hear Kim’s presentation, this will be held in Concurrent Session 5, Parkinson’s Disease (Room 219)
4.00 – 4.15
Physical activity preferences and prejudices in the month prior to a first-ever stroke.
Speaker: Michelle McDonnell
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Physical activity and lower limb muscle mass within six months of stroke: an observational study
Speaker: Karen Borschmann
4.30 – 4.45
Fatigue, physical performance and community ambulation in stroke survivors at discharge from hospital and one month later
Speaker: Jacinta Weber
4.45 – 5.00
Which factors influence the physical activity levels of people with traumatic brain injury when they are discharged home from
hospital?
Speaker: Megan Hamilton
Chair: Janette Blennerhassett and Natalie Fini
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 220
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Concurrent Session 7
Upper Limb
8.30 – 9.00
Contracture: Short of moving forward?
Invited Speaker: Joanna Diong
9.00 – 9.15
Central processing and hemispheric dominance of wrist Proprioception
Speaker: Ettie Ben-Shabat
9.15 – 9.30
Hemiplegic shoulder pain in acute stroke
Speaker: Lucinda Marr
8.30 – 10.00
9.30 – 9.45
Electrical stimulation for contracture management after acquired brain injury: a randomised trial
Speaker: Joan Leung
9.45 – 9.50
How accurate is proprioception? A psychophysical study of wrist proprioception
Speaker: Ettie Ben-Shabat
9.50 – 9.55
Reliability of the Modified Tardieu Scale for the assessment of lower limb spasticity in adults with neurological injuries
Speaker: Ettie Ben-Shabat
9.55 – 10.00
Shoulder pain overnight post stroke: an observational study.
Speaker: Jannette Blennerhassett
Chair: Frances Batchelor and Michelle McDonnell
Room: 219
77
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 8
Electrical Stimulation and Gait
8.30 – 8.45
Can a clinically important improvement in function be achieved during inpatient rehabilitation by stroke survivors with severe
motor disability?
Speaker: Kate Hayward
8.45 – 9.00
Biofeedback gait training to reduce tripping probability in people with stroke: a case study.
Speaker: Catherine Said
9.00 – 9.15
A preliminary study into the use of ankle foot orthoses in the early stages of stroke
Speaker: Robert Mehan
8.30 – 10.00
9.15 – 9.20
Early application of portable peroneal electrical stimulation following stroke
Speaker: Suzanne Kuys
9.20 – 9.25
Changes in walking performance in the chronic phase of stroke recovery using botulinum toxin, physiotherapy and orthotic
management: two longitudinal case studies
Speaker: Janine Simondson
9.25 – 9.30
Questions
9.30 – 10.00
Strength training for walking in neurological rehabilitation is not task-specific.
Invited Speaker: Gavin Williams
Chair: John Cannell and Michele Callisaya
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 217
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
Other Neurological Conditions
10.30 – 11.15
Circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy. Are they effective?
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Coralie English
11.15 – 11.30
The impact of group circuit training for balance and mobility on falls in people with Multiple Sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial.
Speaker: Sheila Lennon
11.30 – 11.45
Comprehensive gait analysis in people with moderately disabled Multiple Sclerosis
Speaker: James McLoughlin
10.30 – 12.30
11.45 – 12.00
Do gait and balance differ across Disease Steps in people with Multiple Sclerosis?
Speaker: Katrina Williams
12.00 – 12.15
Gait training with rhythmic auditory cues to increase speed and reduce gait variability in Alzheimer’s disease – a pilot study.
Speaker: Joanne Wittwer
12.15 – 12.20
Combined multidisciplinary early intervention for patients with impaired consciousness
Speaker: Suzanne Kuys
12.20 – 12.25
An intensive physiotherapy program for a person with Locked In Syndrome: A case report.
Speaker: Paul Bew
12.25 – 12.30
A pilot investigation of therapist-devised, family-supervised exercise programs to improve physical function for inpatient
adults with acquired brain injury
Speaker: Shylie Mackintosh
Chair: Kate Hayward and Alison Chung
12.30 – 1.30
78
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: 219
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Plenary Session 3
Gait and Balance
1.30 – 2.00
Brain activity measures: use of TMS, MRI and functional MRI and EEG to index change in brain and function.
International Keynote Speaker: A/Professor Lara Boyd
2.00 – 2.15
Classification of Gait Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury
Speaker: Gavin Williams
2.15 – 2.30
Balance impairment in people with a history of migraine
Speaker: Frances Batchelor
1.30 – 3.00
2.30 – 2.45
Falls and mobility decline in adults with cerebral palsy: impact on personal wellbeing and quality of life
Speaker: Prue Morgan
2.45 – 2.50
Is minimum foot clearance during the swing phase of walking altered in people with stroke?
Speaker: Cathy Said
2.50 – 2.55
Does hand held dynamometry for calf muscle strength reflect ankle power generation during walking?
Speaker: Michelle Kahn
2.55 – 3.00
Running abnormalities after traumatic brain injury
Invited Speaker: Gavin Williams
Chair: Ruth Barker and Cath Dean
Room: 219
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
3.30 – 4.45
National Disability Insurance Scheme Panel
Speaker: Barby Singer, Liz Shannon, Kirsten Deane, Michael Burke via video
3.30 – 5.15
Chair: Kate Philips
Room: 219
4.45 – 5.15
Ipsen Award and National Neurology Meeting
Chair: Kate Hayward and Paul Bosisto
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 219
Neurology cocktail function
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre (Room 218)
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Breakfast Session 1
7.00 – 8.15
It’s your move: Getting started in Clinical Research
Invited Speaker: Susan Hillier
Chair: Suzanne Kuys
Room: 215
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: * Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
* Video link up
8.30 –10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10.00 – 10.30
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
79
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 –12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5 – Physical activity
3.30 – 3.45
Objective measurement of physical activity after stroke – are we there yet?
Speaker: Natalie Fini
3.45 – 4.00
Walking capacity and activity levels after stroke
Speaker: Niruthikha Mahendran
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.15
Do activity levels of stroke survivors change between one and three months following discharge from hospital?
Speaker: Niruthikha Mahendran
4.15 – 4.45
Sit less, move more. Sedentary time in stroke survivors
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Coralie English
4.45 – 5.00
Prizes
Chair: Karen Borschmann and Katrina Williams
80
Room: 219/220
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Occupational Health
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young, and Deputy Chair of the
Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 11.15
Economic impact of ergonomic interventions
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Alan Hedge
11.15 – 11.30
Implementation of interventions to prevent musculoskeletal injury at work –a behaviour change approach
Speaker: Paul Rothmore
10.30 – 12.30
11.30 – 12.00
Integration of MSD prevention into organisational culture
Invited Speaker: David Caple
12.00 – 12.15
Fatigue in the mining industry
Speaker: Bronwen Otto
12.15 – 12.30
Pre–employment functional capacity assessments predict musculoskeletal injury risk in healthy male coal mine workers
Speaker: Jennifer Legge
Chairs: Richard Fuller and Maree Webber
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 206
Lunch –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
1.30 – 2.15
What lurks beneath the hidden dangers of office work?
Speaker: Leon Straker
1.30 – 3.00
2.15 – 2.30
We should know better –rates of sedentary behaviours in a University workplace
Speaker: Marie–Louise Bird
2.30 – 3.00
The stand-up Australia study
Speaker: David Dunstan
Chair: Martin Mackey
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 206
Afternoon Tea –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
3.30 – 4.00
Impact of ageing and workability in an under-ground coal mine environment: implications for promoting healthy working life
Invited Speaker: Martin Mackey
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.30
Bariatric Challenges in the Workplace: bigger ambulances, longer seat belts, stronger and wider furniture and increased risk
of injury
Invited Speaker: Helen Robertson
4.30 – 4.45
Factors related to work ability in patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders
Invited Speaker: Venerina Johnston
4.45 – 5.00
Optimum biomechanics to reduce the slip risk in manual handling push tasks
Speaker: Andrew Claus
Chair: Paul Rothmore
5.30 – 7.30
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre, Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
Room: 206
81
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 4
8.30 – 9.00
The Eyes Lead the Body: Visual ergonomics for modern computer workstations
Invited Speaker: Jennifer Long
9.00 – 9.15
Grip strength is associated with marksmanship and defensive tactics, but not injuries, in police recruits
Speaker: Robin Orr
8.30 – 10.00
9.15 – 9.30
Physiotherapy and the ageing Australian workforce
Speaker: Richard Fuller
9.30 – 9.35
Does the use of surgical magnification (loupes) effect upper extremity pain, and disability among dental hygienists
Speaker: Peter Osmotherly
9.35 – 9.40
The effect of surgical magnification (loupes) on neck pain and disability among dental hygienists.
Speaker: Peter Osmotherly
9.45 – 10.00
Multifaceted claims management: reducing compensation costs of musculoskeletal work injuries
Speaker: Ross Illes
Chair: Cass Zaina
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 206
Morning Tea –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
10.30 – 11.00
Interventions for the prevention and reduction of neck pain in office workers – what really works?
Speaker: Venerina Johnston
Invited Speaker: David Caple
11.00 – 11.30
Work–related musculoskeletal disorders: can we reduce risk below current levels?
Invited Speaker: Wendy Macdonald
11.30 – 12.00 PeArLS Presentation
Bringing work health and safety to the table: healthcare facility commissioning, occupation, operation and post occupancy
evaluation
Speaker: Karen Davies
10.30 – 12.30
12.00 – 12.15
Going upstream in health promotion: working with Auslan interpreters to improve communication access for the Victorian
Deaf community
Speaker: Sarah Jackwitz
12.15 – 12.20
AT Recognition
Speaker: Richard Fuller
12.20 – 12.25
Respiratory Issues in Agriculture
Speaker: Anne Taylor
12.25 – 12.30
Survey: Priority Importance of Codes of Practices for Agriculture by Agribusiness Professionals, farmers and their workers
Speaker: Anne Taylor
Chairs: Richard Fuller and Paul Rothmore
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 206
Lunch –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 6
1.30 – 3.00
1.30 – 2.00
Australia has stalled on improving RTW: time to get back to basics?
Invited Speaker: Niki Ellis
2.00 – 3.00
Behaviour change - motiving people
Panel: Wendy McDonald, Niki Ellis and Venerina Johnston
Chair: Martin Mackey and David Caple
Room: 206
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea –Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 7
3.30 – 5.00
Professional issues in OHP discussion
Speaker: Barb McPhee
Chair: Barb McPhee
82
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 206
Occupational Health cocktail function proudly sponsored by JobFit Systems
Venue: Wharf Hotel, South Wharf
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre–registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based Coaching
Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a Physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Speaker: Maureen Robinson, Healthdirect Australia
Chair: Ross Iles
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea –Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence–based practice –a marriage made in heaven
Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch –Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
Room: Plenary Hall 2
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea –Exhibition Hall
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
83
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Paediatrics
New Moves in paediatric physiotherapy
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by a Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8:30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Invited Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young,
and Deputy Chair of the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 12.30
Welcome
Friend or foe? The impact of electronic games on children’s physical health.
Invited Speaker: Professor Leon Straker
How the science of adolescent development can promote the art of working with young people.
Invited Speaker: Michelle Telfer
Chair: Emily Ward
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 216
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
1.30 – 1.45
Measurement of team and preterm infant activity using accelerometry
Speaker: Lyn Jensen
1.45 – 2.00
What is known about balance ability and postural stability in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder – a
systematic review
Speaker: Jacqueline Carr
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.15
Postural control in very preterm compared with term preschool age children
Speaker: Lucy Lorefice
2.15 – 2.30
Motor co-ordination and postural stability of extremely low birth weight preschool children following physiotherapy
intervention: a randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Laura Brown
2.30 – 2.45
Are behaviour problems in extremely low birth weight children related to their motor ability?
Speaker: Kate Cherry
2.45 – 3.00
Do children with Developmental Coordination Disorder power gait the same way as typically developing children?
Speaker: Nicola Diamond
Chair: Alicia Spittle
84
Room 216
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
1.30 – 2.00 PeArLs Presentation
The child with the unilateral weakness: dopamine responsive dystonia in disguise – a family case study
Speaker: Melissa Locke
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.30 PeArLs Presentation
Identifying dystonia in children with cerebral palsy
Speaker: Kelly Reynolds
2.30 – 3.00 PeArLs Presentation
Where are we going with robot assisted, partial body-weight supported treadmill training for children with cerebral palsy?
Speaker: Rosemary Nelson
Chair: Adrienne Harvey
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 217
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 3
3.30 – 4.00
Bringing the world of simulation to acute paediatrics
Invited Speaker: Sarah Wright
4:00 – 4.15
Development and evaluation of a model to enhance physiotherapy skills in paediatrics – a preliminary report
Speaker: Prue Morgan
3.30 – 5.00
4.15 – 4.30
Perceived training and professional development needs of Australian physiotherapists for working with overweight and
obese children
Speaker: Nikki Milne
4.30 – 4.45
Developmental outcomes and physical activity behaviour in children post major surgery compared with a healthy birth cohort
Speaker: Genevieve Dwyer
4.45 – 5.00
Investigating the feasibility of slow vital capacity and cough peak flow versus traditional spirometry in children with a
neuromuscular disorder
Speaker: Madeline Caterina
Chair: Hayley King
Room: 216
Concurrent Session 4
3.30 – 4.00
Anyone can set up an advanced practice physiotherapy service…or can they?
Invited Speaker: David Harding
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.30
Role reformation – reflections and recommendations.
Invited Speaker: Sharon Vladusic
4.30 – 4.45
A randomised controlled trial of two exercise programmes for children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and knee pain
Speaker: Verity Pacey
4.45 – 5.00
The functional limitations of school-aged children with joint hypermobility syndrome
Speaker: Lyn Jensen
Chair: Julianne Pegler
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 217
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre – Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
85
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 2
8.30 – 10.00
8.30 – 9.30
Them That’s Got Shall Get, Them Shall Not Shall Lose
International Keynote Speaker: Professor Suzann Campbell
9.30 – 10.00
More children with disability, more active, more often
Invited Speaker: Nora Shields
Chair: Alicia Spittle
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 216
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 3
10.30 – 10.45
An outpatient low intensity locomotor training program for an adolescent with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury
Speaker: Clare O’Donnell
10.45 – 11.00
Identification of Vincristine associated peripheral neuropathies in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
Speaker: Elizabeth Nathan
11.00 – 11.15
Perceptions of idiopathic toe walking by paediatric physiotherapists: definition, assessment and treatment
Speaker: Rachel Turley
11.15 – 11.30
Aerobic training for young people with cerebral palsy in specialist schools: a pilot randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Stacey Carlon
11.30 – 11.45
Physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and walking capacity in children with cerebral palsy: A descriptive study
Speaker: Jane Butler
10.30 – 12.30
11.45 – 12.00
Children with cerebral palsy and periventricular white matter injury: does gestational age affect functional outcome?
Speaker: Adrienne Harvey
12.00 – 12.05
Quantifying daily activities of term infants using a parent-report diary
Speaker: Lynn Jensen
12.05 – 12.10
Fitness and health related quality of life in children with low motor competence
Speaker: Anne Sullivan
12.10 – 12.15
Telehealth readiness factors in parents on King Island that may affect development of a paediatric physiotherapy drop in clinic
Speaker: Cherie Hazlit
12.15 – 12.20
Is parent and teacher delivered intervention effective for four year old children with developmental coordination disorder?
Speaker: Liz Pridham
12.20 – 12.25
Improving balance and strength in children using core stability group sessions – a pilot study
Speaker: Rebecca Shirt
12.25 – 12.30
Physical outcomes post paediatric lung transplant – implications of extra corporeal membrane oxygenation
Speaker: Benjamin Tarrant
Chair: Nikki Milne and Adrienne Harvey
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 216
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 4
1.30 – 2.30
Unexplained signs and symptoms and chronic pain – evidence and challenges
Invited Speaker: Phil Calvert and Marianne McCormick
1.30 – 3.00
2.30 – 2.45
The fatigue experience of children with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: a parent and child’s perspective
Speaker: Verity Pacey
2.45 – 3.00
Outcomes of multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for children and adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome
Speaker: Amanda Apple
Chair: Emily Ward
Room: 216
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
86
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Room: 215
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 5
3.30 – 5.00
3.30 – 4.30
Nutting out Neuromuscular Kids: the what, why and how of assessment
Invited Speaker: Kate Carroll, Katy de Valle, Rachel Kennedy
4.30 – 5.00
Prizes
Chair: Julianne Pegler
Room: 216
Concurrent Session 6
3.30 – 3.45
Functional motor skills in children with treated congenital talipes equinovarus
Speaker: Angela Shearwood
3.30 – 4.30
3.45 – 4.00
Are bilateral and unilateral clubfeet comparable?
Speaker: Kelly Gray
4.00 – 4.15
Gross motor assessment at 12 months of children with clubfoot undergoing Ponseti management
Speaker: Alison Chivers
4.15 – 4.30
Objective assessment of tibialis anterior tendon transfer surgery in clubfoot
Speaker: Kelly Gray
Chair: Hayley King
Room: 217
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
7.00 – 8.15
Registration
Breakfast Session
New perspectives for functional hand use in children with hemiplegia.
Sponsored by: Allergan Australia Pty Ltd
Manual ability is not simply the way by which we move our arms and hands but is a complex interplay between the task,
individual and environment. This session will focus on significant developments in knowledge relating to factors impacting
on a child’s ability to use their upper limbs. It will explore the influence of the ICF, the Manual Ability Classification System and
other assessments. With a particular focus on upper limb bimanual performance, the session will provide understanding on
what is the role of an effective assisting hand and what constitutes functional hand use for children with unilateral disability.
Invited Speaker: Dr Brian Hoare and Dr Susan Greaves
Chair: Adrienne Harvey
Room: 213
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Invited Speaker: * Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop – Physiodirect UK
* Video link up
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based coaching
Invited Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Invited Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Invited Speaker: Maureen Robinson
Chair: Ross Iles
10:00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
87
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Invited Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Invited Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
Paediatrics in entry level physiotherapy – core ingredients or icing on the cake?
3.30 – 3.40
Keeping paediatric curriculum strong in entry level training of physiotherapists – the challenges we are facing.
Speaker: Nikki Milne
3.40 – 4.00
The Great Debate: With the ever increasing demand for physiotherapy education and limited placement opportunities,
paediatrics should be cut from entry level training and positioned as a specialty area in post graduate education.
Negative side: Beverley Eldridge
Affirmative side : TBC
3.30 – 5.30
4.00 – 4.20
What are the perceptions of physiotherapy clinicians relating to the priorities for paediatric curriculum in entry level training?
Speaker: Nikki Milne
4.20 – 4.40
How do we achieve paediatric placement experiences for all students in a highly competitive environment?
Speaker: Meg Moller
4.40 – 4.50
What does the APC (Australian Physiotherapy Council) have to say about university program requirements for Paediatric
training and placements?
Speaker: Gillian Webb
4.50 – 5.10
Setting the bar – the challenges when it is too high and the consequences when it is too low!
Speaker: Meg Moller
5.10 – 5.30
Open Discussion
Chair: Nikki Milne
88
Room: 216
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation 2013 – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Sports
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
8.30 – 8.40
Welcome to Country by Wurundjeri Elder
8.40 – 8.50
Cris Massis, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Physiotherapy Association
8.50 – 9.00
Sponsor Presentation
8:30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.10
Marcus Dripps, President, Australian Physiotherapy Association
9.10 – 9.30
Invited Speaker: The Honourable Peter Dutton, Minister for Health and Minister for Sport.
9.30 – 10.00
Primary Care Reforms and the Physiotherapy Profession
Speaker: Jim Birch, Managing Partner, Health and Human Services, Ernst and Young, and
Deputy Chair of the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority
Chair: Marcus Dripps
10.00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 1
10.30 – 12.30
Welcome
New moves for the shoulder: correction of scapular dyskinesis in the overhead athlete
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Ann Cools
Chair: Henry Wajswelner
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 212/213
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 1
The Sporting Knee
1.30 – 1.45
The Melbourne Return to Sports Score (MRSS) – an assessment tool for return to sports following anterior cruciate
ligament reconstruction.
Speaker: Randall Cooper
1.45 – 2.00
A randomised controlled trial of targeted physiotherapy for patellofemoral osteoarthritis
Speaker: Kay Crossley
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.15
Knee biomechanics following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: implications for patellofemoral osteoarthritis
Speaker: Adam Culvenor
2.15 – 2.30
Medially posted foot orthoses do not increase the knee adduction moment in individuals with patellofemoral osteoarthritis
Speaker: Natalie Collins
2.30 – 2.45
Shoes elevate patellofemoral joint stress during running
Speaker: Jason Bonacci
2.45 – 2.50
Sponsor presentation – Thermoskin
Chair: Aidan Rich
Room 212
89
THURSDAY 17 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 2
Muscles: Function, Atrophy and Injury Prediction in Sports
1.30 – 1.45
Differential atrophy in the lower-limb muscles after 90-days bed-rest?
Speaker: Daniel Belavy
1.45 – 2.00
Bone density and neuromuscular function in older competitive athletes depend on running distance
Speaker: Daniel Belavy
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.15
Predicting football injuries using a ratio of lumbo-pelvic muscle sizes
Speaker: Julie Hides
2.15 – 2.30
Clinical measures of hip muscle strength, flexibility and function in elite Australian football league players
Speaker: Dilani Mendis
2.30 – 2.45
Size and asymmetry of the hip abductor muscles are related to lower limb football injuries
Speaker: Sharne Neill
2.45 – 2.50
Sponsor presentation – Australian Medical Supplies
Speaker: Lisa Bozanich
Chair: Paul Farmer
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 213
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 3
Martial and Performing Arts
3.30 – 5.00
3.30 – 4.15
MMA: multiple disciplines, one cage. How do you prepare?
Invited Speaker: Tom Brydson
4.15 – 5.00
Why Vocally Unload? Tuning up a new move for Physiotherapy
Invited Speaker: Annie Strauch
Chair: Lauren Cain
Room: 212
Concurrent Session 4
Rugby Union and the Upper Limb in Sports
3.30 – 3.45
Changes in sleep time and efficiency in professional rugby union players during home based training and games
Speaker: Wayne Hing
3.45 – 4.00
Intratester reliability of diagnostic ultrasound assessment of the wrist and phalanges to determine skeletal maturity
Speaker: Wayne Hing
3.30 – 5.00
4.00 – 4.15
Lateral epicondylalgia, symptom status and motor cortex changes
Speaker: Lucy Chipchase
4.15 – 4.30
Injury prediction screening in young golfers: a convergent validity pilot study
Speaker: Wayne Hing
4.30 – 4.45
Mulligan’s Mobilisation-with-Movement and exercise versus exercise alone for patients with musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a
pilot study
Speaker: Pamela Teys
Chair: Ben Mather
5.30 – 7.30
90
Conference Welcome Reception
Venue: Melbourne Exhibition Centre – Exhibition Hall
Proudly sponsored by HESTA
Room: 213
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Concurrent Session 5
The Hip
8.30 – 8.45
Hip chondropathy at arthroscopy is associated with labral pathology; and is more prevalent and associated with worse
outcomes in women
Speaker: Joanne Kemp
8.45 – 9.00
Predictors of outcome in people with chondropathy post-hip arthroscopy
Speaker: Joanne Kemp
8.30 – 10.00
9.00 – 9.15
Physical impairments in hip range and strength are greater in those with chondropathy and in females following
hip arthroscopy
Speaker: Joanne Kemp
9.15 – 9.30
Hip pathomechanics associated with single leg squat are related to dorsiflexion restriction in people with patellofemoral pain
Speaker: Natalie Collins
9.30 – 9.45
Can knee osteoarthritis occur as early as one year after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? A magnetic resonance
imaging evaluation
Speaker: Adam Culvenor
Chair: Alan Gray
Room: 212
Concurrent Session 6
Football Injuries
8.30 – 8.45
A targeted pre-season exercise program improves Functional Movement Screen performance in sub-elite Australian
Football players
Speaker: Craig Soley
8.30 – 10.00
8.45 – 9.00
The relationship between the mechanism of hamstring injury, the location of injury and return to play.
Speaker: Tania Pizzari
9.00 – 9.15
Are the risk factors for hamstring muscle strain injuries in the AFL changing?
Speaker: Richard Taylor
9.15 – 9.30
Risk factors for hamstring and quadriceps strain injury in soccer and rugby league players
Speaker: Phoebe Freeman
9.30 – 9.45
Question time
Chair: Maria Constantinou
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 213
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 7
Gymnastics and Circus Arts, New Moves
10.30 – 11.00
Shoulder Injuries in Men’s Artistic Gymnastics
Invited Speaker: Phil Cossens
10.30 – 12.30
11.00 – 11.30
Code of Points Effects on Injuries in Women’s Gymnastics
Invited Speaker: Kathy Yu
11.30 – 12.00
Injury Prevention in Women’s Gymnastics
Invited Speaker: Wendy Braybon
12.00 – 12.30
Injury rates and patterns amongst students at NICA
Invited Speaker: David Munro, Physiotherapist Circus Arts
Chair: Luise Hollmann
Room: 212
91
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Concurrent Session 8
10.30 – 10.45
The Effect of Mulligan’s Bent Leg Raise
Speaker: Wayne Hing
10.45 – 11.00
Intra- and interrater reliability of allied health professionals using the Anterior Line Method to assess subtalar neutral
Speaker: Wayne Hing
11.00 – 11.15
“Slacklining” – a self-generated, graded training program for lower limb rehabilitation
Speaker: Philip Gabel
11.15 – 11.20
Risk factors for acute and chronic injury in recreational and competitive surfers
Speaker: James Furness
11.20 – 11.25
Increased acute lower limb injuries are associated with completing aerial manoeuvres in surfing
Speaker: James Furness
10.30 – 12.35
11.25 – 11.30
Health-related quality of life following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review
Speaker: Stephanie Filbay
11.30 – 11.35
Question time
11.35 – 11.40
Early proprioception and neuromuscular education post anterior cruciate ligament autograft revision yields analogous results
versus traditional rehabilitation in professional athlete
Speaker: Luke Bongiorno
11.40 – 11.45
Myofascial injury as a differential diagnosis to muscle strain: implications to management and rehabilitation
Speaker: Emidio Pacecca
11.45 – 11.50
The relationship between muscle strength and size, physical activity levels and function in hip osteoarthritis; a cross sectional study
Speaker: Maria Constantinou
11.50 – 12.35 – PeArLS Presentation
Predicting the outcome of patient specific exercise interventions, do we need conscious input to make motor control changes?
Speaker: Craig Phillips
Chair: Kylie Turton
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 213
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 9
Combined Session with Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Group
The Knee
1.30 – 1.50
Knee and the use of Doppler Ultrasound in painful OSD in adolescents
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Maitthieu Sailly
1.30 – 3.00
1.50 – 2.10
Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis: consequences and costs
Invited Speaker: Kay Crossley
2.10 – 2.30
Rehabilitation after ACL injury – surgery or rehab alone?
Invited Speaker: May Arna Risberg
2.30 – 3.00
Geoffrey Maitland Oration – Musculoskeletal physiotherapy practice: what is its core business?
Invited Speaker: Gwendolen Jull
Chair: Natalie Collins
Room: Plenary 2
Concurrent Session 10
1.30 – 1.45
Cognitive functional therapy reduces low back pain and disability in adolescent male rowers: a randomised controlled trial
Speaker: Leo Ng
1.45 – 2.00
Health, postural and rowing-related predictors of back pain in adolescent female rowers
Speaker: Gillian Johnson
1.30 – 3.00
2.00 – 2.15
Classification-based cognitive functional therapy in the management of a footballer with low back pain: a case study
Invited Speaker: JP Caneiro
2.15 – 2.30
The influence of ‘Slacklining’ on quadriceps rehabilitation, activation and intensity
Speaker: Philip Gabel
2.30 – 2.45
Management of hamstring muscle strain injuries in the Australian Football League: A survey of current practice
Speaker: Tania Pizzari
Chair: Catherine Worsnop
92
Room: 213
FRIDAY 18 OCTOBER
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
1.30 – 2.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
3.00 – 3.30
Room: 215
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 2
3.30 – 5.00
Surf Sand and Sea
Surfing Injuries: New Moves
Invited Speaker: Phil Walshe
Slacklining for surfing injury rehabilitation and management
Invited Speaker: Phil Gabel
Stand up Paddling
Invited Speaker: Bruce Rawson
Chair: Phil Gabel
5.30 – 7.30
Room: 212
Sports cocktail function
Venue: Melbourne Public, South Warf
*Please note this is a ticketed event and pre-registration is required.
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
6.30 onwards
Registration
Breakfast Session
7.00 – 8.15
Sports Physiotherapy Australia Breakfast – Member Forum
Pathways to APA Sports Titling and Specialisation
Sponsored by: Lifecare
Speaker: Mark Kenna FACP
Speaker: Keren Faulkner FACP
Chair: Aidan Rich
Room: 207
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Telephysiotherapy
8.30 – 8.35
Introduction
8.35 – 8.55
Phone based Physiotherapy Consultations
Speaker: Jill Gamlin and Annette Bishop
8.30 – 10.00
8.55 – 9.15
Phone based Coaching
Speaker: Rana Hinman
9.15 – 9.35
Video based postoperative rehabilitation
Speaker: Trevor Russell
9.35 – 9.55
When setting up a service, what a Physiotherapist needs to consider from a Clinical Governance perspective
Speaker: Maureen Robinson, Healthdirect Australia
Chair: Ross Illes
10:00 – 10.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Current Workforce Reform Projects: Way of the Future
10.30 – 11.00
Physiotherapy Workforce Reform
Speaker: Kath Phillips
11.00 – 11.20
Advancing Physiotherapy – where are we now and where to from here?
Speaker: Paula Harding
10.30 – 12.30
11.20 – 11.30
TBA
Speaker:
11.30 – 11.45
Creating an active and socially engaged older population
Invited Speaker: Noeline Brown
Journal of Physiotherapy Oration
11.45 – 12.30
Evidence-based practice – a marriage made in heaven
Speaker: Sue Jenkins
Chair: Nicki Doyle
12.30 – 1.30
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Room: Plenary Hall 2
93
SATURDAY 19 OCTOBER
Joint Plenary Session (ALL GROUPS)
Evidence based practice – a philosophy not really a practice
1.30 – 1.35
Sponsor Presentation – HESTA
1.30 – 3.00
1.35 – 2.15
Informed decisions: opportunities for physiotherapy in achieving a vision toward better health.
Invited Speaker: Sally Green
2.15 – 2.35
EBP and private practice – ideal or impossible?
Invited Speaker: Jon Ford
2.35 – 3.00
Evidence based opportunity.
Panel: Sally Green, Jon Ford and Steve Milanese
Chair: Marcus Dripps
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary Hall 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
Concurrent Session 11
Combined Session with Gerontology Physiotherapy Group- The Masters Athlete
3.30 – 3.50
Rotator cuff degeneration in the Masters Athlete
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Ann Cools
3.50 – 4.10
Injuries in Athletes at the Australian Masters Games
Invited Speaker: Geoff Thompson
3.30 – 5.00
4.10 – 4.30
Sports Physiotherapy at the Australian Masters Games
Invited Speaker: Pippa Tessman
4.30 – 4.40
Masters Athlete; The role of physiotherapy in sustained performance
Speakers: Pat Galvin and Chris Wardlaw
4.40 – 5.00
Panel: Dr Ann Cools, Geoff Thompson, Pippa Tessman, Chris Wardlaw and Pat Galvin
Chair: Shylie Mackintosh
Room: 212
Concurrent Session 12
3.30 – 3.45
Achilles and patellar tendinopathy exercise programmes: a systematic review comparing clinical outcomes and identifying
potential mechanisms for effectiveness
Speaker: Christian Barton
3.45 – 4.00
The effect of ankle bracing on knee kinetics and kinematics during volleyball specific tasks
Speaker: Tara West
4.00 – 4.05
Assessing upper limb to lower limb muscle strength ratios in rowers, using hand-held isometric dynamometry
Speaker: Erin Smyth
3.30 – 5.00
4.05 – 4.10
The effect of trunk muscle morphology on upper body injury in elite Australian Football League players
Speaker: Alex Clarke
4.10 – 4.15
Management of a scaphoid fracture by percutaneous screw fixation: case study of an elite road cyclist.
Speaker: Emidio Pacecca
4.15 – 4.20
A Systematic Video Analysis of hamstring Injuries in Australian Rules Football – a Pilot Study
Speaker: Diana Perriman
4.20 – 4.25
The effects of a varus unloader brace for lateral tibiofemoral osteoarthritis and valgus malalignment after anterior cruciate
ligament reconstruction
Speaker: Natalie Collins
4.30 – 4.35
A prospective study of groin pain and low back pain in athletes in an Australian Football League team
Speaker: Kerrie Evans
Chair: John Fitzgerald
94
5.00 – 6.00
Honoured Members and College Graduation – Plenary Hall 2
7.00 – 11.30
Conference Dinner
Venue: Melbourne Convention Centre, Melbourne Room
Theme: Masquerade Ball
Proudly sponsored by SteelBlue
Room: 213
SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER
7.30 onwards
Registration
Plenary Session 3
Combined Session with Animal Physiotherapy Group
8.30 – 9.00
8.30 – 9.00
Integration of sports science/sports medicine and coaching in high performance equestrian sports
Chair: Katrina Varcoe-Cocks
Room: 212/213
Plenary Session 4
9.00 – 10.00
Taping Workshop
Beiersdorf Australia: Sports Taping Masterclass
Speaker: Andrew Hughes and Maria Constantinou
Chair:
10.00 – 10.30
Room: 212/213
Morning Tea – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 5
Athletic Pubalgia, Groin and Adductor Injury: New Moves
10.30 – 11.00
Central public pain classifications and their relationship to movement
Invited Speaker: Andrew Wallis
10.30 – 12.30
11.00 – 11.30
Growth and maturation of the pubic symphysis – implications to the adolescent athlete
International Keynote Speaker: Dr Matthieu Sailly
11.30 – 12.00
Movement variability in athletes with a history of groin pain
Speaker: Suzi Edwards
12.00 – 12.30
Panel: Andrew Wallis, Dr Mathieu Sailly, Suzi Edwards
Chair: Mick Drew
Room: 212/213
Workshop – JoP Writing for Publication
10.30 – 11.30
Writing Skills Workshop
Speaker: Editorial Board members, Journal of Physiotherapy Chair: Mark Elkins
12.30 – 1.30
Room: 215
Lunch – Exhibition Hall
Plenary Session 6
Combined session with the Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Group
Back Injuries in Rowing: New Moves for Prevention
Ivan Hooper – APA Sports Physiotherapist – QLD
1.30 – 3.00
Kellie Wilkie – APA Sports Physiotherapist – TAS
JP Caneiro – APA Sports Physiotherapist – WA
Australian Olympic Team Rowers: Kim Crow and Josh Dunkley-Smith
Live Demonstration of Corrections to Rowing Ergometer Techniques to Prevent Back Injury
Australian Olympic Rowing Team Members Kim Crow & Josh Dunkley-Smith, Fergus Pragnall from Sykes Racing & Concept 2
Rowing Ergometers.
Chair: Henry Wajswelner
3.00 – 3.30
Room: Plenary 2
Afternoon Tea – Exhibition Hall
95
Graduate Certificate
(Physiotherapy)
40CP
Advanced Clinical Reasoning
for Physiotherapists in Aged/
Neurological Fields
Research Unit 1: A literature
review with critical analysis
(Aged/neurological fields)
Aged and Neurological
Disorders I: Holistic
Management
Inter-professional practice
for Hospital and Community
Contexts
Graduate Diploma
(Physiotherapy)
80CP
Management of Chronic
Disease and Disability in
Community Contexts
Research Unit II: Preparation
of Ethical Proposal for a
Clinical Research Activity
Aged and Neurological
Disorders II: Maximising
Outcomes and Participation
Advanced Physiotherapy
Practice for Neurological or
Gerontological fields
Master of Rehabilitation:
(Neurological or
Gerontological
Physiotherapy)
120CP
Physiotherapy
Rehabilitation of Balance
and Gait Disorders of older
adults or following ABI
Clinical Research Project for Physiotherapists:
(Individualised clinical projects in the fields of aged
or neurological rehabilitation)
Physiotherapy
Rehabilitation of adults
with Vestibular Disorders or
following Stroke/ABI
*Subject to final approval by the Australian Catholic University this program will commence part-time in 2015† and be available full-time in 2016.
96
KEYNOTES AND INVITED SPEAKERS
Keynote speakers
Dr Bruce Becker
A graduate of Tulane University School of Medicine, Dr. Becker completed his residency training in Physical Medicine
and Rehabilitation at the University of Washington. Dr. Becker was an Associate Professor at Wayne State University
School of Medicine, serving as Vice President of Medical Affairs for the Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan from 1992
until 1998 when he moved to Spokane, WA to serve as Medical Director of St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute.
Since 2006 he has served as Director of the National Aquatics and Sports Medicine Institute at Washington State
University, pursuing physiologic research during aquatic activity. He holds clinical appointments as Clinical Professor
in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and also Research
Professor at Washington State University.
In 1997, Dr. Becker and Andrew Cole, MD co-authored the textbook Comprehensive Aquatic Therapy published by
Butterworth-Heinemann, which was also published in Portuguese and German. Elsevier published the second edition
of the textbook in 2002, and a third edition was just published in February 2011 by Washington State University
Press. He has published chapters on aquatic therapy in most of the leading textbooks in rehabilitation, authored
aquatic research articles in numerous journals and lectured nationally and internationally in the area of aquatics.
In recent years the Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation Institute, The U.S. Water Fitness Association and Aquatics
Magazine, the International Swimming Hall of Fame, Aquatics International Magazine and The National Swimming
Pool Foundation have honored him for his pioneering support and research into the health value of aquatic activity
and exercise.
Dr Lucie Brosseau
Dr. Lucie Brosseau is a rehabilitation epidemiologist. She holds a Bachelor of Physiotherapy, a Master of Clinical
Science, a Master of Kinanthropology (neurokinetics) and a Doctorate in Public Health (Epidemiology). She is
currently a full professor at the School of Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Ottawa.
She holds a University Research Chair in Evidence based Practice in Rehabilitation. She is also a member of the
musculoskeletal group at Collaboration Cochrane. She co-developed the Ottawa Panel guidelines methodology.
A/Professor Lara Boyd
Dr. Lara Boyd is the Canada Research Chair in Neurobiology of Motor Learning, a Michael Smith Foundation for
Health Career Investigator, a Peter Wall Scholar, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy,
at the University of British Columbia. She is a Neuroscientist and Physical Therapist.
Dr. Boyd directs the Brain Behaviour Lab at the University of British Columbia, which performs research designed to
advance theoretical conceptualizations of how brain function relates to behaviour during learning. She is an expert
in neuroimaging and neurophysiology, and uses a variety of cutting edge technology in her research. Dr. Boyd also
directs the Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences in the Faculty of Medicine.
Professor Suzann Campbell
Suzann K. Campbell, PT, PhD, FAPTA, is Professor Emerita at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Campbell is senior
editor of Physical Therapy for Children and has published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles. Her group’s research
on assessment of infants with movement disorders resulted in publication of the Test of Infant Motor Performance,
a functional motor scale for newborns which was normed on 990 U.S. infants. Recent research has demonstrated
the value of the TIMP for educating parents of premature babies about their infant’s motor development. Most
recently she completed a study of the effects of exercise for infants with perinatal brain injury on motor outcomes
and brain development as measured with MRI.
Dr. Campbell holds the BS and MS in Physical Therapy and a PhD in Neurophysiology from the University of
Wisconsin-Madison. Her work has been honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American
Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine, the Jonas Salk Award for Leadership in Research from
the March of Dimes, and numerous awards from the American Physical Therapy Association, including the Mary
McMillan Lecture Award, the Marion Williams Award for Research, and the Section on Pediatrics Research Award.
97
Dr Chad Cook
Dr. Cook is a Professor and Chair for the doctor of physical therapy division at Walsh University in the United States.
Dr. Cook received his Bachelors of Science in Physical Therapy in 1990, and a Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) in
2003. Dr. Cook has been an academician for 14 years, having taught at Texas Tech University (1999-2004), Duke
University (2004-2010) and Walsh University (2010 to present) and has been a research consultant with the Hawkins
Foundation of the Carolinas for the last 7 years. Within his tenure as a research clinician he has published 2 books (in
their 2nd edition), 150 peer-reviewed papers, and has presented nationally/internationally at over 145 presentations/
conferences. He has been the principle investigator of multiple randomized trials and has served as an editor in chief/
associate editor for 5 peer-reviewed journals for the last 8 years.
Dr. Cook has won numerous teaching awards locally, was the 2009 winner of the top educator award for the American
Physical Therapy Association, the 2011 excellence in research award at AAOMPT, is the 2008 recipient of the Helen
Bradley career achievement award and is the 2005 winner of the J Warren Perry Distinguished Authorship Award.
Dr Ann Cools
Dr. Cools is a physiotherapist, working as an associate professor at the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and
Physiotherapy at the Ghent University, Belgium. After graduation from the University of Leuven in 1986, she worked
in a general physiotherapy practice for several years. Since 1998, she has a teaching and research assignment at the
Ghent University, in basic education as well as in advanced courses. Her topic of research and teaching expertise, as
well as her clinical work is shoulder rehabilitation in general, and sport specific approach and scapular involvement in
particular.
She has published numerous papers in international journals, wrote contributions and chapters in several
international recognized books, and gives courses on a national and international level. She is at present head of the
Physical Therapy Education at the Ghent University, and was founding member and president of the European Society
of Shoulder and Elbow Rehabilitation (EUSSER) 2008-2012.
Dr Linda Denehy
A/Prof Denehy is a PhD-qualified physiotherapist who is Head of the Department of Physiotherapy at The University
of Melbourne, Australia. She was employed as a teaching and research academic since 1993 and obtained her PhD in
2002. Linda has supervised 25 research higher degree students to completion and has extensive research expertise
in the area of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy particularly in patient populations who are acutely unwell.
She has over 70 research publications in peer reviewed journal papers, invited papers and book chapters. A/
Prof Denehy has been successful in obtaining funding from 30 applications of over $6million for research into
physiotherapy related topics, including as chief investigator on a nationally competitive grant investigating
rehabilitation after critical illness.
Her other main research areas are acute surgical physiotherapy and exercise-oncology. She has been invited to speak
at 12 national and international conferences, reviews for nationally competitive granting bodies internationally and for
several international scientific journals.
Dr Coralie English
Dr English is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia and an NHMRC
Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Florey Neurosciences Institute. She is an experienced clinician, having worked
for many years predominately in the area of stroke and neurological rehabilitation prior to taking on a research career.
Her research work has focused around maximizing physical activity levels of stroke survivors to optimize functional
outcomes. Much of her work has centered around the use of circuit class therapy for stroke survivors.
She is one of the Chief Investigators and the Trial Manager for the CIRCIT trial which aimed to compare the
effectiveness of circuit class therapy and 7-day a week therapy against usual care for stroke survivors in rehabilitation
centres. Her postdoctoral fellowship work focusses on the negative health effects of prolonged sitting time in
community-dwelling stroke survivors and how we might be able to encourage stroke survivors to sit less during
the day.
Professor Alan Hedge
Alan Hedge is a Professor in the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis, Cornell University and a Research
Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University. He directs the Cornell
Human Factors and Ergonomics laboratory.
His research and teaching activities focus on ergonomic designs that promote health, comfort and productivity,
especially in healthcare and office workplaces.
98
He is a Fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and he was awarded the 2003 Alexander Williams Design
Award and the 2009 Oliver Hansen Outreach award. He is also a Fellow of the Institute for Ergonomics and Human
Factors, a Fellow of the International Ergonomics Association, and a Certified Professional Ergonomist.
He has published 3 books and more than 30 chapters and 200 articles on these topics. He is on the editorial board of
several ergonomics and related journals and actively involved in professional societies and activities. He frequently
appears as an ergonomics expert in the media, including TV, radio, newspaper and magazine articles.
Dr Jonathan Hill
Dr Jonathan Hill holds a full time research post at the Arthritis Research UK (ARUK) Primary Care Centre, Keele
University, UK where he started as a physiotherapy research assistant in 1999, conducted a PhD from 2004 to 2008,
and was then awarded a competitive 5 year post–doctoral research fellowship.
The focus of his research is to provide evidence that has a direct benefit for musculoskeletal patients in primary care
and he is currently the principal investigator for three research programmes:
1) Ongoing work on stratified care following the STarT Back randomised clinical trial (Hill et al, 2011 published in The
Lancet) and the IMPaCT Back implementation study;
2) Developing a new musculoskeletal patient reported outcome measure;
3) Investigating which factors mediate treatment outcome in physiotherapy interventions.
Professor Hal Kendig
Professor Hal Kendig is Director of the Ageing, Work, and Health Research Unit in the Faculty of Health Sciences at
the University of Sydney. As a sociologist and gerontologist, he is a Chief Investigator on the ARC Centre of Excellence
in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR) for which he leads research on healthy and productive ageing and related
policies.
He served as National Convenor of the ARC/ NHMRC Research Network in Ageing Well 2005–2010, contributed to the
Prime Minister’s PMSEIC Working Group on Healthy Ageing, and contributed to the 2020 Summit. He was elected as
an ASSA Fellow in 1989.
Cathy McGowan
Cathy graduated from the University of Sydney in 1991 as a veterinary surgeon and went on to do both her
internship in equine medicine and surgery and PhD in equine exercise physiology at Sydney University. She then
spent several years in private equine practice before starting a clinical academic career at the Royal Veterinary
College, London in 1999. There she continued her research in muscle disease and started research into Equine
Cushing’s Syndrome, Equine Metabolic Syndrome and laminitis which has continued through her various academic
posts in Queensland Australia, Helsinki, Finland and now back in the UK at Liverpool.
Cathy has been involved in post graduate Master’s level education for Physiotherapists since 1999 when she
developed the Royal Veterinary College Masters and Post Graduate Diploma programs in Veterinary Physiotherapy
which commenced in 2000. At the University of Queensland she developed an online distance education Animal
Physiotherapy MSc program for physiotherapists. Following the closure of the programme at the Royal Veterinary
College, London, Cathy started a new online postgraduate PGDip/MSc programme in veterinary physiotherapy at
the University of Liverpool in 2012, directed by Dr Tracy Crook.
Professor Lorimer Moseley
Lorimer has written 120 articles, three books and numerous book chapters on pain. He won the 2008 Ulf
Lindblom award for the outstanding clinical scientist working in a pain-related field, was runner up for the 2012
Australian Science Ministers Prize for Life Sciences and won the 2013 Marshall & Warren award for Best Innovative
NHMRC Project.
He leads a group of 30 researchers investigating the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain.
Professor Geoff Norman
Geoff Norman is Professor of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University. He received a Ph.D.
in nuclear physics from McMaster University in 1971, and subsequently a M.A. in educational psychology form
Michigan State University in 1977. He is the author of 10 books in education, measurement and statistics, and 300
journal articles.
His primary research interest is in cognitive psychology applied to problems of learning and reasoning. He
presently holds a Canada Research Chair. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2007. In
2008, he won the prestigious Karolinska Prize for lifetime achievement in medical education research. He
received an honorary degree from Erasmus University in 2010. In 2012, he was appointed the Querido Chair at
Erasmus University.
99
Professor Leon Straker
Professor Straker’s first clinical job was as a paediatric physiotherapist in a major children’s hospital. Since then he has
worked as a community physiotherapist providing preventative education programs to schools and healthy lifestyle
programs to overweight children. Over the past 15 years he has been conducting research on the interaction of children
and technology within an ergonomics framework.
His research has included: laboratory studies on the impact of various workstation and computer designs on posture,
movement and muscle activity whilst children use computers and on the energy expenditure, physiological load,
movement and muscle activity whilst children play electronic and real world games; field studies on the experience of
musculoskeletal discomfort associated with computer use and on the variability of posture and movement of children
across whole days as they interact with various types of technologies; longitudinal large cohort studies on spinal pain,
activity, technology use across adolescence; multi-disciplinary intervention studies targeting movement skills and
social skills in pre-school children, physical activity in primary school children, healthy lifestyle behaviours in teenagers
who are obese and motor coordination in children with developmental coordination disorder.
Other projects have included musculoskeletal disorders in children learning musical instruments and musculoskeletal
loading during in young elite tennis players and gymnasts.
Dr Britt Stuge
Britt Stuge has been a physiotherapist since 1982. She completed her Master of Science in 2001 and her PhD in 2005, at
University of Oslo, Section for Health Science, Norway.
Since 2006 she has served as a senior researcher at Division for Neuroscience and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Oslo
University Hospital, Norway where she is supervising health professionals for master’s degrees and postgraduate
studies. She is a specialized physiotherapist in women’s health, and she also works part-time at a clinical practise,
especially seeing patients with pelvic girdle pain.
Britt has published a couple of book chapters and numerous research articles, especially on pelvic girdle pain. She
has been an invited speaker at several national and international conferences and gives courses on a national and
international level. Her work has been honored with national and international awards.
Britt has been a member of EEC Cost Commission Group, for European guidelines for pelvic girdle pain, and a member
of the Norwegian Bone & Joint Decade’s 2000-2010 professional group.
Professor Thierry Troosters
Professor Thierry Troosters is the Head of the Research Group for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Rehabilitation at The
University of Leuven in Belgium. He is a physiotherapist and Research Professor in the field of rehabilitation sciences.
Prof Troosters conducts research on physical activity and non respiratory consequences of lung diseases (muscle
weakness, exercise capacity) and pulmonary rehabilitation. He has over 100 publications and presentations worldwide
and is an internationally renowned leader in physical activity research.
Dr Andrew Vickers
Andrew Vickers is on faculty in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer
Center. His research focus is the detection and initial treatment of prostate cancer, in three broad areas: randomized trials,
surgical outcomes research and molecular marker studies. He has a special interest in the use of PSA to predict long-term
risk of aggressive prostate cancer.
Dr Vickers is also the Chair of the Acupuncture Trialists’ Collaboration, a group that conducts individual patient data
meta-analyses on acupuncture pain trials.
100
Invited speakers
Vanessa Alford
Vanessa Alford is a physiotherapist and nutritionist who is currently a PhD candidate at the Physiotherapy, School of
Heath Sciences, The University of Melbourne.
Vanessa has previously worked as a musculoskeletal physiotherapy lecturer at Nanyang Polytechnic, Singapore
and has had various tutoring roles at The University of Melbourne. The focus of her thesis is on examining the
relevance of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) to the Australian Indigenous
health experience.
Vanessa has always had a strong interest in under-represented minorities, having travelled extensively around
developing countries since her adolescent years. Vanessa believes in taking a holistic and a person-centered approach
to healthcare and understands how important this is in an Indigenous context.
Julia Battams
Julia Battams is Equestrian Australia’s National Performance Director for Dressage and Para Equestrian. In this role
she is responsible for the development and implementation of both domestic and international programmes for able
bodied and disabled competitors towards performance at World Championships and Olympic/Paralympic level.
Julia has competed herself at National Grand Prix level for many years and currently has several young horses
competing at Prix St George’s level.
Jim Birch
Jim is currently Ernst & Young’s Lead Partner in Health and Human Services for Asia Pacific, and Government and
Public Sector Leader, Oceania. He has over thirty years experience in planning, leading and implementing change in
complex organisations transcending such areas as Health Care, Justice and Human Services.
Jim has been a Chief Executive of the Human Services and Health Department (South Australia), Deputy Chief
Executive of Justice, and Chief Executive of major health service delivery organisations, including teaching hospitals.
At a national level he has been Chair of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council, led the establishment of
the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care and was a Board Member of the National E Health
Transition Authority.
Since 2006, Jim has delivered or led major consultancies in areas such as organisational review, infrastructure,
program evaluation, policy development, strategic planning, financial turnaround and change management.
Jim was appointed as the Deputy Chair of the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority in 2011, is a member of the
Board of the National Health Call Centre Network Ltd and Chair of Rural Health Workforce Australia. Jim has also
been a Board Director of a number of State based and national boards.
Jim’s clients have included most of the Health Departments in Australia and also many private sector and nongovernment organisations. Jim has also consulted internationally in the Middle East and South East Asia.
Jim holds a Bachelor of Health Administration from the University of New South Wales.
Felicity Blackstock
Felicity Blackstock is a senior lecturer in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy practice and course coordinator at La
Trobe University. Her interest in simulated learning environments commenced in 2006 when she travelled to the
USA on a Ian Potter Travel Fellowship to attend the international simulation in healthcare conference and explore
opportunities for simulation in physiotherapy education.
Since this time, Felicity has conducted systematic reviews on simulation for health professional education, been
involved in the cardiorespiratory arm of the large national randomised controlled trial evaluating simulated
learning environments for physiotherapy clinical education, and implemented standardised patients in the new
pre-clinical curriculum of La Trobe University receiving a La Trobe Teaching and Learning Citation for Excellence.
Craig Boettcher
Craig Boettcher graduated with First Class Honours from physiotherapy at The University of Sydney in 1992. He
has owned and run a private practice in Newcastle for over 14 years.
Craig was awarded his PhD in 2010 by the Faculty of Medicine, The University of Sydney, for his research into
shoulder muscle activity, and is currently an Honorary Associate researcher with the Faculty.
101
He is a Titled Sports Physiotherapist and has worked with many elite athletes throughout his career, with a particular
interest in swimmers. He has worked closely with the Australian swim team for the past 5 years, being a chosen
therapist at many events including the Delhi Commonwealth Games and last year’s London Olympics.
He was an AIS swimming scholarship holder in the mid 80s and continues to enjoy a social swim and game of waterpolo when he gets time from work, study and his family of three active little children.
Dr Robyn Box
Graduating from the University of Queensland in 1982, Robyn has worked in the area of Oncology and Lymphoedema
for over 25 years across health sectors in QLD and VIC. Having completed her Research PhD in Physiotherapy for
Breast Cancer Rehabilitation, Robyn is principal of a private physiotherapy practice in Brisbane, focusing on providing
care for people undergoing cancer treatment and with Lymphoedema.
Committed to providing evidence-based best practice to optimize individual outcomes for patients, her particular
clinical and research interests are:
• physiotherapy rehabilitation after cancer treatment to prevent and minimize physical sequelae
• optimizing health and well-being for patients diagnosed with cancer
• assessment and early detection of secondary Lymphoedema
• efficacy of treatment interventions to prevent and minimize secondary Lymphoedema, manage primary
Lymphoedema and other chronic oedemas to optimize quality of life for individuals.
Robyn is actively involved in the education of health professionals at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in
the area of Oncology and Lymphoedema. She has a number of publications, presents at national and international
conferences (British Lymphology Society – Keynote Speaker, 2011; Australasian Lymphology Association Conference,
2012) and is a reviewer for a number of journals and research grant bodies.
Wendy Braybon
Wendy Braybon is a Specialist Sports Physiotherapist and APA titled Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist.
She has attended five Olympic Games working with the Australian team and in 2012 was Head Physiotherapist for the
Australian Olympic Team at the London Olympic Games.
She was also physiotherapist for the Australian Commonwealth Games team in 2010 and has attended many world
championships with the Australian Softball team who travelled with for many years. She was recently elected to the
Australian Softball Hall of Fame.
She is currently the head Physiotherapist with the Australian Women’s Gymnastics team, who she has worked with
for the past ten years.
Wendy works in Private Practice in Melbourne as well as being Head Physiotherapist at the Victorian Institute of Sport
where she is currently involved in research into factors leading to injury in young gymnasts.
Thuy (Twee) Bridges
Thuy (Twee) Bridges is the director of PhysioWISE with two physiotherapy clinics in Sydney. She is also a Certified
Kinesio Taping Instructor, Anatomy Trains associate lecturer, a Certified Mulligans Practitioner, Trigenics practitioner
and Pilates instructor.
Thuy has presented her work at the International Fascia Research Congress (Canada), the Fascia Research Summer School
(Germany), Kinesio Taping Research Symposiums (USA) and will be presenting at the Low Back Pain World Congress (Dubai)
later this year. She also teaches courses and gives lectures across a wide range of disciplines relevant to physiotherapy.
Dr Kim Brock
Dr Kim Brock is a clinical physiotherapist and researcher in the field of neurological rehabilitation. In her clinical
role, Kim provides clinical care and consultancy services to inpatient and community rehabilitation services at St
Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne. She is an internationally qualified tutor in the Bobath concept, and regularly teaches
postgraduate courses throughout Australia and overseas.
Kim holds the position of research co-ordinator for the Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Departments at St Vincent’s
and has facilitated a wide range of research endeavours from audits to randomized controlled trials. Kim completed
her doctoral studies in 1999, addressing models for funding and evaluating stroke rehabilitation services. Current
research interests include the effectiveness of interventions based on the Bobath concept for improving mobility and
upper limb control post stroke, and recovery of postural control in contraversive pushing. Other research areas include
access to rehabilitation for people with severe stroke, short term goal setting in rehabilitation, longer term community
outcomes post stroke and effectiveness of Bobath based interventions for people with multiple sclerosis.
102
Kim was a member of the Stroke Expert Advisory Group responsible for developing the Stroke Care Strategy for
Victoria and of the Victorian Stroke Clinical Network, charged with implementing the Strategy.
Tom Brysdon
Tom is an APA Sports Physio who has worked with professional mixed martial artists for almost 10 years. He is
currently the physiotherapist for Team CFS – a team of professional mixed martial arts fighters, Team Regis and Team
SRG – professional Muay Thai Boxers, as well as being the preferred Physio provider for Gracie Sydney – Brazilian
Jiu Jitsu.
Tom also has extensive experience working with elite level rugby league, rugby union, touch football, AFL players and
elite swimmers.
Tom graduated from the University of Sydney and completed his Master’s in Sports Physiotherapy out of the La Trobe
University, Melbourne.
Stuart Canavan
Stuart has spent his entire 20 year career in musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy. He is a former faculty member
at the University of Kentucky and the Medical University of South Carolina.
Over the last 15 years he has developed a special interest in the treatment and management of complex pain. He has
conducted numerous lectures on this topic and has developed a reputation for innovative clinical reasoning models
and treatment approaches for those patients experiencing complex pain. Many of these approaches include not only
cortical remodelling techniques but also expanding clinical assessment to understand the influence of visceral and
immunological factors in pain presentations.
Joao Paulo Caneiro
JP is an APA-Titled Sports Physiotherapist with a Masters in Sports Physiotherapy from Curtin University, Specialist
Sports Physiotherapist and a fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapy
He initially trained in Brazil where he also completed a Masters in Biomechanics. In Brazil he worked with a variety of
sporting teams and was involved in physiotherapy education at a Post-Graduate level. In addition to his clinical work,
JP is part of a research team at Curtin University led by Prof. Peter O’Sullivan.
JP is currently involved in clinical research of spinal pain disorders and a new management approach for non-specific
chronic lower back pain called: Cognitive Functional Therapy. JP has a particular interest in the diagnosis and
management of chronic/persistent musculoskeletal disorders, in special lower back and anterior knee pain.
JP is part of the Australian Rowing medical team, touring internationally for major competitions.
David Caple
David has been a Director of David Caple & Associates Pty Ltd since 1984 and manages major Work Health and
Safety (WHS) research and practice projects funded by Governments and industry groups in Australia, New Zealand,
UK, Singapore, Hong Kong and Malaysia. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Latrobe University, Australia and a Senior
Research Fellow at Ballarat University, Australia.
Having completed his science studies in Australia and ergonomics at Loughborough University, UK, David has been
a guest researcher in Sweden and USA. He is a Certified Practicing Ergonomist (CPE) in Australia, UK and USA.
David Caple was the 16th President of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA) 2006-2009. He was the
Chair of the IEA International Development Committee and Past President of the Human Factors and Ergonomics
Society of Australia (HFESA). He was also the Chair of the IEA 2009 Congress International Advisory Committee in
Beijing, China. Since 2006, David has represented the IEA at conferences and meetings in 30 countries.
Published research papers have been in the areas of ergonomics and occupational health and safety relating to
prevention of musculoskeletal disorders, and change management in small, medium and large enterprises. Since
2000 David has been involved in the development of the WHS Strategy for large government departments and
private companies. In 2012 he was the facilitator for the Australian Work Health and Safety Strategy 2012 – 2022.
David is an independent member of the Victorian Government OHS Advisory Committee (OSHAC) appointed by
the Minister and a panel member for independent OHS advice to the Australian Government.
103
Kate Carroll
Kate Carroll is a physiotherapist who has worked at The Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne since 1996 and
completed her PhD in 2008. In 2003 she joined the Children’s Neuroscience Centre as the founding coordinator and
research physiotherapist for the Neuromuscular Team. The team now includes three physiotherapists and has taken
part in a number of international trials for children with neuromuscular conditions in partnership with the Cooperative
International Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG) and pharmaceutical companies. In-house research projects are
also undertaken.
Kate is currently an elected member of the CINRG Outcomes Subcommittee, a member of the Australian
Neuromuscular Network and a research associate with the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute. In addition to
research responsibilities, Kate also works in the weekly Neuromuscular Clinic at The Royal Children’s Hospital that
provides multidisciplinary care for more than 500 children and adolescents with a variety of neuromuscular conditions
who come from all around Victoria and beyond.
Dr Janet Chase
Janet Chase is a physiotherapist whose chosen area of practice for 30 years has been the treatment of incontinence
and pelvic floor dysfunction in women, men and children, but now chooses to see only paediatric patients, and
is committed to advancing the continence care of children. She has a strong interest in continence education
and was one of the three-person committee that wrote the curriculum and set up the postgraduate course
for physiotherapists at the University of Melbourne which now attracts interstate and international students.
She teaches medical students, post-graduate physiotherapy and multi-disciplinary audiences interstate and
internationally.
Janet has been active in the Continence Foundation of Australia (CFA) since it was established and served on the
Australian Government National Continence Management Strategy Advisory Committee. She is currently chair-person
of the CFA Paediatric Advisory Sub-committee, Committee member of the physiotherapy group of CFA (Victoria
Branch), Board member of the International Children?s Continence Society and a Director of CFA. She has completed
her doctorate -her area of research being bowel dysfunction in children.
Doug Cary
“As a youngster I spent many summer holidays on my Uncle & Aunties farm in Kojonup. I am reminded (as I have no
personal recollection) at family gatherings, how I expressed my love for the farm and not wanting to leave, by firstly
planting a cricket stump in their new leather sofa and secondly, by hiding in the pump house for 7 hours till nightfall.
Perhaps this is where my love for all things rural and acupuncture started.
I qualified from Curtin University in 1987 and spent the next few years developing my career and pushing my
boundaries. I spent a lot of time in the outdoors, learning skills and developing confidence in scuba, rock climbing,
bush walking and triathlons in Tasmania, Canada, USA and Patagonia. Solo activities taught me to plan, be organised,
respect the environment and look after my kit, never knowing what mother nature would toss my way.
I returned to Australia in 1992 to complete my post graduate diploma in manipulative physiotherapy at Curtin
University and in 1995, I completed a post graduate diploma in clinical acupuncture at the Australian Institute of
Holistic Medicine, Perth.
I am a gold member of the A.P.A., titled member of the M.P.A. and was the inaugural W.A. chair of the Acupuncture &
Dry Needling Group. I was the WA representative on the A.P.A. Acupuncture Working Party which finalised the A.S.G.’
Guidelines for Safe Acupuncture’.
I completed my Specialisation in musculoskeletal physiotherapy in 2009 and am now a Fellow of the Australian
College of Physiotherapists. I am currently completing my M. Philosophy (Physiotherapy) at Curtin University, studying
sleep patterns and their relationship to pain and stiffness. I have created an iPhone home exercise wizard for clinicians
and writing a forth coming book “Secretes of successful sleeping: maximising your horizontal time”.
I now enjoy a mix of raising cattle, assisting physiotherapy clients, teaching professional courses and staying on track
with my research.
104
A/Professor Pauline Chiarelli
Associate Professor Pauline Chiarelli is currently the Convener of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy Program, University
of Newcastle. A/Prof Chiarelli was a founding member of the Continence Foundation of Australia and first Australian
Physiotherapist member of the International Continence Society.
Pauline lays claim to being the first Australian Physiotherapist Continence Adviser. She is a Research Associate
with Australian Longitudinal Women’s Health, immediate past Scientific Editor of the Australian and New
Zealand Continence Journal and a member of the steering committee of the Australian National Continence
Management Program.
Pauline has a Master degree in Medical Science in Health Promotion: a degree that has proven effective in her efforts
to “dry up Australia”. She has over 50 papers published in peer reviewed journals, is the author of the international
best-selling booklet “Women’s Waterworks”, many chapters in edited Texts and is a Fellow of Australian College
of Physiotherapists.
Early work as a childbirth educator led to her interest in postnatal pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation and continence
promotion but more recently her research efforts involve men having treatment for prostate cancer.
Her basic, introductory, practical workshops over many years have introduced almost 1000 Australian
physiotherapists to the important role physiotherapists can play in continence promotion.
Professor Jeff Coombes
Professor Jeff Coombes is a teacher, researcher and accredited exercise physiologist in the School of Human
Movement Studies at The University of Queensland. His research interests encompass the importance of fitness for
health and optimising exercise in clinical populations. By assessing physiological, biochemical and molecular changes
in response to exercise interventions, he also studies the mechanisms by which exercise provides health benefits.
He has been researching clinical exercise for 10 years and conducted a number of large randomised trials in chronic
disease populations.
His recent interests are focused on high intensity interval training and is currently completing trials in participants
with kidney disease, the metabolic syndrome and obese adolescents. Jeff has over 150 publications and recently coauthored two national position statements on the benefits of exercise in diabetes and kidney disease.
Phil Cossens
Phil is a Sports Physiotherapist who works in private practice in Canberra. He has been Physiotherapist to the
Australian Men’s Gymnastics team since 2005.
He is currently undertaking a longitudinal research project investigating shoulder injuries in elite men’s gymnastics,
and has an interest in developing coaching practices to minimise injury risk and improve gymnasts’ performance.
Matthew Cotchett
Matthew graduated with a Bachelor of Science in 1996, and a Bachelor of Podiatry (Honours) in 2000. He is a
practicing Podiatrist, and a Lecturer in the Department of Podiatry, La Trobe Rural Health School in Bendigo.
Matthew is due to submit his PhD in six months, which has focused on the effectiveness of trigger point dry
needling for plantar heel pain.
Matthew’s other research interests involve the evaluation of depression and anxiety in people with
musculoskeletal pain of the foot.
Dr Kay Crossley
Dr Kay Crossley is an APA Sports Physiotherapist, who worked in in a large multi-disciplinary sports medicine
centre in Melbourne for more than 20 years. She has contributed to a number of sports medicine and
physiotherapy texts, including Clinical Sports Medicine.
Kay obtained her PhD in 2002 in the School of Physiotherapy, the University of Melbourne. Her doctoral studies
investigated the effects of physiotherapy in patellofemoral pain.
Dr Crossley is an Associate Professor and Reader in Physiotherapy at the University of Queensland. Her main
research focus is on the prevention and management of patellofemoral pain and early-onset osteoarthritis after
sports-related injuries.
105
Kim Crow
Kim Crow is an Olympic and World Championship medalist in rowing. Kim began her sporting career in track and field,
where she was a World Youth silver medalist in the 400m hurdles. At 19, she had to cope with the burden of quitting
her chosen sport of athletics as the result of a career debilitating foot injury.
In learning about herself through this disappointment, she channeled her determination into recovery and then into
her new sport of rowing.
Kim won herself a seat in the Australian women’s eight within eight months of starting
rowing, and went on to win a World Championships bronze medal that year. She has since raced internationally in all
Olympic boat classes, culminating in a silver and bronze medal in the double and single sculls respectively at London
2012. She was the only rower from any country to attempt two rowing events at the London Olympics.
Throughout her dedicated and arduous training regime, Kim has maintained her study and career, achieving a perfect
score of 99.95 in her VCE and graduating from her Melbourne University Media and Communications / Law degree
with first class honours and the top female graduate of her year. She interned at the Court of Arbitration of Sport in
Lausanne, Switzerland, and now works as a lawyer at Arete Group in Canberra.
She was elected chair of the Australian Olympic Committee Athletes’ Commission in 2012, and actively involves
herself with various charity initiatives.
Rebekah Das
Rebekah Das is a physiotherapist, currently completing her PhD at the University of South Australia. Her research
focus is to characterise the sensation of urinary urgency.
Rebekah began her career as a rural physiotherapist and commenced teaching in physiotherapy at the University
of South Australia in 2001. Pelvic floor function and continence management have become a particular interest and
focus of clinical, teaching and academic roles.
Katy de Valle
Katy started work in the Physiotherapy Department at The Royal Children’s Hospital in 1998 and there developed an
interest in the field of Neurology and muscle weakness.
Katy has worked for the Neurology Department in the area of Neuromuscular Research for the past seven
years. She has been involved in research both within the Neurology Department and in conjunction with The
Cooperative International Research Group (CINRG) and various pharmaceutical companies. Her research team
have be involved in numerous drug trials, natural history studies and other interventional studies for children with
Neuromuscular Diseases.
She works with a fabulous team both at The Royal Children’s Hospital and around the world.
Kirsten Deane
Kirsten Deane is the Deputy Chair of the National People with Disabilities and Carer Council and a member of the
NDIS Expert Advisory Group on National Approach to Choice and Control. Until recently she was also the Executive
Director of the National Disability and Carer Alliance and the Deputy Campaign Director of the Every Australian Counts
campaign for the NDIS. She is a long-term board member of both Down Syndrome Victoria and Down Syndrome
Australia. A former journalist turned academic, Kirsten has three children and as a result spends a lot of time running
and not much time sleeping.
Dr Joanna Diong
Joanna Diong PhD BAppSc(Physio)(Hons) is Lecturer in musculoskeletal anatomy at the Discipline of Biomedical
Science, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney.
Jo has a broad background in clinical physiotherapy practice and completed a PhD in clinical epidemiology and clinical
biomechanics at The George Institute for Global Health. Her research focused on the incidence and mechanisms of
contracture after spinal cord injury and provided the first measures of gastrocnemius muscle length at known tension
in people with spinal cord injury who had ankle contracture. She held post-doctoral appointments at The George
Institute and Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) where she continued her research on passive mechanical
properties of muscles.
She also supported the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and contributed to evidence translation by
adapting UK national guidelines on hip fracture management for endorsement by the Australian NHMRC.
Jo has broad interests in muscle physiology, applied anatomy and clinical research, and continues to extend her work
on the mechanical properties of muscles after stroke, gerontology and injury from falls, and evidence based practice.
106
Professor David Dunstan
David is Head of the Physical Activity laboratory at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne and is an
Australian Research Council Future Fellow. He is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Sports Science, Exercise and
Health at the University of Western Australia, an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Population Health at
the University of Queensland, an Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at
Deakin University and an Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine at Monash
University. His research focuses on the role of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in the prevention and
management of chronic diseases.
His research program has attracted considerable external funding from the NHMRC, VicHealth and the National Heart
Foundation. He has published over 100 peer reviewed papers, including publications in high impact journals such as
Circulation, Diabetes Care, Diabetologia, Obesity Reviews, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Journal of
the American College of Cardiology. Over the past 15 years David has established an extensive media profile including
interviews with ABC Catalyst, National Public Radio, Wall Street Journal, CNN, the New York Times and the LA Times.
Nick Economos
Nick is a physiotherapist who currently works in private practice at Empower Rehab, an interdisciplinary clinic of
physiotherapists and psychologists based in Heidelberg, Melbourne. They focus on the best practice management of
complex and persistent pain conditions to achieve sustained functional outcomes. Nick also currently consults as a
physiotherapy advisor and was the winner of the WorkSafe Treating Health Practitioner Achievement Award in 2012.
Suzi Edwards
Dr Suzi Edwards is a biomechanics lecturer within the School of Human Movement Studies at Charles Sturt University.
She graduated with a Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise & Sport Science) from the University of Sydney in 1999,
Masters of Science (Honours) in 2002 and PhD in 2010 at the University of Wollongong. During her studies, she
sustained five knee and two shoulder reconstructions as a former athlete, which led to her research passion into the
mechanics of sporting injuries. Her primary research area focuses on investigating the role of the lumbopelvic region
within sporting injuries and performance, particular during dynamics lower limb landings and the role of movement
variability in overuse injuries. This research aims to provide critical information that can be utilised in the design of
practical intervention strategies for coaches and clinicians that assists in reducing the incidence and severity of
sporting injuries, and/or improving athletic performance in a diverse variety of sporting communities.
Professor Niki Ellis
Professor Niki Ellis is an occupational and public health physician. She is the CEO of the Institute for Safety,
Compensation and Recovery Research, a partnership between WorkSafe Victoria, the Transport Accident
Commission and Monash University.
ISCRR has developed an innovative collaborative research model with the aim of undertaking research which has
impact. Indeed it is accountable for the impact its work has on WorkSafe and TAC and their clients. Before taking up
the role as foundation CEO of ISCRR, Niki set up the Centre for Military and Veterans’ Health at UQ.
Before that she spent 10 years in the private sector and 10 years in the public service. Her book, Work and Health:
management in Australia and New Zealand was published by Oxford University Press in 2001 and is still used in
training in occupational health today.
A/Professor Shaun Ewen
Associate Professor Shaun Ewen is an Aboriginal academic at the Onemda VicHealth Koori Health Unit, where he
is also the Deputy Director of the Centre for Health and Society, a cross-faculty, multi-disciplinary Centre, located
in the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne. He has a Bachelor Degree
in Physiotherapy, a Master Degree in International Relations, and a Doctorate in Education (focusing on cultural
competence at a School of Medicine).
He is the inaugural Associate Dean (Indigenous Development), in the faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health
Science. This position, established in 2010, is to enable and ensure that the Faculty is positioned to respond
to the obligations the Faculty has in regards to Indigenous development, across the domains of teaching and
learning, research, recruitment (staff and student), partnerships, and cultural recognition.
His research interests and expertise is in Indigenous health workforce development, and Indigenous health
teaching and learning in the health sciences.
107
Sarah Foley
Sarah is a paediatric physiotherapist and cofounder of the Kids Plus Foundation in the Barwon region, a not for profit
organisation providing innovative services for children with cerebral palsy and their families. She is also a co-director
of Children’s Therapy Services in Geelong. Sarah is a qualified senior Bobath tutor and teaches extensively in Australia.
Her clinical background is in the field of cerebral palsy and developmental follow up for babies at developmental risk.
Dr Jon Ford
Dr Jon Ford (PhD, M Physio, B App Sc Physio, Cred MDT – Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist) is the Clinical Director of
Spinal Management Clinics; a multi-disciplinary group of practitioners providing evidence-based services for people
with musculo-skeletal problems.
He is also the Team Leader of the Low Back Research Team at La Trobe University where he is investigating the
classification and specific treatment of low back disorders via the STOPS trials.
Helena Frawley
Helena Frawley is a physiotherapist with research, academic and clinical interests. She completed her PhD at The
University of Melbourne in 2008, and gained Fellowship of the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2011, as a
Specialist Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapist.
Helena is currently a National Health and Medical Research Council Research Fellow, and is undertaking translational
research in the area of pelvic floor muscle training and continence advice for pregnant and postnatal women.
Additional research interests include conservative therapies for women with pelvic organ prolapse, investigation of
pelvic floor muscle tension in women with pelvic pain, and rehabilitation following pelvic cancer.
Her current roles include:
• Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy at The University of Melbourne
• Senior Consultant, Allied Health Research at Cabrini Hospital, Melbourne.
• Helena is active internationally with scientific committees to promote continence and pelvic floor health:
- Chair of the International Continence Society (ICS) Physiotherapy Committee
- Mentor of joint ICS & IUGA Standardisation of Terminology Working Group for Conservative Management of Pelvic
Floor Dysfunction
- Member of ICS Standardisation of Terminology Working Group for Chronic Pelvic Pain
- Member of the Scientific Committee of the 1st World Congress on Pelvic Pain, Amsterdam 2013.
Philip Gabel
Philip Gabel is a full time Sports and Spinal Physiotherapist with a small practice in Coolum on Queensland’s Sunshine
Coast.He has a PhD from the University of the Sunshine Coast investigating the link between bio-psychosocial
screening and outcome measures and the prediction of recovery for compensation and sporting patients.
He also completed a Research Masters on upper limb outcome measures and a Grad Dip by Research on Laser Therapy.
Philip has published and in press papers on outcome measures for the upper and lower limbs and spine, the link
between bio-psychosocial screening and outcome measurement for worker injury and whiplash and Slacklining as a
rehabilitation modality for the lower limb and core stability.
He is a Credentialed, McKenzie Therapist, Acupuncture and Aquatic Therapist, a Manual Handling instructor and
former Research Fellow at James Cook and Griffith Universities. He has been a physiotherapist for the Organisations
of the 2012 London Olympics and 2006 Commonwealth Games plus Australian World Championships teams. A former
professional triathlete and Australian Team member he continues his sporting passions through body surfing, wine
and chocolate and research into surfing injuries.
He is the developer of ADVISE Rehabilitation Decision Support Software.
Jenny Geytenbeek
Jenny Geytenbeek is an aquatic physiotherapist with 20 years clinical experience particularly in musculoskeletal
practice. She is currently employed in private practice including aquatic therapy for post-acute orthopaedic conditions
and chronic pain.
Jenny is a clinical educator with the University of South Australia’s post-graduate program in musculoskeletal
physiotherapy, and teaches aquatic physiotherapy with the APA Level 1 and 3 courses. Her own master’s study included a
systematic review of the evidence supporting aquatic physiotherapy. This work was later updated and expanded with
support of the APA Aquatic Physiotherapy Group publishing an evidence-based practice guide linked to the APA website.
108
Jenny endeavours to keep up with the growing evidence supporting aquatic physiotherapy maintaining possibly the
largest personal index of aquatic physiotherapy research in Australia.
Dr Lesley Goff
Dr. Lesley Goff is a titled Musculoskeletal and Animal Physiotherapist. Lesley is director of her private musculoskeletal
physiotherapy clinic and her animal physiotherapy practice in Toowoomba, Queensland. She is consultant Animal
Physiotherapist at University of Queensland Veterinary Medical Centre and Honorary lecturer at the School of
Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, UK. Her areas of clinical interest are the human and animal sacroiliac joint –
the subject of both masters and doctoral research and optimising the horse and rider’s athletic performance.
Lesley is co–editor of the textbook Animal Physiotherapy, and has authored a chapter in Equine Sports Medicine
and Surgery, 2nd edition (edited by Hinchcliff, Kaneps and Geor). Lesley balances her clinical work with lecturing
and presenting courses to veterinarians and physiotherapists in Australia as well as internationally. Lesley enjoys
spending time with her family and competing in triathlon.
Dr Susan Greaves
Susan Greaves, B.App. Sc.(OT), MOT, PhD is the Senior Occupational Therapist for neurology/neurodevelopment at the
Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne where she has worked for the past 13 years. She has a strong clinical background
in the field of cerebral palsy and early intervention, especially assessment and management of the upper limb in
children with hemiplegia.
Sue recently completed a PhD program to develop a test called the Mini-Assisting Hand Assessment (Mini-AHA) that
evaluates how well young children aged 8–18 months with unilateral CP use their affected upper limb during bimanual
play. Sue has presented her findings from her research at both national and international conferences, as well as in
journal articles and book chapters.
Professor Sally Green
Sally Green is Co-Director of the Australasian Cochrane Centre and a Professorial Fellow in the Faculty of Medicine,
Nursing and Health Sciences at Monash University. She holds a PhD in Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine from
Monash University in addition to her clinical qualifications in Physiotherapy.
Sally is an active Cochrane reviewer and has several competitively funded research projects which aim to improve
health outcomes by investigating the most effective and efficient pathway of knowledge from research result to
sustained change in clinical practice and policy. Professor Green is a practicing Manipulative Physiotherapist and APA
member and is a member of the National Health Medical Research Council’s Health Care Committee.
A/Professor Terry Haines
A/Prof Terry Haines is Director of the Allied Health Research Unit (Southern Health and Monash University). He has
published over 100 peer–reviewed papers and received over $8 million in research funding since completing his PhD in
2005. Terry’s research commenced in the field of falls prevention amongst older hospital patients, but his joint hospital/
university role has seen his research scope expand into chronic disease management, oncology, paediatrics, health
professional education, and hospital systems design.
Terry is currently the Chair of the Physiotherapy Research Foundation Grant Review Committee, President of the
Australia New Zealand Falls Prevention Society, is a member of the Journal of Physiotherapy editorial board, and is
supported by a Career Development Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council.
David Harding
David Harding (B.App. Sci (Phty), M.Manip Phty, Specialist Certificate in Paediatric Orthopaedic Physiotherapy) is an
APA titled Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist working at Monash Children’s Hospital, Monash Health.
David had a leading role in developing advanced practice physiotherapy roles at Monash Health, including planning
service delivery, instigating and evaluating services, and ensuring their ongoing viability.
In 2006 he established the Physiotherapist Led Neurosurgery Clinic, the first physiotherapist led clinic at Monash
Health, and went on to establish the Physiotherapist Led Paediatric Orthopaedic Assessment Clinic at Monash
Children’s Hospital in 2009.
David has over 24 years clinical experience in both the private and public sectors, working with both adults and
children. He continues to have an active role in provision of advanced practice physiotherapy services in both
neurosurgery and paediatrics at Monash Health, as well as ongoing involvement in the establishment of other
physiotherapist led services.
109
Paula Harding
Paula is a Grade 4 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist at The Alfred hospital in Melbourne. Paula graduated from Lincoln
Institute of Health Sciences in Melbourne and has over 20 years of experience working in the musculoskeletal area in
both the private and public sector.
In 2000, she completed a Masters of Manipulative Physiotherapy at La Trobe University and in 2012 completed a
Clinical Doctorate of Physiotherapy at The University of Melbourne. Recent project manager roles at The Alfred
have included the successful implementation of a primary practice musculoskeletal physiotherapy service into
the Emergency and Trauma Centre and the introduction of a Physiotherapy Arthroplasty Review Clinic into the
orthopaedic outpatient department.
Paula is currently the project manager for the “Health Workforce Australia Expanding Scope of Practice for
Physiotherapists in Emergency Departments” project of which the Alfred Hospital is a lead site, and project manager
for the Victorian Department of Health “Advancing Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy” project. An area of interest
for Paula has been developing the education and training program, and work-based competency assessment for
Advanced Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy roles.
A/Professor Susan Hillier
Associate Professor Susan Hillier currently is Associate Head (Research) within the School of Health Science at the
University of South Australia. She teaches and researches in the area of Clinical Neuroscience and rehabilitation. She
also maintains a small private practice working predominantly with people who have movement difficulties.
Her research activities cover a wide range of methods in both primary and secondary research, with a strong focus
on translation and implementation work in clinical trials. She publishes widely and supervises students undertaking
honours and PhD projects – all within the international Centre for Allied Health Evidence.
A/Professor Rana Hinman
Associate Professor Hinman is a physiotherapist and academic researcher at the Centre for Health Exercise & Sports
Medicine, within the Department of Physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne. Her primary area of research is
knee osteoarthritis (OA).
Her research aims to improve joint health via conservative non-drug interventions, and to understand the
biomechanical and neuromuscular factors that are important in the genesis of disease and associated symptoms.
She has expertise in a range of research methodologies, ranging from lab-based experiments through to randomised
controlled trials and systematic reviews.
Her research has evaluated a vast range of treatment strategies for knee OA, including multi-modal physiotherapy,
exercise (strengthening, and neuromuscular), aquatic physiotherapy, knee taping, footwear, gait aids and gait
retraining, shoe insoles and telephone coaching.
Dr Brian Hoare
Brian has been a full time occupational therapist (OT) at Monash Children’s, Southern Health since 2000 where he is
currently the senior OT for the Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation Service (VPRS). While maintaining a full time clinical
caseload, Brian completed his PhD in 2010. In 2011 he took leave from his clinical position to undertake a 9 month
post-doctoral position at Karolinska Institute, Sweden with Professor Ann–Christin Eliasson and A/Professor Lena
Krumlinde–Sundholm.
Brian’s doctoral research evaluated the effects of upper limb therapy following Botulinum toxin–A in children aged 18
months to 6 years with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). These research findings have been disseminated widely through
publications in high quality, peer reviewed journals.
Professor Paul Hodges
Paul Hodges PhD MedDr DSc BPhty(Hons) FACP is an NHMRC Senior Principal Research Fellow and the Director of the
NHMRC Centre for Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health (CCRE SPINE). Paul has 3 doctorates;
one in Physiotherapy and two in Neuroscience. His research blends these skills to understand pain, control of
movement, and the interaction between multiple functions of the trunk muscles including spine control, continence,
respiration and balance. The large multidisciplinary Research Centre that Paul leads aims to bridge the gap between
basic science and clinical practice.
110
He has received numerous international research awards (2006 and 2011 ISSLS Prize [premier international prize for
spine research from the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine]; Suzanne Klein-Vogelbach Prize),
leadership awards (Emerging leader in Health [Next 100 Awards], Future Summit Australian Leadership Award),
published >250 scientific papers and book chapters, presented >120 invited lectures at major conferences in 30
countries, and received >$AU22 million in research funds.
He is the lead chief investigator on the first physiotherapy based NHMRC Program Grant (~$AU8 million) and received
the 2011 NHMRC Achievement Award as the highest ranked NHMRC Research Fellow across disciplines in Australia.
A/Professor Anne Holland
Anne Holland is A/Professor of Physiotherapy at La Trobe University and Alfred Health in Melbourne. She leads the
physiotherapy research program at Alfred Health, where she provides supervision and mentoring for research projects
involving clinical staff, research staff and higher degree students who are conducting research across acute, subacute
and community sectors.
Anne’s own research program aims to optimise health and wellbeing for people with cardiorespiratory disease. In
2009 Anne was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to study the use of telerehabilitation for people with chronic lung
disease in Norway, Scotland, Canada and the USA.
Her current research projects are investigating new models for pulmonary rehabilitation to improve access and
uptake. This includes low cost home based models; in-home tele–rehabilitation using broadband technologies; and
the use of web platforms to promote physical activity in people with chronic disease.
Anne has published over 70 peer reviewed journal articles and her research program has received more than $2million
in competitive grant funding.
Ivan Hooper
Ivan is an APA Sports Physiotherapist who has been working with the Australian Institute of Sport since 2005. He
has degrees in physiotherapy and sports science, including a Master’s Degree in Sports Physiotherapy. He has just
stepped down from the role of Sports Medicine Coordinator for the National Rowing Centre of Excellence.
He is maintaining a small involvement with the NRCE, managing their injury & illness surveillance system. He currently
is Sports Physiotherapist to the AIS Diving Program and the remainder of his time is spent with Queensland Sports
Medicine Centre. Ivan is one of a small group of physiotherapists who have been a team physiotherapist at four
Olympic Games.
He has been a physiotherapist on Australian Rowing Teams since 1997, including Athens 2004, Beijing 2008 and
London 2012 Olympic Games. He has also worked with Australian Kayaking teams including the Sydney 2000 Olympic
Games. Ivan also sits on the National Committee for Sports Physiotherapy Australia being the Immediate Past Chair.
Kylie Houlihan
Currently the Contract Principal Project Officer for the Clinical Access and Redesign Unit for the Health Systems
Innovation Division of the Queensland Department of Health, Kylie, has had a long and successful career in the
provision of healthcare services.
She is dedicated to effecting transformational change in patient care, particularly in the areas of chronic disease
prevention and management. Kylie has an impressive track record of ensuring that strategic outcomes are achieved
with efficiency and aligned with current best practice.
Over the past eighteen months, Kylie has led the Cardiac Rehabilitation Reform Project for the Queensland
Statewide Cardiac Clinical Network. To progress the key service improvement recommendations of the Cardiac
Rehabilitation Reform Report, she established and led a peak advisory body, which included multidisciplinary
representatives from Queensland Health, the National Heart Foundation, consumer groups and the Health
Contact Centre. Project outcomes already include: the development of the HEART Online website, which is
now hosted by the National Heart Foundation; securing the funding for the foundation of the Telehealth
multidisciplinary education service, which will offer video based programs accessible throughout the state,
including to rural areas; and authorisation and full ethics approval for a pilot program to introduce an Automated
Referral Pathway and a Centralised Triage Service for Cardiac Rehabilitation.
As a result of these successes, Kylie was invited by the Clinical Access Redesign Unit to progress the State-wide
Chronic Disease Management Project with which Cardiac Rehabilitation is integrated.
Andrew Hutton
Andrew Hutton is an APA Titled Sports Physiotherapist currently sharing his professional time between
lecturing on the dnp: integrated neuro-myofascial dry needling training programme courses and clinical time at
Physiotherapy Solutions South, Kingston Beach, Tasmania.
As a sports physiotherapist he has integrated acupuncture and dry needling into his management of
mainstream sporting and musculoskeletal presentations since 1994. The use of various needling techniques
has entirely replaced the use of electrotherapy agents and has reduced the majority of manual therapy
techniques commonly used in such a clinical setting, preserving the clinicians resources for other aspects of the
clinical intervention.
111
He completed the APA acupuncture training programme in 1990 and lectured on the APA Acupuncture training
programme from 1997-2008.
In response to the demands of physiotherapists with traditional acupuncture training finding integration into
musculoskeletal physiotherapy difficult, Andrew developed workshops in musculoskeletal acupuncture which were
well received and which evolved into the dnp: integrated neuro-myofascial dry needling approach practiced my many
physiotherapists in Australia and New Zealand today.
A/Professor Sue Jenkins
Associate Professor Sue Jenkins is a distinguished respiratory physiotherapist holding both a clinical and an academic
appointment. She is a member of the Physiotherapy Department at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital where she jointly
manages an out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation service, and is also Associate Professor of Cardiopulmonary Science
in the School of Physiotherapy at Curtin University, WA. Other appointments include Head of the Physiotherapy Unit
of the Lung Institute of Western Australia (LIWA).
Her interests include pulmonary rehabilitation, self-management, airway clearance techniques and professional
issues; she has published almost 100 papers, having received almost $2 million in research funding throughout her
career. Sue is on the Editorial Board of a number of journals and is a regular reviewer. She is also a referee for major
international funding bodies and a number of scientific meetings.
Sue has received numerous awards for her publications and teaching and has been an invited speaker at national and
international meetings. She has been involved in 170 conference presentations.
Dr Venerina Johnston
Dr Venerina Johnston is a researcher and lecturer in the Division of Physiotherapy at The University of Queensland.
She has qualifications in physiotherapy, occupational health and safety and work disability prevention. Her research
interests are in the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal problems, in particular, the neck and upper extremity
and the prevention of disability following a workplace injury.
Venerina has a rich background in occupational rehabilitation and injury management from the perspective of the
insurer, provider and employer. She has published over 30 scholarly works and has been successful in obtaining over
$1million in research funding.
Mark Jones
Mark Jones graduated from the University of Florida with a B.S. in Psychology and then completed his Physical Therapy
studies at the University of Iowa. Having developed an interest in manual therapy Mark travelled to Australia to study
Manipulative Physiotherapy and after completing his Graduate Diploma in 1985 he completed his Masters by Research
in 1989. The title of his thesis was “Facilitating Students’ Clinical Reasoning in Physiotherapy Education”. Mark has a
special interest in biopsychosocial health care and the teaching and assessment of clinical reasoning in physiotherapy.
Mark is currently Senior Lecturer and Program Director, Master of Musculoskeletal and Sports Physiotherapy, School
of Health Sciences, University of South Australia. He has conducted and supervised research in the areas of clinical
reasoning and musculoskeletal physiotherapy with over 75 publications including the texts “Clinical Reasoning in the
Health Professions” and “Clinical Reasoning for Manual Therapists”.
Mark lectures and runs continuing education courses in clinical reasoning and musculoskeletal physiotherapy
regularly, both nationally and internationally.
A/Professor Sue Jones
Associate Professor Sue Jones is a physiotherapist and Chair of the Accreditation Committee of the Australian
Physiotherapy Council. Sue is the Dean of Teaching and Learning in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Curtin University,
a position she has held for the last seven years.
She was responsible for leading and ensuring interprofessional education and practice was embedded within health
sciences curricula as part of the Faculty of Health Sciences Strategic Plan. As part of the Faculty of Health Sciences
Interprofessional First Year, Sue led the inclusion of a core unit for over 2300 first year students across 19 disciplines
on Indigenous Cultures and Health which has had exceptional student feedback.
Sue was a Fieldwork Coordinator in the School of Physiotherapy for 15 years and has successfully led two ALTC
leadership grants entitled Building Academic Leadership Capability at the Course Level: Developing Course
Coordinators as Academic Leaders and Building Leadership Capacity for Work Integrated Learning: Developing
Fieldwork Coordinators as Academic Leaders.
She is currently a project team member on an OLT grant: Working together: Intercultural academic leadership for
teaching and learning in Indigenous culture and health.
112
Dr Gwendolen Jull
Dr Gwendolen Jull is Emeritus Professor in the Division of Physiotherapy at the University of Queensland, Australia.
She is a Director of the NHMRC Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury and Health. Her research,
teaching and clinical interests are cervicogenic headache, whiplash associated disorders, manual therapy and
quantifying the dysfunction in the cervical motor and sensorimotor systems as a basis for therapeutic exercise in the
rehabilitation of neck disorders.
Gwen has published extensively in the field and has published a textbook on the management of neck pain. Professor
Jull is a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists and Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist. She is the
co-editor of Manual Therapy, a leading international journal in Musculoskeletal physiotherapy.
Victoria Kahn
Victoria Kahn Victoria gained her Bachelor of Physiotherapy (hons) from University of Melbourne (2003) and
completed her Masters in Sports Physiotherapy at La Trobe University (2010). She worked in private practice in
Melbourne with a keen interest in AFL (local, state, representative and VFL levels) and cricket prior to equestrian.
Victoria joined Equestrian Australia as the Team Physiotherapist and Sports Science/Sports Medicine (SSSM)
manager for the Australian team at World Equestrian Games (Kentucky, USA, 2010) and worked as SSSM Manager for
the Para-equestrian team following this event. This role was expanded to National SSSM Manager in September 2011,
encompassing all equestrian disciplines.
Her role includes developing a screening protocol specific and meaningful to equestrian athletes, establishing
worldwide networks of service providers and assisting in facilitating individually tailored programs for riders which
may include physiotherapy and manual therapies, hydration, nutrition, core stability, strength and conditioning and
sports psychology.
Rachel Kennedy
Graduating in 1993 from La Trobe University, Rachel Kennedy is a physiotherapist who has worked in the field of
paediatrics since 1996. She has worked in the hospital, community and education sectors, both public and private.
As a member of the Neuromuscular Team in the Children’s Neuroscience Centre at The Royal Children’s Hospital,
Melbourne, she is primarily involved in research in the area of neuromuscular disorders in children and adolescents.
Our team is involved in international studies through the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group
(CINRG) and in conjunction with pharmaceutical companies. We also have a number of in-house research projects
currently in progress.
Rachel is a member of the APA and National Paediatric Group, the Australian Neuromuscular Network (ANN) and a
research associate with the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.
Angela Khera
Angela has over 20 years experience as a physiotherapist treating men & women with pelvic floor dysfunction. She
has developed a special interest in the assessment and management of chronic bowel dysfunction, in particular
constipation & defaecation disorders. Her current clinical position is as senior clinician, Caulfield Continence
Service, Victoria.
Over the last four years Angela has also worked in private practice with Professor Michael Kamm, one of the world’s
leading gastroenterologists, renowned for his work in both functional gut disorders and inflammatory bowel disease.
This has provided Angela with a unique opportunity to assess and manage a wide range of complex gut disorders
and to also participate in weekly Gastro-Psychological Medicine multidisciplinary team meetings.
Angela is an invited lecturer at the University of Melbourne (School of Physiotherapy) for the postgraduate
Continence & Pelvic Floor Rehabilitation course and is a member of the Australian Physiotherapy Association,
Continence & Women’s Health Group and the Continence Foundation of Australia, Physiotherapy Group.
113
Rob Laird
Rob Laird is a specialist musculoskeletal physiotherapist, qualifying as a Fellow of the Australian College of
Physiotherapy in 2008. He has post graduate qualifications in both musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy
(1986, 1997).
Rob specializes in the management of lumbo-pelvic pain, working as a consultant specialist physiotherapist in private
practice, and in an advanced practitioner role at the Austin Hospital, Melbourne,(neurosurgery and physiotherapy
outpatient clinics). He is completing a PhD degree (Monash University), in developing assessment, diagnostic and
treatment methods using motion sensor technology to measure and modify movement patterns that are associated
with low back pain.
He also lectures on lumbar spine management, motor control and clinical relevance of spinal imaging to Master degree
physiotherapy students at LaTrobe University, and Australian Physiotherapy Association post graduate spinal courses
in Victoria.
Dr Andrew Leaver
Andrew is lecturer in the Discipline of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney. Andrew’s research is centred around
the prevention and management of disability that is associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain. This research has a
particular focus on neck pain, and Andrew’s investigations into the relative efficacy of cervical spine manipulation and
mobilisation has ignited debate about benefits and risks of neck manipulation.
Andrew’s clinical work is in the field of chronic pain management as consultant physiotherapist to a multidisciplinary
pain clinic. Andrew is an Independent Physiotherapy Consultant appointed by WorkCover NSW and a Medical Assessor
for the NSW Motor Accidents Authority.
Candice Liddy
I am an Indigenous woman and a descendant of the Maranunngu (Daly River) people. My Grandparents are from the
stolen generation and gained little education. I am proud to represent them by completing my tertiary studies and
graduating as a Physiotherapist from the University of Melbourne.
I am a born and bred Darwin girl, I completed my schooling in Darwin. After finishing year 12 in 2008, I was accepted
to study a Bachelor of Physiotherapy at Melbourne University in 2009. Whilst completing my degree I was able to
maintain a balanced life by playing hockey for Melbourne University, Trinity College, Melbourne Cricket club, and
also representing the Northern Territory at National competitions. I completed my degree in 2012 and have recently
returned home to Darwin. I am currently employed as a Physiotherapist at the Royal Darwin Hospital.
I strongly believe that education is the key to a successful life. I would like to see more Indigenous students move
forward to undergraduate study, especially in the health field, where we can make a difference and help to bridge the
gap in Indigenous disadvantage and contribute to a better future for Indigenous people.
Dr Jennifer Long
Jennifer Long is an optometrist and a Certified Professional Ergonomist (CPE). For the past seven years she has been
self-employed as a visual ergonomics consultant and has provided visual ergonomics advice to a range of industries
including offices, retail, manufacturing and transport.
Jennifer maintains her clinical optometry skills by working in a rural optometry practice. In 2012 Jennifer was appointed
the Chairperson of the International Ergonomics Association Technical Committee for Visual Ergonomics. She is
also a Visiting Fellow at the School of Optometry and Vision Science, UNSW, where she teaches Colour Vision and
Environmental Optometry to undergraduate optometry students.
Dr Julie Luker
Julie Luker is a physiotherapist with particular interests and expertise is in the fields of stroke management,
the rehabilitation of older adults and inter-disciplinary models of team based care. Julie completed a Master of
Physiotherapy in 2008 and a PhD in 2012 in which she investigated the implementation of acute stroke clinical
guidelines by allied health staff, and the factors that influence the quality of care patients receive.
Julie is actively involved in stroke service planning, clinical guideline development and implementation at national and
state levels. In 2013 she commenced a four year NHMRC post-doctoral Australian Research Fellowship with the Florey
Institute of Neurosciences in Melbourne in conjunction with the University of SA.
114
Dr David MacDonald
David MacDonald was awarded his PhD from the University of Queensland in 2011 where he is currently a Lecturer
in the Division of Physiotherapy. He has been a musculoskeletal physiotherapist since 1994 with a special interest in
helping people manage chronic low back pain.
He became a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Manipulative Physiotherapy in 2001. David’s doctoral research aimed
to improve our understanding of why some people continue to hurt their back while others do not. The current theme
of his research could be summed up best by this Mark Twain quote “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into
trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”
He is currently investigating the integrity of commonly held beliefs in lifting instruction and the assessment of
patients with lateral epicondylalgia. He is a communications consultant, panpacific jiu jitsu champion, and he enjoys
making beer, soap and ice cream. His order of preference depends on the type of day he has had.
Dr Wendy Macdonald
Dr Wendy Macdonald is an Adjunct Professor at La Trobe University’s Centre for Ergonomics and Human Factors,
and is Director of the Centre’s work for the World Health Organisation network of Collaborating Centres in
Occupational Health.
Internationally, she coordinates WHO network activities related to the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal
disorders, and as Co-Chair of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA) Technical Committee on Musculoskeletal
Disorders (MSDs) she is responsible on behalf of the IEA for developing an MSDs risk management toolkit for routine
workplace use, following WHO specifications.
She was recently awarded a Fellowship of the International Ergonomics Association, and is also a Fellow of the Safety
Institute of Australia and the Ergonomics Society of Australia.
Dr Martin Mackey
Dr Martin Mackey is a senior lecturer and researcher in the Discipline of Physiotherapy and member of the Ageing,
Work and Health Research Unit at The University of Sydney. Martin is Course Director of the undergraduate
physiotherapy program, with special responsible for the occupational health curriculum. His doctoral research
completed in 2005, evaluated ergonomic and exercise approaches for optimising performance of repetitive manual
work. His current research interests are focussed on injury prevention, work ability and promotion of worker wellness
in an ageing sedentary workforce.
Martin has presented his research findings as an invited speaker at numerous local and international scientific
conferences and was convenor of the Occupational Health Physiotherapy Australia Conference in 2009. Martin has
over 25 peer reviewed publications and book chapters and has received over $A880,000 in research funding. He is a
past chair of Occupational Health Physiotherapy Australia (NSW Chapter).
Marianne McCormick
Marianne McCormick, BApp Sc. Physiotherapy, is currently the Senior Physiotherapist for the Pain and Palliative Care
unit at the Sydney Children’s Hospital Network, Randwick.
She graduated from the University of Sydney in 1991 and has extensive clinical experience in paediatric
physiotherapy in both tertiary hospital settings, and in rural hospital and community settings in New South Wales
and in the United Kingdom.
Her current role as a member of the multidisciplinary pain team is in the clinical assessment, treatment and
management of children with chronic pain disorders and clinical research into the best practice model of
management for this population.
She is also currently a Conjoint Associate Lecturer in the school of Women’s and Children’s Health at the University
of New South Wales. Completed an NHMRC TRIP (evidence-translation) Fellowship, focused on improving uptake
of preoperative pelvic floor muscle training by men undergoing radical prostatectomy.
Brooke Marsh
Brooke is a Titled Animal Physiotherapist who graduated from University of Qld with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy
in 1997 and a Masters in Animal Studies (Physiotherapy) in 2005.
As a human physiotherapist she worked in private practice combining her skills in pilates and acupuncture. She
now works in a small animal specialist centre on the Sunshine Coast Qld where she rehabilitates a wide variety of
acute and chronic conditions and enjoys providing holistic management to each of her clients.
As the Chair of the Animal Physiotherapy Group of the APA she is highly motivated member of her field and
presents at courses around Australia.
115
Leigh McCutcheon
Ms Leigh McCutcheon graduated from Sydney University and has been in practice since 1991. Leigh is the senior
partner of the Combined Health practice group and is the principal physiotherapist of the Robina Physiotherapy Clinic
on the Gold Coast. In 1999 Leigh completed a Graduate Certificate in Orthopaedic Manipulative Therapy and then
went onto complete a Master of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy (first class honours) and a Post Graduate Diploma in
Western Acupuncture.
Leigh lecturers on acupuncture and dry needling courses nationally and internationally and sessionally lectures
at Griffith University and Bond University. She completed her PHCRED research fellowship at Griffith University in
2012. Leigh is presently the Queensland representative member for the Australian Physiotherapy Association’s
Acupuncture and Dry Needling Group. She is a delegate on the APA Guild Risk Management Committee and was on the
panel of physiotherapists that developed the Australian Society of Acupuncture Physiotherapist’s Acupuncture and
Dry Needling Safety Guidelines.
Renae McNamara
Renae McNamara is a senior respiratory physiotherapist and clinical specialist in pulmonary rehabilitation at the Prince
of Wales Hospital, Sydney. Renae balances her clinical work with lecturing and presenting courses to physiotherapists
and allied health professionals in Australia.
She is currently completing her PhD through the University of Sydney investigating the effectiveness of waterbased exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with physical co-morbidities. Renae
has won national and international awards and has been awarded numerous research grants and scholarships
for this innovative work. Current research projects Renae is involved in include defining the smallest worthwhile
effect of water-based exercise in people with COPD; examining physical activity in people with COPD with physical
comorbidities; and investigating telerehabilitation as an alternative to traditional pulmonary rehabilitation.
Pat Maher
Pat Maher has worked as a clinician in acute care, rehabilitation and rural settings; he has policy, service purchasing
and management experience in acute care, community health services and disability services; and has worked as a
senior manager of health and community services multidisciplinary work units. He has experience in leading national
health workforce reform projects in a variety of workforce areas.
Pat has a Bachelor of Science (Honours), Bachelor of Physiotherapy, Master of Physiotherapy (Rural and Remote
Health), and a Graduate Diploma of Public Sector Executive Management. He has served on a variety of health related
bodies including the NT Physiotherapy Registration Board, the Australian Physiotherapy Council, NT Ministerial Health
Advisory Council and the NT Health and Community Services Complaints Commission Review Committee.
Pat has published in the area of Aboriginal health. He is currently a Program Manager, Workforce Innovation & Reform
at Health Workforce Australia.
Professor Hylton Menz
Professor Hylton Menz is a podiatrist who graduated with first class Honours and the University Medal from La Trobe
University in 1993, and completed his PhD focusing on gait patterns, balance and falls at the University of NSW in
2002. He is currently a National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Fellow, and Leader of the Lower
Extremity and Gait Studies Program at La Trobe University.
Professor Menz’s broad research disciplines are human movement, rehabilitation and rheumatology, with a particular
focus on musculoskeletal foot problems in older people. His research extends from laboratory-based biomechanical
studies through to analysis of epidemiological datasets and the conduct of clinical trials.
Professor Menz has published over 170 papers in podiatry, gerontology, rheumatology and biomechanics journals, and
he is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Foot and Ankle Research. He has won several awards for his research, including the
Young Tall Poppy Award by the Australian Institute for Policy and Science, the La Trobe University Excellence in Research
Award, first prize in the British Medical Association Book Awards for his textbook Foot Problems in Older People:
Assessment and Management, and a Fulbright Senior Scholarship to Harvard University.
116
Steve Milanese
Steve Milanese, B.App.Sc (Physiotherapy), Grad.Cert (Sports Physio), Grad.Dip. (Ergonomics), M.App.Sc. (Manipulative
Physio), PhD, is a lecturer in the School of Health Science, University of South Australia. He currently teaches in the
areas of biomechanics, evidence based practice, and the use of electrophysical agents.
He has worked clinically in Australia and overseas, and as an academic in University of South Australia and James Cook
University, Townsville. He coordinated pain management services in St Marys Hospital, West London, and worked in
rural and city practices and coordinated on-site injury management clinics in industry in Australia.
Steve has published over 50 peer reviewed papers, 8 book chapters and presented at 15 national and international
conferences in a range of topics from adolescent ergonomics, evidence based practice, manual handling, use of
electrophysical agents and clinical education. His current research focuses include learning styles and the clinical
education experience, manual handling training of undergraduate students and sports injury epidemiology in
Australian Rules football and netball.
Michelle Monk
Michelle has worked full time as a small animal physiotherapist in Melbourne for over 10 years. She graduated from
the University of Queensland with a Master of Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) in 2004. Her business – Dogs In
Motion Canine Rehabilitation provides physiotherapy and underwater treadmill services across three specialist clinics
in Melbourne.
She has a special interest in the application of custom orthotics and prosthetics for animals and has been the
Australian distributor for OrthoPets for over 3 years, fitting over 150 devices to her patients.
Professor Meg Morris
Professor Meg Morris is a world leader in research and clinical practice pertaining to physiotherapy, therapy outcome
measures and technologies for older people, especially those living with neurological conditions such as parkinson’s
disease, stroke, TBI and dystonia. She will lead CRE research related to how smart technologies can re–enable frail
older Australians to live safely and well at home and in the community. She has particular expertise in how smart
technologies can re-enable frail older Australians to live safely and well at home and in the community. She also
leads research and clinical practice on physiotherapy for people with Parkinson’s disease, falls prevention, gait
rehabilitation, physical activity and health related quality of life.
Professor Morris has more than 200 publications and $12 million+ research grants to date and she has supervised
more than 30 research higher degree students. She has successfully led several large research groups and major
trials and is expert in the translation of science into evidence based practice.
David Munro
David Munro is a private practitioner and Head of Physiotherapy and Health Care at the National Institute of Circus
Arts (NICA). NICA is Australia’s only full-time Circus Training facility, attracting students not only from all over
Australia, but also internationally. David has been involved at NICA since its inception in 2001.
In 2004 David was awarded a prestigious Churchill Fellowship to study the role of physiotherapy in circus
arts travelling to the USA, Canada and China. During the Fellowship he spent time with Cirque du Soleil and
various international circus organisations. With very little published data regarding circus arts, the research
being conducted at NICA represents some the world’s first evidence for the incidence, cause and treatment of
circus injuries.
Kate Murray
Kate Murray graduated as a physiotherapist 25 years ago but has been specialising in the treatment of dizziness
and vertigo for the past 17 years. She completed a PhD in the area of vestibular rehabilitation at the University of
Melbourne in 2005 and has spent some time working in the UK with experts in this field.
In 2006 she established Dizzy Day Clinics, which is private physiotherapy practice that specialises in the
assessment and management of people with a range of vestibular disorders. She runs regular training courses for
physiotherapists with an interest in this area and works closely with medical specialists at the Royal Victorian Eye
and Ear Hospital.
117
Dr Kirsten Neil
Dr Kirsten Neil graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1996. Kirsten is a specialist in equine medicine and
FEI veterinarian. Over the past 17 years Kirsten has worked in equine hospitals in Victoria, at the Scone Veterinary
Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit, at Massey University in New Zealand and completed her specialist residency
training at Michigan State University in the United States. Whilst at Michigan State, Kirsten also completed a Masters
degree on the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate for equine osteoarthritis.
Kirsten has been an FEI veterinarian for over 70 eventing, showjumping, and dressage competitions, and has been a
treating and private veterinarian at numerous events including at the Sydney Olympics, Badminton and Rolex Three
Day Events. In 2008 Kirsten decided to concentrate on her particular interest in performance horses and started
Sporthorse Veterinary Specialists, a practice dedicated to sport and pleasure horses. Kirsten provides second opinion,
medical and referral consultations for other veterinarians, and concentrates on problems in sporthorses, in particular
lameness and poor performance.
Kirsten has a special interest in musculoskeletal ultrasonography and regularly attends conferences overseas
dedicated to advanced diagnosis and care of the equine athlete, and instructs veterinarians at conferences in
Australia in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.
In 2012 Kirsten obtained an advanced qualification in equine lameness, biomechanics and imaging by becoming
a certified member of the International Society of Equine Locomotor Pathology (ISELP), and is currently the only
veterinarian in Australia to have obtained this qualification. Kirsten is also planning on taking examinations in 2013
to become a specialist in equine sports medicine and rehabilitation with the American College of Veterinary Sports
Medicine and Rehabilitation. Kirsten was recently appointed as one of the Australian Equestrian Team Veterinarians.
Patricia Neumann
Patricia Neumann is a Specialist Continence & Women’s Health Physiotherapist with a private practice in Adelaide,
dedicated to the management of pelvic floor dysfunction in men and women. Her practice is part of a newly
formed multidisciplinary pelvic pain collaboration, providing integrated services for persistent pelvic pain suffers.
She completed her PhD at the University of South Australia where she has an ongoing association as an academic
researcher with the International Centre for Allied Health Evidence (iCAHE).
Her interests lie in extending the scope of C&WH physiotherapy clinical practice and the evidence-based management
options available to patients with pelvic floor dysfunction, in particular those with pelvic pain, pelvic organ prolapse
and post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence.
Jane Orton
Jane Orton is a Physiotherapist who is currently completing her Clinical Doctorate in Physiotherapy. She has worked
in the area of paediatrics and early development for 25 years in both the hospital and community setting. She has
participated in the VIBeS Plus research project involving early intervention for preterm infants and is an author of a
Cochrane systematic review on intervention programs for preterm infants.
She currently works as a clinical specialist at the Royal Women’s Hospital in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the
Newborn Follow-Up Clinic for high-risk infants.
Dr Peter O’Sullivan
Peter as the Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy at Curtin University, West Australia and is a Specialist
Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist at bodylogicphysiotherapy.com
Peter and his team conduct clinical research investigating the development, classification and targeted management
of persistent pain disorders. He has developed an innovative management approach called ‘classification based –
cognitive functional therapy’.
He has published over 120 papers with his team in international peer review journals, has been an invited speaker
at more than 70 National and International conferences and has run clinical workshops in over 22 countries. Peter’s
passion is translating research into practice (see: www.pain-ed.com).
Dr Jennifer Paratz
Jennifer is a fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapy specialising in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy. She also
has a Masters in research and PhD, investigating intracranial dynamics in head injured adults and pre term neonates.
118
Jennifer has worked in a number of states and is currently chair of the Burns, Trauma & Critical Care Research Centre
at Royal Brisbane Hospital, Australia. She was previously director of a cardiopulmonary research centre at Alfred
Hospital/La Trobe University, Melbourne and has a large amount of experience in clinical work, research and teaching
at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.
She is frequently invited to speak at conferences nationally and internationally, published extensively and has
contributed to many textbooks. Research interests include haemodynamics in intensive care, early rehabilitation in
intensive care, myocardial function and sepsis in severe burns and exercise in disease states. Kathleen Philip
Kathleen was appointed to the newly created role of Chief Allied Health Advisor of Victoria in 2013. She continues
in her role as the Manager, Workforce Innovation and Allied Health team in the Health Workforce Unit of the
Department of Health Victoria, a position she has held since 2008. Kathleen graduated as a physiotherapist in 1979
and worked as a musculoskeletal physiotherapist in a variety of settings, becoming a specialist and Fellow of the
College of Physiotherapy in 2007. Having also completed qualifications in Public Health Health Economics and Health
Policy in 2005, she joined the department in 2007. She is responsible for Victoria’s new health workforce reform
implementation agenda (2012-16) as well as providing leadership and strategic direction to Victoria’s allied health
workforce. Prior to joining the department she was involved in the establishing new service models and advanced
practice physiotherapy roles in orthopedics, neurosurgery and Emergency.
Tania Pizzari
Tania Pizzari is a part-time Lecturer in the School of Physiotherapy at La Trobe University. She graduated from La
Trobe University with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy(Hons) in 1997 and with a PhD in 2002.
Her research interests include rehabilitation for shoulder instability, EMG of the shoulder, groin pain and hamstring
injuries in football, and hip muscle structure and function.
She works part-time in her own private practice as a physiotherapist, presents lectures on knee, hamstring
and shoulder management for the Australian Physiotherapy Association and consults to the Victorian worker’s
compensation association.
Martin Rabey
Martin Rabey is a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist. He has worked as an Extended Scope Practitioner
in a London teaching hospital, and more recently in the Spinal Surgery screening clinic at Royal Perth Hospital. He
has lectured in the UK and Europe on neck pain, headache, and knee pain. He is currently lecturing in anatomy and
pathology at Curtin University, where he is undertaking his doctoral degree on chronic low back pain. Martin currently
practices at Body Logic Physiotherapy in Perth.
Bruce Rawson
Bruce Rawson is a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapy and has 24 years clinical experience that
includes working as a physiotherapist in private practice along with working as Team Physiotherapist for many
Professional, State Representative and Australian National teams including the Australian Olympic Team (2004) and
also as Head of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation for the Gold Coast Titans Rugby League Team in the NRL (20062009).
In 2004 Bruce traveled to Athens as Physiotherapist for the Australian Olympic Baseball team, 2004 Olympic
Silver Medalists, where Bruce was responsible for maximizing performance and recovery as well as acting as team
physiotherapist.
Bruce’s experiences in sport combined with a degree and extensive background in exercise science have assisted
him to develop significant expertise in the development of High Performance Sports Programs. Bruce continues
with Australian Baseball as National Sports Medicine and Athlete Performance Manager as well as also consulting
to the Australian Weightlifting Federation.
Bruce has also been involved in the delivery of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Physiotherapy and
Undergraduate Exercise Science degree programs at both Griffith University and Bond University on the Gold
Coast. Bruce currently consults privately as a Specialist Sports Physiotherapist at Pindara Physiotherapy and
Sports Medicine on the Gold Coast. Bruce also consults as a Clinical Leader in the Neurosurgical Screening Clinic
and Orthopaedic Physiotherapy Screening Clinic at Gold Coast Hospital, Qld.
Julie Redfern
Julie Redfern is a Senior Research Fellow in the Cardiovascular Division at The George Institute for
International Health, a Clinical Senior Lecturer with the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Sydney and a
Clinician Physiotherapist.
She is currently the Allied Health representative on the Board of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand
and holds a NHMRC Postdoctoral Health Professional Fellowship that is co-funded by the National Heart Foundation.
Julie is a leading Australian allied health professional working in the area of cardiovascular disease prevention
and has won numerous rewards for her work including being a a NSW Tall Poppy. 119
Professor May Arna Risberg
May Arna Risberg is a Professor in Sport Physical Therapy at the Norwegian School Sport Sciences and Department
of Orthopedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital and Chair of the Norwegian research center for Active Rehabilitation
(NAR). She has an extensive international collaboration and holds an Adjunct Clinical Professor position at the
Department of Physical Therapy, College of Arts & Sciences, University of Delaware, USA.
She also holds a Chair of research position at the largest multidisciplinary, private sport medicine clinic, in Norway
(Nimi), also with a clinical appointment. Her main research area is active rehabilitation within knee injuries and knee
and hip osteoarthritis. She has been the main supervisor of 6 PhD students who have defended their thesis, and is
currently the main supervisor of 6 PhD students, and has published more than 70 original research articles, systematic
reviews, and book chapters.
Professor Darren Rivett
Professor Rivett is the Head of the School of Health Sciences and Foundation Professor of Physiotherapy at The
University of Newcastle, Australia. He has been a recognised manipulative physiotherapist since 1986, and convened
post-professional programs in manipulative physiotherapy at the University of Sydney and the University of Otago in
New Zealand.
Professor Rivett is the immediate-past Chairman of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Australia and has served on
national and international professional standards bodies in the field of manipulative physiotherapy, including for the
International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT).
Professor Rivett is the co-editor of the successful text ‘Clinical Reasoning for Manual Therapists’ and co-author of the
new text ‘Mobilisation with Movement: The Art and the Science’. His main research interests are the benefits and risks
of manual therapy in the cervical spine and clinical reasoning in musculoskeletal physiotherapy, areas in which he has
published extensively and is regularly invited to present internationally.
Professor Rivett is co-author of the IFOMPT ‘International Framework for Examination of the Cervical Region for
potential of Cervical Arterial Dysfunction prior to Orthopaedic Manual Therapy Intervention’. He is presently serving on
the Board of Directors of the Australian Physiotherapy Association and supervising ten research higher degree candidates.
Maureen Robinson
Maureen Robinson is the General Manager, Clinical Governance for Healthdirect Australia. Prior to joining Healthdirect
Australia, Maureen provided an extensive range of consultancy services in healthcare quality and clinical governance in
both New Zealand and Australia. In her role at Healthdirect Australia Maureen is responsible for establishing, directing
and managing our clinical governance research and analysis functions in order to promote and support patient safety and
clinical governance within the company and for contracted services.
The work that Maureen undertakes in her role at Healthdirect builds on her impressive track record of leading
and creating reform in healthcare quality, including the development Australia’s first state based health quality
and clinical governance framework, “The Framework for Managing the Quality of Health Services in NSW’ and the
“Clinician’s Toolkit for Improving Patient Care”. Maureen designed and oversaw the implementation of the NSW Safety
Improvement Program, the NSW Incident Information Management System, established the priorities for quality in the
New Zealand health and disability sector and developed and implemented the New Zealand Incident Management
policy and system.
Hal Robertson
Hal Robertson is a NZ trained physiotherapist who has a diploma in OHS. She works as part of the Workforce Health,
WorkFit Services team and currently manages these services in the Western Suburbs, Breast Screen SA, Adelaide
Dental hospital and New RAH.
Hal is involved as a Work Health and Safety/WorkFit Services consultant for the New RAH project.
She is currently treasurer and a long term member of Australian Association for the Manual handling of People.
Published papers includes practical studies on using slide sheets to move patients and assessing other manual
handling risks for nurses and care workers dating back to 1996.
She has over 20 years’ experience working in health care and industrial settings. Her special interest is obesity and
safe and dignified bariatric consumer management.
She won a SA Health Award in 2011 for her work with bariatric patient management at Royal Adelaide Hospital. She is
now located at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital and was involved in setting up their Bariatric Working Party in August 2012.
120
A/Professor Trevor Russell
Trevor Russell is an Associate Professor in the Division of Physiotherapy within the School of Health and
Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Queensland. He has a PhD in Telerehabilitation and co-directs the
Telerehabilitation Research Unit at the University of Queensland. His primary research focus surrounds the use of
mobile technologies and telecommunication tools for both clinical service provision and teaching and learning in the
rehabilitation sciences. Specifically his research aims to develop innovative computer based hardware and software
solutions to enable the provision of rehabilitation services remotely via the Internet; to further the evidence base
of telerehabilitation through controlled clinical trials of telerehabilitation interventions; to evaluate the treatment
efficacy of specific telerehabilitation interventions; investigate cost-benefit factors of telerehabilitation services; and
develop best practice guidelines for the establishment of telemedicine services in the rehabilitation sciences. He has
an extensive role in the teaching and coordination of the under-graduate, graduate and post-graduate physiotherapy
programs at the University of Queensland including the role of coordinator of the graduate entry Masters of
Physiotherapy Studies program. Dr Matthieu Sailly
Dr Sailly Matthieu is a French sport physician with a specific interest in MSK ultrasound. He is graduated from Grenoble
University. In his first position, he shared his time between a professional rugby team and a sport academy.
He moved then to Doha, Qatar for several years to become chief of Aspire Academy medical centre. He had thus
opportunity to work with highly trained adolescent athletes and shared knowledge with a multi-cultural medical
staff. He developed his experience on growth related injuries or sport issues on immature athletes in various sports:
football, athletics and squash. He took part on long term development athlete strategies.
He is currently working back to the South West part of France at Pau in a sport medical centre developing PRGF use in
sport injuries. He is also looking after a professional basketball team. He published several papers on apophysitis and
MSK ultrasound. He is a former triathlete and swimmer.
Professor Susan Sawyer
Professor Susan Sawyer holds the inaugural Chair of Adolescent Health at the University of Melbourne and is the
Director of the Centre for Adolescent Health at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Australia’s leading academic centre
of excellence in adolescent health. A paediatrician by training, Professor Sawyer has helped establish the field of
Adolescent Health and Medicine in Australia and within our region.
With over 250 publications and 25 book chapters, her clinical and research interests focus on models of ‘adolescent
friendly’ health care, especially for young people with chronic health conditions.
She is an advisor to the World Health Organisation, UNICEF and the World Bank on adolescent health, is the VicePresident of the International Association of Adolescent Health, and was recently inducted into the Victorian
Women’s Honour Roll for her contributions to the Victorian community. Dr Siobhan Schabrun
Dr Siobhan Schabrun is a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Clinical Research Fellow at The
University of Queensland, Australia. She studied Physiotherapy at The University of South Australia and completed
a PhD in Neuroscience at The University of Adelaide.
Her research focuses on cortical plasticity in musculoskeletal and neurological conditions. Using powerful
non–invasive brain stimulation techniques, Siobhan investigates how cortical plasticity might contribute to the
development of chronic pain and tests new therapies with the potential to drive beneficial plasticity in a range
of conditions.
In 2011 she received a Queensland Young Tall Poppy Scientist of the Year Award for outstanding achievement in
science and science communication.
Professor Nora Shields
Nora Shields is Professor of Clinical and Community Practice in the School of Allied Health at La Trobe University, a
conjoint position with Northern Health. She is a member of the Physical Activity in Rehabilitation research group
based at the Faculty of Health Sciences.
She is recognized for her research on engaging people with disability in physical activity and exercise. She has
received a number of research awards including the Community Research Prize from the Australasian Academy
of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine. She is a director on the board of Disability Sport and Recreation,
the peak organisation for the disability sport and recreation sector in Victoria. 121
Anthony Schneider
Tony lives in in Benalla with his wife and is involved in several community groups. Tony’s recreational interests include
alpine skiing, cycling (officially a MAMIL) and more recently fly-fishing and flying.
Even when unsolicited (and particularly over a bottle of red), Tony will share his opinions about the state of
the physiotherapy profession and where it should be heading. He thinks that physiotherapy is and will become
increasingly important in providing effective and affordable services that keep the community healthy. He doesn’t
think that physiotherapists need to be price-takers or get involved in grubby deals with insurance companies.
James Simcock
James graduated from the University of Melbourne with honours in 2005. Following graduation he worked for 12
months in a busy small animal general practice. He has completed two, twelve month internships in both Small Animal
Oncology and Small Animal Surgery along with a three year American College of Veterinary Surgeons residency
program at Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals.
In 2010 James achieved membership to the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists Internal Medicine Chapter.
In 2013 he became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons by passing the certification
examinations on his first attempt. This makes James one of the first Australian trained small animal surgeons to pass
this examination.
James has published on gastrointestinal and urogenital surgery and oncology and has presented a number of times
at the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists, Science Week. James is an internship director and surgical residency
advisor for the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. He is also an instructor for veterinary post graduate
education courses in surgery.
James is particularly interested in orthopaedic and neurologic surgery. He is staff surgeon and a Co-Director of
Southpaws Specialty Surgery for Animals.
Professor Barby Singer
Prof Barbara Singer is a physiotherapist with 25 years of clinical experience in a variety of neurological settings
including acute and rehabilitation neurology and neurosurgery services. She currently co-ordinates postgraduate
programmes for physiotherapists with an interest in neurological rehabilitation at the University of Western Australia.
She was awarded Fellowship by Original Contribution of the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2011.
During her time as the NNG representative on the National Advisory Council, she contributed to the APA’s position
statement on Physiotherapy for people with disability and has been a strong advocate for the National Disability
Insurance Scheme since the inception of the campaign – Every Australian Counts – in 2009.
Dr Alicia Spittle
Alicia is a paediatric physiotherapist who has a special interest in neonates and the development of preterm infants
in early infancy. Alicia is a researcher with the Victorian Infant Brain Studies (VIBeS) team at the Murdoch Childrens
Research Institute, works clinically in the neonatal intensive and special care nurseries at the Royal Women’s Hospital
in Melbourne and lectures at the University of Melbourne.
Alicia recently received a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship to continue
her research on improving outcomes of children born preterm. She has received over $1.5 million in research funding
and is currently a chief investigator on two NHMRC project grants investigating outcomes of children born preterm.
In 2012 she received the Anne McCoy award from the Victorian Branch of the APA in recognition of her services to
paediatric physiotherapy.
Ryan Stafford
Ryan Stafford is a PhD candidate within the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of
Queensland and is supervised by Prof Paul Hodges (University of Queensland) and Prof James Ashton-Miller
(University of Michigan, USA). Prior to enrolling in PhD studies he completed his undergraduate degree in Kinesiology
at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
His research involves development and implementation of novel techniques to investigate how the structures
within the male pelvic floor coordinate and control urinary continence. Using these novel methods, he has been
able to provide new insight into the dynamics of “normal” pelvic floor function and aims to investigate how these
observations relate to dysfunction.
Through this research he has won an international award for innovation and multiple awards for communication.
122
Charlotte Steed
Charlotte Steed graduated with a BSc Hons in Physiotherapy in 1994 in England. She migrated to Australia in 1999,
and graduated with a Masters in Animal Studies (Animal Physiotherapy) in 2005. She works part time for the public
sector in Harvey, WA. She also runs her own private animal physiotherapy practice, Topline Physiotherapy and
manages Fat 2 Fit Pets, an online self management program for pets and their owners.
Charlotte lives with her husband, 2 children and various animals on 5 acres at her home in Gelorup WA.
Professor Michele Sterling
Michele Sterling is Professor in the School of Medicine and Associate Director of the Centre of National Research
on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD), The University of Qld. She holds a NHMRC Senior Research
Fellowship and is a Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist and a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists.
Michele leads the Rehabilitation (Medicine and Allied Health) program at CONROD.
Her research focuses are 1) the biological and psychological factors underlying chronic pain development following
minor injury, particularly whiplash associated disorders 2) the prediction of outcome following whiplash injury 3)
improving the timing and nature of interventions for musculoskeletal injury and pain and 4) translation of research
findings to clinical practice.
Michele has received over $13M in competitive research funding and has published over 100 papers and two books in
the areas of whiplash and musculoskeletal pain. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Physiotherapy
and Associate Editor of the European Journal of Physiotherapy. Michele is Chair of the Scientific Committee of the
Australian Pain Society and has been a member of the Scientific Committee of the International Association for the
Study of Pain. Annie Strauch
Annie Strauch (B. Phty(Hons), M. Phty(Musc), M. Phty(Sports)) is an APA titled Sports and Musculoskeletal
Physiotherapist holding a Masters in both Sports Physiotherapy and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy. She has
extensive experience in the dance, theatre and musical theatre industries and is the Australian pioneer of vocal
unloading; physiotherapy treatment of the performance voice and dysfunctional voice.
Annie’s passion for physiotherapy in performance and the performance voice developed on London’s West End
where she managed performers in over 30 productions. Annie is currently the director of Performance Medicine,
a Melbourne based dance and performance physiotherapy practice. As well as managing the physical health of
performers, she consults in sustainable direction and choreography for musical theatre productions and is the
resident physiotherapist for the Melbourne Theatre Company.
Annie’s vocal unloading treatment aims to act as a neuromuscular cycle breaker to enhance the performance voice
and to alleviate the pathological voice. She works in a multidisciplinary team in conjunction with ENT specialists,
speech pathologists and vocal coaches.
She has presented her vocal unloading work nationally at Speech Pathology, ENT and voice teacher conferences,
and in 2013 she will be presenting internationally at the Voice Foundation (USA) and the International Congress of
Voice Teachers.
Alyssa Tait
Alyssa Tait is passionate about helping women achieve optimal health. She has undergone specialised
postgraduate training in pelvic floor dysfunction, and has a special interest in irritable bowel syndrome and all
types of chronic pelvic pain, particularly vulvodynia.
Alyssa worked for several years in the public health system in women’s health and was part of the project team
that produced the clinical practice guidelines First and Second Steps in the Management of Urinary Incontinence
in Older Community Dwelling People. She has also completed postgraduate qualifications in nutrition medicine,
Western herbal medicine and naturopathy, and is an Accredited Teacher of the Billings Ovulation Method.
Believing that the world of orthodox medicine and natural therapies are complementary, Alyssa founded
Equilibria Physiotherapy & Nutrition, which uniquely bridges the gap between the two worlds. While working
within a strong science-based framework, Alyssa incorporates the best of natural medicine into her work.
123
Morag Taylor
Morag graduated from the University of Sydney in 1999 as a physiotherapist and has worked at the Prince of Wales
Hospital in Aged Care Rehabilitation for 11 years. Morag has also been working part-time as a research physiotherapist
examining falls in older people since 2005. More recently she has undertaken her PhD part-time investigating fall risk
in cognitively impaired older people.
The specific risk factors examined include demographic characteristics, medical history and medication use, as well as
gait, neuropsychological, physiological and functional factors. To date she has five published manuscripts in this area
and has presented her work nationally and internationally.
Michelle Telfer
Michelle Telfer is the Clinical Lead of Adolescent Medicine at The Centre for Adolescent Health, Royal Children’s
Hospital in Melbourne. As well as managing adolescents with general medical problems she works in the subspecialist
areas of eating disorders and gender identity dysphoria. She has a keen interest in teaching medical students and
junior medical staff about effective communication and engagement with adolescent patients within the clinical
setting to maximise patient care. Prior to studying medicine Michelle was an elite gymnast with the Australian Artistic
Gymnastics team, winning silver and bronze medals at the 1990 Commonwealth Games in Auckland and competing in
the Barcelona Olympic Games in 1992. Pippa Tessman
Pippa Tessmann, APA Sports Physiotherapist graduated as a Chartered Physiotherapist from the University of
London, in 1983. She worked for 6 years in London before travelling to Australia & settling in the Red Centre. Alice
Springs Physiotherapy and Sports Injury Clinic was established in September 1994, by Pippa.
The Clinic has been accredited since 1996. The clinic is highly respected in the local community and this has been
enhanced by Pippa being named the NT Telstra Westpac Business Woman of the year in 2006 & in 2007 the Clinic
won the NT Telstra Australian Government Micro-Business Award.
Pippa was appointed as a professional member to the Physiotherapy Board of Australia in 2009 & in 2012 as the
Deputy Chair. Pippa was appointed to the NT Physiotherapists Registration Board in 2002, and as Chair in 2006. Pippa
was a Director of the Australian Physiotherapy Council, 2007-2009.
Highlights of Pippa’s career as an APA Sports physiotherapist have included working with NT teams, Masters athletes &
International athletes at the Arafura Games and the 2006 Commonwealth Games.
Dr Geoff Thompson
Dr Thompson was born in South Australia in 1945, and completed his medical degree at Adelaide University Medical
School, Royal Adelaide, and Queen Elizabeth Hospitals, graduating with distinction in 1969.
Dr Thompson completed a diploma of aviation medicine while working as a flight surgeon at RAAF bases East Sale
and Darwin. He was responsible for leading, and coordinating the “stretcher case” evacuation of Darwin after Cyclone
Tracey struck that city on Dec 24, 1974.
Dr Thompson entered private General Practice in 1975, including clinics to remote Arnhemland, and, as a qualified
professional pilot, using his own light aircraft.
In 1978 he completed a Diploma in Child Health at Gt Ormond St Hospital, London, completed a training programme in
Sports medicine at the Cooper clinic, Dallas, Texas.
In 1980 he spent a year as Medical Director of RFDS, WA, and following further study, obtained his Fellowship of the
Australasian College of Sports Physicians in 1990
He continues in private specialist Sport and Exercise Medicine at Territory Sportsmedicine in Darwin and Alice Springs,
working in close collaberation with Sports Physiotherapists.
From 1986, Dr Thompson has been the Medical Director for the Alice Springs Masters Games ,held alternate years,
caring for over 35,000 Masters Athletes in that time.
He has also been the Medical Director for the Arafura Games, held in Darwin, on alternate years.
Dr Thompson was a Sports Physician at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Team Doctor for the Australian men’s
hockey team. And since the Beijing Olympics, has been the Senior Medical Officer for the Australian Paralympic team
in Vancouver, London, and next year, in Sochi, Russia.
Dr Thompson is married to Sandy, has 2 children, 2 delightful grandchildren, is a keen bush walker, very enthusiastic
cyclist, and, with Sandy, and avid adventure traveler.
124
Judith Thompson
Judith qualified as Physiotherapist at Guy’s Hospital London 1980, practising in the area of Continence and Women’s
Health since 1992 Completed post-graduate diploma in continence and women’s health at Curtin University 1994
Completed PhD at Curtin University in 2006 investigating the use of real time ultrasound as a method of assessment
for women with pelvic floor dysfunction Current co-ordinator and lecturer on the post graduate masters program in clinical physiotherapy continence and women’s
health major at Curtin University Currently practising as a specialist continence and women’s health physiotherapist in private practise at Body Logic
Physiotherapy, Shenton Park, Perth WA. Chairperson of the Australian Physiotherapy Association Continence and Women’s Health professional practice standards
committee since 2008 Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists in the area of Continence and Women’s Health in Nov 2009
On the Board of Directors of the Australian College of Physiotherapists
Judith has presented at many national and international conferences, she has seven papers printed in international
peer review journal.
Dr Julia Treleaven
Julia Treleaven is a Lecturer for the Division of Physiotherapy and a Senior Researcher in the Whiplash and Neck Pain
Research Unit at the University of Queensland. She has been researching whiplash and neck pain since 2000 and in
2004 completed her PhD focusing on the necks influence on dizziness, head and eye movement control and postural
stability in whiplash injuries.
Since then she has continued her research in this area. She has published several papers in peer reviewed journals
and has contributed to book chapters and is one of the authors of a recent book entitled Whiplash and Neck Pain. Julia works part-time as a physiotherapist in a private practice and is also the clinic manager and assessor at the
Whiplash Physical Diagnostic Clinic at the University of Queensland. Katrina Varcoe-Cocks
Katrina Varcoe-Cocks is a Titled Animal Physiotherapist. Katrina earned her Bachelor of Physiotherapy (hons) from
Melbourne university (1998) and completed her Masters in Animal Studies at Queensland University (2004).
She works on horses around Victoria ranging from pleasure to international level. She also enjoys working on the
horse and rider in combination.
Katrina now presents courses in Australia and has an interest in developing more objective measures for
physiotherapy assessment and treatment on horses.
Sharon Vladusic
Sharon Vladusic is a Physiotherapist who has worked at the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne for 15 years, and
is currently employed by the Orthopaedic Department. Sharon and her colleague Prue Weigall are responsible for
the physiotherapist-led paediatric orthopaedic assessment clinic (OAC). This involves the management of infants
with developmental dysplasia of the hip and clubfoot; and in the assessment of children with normal postural
variations, scoliosis and simple musculoskeletal conditions. She assisted in the development of Orthopaedic
fact sheets for Royal Children’s Hospital Orthopaedic Department and Victorian Paediatric Orthopaedic Network
(VPON) for parent and health professional education.
Sharon completed her Post Graduate Certificate of Physiotherapy (Paediatrics) in 2005 and the Specialist
Certificate in Paediatric Orthopaedic Physiotherapy (SCiPOP) in 2009. She has previously worked with infants
and children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, spina bifida, and plagiocephaly, and assisted in the development
of the educational poster and brochure – ‘Back to Sleep – Tummy Time To Play’ and ‘How To Protect Your Baby’s
Head Shape’.
Sharon is a co-author in a chapter in the book ‘Spina bifida: management and outcome’ and of several journal
articles on plagiocephaly and obstetric brachial plexus palsy.
125
Andrew Wallis
Andrew is a Sports and Manipulative physiotherapist who graduated from The University of South Australia in 1995.
He went on to complete a Masters in Sports Physiotherapy and Masters in Manipulative Physiotherapy in 1999
and 2000.
Andrew is currently employed as the head physiotherapist at St. Kilda Football Club (from 2007) and works privately
in Melbourne at Malvern Sports Medicine Centre. Prior to his time at St. Kilda he worked at the Melbourne Victory
Football Club from 2005-2007 . Working in the field of elite sport over the last 15 years, which has also included
netball (Thunderbirds), cricket (Redbacks), triathlon and motor racing (DJR), Andrew has developed a special interest in
hip and groin pathology. He is also a lecturer on hip and groin pain on the Masters program at La Trobe University.
The above journey has led to the development of an evidence based assessment and treatment model that is the
subject of further research attempting to validate this model
Phil Walshe
Phil Walshe graduated from Sydney University as a physiotherapist in 1990. He completed his Master of Sports
physiotherapy at Griffith university in 1999 and following this taught in this programme until 2007. In 2007 he
became a founding member of Bond University’s DPT clinical faculty and continues in this role today.
Phil has been the owner operator of Byron Bay Physiotherapy for over fifteen years and has treated thousands
of surfers from recreational level to WCT competitors. He was a member of Surfing Australia”s inaugural Science
Advisory Board and is a consultant to Red Bull Internationals High Performance Sports Program.
Phil is a qualified Olympic weightlifting coach and has worked improving high performance programmes for WCT, WQS
surfers, athletes from the NRL and ARU and paralympic medallists. Lyn Watson
Lyn Watson is a clinical Manipulative and Sports Physiotherapist who has been working exclusively in the diagnosis,
assessment and rehabilitation of shoulder injuries for the past 25 years. She is the Clinical Shoulder Physiotherapy
Specialist at LifeCare, Prahran Sports Medicine Centre and Melbourne Orthopaedic Group.
Lyn has been conducting clinically relevant, published research since 1996. She has published her research on Taping
Techniques, Frozen Shoulder, Hydrodilatation, Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, Glenohumeral Joint Instability, Scapula
Biomechanics and Clinical Outcome Measures in the Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Manual Therapy and
British Journal of Sports Medicine.
She is the specialist shoulder physiotherapy consultant to a variety of national and international teams and individual
athletes. She has been consulting to the Australian Cricket Team since 1994, and working with Australian Olympic Level
Swimmers, Water Polo, Beach Volleyball, Sprint and Slalom Paddlers, Rowers and professional Tennis Players.
Lyn is an internationally renowned lecturer, course presenter and clinician. Over the last 25 years she has developed
a logical and progressive approach to the assessment, diagnosis, rehabilitation and management of the shoulder and
shoulder girdle. She has been teaching this approach in her Shoulder Physiotherapy courses throughout Australia,
Canada, United Kingdom, France, Italy, USA, South Africa and Asia since 1992.
Lisa Westlake
Lisa Westlake is a physiotherapist, fitness instructor, author and a highly regarded national and international
presenter. Through her business, Physical Best, she combines physiotherapy and fitness instruction to provide a
range of effective exercise programs for people of all ages and abilities.
Lisa spreads the word on physiotherapy, health and fitness through numerous publications and her regular health and
fitness segments on ABC radio. She was awarded Australian Fitness Leader of the year in 2000, Australian Fitness
Presenter of the year in 2003 and Australian Fitness Author of the year in 2009. A/Professor Chris Whitton
Chris is Head of the Equine Centre, University of Melbourne and leads equine orthopaedic research at the University
of Melbourne. This involves a multidisciplinary approach using biomechanics, microstructural analysis and
epidemiology. Chris brings a clinical focus to his research due to his role in investigating and treating lame horses as a
specialist equine surgeon within the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
Chris completed a PhD at the University of Sydney in carpal joint disease of racing horses in 1997 before moving to the
Animal Health Trust in Newmarket, England, as a Senior Scientist until 1999. He ran his own referral practice at the
Newcastle Equine Centre from 1999–2004 before returning to an academic position at the University of Melbourne.
126
Current research areas include musculoskeletal and finite element modelling of the equine forelimb and subchondral
bone, microstructural analysis of subchondral bone and the epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries in racehorses.
Kellie Wilkie
Kellie Wilkie is the current Rowing Australia Lead Physiotherapist. She has travelled with Rowing Australia for
the last 6 years as part of a National Team and in 2012 was appointed Olympic Physiotherapist to the Australian
Rowing Team.
Previous to this Kellie travelled extensively with underage and open water National Swimming Teams. Kellie’s main
areas of interest are shoulder injuries and physical performance optimisation for elite rowers.
Kellie is a titled Sports Physiotherapist and is a Principal Physiotherapist and Director of BODYSYSTEM Physio
in Hobart. Kellie is also a past recipient of the Marie Claire, Telstra Young Business Woman Award for the state
of Tasmania. Dr Gavin Williams
Gavin has worked in neurological rehabilitation for over 20 years. He currently combines clinical work at the Epworth
Hospital in Melbourne and clinical research at the University of Melbourne.
Since he began working at the Epworth Hospital 18 years ago, he has developed a program to teach advanced gait
and running skills to people with neurological injuries. This program led to his doctoral studies titled ‘The development
of a high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT) for people with traumatic brain injury’. Since that time he has been
a Post-doctoral Research Fellow focusing on the assessment, classification and treatment of mobility limitations
following traumatic brain injury.
Gavin was awarded Fellowship to the Australian College of Physiotherapists in 2011. He has over 30 peer-reviewed
journal publications and over 50 international and national conference presentations. He was also involved in
the development of a new classification system for Paralympic athletics which was implemented at the London
Paralympics. Gavin currently holds a NHMRC post-doctoral research fellowship.
A/Professor Marie Williams
Associate Professor Marie T Williams (PhD, Grad Cert (Cardioresp Physio), B.App.Sc (Physio) is the Associate Head,
School of Population Health and member of the Nutritional Physiology Research Centre, School of Health Sciences,
University of South Australia.
Marie is a physiotherapy academic with over fifteen years’ experience in physiotherapy education and research training
(honours and higher research degrees) including the design and completion of clinical rehabilitation research (primary and
secondary studies). Her areas of research include the management of people with chronic respiratory disease with particular
reference to the mechanisms underpinning the perceptual experience of dyspnoea and how (or whether) this sensation can
be substantially altered.
She is currently leading an NHMRC supported project to assess the effect of combining comprehensive pulmonary
rehabilitation with a cognitive behaviour program specific for the sensation of breathlessness.
Sarah Wright
Sarah is the Clinical Lead Physiotherapist for Critical Care at Royal Children’s Hospital, Brisbane. For the past 20
years she has been working in the cardiorespiratory field and specialising in paediatrics. She has a keen interest
in training and education and over the past 4yrs has used immersive simulation as a tool for staff competency in
critical care.
Sarah is currently working as the Simulation Consultant for the HWA initiative for simulated learning in paediatric
allied health, introducing SLE into university paediatric curricula and clinical placements.
Kathy Yu
Kathy has been working in Sports Medicine for 20 years. Kathy is the Team Physician for the Victorian Men’s
Gymnastics High Performance Centre, and has managed the medical needs of these athletes since 2000.
She is the Chief Medical Officer of Gymnastics Australia, and Consultant Medical Officer at the National Institute
of Circus Arts. As part of these roles, Kathy attends and arranges medical services for gymnastics competitions
throughout Victoria and Nationally.
Kathy is interested in all aspects of growing children’s health and wellbeing. She holds a Masters of Public Health
in Occupational Medicine and Graduate Diploma in Sports Medicine.
127
APA Conference 2013 ‘New Moves Green Moves’
Conference App
E-Posters at the Internet Lounge
APA Conference 2013 New Moves is our
most intelligent event yet. New knowledge
and experiences will be shared in ways that
demonstrate our growing commitment to green
and sustainability.
For the first time, the APA Conference 2013 ‘New
Moves’ will feature all posters as electronic posters!
Incredible environmental efforts are being made
across the globe encouraging people to “go green.”
This initiative of our Conference App greatly reduces
the amount of paper being used and wasted, and
consequently makes a valuable contribution to the
Australian environment.
Our Conference App will enable you to: access the
full program and session details; view speaker bios;
create a personalised program; take notes; check
venue maps, receive alerts, and much more!
Our Conference App is compatible with iOs and
android devices,and has many benefits for the
user – YOU!
• Personalisation – favourite lists and schedules can
link to personal calendars
• Live Audience polling, instant audience responses
shared on-screen with voters
• No need for app store downloads, easy access to
the App via a URL or a QR code
• Attendees can easily interact with each other
• Offline version, attendees can download an offline
version for times when there is limited or no
internet connectivity
Conference QR Code and
App link address
This exciting initiative will enable delegates to sit
down and relax while viewing the e-posters of
your peers.
E-posters have an intuitive user interface and is
simple to use. All E-Posters have a full text search,
enabling delegates to search via keywords, author,
and presentation title. You are able to easily
communicate with authors – simply by contacting
them via the in-built mail system.
Please visit the Internet Lounge, sponsored by
TAC& Worksafe, in the Exhibition area to view these
e-posters.
Abstract submissions for the e-posters are featured
in the Abstract e-Book.
Melbourne Convention and
Exhibition Centre MCEC
APA Conference 2013 New Moves will take place at
the world’s first six star green environmentally rated
venue, the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition
Centre (MCEC). Ingenious design, local suppliers
and dedicated staff ensure that MCEC continues
to set the standard for green. Read MCEC’s
green credentials.
As the first ‘6 Star Green Star’ environmentally
rated convention centre in the world, the venue
represents world leadership in best practice,
innovation and sustainability and continues to raise
standards to new heights in technology, imaginative
catering and service options.
Subscribe to MCEC’s blog and follow their food
and wine team as they travel across Victoria,
meeting with sustainable farmers, producers and
winemakers. http://www.fromfarmtofork.net.au
Melbourne – Transport me
http://eventmobi.com/apaconference2013/
Melbourne is commuter-friendly with flexible,
no-fuss ways to move around town. Bike tracks,
waterways, trains, buses and trams can transport
you through the city as you take it all in.
Myki makes public transport even easier. Buy a
visitor pack (includes Myki pass)
Need wheels? Try Melbourne’s bike share initiative
for short trips across the city. Let’s roll!
128
129
Exhibitors
Exhibition Floor Plan
The Exhibition will be held across the entire Conference, from Thursday 17 October to
Sunday 20 October. The Exhibition will be located in Exhibition Hall, with entry via door 7. The
exhibition consists of almost 100 booths.
Loading 6
Loading 7
Bay 12
Bay 13
S to r a g e
96
20
95
Bay 14
S to r a g e
Stage
94
93
92
91
Catering
Catering
Delegate Lounge
19
90
89
88
87
120 PAX
86
18
17
60
59
64
63
68
67
57
58
61
62
65
66
15
85
84
83
14
13
12
82
Catering
Catering
52
51
56
55
48
47
49
50
53
54
45
46
11
10
80
79
Charge
Bar 1
Catering
81
Catering
78
77
9
8
40
39
37
38
44
43
41
42
Internet Cafe
7
76
75
32
6
Catering
29
31
36
30
33
74
35
Catering
34
73
72
71
3
130
2
24
1
21
23
28
27
25
26
APA Booth
Door 6
22
ENTRY / EXIT
Door 7
70
Exhibitor Listing
Companies are listed in alphabetical order
Organisation
Email address
Logo
Booth
AbbVie PTY LTD
http://www.abbvie.com
51
Access Health
http://www.accesshealth.com.au
20
Adidas
http://www.adidas.com.au
Aidacare
http://www.aidacare.com.au
93
Algeos
http://www.algeos.com.au
73
AppVendo
www.appvendo.com
41
Ascent Footwear
http://www.ascentfootwear.com.au
88
ASICS
http://www.asics.com.au
6&7
Ausmedic Australia
http://www.ausmedic.com
8&9
Australian Medical Supplies
(Bronze Sponsor)
http://www.ausmedsupply.com.au
87
Back In Motion Health Group
http://www.backinmotion.com.au
19
Beiersdorf Australia (Elastoplast)
http://www.elastoplastsport.com
80 & 81
Blackmores
http://www.blackmores.com.au
Bodyflow
(Charge bar Sponsor)
http://www.bodyflow.com.au
Church & Dwight Australia (Dencorub)
http://www.dencorub.com.au
10
Club Warehouse
http://www.clubwarehouse.com.au
61
Comfort & Fit Asia Pacific
http://www.comfortandfit.com.au
3
CoreFitnessRoller PTY LTD
http://www.corefitnessroller.com
21
35 & 36
CLUB
WAREHOUSE
84
CLUB
WAREHOUSE
Charge Bar
131
132
Organisation
Email address
Logo
Booth
Dal + Brands
(Bronze Sponsor)
http://www.dalbrands.com.au/
94
Department of Veterans’ Affairs
http://www.dva.gov.au/
85
Digital Orthotics (DOLA)
http://www.dolaustralia.com.au
46
DJO Global
http://www.dolaustralia.com.au
63 & 83
DMA Clinical Pilates & Physiotherapy
http://www.clinicalpilates.com
31
DorsaVi
http://www.dorsavi.com
68
Elsevier Australia
http://www.elsevierhealth.com.au/
18
ENoteFile
http://www.enotefile.com
29
Flexi Pillow
http://www.flexipillow.com.au/
82
Flexi-Sports Australia
http://www.flexi-sports.com.au
47
Gensolve Practice Manager
http://www.gensolve.com
17
Health Workforce Australia
(Bronze Sponsor)
http://www.hwa.gov.au
HealthEngine
(Bronze Sponsor)
http://www.healthengine.com.au
91
Hesta Super Fund
(Gold Sponsor)
http://www.hesta.com.au/
45
HF Industries PTY LTD
http://www.HF.com.au
53
Hicaps
http://www.hicaps.com.au
42
Hotteeze PTY LTD
http://www.hotteeze.com.au
78
HUR Health & Fitness Equipment
http://www.huraustralia.com.au
89
ICB Medical Distributors
http://www.icbmedical.com
49
Not
exhibiting
Organisation
Email address
Logo
Booth
Jobfit Systems International
http://www.jobfitsystem.com
90
Kneewalker Oz Pty Ltd
http://www.kneewalkeroz.com/
60
Leisure Concepts
http://www.leisureconcepts.com.au
LifeHealthCare
http://lifehealthcare.com.au/
Magic Mobility
http://www.magicmobility.com.au
43 & 44
40
Magic
TM
67
MOBILITY
Mat-Tastic
http://www.mat-tastic.com.au/
54
Medeleq PTY LTD
http://www.medeleq.com.au/
76
Meditron PTY Limited
http://www.meditron.com.au
48
Mizuno
http://www.mizuno.com.au
32
Nordic Academy
(Registration Sponsor)
http://www.nordicacademy.com.au/
50
Oapl
http://www.oapl.com.au
57
OPC Health
http://www.opchealth.com.au
66
Painfreeback.Net
http://www.painfreeback.net
70
PhysioPulse
http://www.physiopulse.com.au
30
Physiotec
http://www.physiotec.net.au
55
Physipod
http://www.physipod.com.au
75
PPMP
http://www.ppmp.com.au
23
Practioner Supplies
http://www.practitionersupplies.com.au
14
Premium Physio Solutions
http://www.ppsoz.com.au
79
133
134
Organisation
Email address
Logo
Booth
TM2 Healthcare Solutions
http://www.insidetm2.com.au
52
Tricycle (P3 Pillow)
http://www.p3pillow.com
15
United Pacific Industries
(Thermoskin)
http://www.thermoskin.com
34
Vasyli Medical
http://www.vasylimedical.com.au
58
Whiteley Allcare
http://whiteleyallcare.com.au/
Your World Healthcare (Australia)
http://www.yourworldhealthcare.com.au
37 & 38
86
Authorised Bodyflow Clinic
®
135
136
APA Conference 2013 Awards
Group
Award
Animal
Best new presenter award
Acupuncture & Dry Needling
Best free paper
Best 5x5
Aquatic
Best free paper
Best 5x5
Cardiorespiratory
CRPA ‘Jill Nosworthy’ Award for Excellence in Research Cardiorespiratory Rehabilitation Award
Acute Cardiorespiratory Management Award
CRPA ‘Elizabeth Ellis’ New Researcher’s Award
Award for Best 5x5 Presentation
Clinician Award for Best Presentation
Continence and Women’s Health
Best Student Research Presentation
Best Research Presentation
Educators
Best Overall Research Paper
Best Student Research Paper
Gerontology
Best presentation by a student researcher
Academic Award for Best Podium (Oral) Presentation
Clinician Award for Best Podium (Oral) Presentation
Academic Award for Best 5x5 Presentation
Student Award for Best 5x5 Presentation
Musculoskeletal
Best clinician free paper
Best new investigator free paper
Best clinician 5x5
Best new investigator 5x5
Neurology
Best free paper by a student researcher
Best free paper presentation for a researcher in a clinical practice
Best overall free paper
Innovation award
Paediatric
Yvonne Burns Award
‘Joanne Tubb’ award for best podium presentation by a clinician
Best clinician podium presentation
New rsearcher award
Best 5x5 presentation
Best rural/ remote physiotherapy presentation
Leadership
Best overall paper
Innovation Award
Sports
Best Overall Paper
Best Clinical Researcher
Best New Researcher
Award for Best 5x5 Presentation
137
College Graduation 2013
The 2013 Graduation Ceremony is the College’s
showcase event at the APA Conference 2013
“New Moves”.
The Graduation Ceremony will welcome eight
new Fellows into the College with graduates
across three disciplines of physiotherapy
including our first in gerontology, as well as
both musculoskeletal and sports.
The College is also delighted to be
adding to our pool of Fellows by Original
Contribution, with two graduands set
to take the stage at this, the College’s
thirteenth presentation of Fellows.
We welcome you to come along to celebrate
our Fellows on Saturday 19 October from
5.30pm – 6.15pm in the Plenary Hall 2 at the
Melbourne Convention Centre.
Right: Newly graduated Fellows celebrate at Brisbane
Convention & Exhibition Centre, October 2011.
www.dalbrands.com.au
1300 55 99 85
Sit stand furniture
Ergonomic chairs
Electric desks
24/7 chairs
138
General information
Abstracts
Communications
Abstracts for this conference which have been
accepted are published in the Abstract e-book.
Keynote and invited speaker abstracts/presentation
summaries are included in the Abstract e-book.
M CONNECT – FREE WI-FI
Atms & Banking
ATMs are located adjacent to the Melbourne
Convention Centre (MCC) entry, and on the
Melbourne Exhibition Centre (MEC) concourse.
Business Centre
Public photocopy and fax services are available at
the MEC Café in the Exhibition Centre. Photocopying
services are available from the MCC Customer
Service Desk.
Public telephones are located on all levels of the
MCC and in the MEC foyer and concourse.
Catering
All morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea breaks will
be held in the Exhibition Area. Refreshments are
included in the cost of your registration.
Delegates who have identified a specific dietary
requirement will be catered for. Identified tables
and plates will be located in the Exhibition towards
the stage area
Cloak Room / Luggage Storage
Located off the main Convention Centre
foyer, providing storage for visitor and
delegate belongings.
Dress Code
The APA encourages delegates & presenters to
wear smart casual clothes for the Conference,
Welcome Function, and Conference Dinner.
Free limited wireless internet is available to all
conference delegates, event attendees and general
public at the MCEC during our event. The service:
• Coverage extends throughout the venue,
including meeting rooms, exhibition bays, the
plenary and all other public spaces.
• Is suitable for webmail, Facebook, Twitter, Skype,
and basic internet browsing
• Is not suitable for services such as file sharing or
video streaming
• Has a maximum bandwidth of 512Kb/s per user,
with actual bandwidth influenced by the number
and density of concurrent users.
• Requires users to subscribe (free of charge) via
a login page, and agree to a set of terms and
conditions. Users are able to re-subscribe (free
of charge) for a 12 hour period or once a 100MB
download limit is reached
A charge-bar will be available on-site for smart
phones and devices.
Disabled Access
Parking is available for people with disabilities
in the Melbourne Exhibition Centre car park.
Accessibility parking locations are near entry
doors 1, 6 and 10, which have lift access to the
concourse and exhibition area on Level 1.
Easy access to trams and taxis is via a ramp
outside the main Clarendon Street entrance.
Accessibility access to the Convention Centre is
via the four main entrances. To access all levels
of the Convention Centre, lifts are located within
the main foyer.
Exhibition
The exhibition will be open for delegates for the
entire duration of the Conference, commencing
on the morning of Thursday 17 October 2013,
8.30am, and closing at 3.30pm on Sunday 20
October 2013. The exhibition space will be
located in Exhibition Bays 12 –14 (Door 7) of the
Melbourne Exhibition Centre.
139
Emergency Evacuation Assembly Areas
Evacuation Assembly
Evacuation Assembly
Evacuation Assembly
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Melbourne Exhibition Centre
Grassed area
outside MEC
Tea House Building
Under Freeway
Melbourne Convention
Centre
Under Freeway
Grassed area
outside MCC
Flinders Wharf Park
Area
Emergency First Aid & Medical
For ALL medical emergencies please contact event security.
Emergency telephone numbers are: Ambulance: 000 Dental: 1300 360 054
Evacuation Procedures
The MCEC has two alarms, which can be heard throughout the building if a fire alarm is activated or there is a
pending emergency.
The first alarm is the ALERT ALARM which is a BEEP-BEEP-BEEP sound (similar to a truck reversing). On hearing
this alarm, all trained wardens will attend the Wardens Phones and await instruction from the Senior Warden.
ALL OTHER STAFF MEMBERS AND OCCUPANTS WILL CONTINUE ON WITH THEIR NORMAL DUTIES.
The second alarm is the EVACUATION ALARM which is a WHOOP-WHOOP-WHOOP sound (similar to an air raid
siren). This is the signal for the wardens to evacuate the area via the fire stairs. LIFTS ARE NOT TO BE USED. You
will then be guided to move quietly and calmly to the Assembly Areas.
Evaluation Forms
Evaluation forms will be available online after the conference for all delegates.
140
Insurance
The APA encourages delegates to secure appropriate insurance. The APA will not be held liable for any loss.
Message Board
For any updates throughout Conference please check the notice boards located near registration desks. Alerts
will be sent to those delegates using the Conference App.
Mobile Phones
For the convenience of delegates, all mobile phones should be turned to silent before
Name Badges & Tickets
Name badges must be worn by delegates and exhibitors at all times during the conferences.
Delegates are permitted to attend any session/s on the day/s of registration (subject to room availability).
Parking
Wilson’s Car Park (under the Exhibition Centre) entry off Normanby Road.
(Rates subject to change.)
Weekend rate: $15.00, per exit, per day
Early bird rate: $13.00, enter between 6am – 9am and exit between 3pm – midnight Monday – Friday
Evening rate: Monday to Thursday- $12.00 entry from 6pm and exit before 6am
Evening rate: Friday $15.00, entry from 6pm and exit before 6am
Please note – All MEC car park patrons will be directed to car park Door 1 during overnight closure (8pm –
6am) to exit the car park.
141
Prayer Room
APA Group Cocktail Functions
Separated male and female prayer rooms including
washing facilities are located in the MCC off the
main foyer.
Date:
Friday 18 October 2013
Time:
5.30 – 7.30pm
Location:
various
Registration Desk
Additional Ticket Cost: refer to group programs
The APA Registration Desk will be located on the
Ground floor in the main foyer of Convention Centre.
The Registration Desk will operate and be managed
by Info Salons during the following hours:
Refer to the group programs for information on
additional social functions for various groups,
including times and venues. These are ticketed
events and require pre-registration.
Thursday 17 October
Friday 18 October
Saturday 19 October
Sunday 20 October
Speaker Preparation
7.30am – 5.30pm
7.30am – 5:00pm
7.00am – 5.30pm
7.30am – 3.30pm
Security
The MCEC has 24 hour a day security presence.
The security control room is located on the ground
floor of the Melbourne Convention Centre. Security
control room: 03 9235 8333.
Smoking Policy
The Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre
has a strict “No Smoking” policy within all areas of
the Venue.
Social Program
Tickets for the APA social functions will be provided
at the Registration Desk when you pick up your
name badge & satchel. You must present your
ticket for entry to all social functions.
APA Conference Welcome Reception
Date:
Time:
Location:
Thursday 17 October 2013
5.30pm – 7.30pm
Melbourne Convention
& Exhibition Centre
(Exhibition Hall, Door 7)
Additional Ticket Cost: $90.00
Sponsored By:
APA Conference Dinner
Date:
Time:
Location:
142
Saturday 19 October 2013
7.30pm – 11.30pm
Melbourne Convention
& Exhibition Centre
(Melbourne Room )
Additional Ticket Cost: $130.00
Dinner Theme:
Masquerade
Sponsored By:
Speakers are asked to report to the Speaker
Preparation Room after reporting to the
Registration Desk to collect their name badges. The
Speaker Preparation Room is located on the second
floor, in room 214.
Opening times for the Speaker Preparation Room is
7.00am until 5.00pm daily.
Trade Exhibition
The trade exhibition is located in Exhibition Hall
(Bays 12-14) at the Melbourne & Exhibition Centre,
and is accessible via door 7.
Opening hours for delegates:
Thursday 17
October 2013
Exhibition
Open
8.30am – 7.30pm
Welcome
Reception
5.30pm – 7.30pm
Friday 18
October 2013
Exhibition
Open
7.30am – 5.30pm
Saturday 19
October 2013
Exhibition
Open
7.30am – 5.30pm
Sunday 20
October 2013
Exhibition
Open
7.30am – 3.30pm
Transport
The Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre
is conveniently located in the Melbourne CBD for
visitors with easy and direct access to an efficient
citywide transport network of buses, trains, trams
and taxis.
Map of Melbourne
143
Venue floorplans
Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC)
144
Melbourne Convention Centre (MCC)
Ground level
APA Conference 2013 Registration and Plenary Hall 2
APA Registration Area
145
Melbourne Convention Centre (MCC)
Level two
APA Conference 2013 Meeting Rooms
146
Melbourne Exhibition Centre (MEC)
Ground level
APA Conference 2013 Exhibition
147
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
About PCC4U
The Palliative Care Curriculum for Undergraduates (PCC4U) project aims to promote and sustain
the inclusion of the principles and practice of palliative care in all health care training. It supports the
inclusion of palliative care through the provision of:
•
•
suite of evidence-based student and facilitator learning resources
capacity building and professional development activities.
About the LEARNING RESOURCES
A series of student-centred learning modules and focus topics are available online and on CD. The
modules focus on developing graduate capabilities in palliative care. They include a case study, video
vignettes and current references. The four modules are:
•
•
•
•
principles of palliative care
c ommunicating with people who have a life-limiting illness
clinical assessment and intervention in palliative care
optimising function in palliative care.
The focus topics aim to support the care of specific populations with life limiting illness
and the provision of palliative care in a variety of contexts. They include:
•
•
•
multidisciplinary care
c aring for Aboriginal people with life-limiting conditions
caring for children with life-limiting conditions.
Access the resources at
www.pcc4u.org
Learning Modules – CD
e care
palliativ cula
rri
cluding
es for in dergraduate cu
2012
in un
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
www.pcc4u.org
Principl
yrig
January 2012 © Cop
C
ht P
U
C4
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
nt
www.pcc4u.org
yrig
January 2012 © Cop
Governme
Australian Ageing
and
by the
Funded nt of Health
Departme
C
ht P
U
C4
Video Vignettes – DVD
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
www.pcc4u.org
yrig
January 2012 © Cop
Video Vignettes – DVD
148
by
Prepared
ing
Enhanc
ect Team
ates Proj
ergradu
for Und
iculum
Curr
iative care
lity pall
ide qua
to prov
ionals
profess
health
ative Care
the Palli
all
acity of
the cap
Funded by the Australian Government
Department of Health and Ageing
www.pcc4u.org
yrig
January 2012 © Cop
C
ht P
U
C4
4U
CC
ht P
CRICOS No. 00213J
ent
n Governm
Australia lth and Ageing
by the
Funded artment of Hea
Dep
© QUT 2013 18531
Learning Modules – CD
The Australian Physiotherapy Association and the Conference
Committees would like to thank all the Sponsors of the APA
Physiotherapy Conference 2013
Gold Sponsor
Pre-Conference Workshop Sponsor
(including Welcome Reception)
Advantage
Continence and Women’s Health Goup
Cardiorespiratory Group
Bronze Sponsors
Cardiorespiratory Group
Acupuncture and Dry Needling Group
Cardiorespiratory Group
Internet Lounge Sponsor
Breakfast Sponsors
Paediatric Group
Lifecare
Registration Sponsor
Sports Group
Cocktail FunctionSponsors
Fisher & Paykel
Conference Dinner Sponsor
Cardiorespiratory Group
Occupational Health Group
Chargebar Sponsor
Continence and Women’s Health Goup
Morning Exercise Sponsor
149
We’re hitting
the beach!
2014 Business and Leadership Symposium
October 31 – November 2, Cairns, QLD
2015 APA Conference
October 3 – October 6, Gold Coast, QLD
For more information visit: physiotherapy.asn.au
`