Document 22181

Success Story:
Cruciate Tear in
Poodle - Page 7
Quick Questions
and Answers with
Dr. Xie - Page 8
Success Story: Prostatitis
Resolved by Integrated
Medicine - Page 9
Dr. Xie demonstrates flying needle acupuncture
techniques for circling the dragon on a 5-year
old male llama, Tat, to treat abscessed tooth.
F E AT U R E A R T I C L E :
HEADLINE NEWS
- by Huisheng Xie, DVM PhD and Justin Shmalberg, DVM CVA
1. Introduction
Qi gives life to the world. Where there is
Qi, there must be life. For Chinese herbal medicine, Qi mainly refers to the physiological activity of each Zang-Fu organ.
For example, Spleen Qi represents the
Spleen’s function of transporting and
transforming water and food. Heart Qi
refers to the Heart’s physiological activities of controlling the Blood and storing
the Mind. Lung Qi refers to the Lung’s
function of dominating inspiration and
expiration. Kidney Qi represents the
Kidney’s control of the bladder, sexual
function, and bones.
Qi Deficiency is characterized by weakness or vacuity of these physiological
activities with respect to each internal
Zang-fu organ. The major clinical signs
of Qi Deficiency include general weakness, fatigue, exercise intolerance, anorexia, diarrhea, loss of body weight,
muscle atrophy, dyspnea, asthma, or
urinary or fecal incontinence. In these
patients, the tongue is often pale and
wet and the pulses are usually weak. A
Qi Deficiency Pattern is often seen in
older patients with chronic illnesses in-
cluding renal failure, congestive heart
failure, chronic diarrhea, lower airway
diseases, and immunodeficiency.
According to the Huang Di Nei Jing,
“deficiency is treated with tonification”
to restore the equilibrium of the body.
There are four categories of Chinese
herbs which tonify deficiency: Qi Tonics, Blood Tonics, Yin Tonics and
Yang Tonics. Each herb category
treats a specific Deficiency Pattern
because the herbs provide counteracting properties to the particular deficiencies within that patient.
Qi Tonic Herbs are primarily for
Spleen, Lung, Kidney or Heart Qi Deficiency Patterns. The Liver stores and
spreads the body’s Qi, so it generally
is not deficient in this respect. The
mechanism of herbal action is to invigorate and enhance the physiological
functions of the Zang-fu organs in order to provide a cure. The majority of
these Qi tonic herbs are neutral or
warm with a sweet taste.
We are proud to announce that
starting in Feb 2009, the Chi Institute has been approved to offer
the new diploma of Certified Veterinary Food Therapist (CVFT) by
the China National Society of
TCVM. For details of this certification, please visit www.tcvm.com.
Dr. Xie’s Jing Tang Herbal is
pleased to start offering the teapill
form of Liver Happy formula. For
details of this product, please visit
www.tcvmherbal.com.
95 licensed veterinarians from
USA, CANADA, AUSTRALIA,
BELGIUM, HONDURAS, HONG
KONG, JAPAN, SINGAPORE and
SPAIN have successfully completed the Chi Institute 1st On-line
class, Veterinary Herbal Medicine
Kidney Module. The Veterinary
Food Therapy program is also
available for On-line study now at
the Chi Institute.
(Continue to Page 3)
Page 2: the author of the article "Di Gu Pi in a Hip Dysplasia Case"
is Dr. Cynthia West.
1
Jia-yu-guan, the west end of the Great
Wall, that will be visited in the TCVM
Annual Conference 2010.
TCVM
Sports
Medicine
A 14 year old Hanoverion mare owned by Dr. Gloria Weintrub won a
Fourth Level competition with the TCVM aid in New Jersey.
Conference Syllabus
8:30 - 8:45: Welcome Ceremony
8:45 - 9:20: TCVM Sports Medicine: Overall
View
9:30-12:30: TCVM for Equine Sports
Medicine Part I
1:30 - 2:20: TCVM for Equine Sports
Medicine Part II
2:30- 5:30: Overview on All Canine Sports
Canine TCVM Sports Medicine
How to Approach Canine Athletes (Lab Demo)
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-Ji Practice
8:30 - 11:20: Comparison of Top 20
Chinese Herbal Formulas
How to Make a Final Herbal
Selection for Clinical Cases
11:30-12:30: How to Customize a Herbal
Formula for Each Individual
Patient
1:30 - 5:30: Advanced TCVM for
Treatment of Cushing’s
Disease and Addison’s
Disease
Advanced TCVM for
Treatment of Hypothyroidism
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-Ji Practice
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-Ji Practice
8:30- 12:30: Advanced TCVM for Treatment
8:30 - 9:20: Herbal Quality Control
of Diabetes
9:30 -10:20: Herbal Safety and Herbal
Advanced TCVM for Treatment
Interaction with Western Drug
of Hyperthyroidism
10:30-11:20: Herbals for Parasite Control
1:30 - 3:20: TCVM Wet Lab (Canine/Equine)
Other Recent Herbal Studies
4:00 - 6:00: TCVM Wet Lab (Canine/Equine)
11:30-12:30: Acupuncture for Immune
6:00 - 9:00: Social Party
Response
Major Speakers
Dr. Xie received his DVM at the Sichuan CVM in China 1983, his Master
of Science in Veterinary Acupuncture in 1988 and his PhD from University of Florida in 1999. He is the Director of Veterinary Acupuncture
Internship Program at the Veterinary Medical Center of the University of
Florida. He has been invited to lecture veterinary acupuncture and
herbal medicine all over the world. He has published 10 books and over
100 scientific papers.
2
(Continued from page 1)
Lung Qi Deficiency
2. Comparison of Qi Deficiency Patterns
7) Cough, Dyspnea or Asthma: Bu Fei San
General Qi Deficiency and clinical differentiation of
Spleen, Lung, Heart and Kidney Qi Deficiency are listed
in Table 1.
8) Poor performance or Exercise Intolerance : Qi
Performance
9) Recurrent respiratory infections or other generalized immunodeficiency: Wei Qi Booster
Table 1 Qi Deficiency and Corresponding Qi Tonic
Herbal Formulations
Pattern
General Qi
Deficiency
Clinical
Differentiation
Example of Qi
Tonic Herbs
General weakness
Older patients and/or
chronic illness; Tongue pale and wet; Pulse - weak
Si Jun Zi Tang
(Four Gentlemen)
10) Lin syndrome or Urinary Incontinence
a. Young patient: Suo Quan Wan
b. Older patient: Jin Suo Gu Jing Wan
c. With yang deficiency or IVDD: Wu Bi Shan Yao
Poor appetite, fatigue or
lethargy, diarrhea, muscle
atrophy abdominal distention, edema, prolapsed rectum
Xiang Sha Liu Jun
Zi Tang
(Eight Gentlemen)
Shen Ling Bai Zhu
Bu Zhong Yi Qi
Tang
Lung Qi
Deficiency
Cough, asthma, dyspnea
Weak voice, exercise intolerance; Recurrent respiratory infections,
spontaneous sweating
Bu Fei San
Qi Performance
Wei Qi Booster
Heart Qi
Deficiency
Sweating; Palpitation / Cardiac arrhythmias; Listlessness; Anxiety or Shen
disturbance
Heart Qi Tonic
Kidney Qi
Deficiency
Urinary dribbling or incontinence; Weakness, thoracolumbar pain; Infertility, or
impotence; Intervertebral
disc disease (IVDD)
Suo Quan Wan
Jin Suo Gu Jing
Tang
Wu Bi Shan Yao
Spleen Qi
Deficiency
Kidney Qi Deficiency
11) Renal failure: Rehmannia 8 (Jin Gui Shen Qi)
12) Bi Syndrome or general arthritis: Dok’s Formula or
Equine Du Huo
13) Wei Syndrome or hindlimb weakness: Bu Yang
Huan Wu
14) Infertility: Epimedium Powder
Heart Qi Tonic
15) Congestive heart failure: Heart Qi Tonic
16) Heart Yang and Qi Collapse: Chinese Ginseng or
Ginseng and Astragalus Liquid
Other Qi Deficiency Conditions
17) Diabetes or Insulin Resistance: Jiang Tang Cha
18) With Concurrent Yin Deficiency
a. Heart disease: Sheng Mai Yin
b. Diabetes, Cushings: Rehmannia 11
c. Thyroid disorder: Jia Bing Fang
19) With Blood Deficiency
3. How to select Qi Tonic Herbal Medicines
a. General: Eight Treasures (Ba Zhen Tang)
Chinese herbal selection is based on the diagnostic pattern. All of the following herbal medicines can be used for
generalized Qi Deficiency, but a formula is specifically
selected to match the main clinical complaint associated
with a specific internal organ Qi Deficiency (Table 2).
Acupoints with similar actions have been listed in Table 2
along with comparisons of each formula’s clinical application and its relative strength with respect to Qi tonification.
b. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia or thrombocytopenia: Gui Pi Tang
20) With Yang Deficiency
a. Cushing’s disease: Rehmannia 14
b. CHF: Zhen Wu Tang
21) With Blood and Yang Deficiency: Shi Quan Da Bu
Spleen Qi Deficiency
1) Anorexia: Eight Gentlemen (Xiang Sha Liu Jun Zi
Tang)
2) Vomiting: Happy Earth
3) Body Weight Loss or Muscle Atrophy: Qi Performance
4) Diarrhea: Shen Ling Bai Zhu
5) Edema: Shi Pi Yin
Qi tonic herb - Da Zao (jujube)
6) Prolapse or Fecal Incontinence: Bu Zhong Yi Qi
3
Table 2: Most Common Qi Tonics: Comparison of clinical applications, relative strength,
and acupoints with similar actions
Qi Tonic Strength
(Relative)
Name of Formula
TCVM Indications
Chief Complaint(s)
Acupoints with similar
actions
20%
Happy Earth
Stomach Qi Stagnation with
Spleen Qi Deficiency
Vomiting
CV-12, GB-34, PC-6
40%
Eight Gentlemen
Spleen Qi Deficiency with
Stomach Qi Deficiency
Poor Appetite
ST-36, GB-34, Shan-gen
50%
Suo Quan Wan
Kidney Qi Deficiency,
Urinary Incontinence
Urinary
Incontinence
BL-26/39
55%
Jia Bing Fang
Qi Deficiency with
Yin Deficiency
Hypothyroidism
BL-26, BL-23, KID-27
60%
Jiang Tang Cha
Spleen Qi Deficiency with
Kidney Yin Deficiency
Diabetes
BL-23/26, ST-36
65%
Wei Qi Booster
Spleen Qi + Lung Qi
Deficiency
Immunodeficiency,
Neoplasia
LI-10, ST-36, GV-14,
LI-4
65%
Qi Performance
Qi Deficiency with
Stagnation
Muscle atrophy, Poor
appetite
ST-36, Qi-hai-shu,
SP-10
65%
Dok’s Formula or
Equine Du Huo
Kidney Qi/Yang Deficiency
Generalized
Arthritis
BL-11, BL-26
65%
Sang Zhi San
Kidney Qi Deficiency
Bi Syndrome in limbs
BL-11, GB-39
70%
Four Gentlemen
Global Qi Deficiency
Any weakness
ST-36, LI-10
70%
Wu Bi Shan Yao
Kidney Qi Deficiency with
Yang Deficiency or IVDD
Urinary
Incontinence, IVDD
BL-26, BL-39, CV-4/6
70%
Shen Ling Bai Zhu
Spleen Qi Deficiency
Chronic Diarrhea
ST-36, LI-10
70%
Bu Fei San
Lung Qi Deficiency
Dyspnea or cough
ST-36, LU-7/9
70%
Heart Qi Tonic
Heart QI Deficiency
Heart failure
ST-36, CV-17
Jin Suo Gu Jing
Kidney Qi Deficiency
Urinary incontinence or
premature ejaculation
BL-26/39, CV-4
75%
Shi Quan Da Bu
Qi+Blood+ Yang Deficiency
Geriatric
Weakness
ST-36, SP-10, GV-3
80%
Bu Zhong Yi Qi
Spleen Qi Deficiency
Prolapse or Fecal
Incontinence
ST-36, GV-1
80%
Bu Yang Huan Wu
Qi Deficiency
Wei Syndrome or hindlimb
weakness
ST-36, Liu feng
Ba Ji San
Kidney Qi/Yang Deficiency
Bi Syndrome at Spine
80%
Bao Yuan Tang
Heart Yang Deficiency
Congestive Heart
Failure, Cardiomypothy
ST-36, GV-3, CV-14
80%
Shi Pi Yin
Spleen + Kidney Qi
Deficiency
Edema
GV-3/4, CV-4/6
85%
Rehmannia 8
Kidney Qi/Yang Deficiency
Renal Failure
GV-3/4, KID-3
85%
Rehmannia 14
Kidney Qi/Yang Deficiency
Cushing’s Syndrome
GV-3/4, CV-4/6
95%
Zhen Wu Tang
Heart +Kidney Yang
Deficiency
Ascites or CHF
GV-3/4, Bai-hui, SP-6/9
95%
You Gui Wan
Yang Deficiency
Infertility, renal failure
GV-3/4, Bai-hui, CV-4/6
100%
Chinese Ginseng or
Ginseng & Astragalus Liquid
Yang Qi Collapse
Syncope or collapse
GV-26, KID-1
75%
80%
4
BL_26, Bai-hui, GV-3,
CV-14
Are you feeling challenged by the chronic
Gastrointestinal cases?
Do you long to offer herbal solutions for
Spleen cases?
Limit On-Site Class
Size to 30 Students
On-Site Class: July 16 - 19, 2009
On-Line Class: July 26 - Oct 26, 2009
Veterinary Herbology Equine/Canine Wet-lab: Tongue and Pulse Diagnosis
Study On-Site / On-Line
Gastrointestinal / Spleen Module Syllabus *
Thursday, July 16, 2009
8:30 to 9:20
Spleen Physiology (Dr. Shen Xie)
9:30 to 10:20 Relationship of Spleen with Other
Organs (Dr. Shen Xie)
10:30 to 12:20 Spleen Pathology (Dr. Shen Xie)
13:30 to 17:30 Herbal Studies (Dr. Shaolin Deng)
Friday, July 17, 2009
8:30 to 12:30 IBD and Diarrhea
Anorexia Syndrome, Megaesophagus and Vomiting
Abdominal Pain (Colic)
Megaesophagus and Constipation
(Dr. Shen Xie)
13:30 to 16:30 TCVM Approach for Clinical
Cases (Demo/Lab)
(Dr. Connie Dinatale: Canine Lab)
(Dr. Shen Xie: Equine)
17:00 to 18:30 How to Approach Canine Cases
(Dr. Dinatale and Dr. Xie)
Saturday, July 18, 2009
8:30 to 12:20 How to Treat Small Animal GI
Disorders (Dr. Dinatale)
13:30 to 17:30 Stomatitis and Gingivitis
GI Ulceration and Pancreatitis
Chronic Hemorrhage, Muscle
Atrophy, Obesity
Food Therapy for GI Disorders
(Dr. Roger Clemmons)
Sunday, July 19, 2009
8:30 to 12:30 Equine GI Disorders (Dr. Shen Xie)
On-Site 2009
On-Line 2009
Liver/Endocrine
Feb 26 - Mar 1
Mar 8 - June 8
Dermatology/Oncology/
Immune-mediated
April 23 - 26
May 3 - Aug 3
Gastrointestinal/Spleen
July 16 - 19
July 26 - Oct 26
Respiratory/Cardiovascular
Oct 15 - 18
Oct 25 - Jan 25
Kidney/Geriatric/Urinary/
Reproductive
Dec 10 - 13
Dec 20 - Mar 20,10
Veterinary Herbal Medicine
Major Speakers
Shen Huisheng Xie, DVM, PhD
On-Site Class Location
Dr. Xie is a third generation TCM practitioner who was born and educated in
China. He received his DVM at the Sichuan CVM in China 1983, his Master of
Science in Veterinary Acupuncture in
1988 and his PhD from University of
Florida (UF) in 1999. Currently he is the
Director of Veterinary Acupuncture Internship Program at the Veterinary Medical Center of the UF.
Tuition and Registration
Constance DiNatale, DVM, CVA
Dr. Constance DiNatale owns a holistic
practice in Winter Park, Florida. She uses predominantly herbs, acupuncture,
nutrition, and spinal manipulation to treat
patients. She took the IVAS acupuncture
course in 1989, and has studied and
taught with Dr. Xie at Chi Institute since
1999. Her favorite things to do in her
spare time are to spend time with her
son, Valenttine, and to teach and learn at
the Chi Institute.
Chi Institute of Chinese Medicine
9700 West Hwy 318, Reddick, FL 32686
Tel: (800)891-1986 Fax: (866)700-8772
www.tcvm.com
[email protected]
On-Site: $750; On-Line: $850;
On-Site+On-Line: $900
On-Line Student Benefits:
3-month Online Access to 24 hrs
Lectures and 5 hrs Lab Demo
Homework Assignment
Daily Email Mentorship
Class Notebook Binder in Mail
Class Herbal Samples Kit in Mail
Eligible for the Diploma of the Certified Veterinary Chinese Herbologist
(CVCH)
32 C.E. Hours by RACE
Please visit www.tcvm.com or call 800-891-1986
for questions or registration.
5
Chinese Medical Manipulation
Pulse Diagnosis
Ba-shen-fa stretching of the hind limb
Ban-fa wrenching of the lumbar in horses
counterclockwise
1. Gain competence and confidence in
techniques
2. Learn and practice Tui-na on each other for Self-healing
3. Review and refine TCVM Pattern Differentiation
4. Review of the Channels and Sinew systems
5. Leave with practical level of proficiency in
technique
Tui-na, also called An-mo, is Chinese manual therapy used for preventing and treating disease. Tui-na practitioners use various manipulations
applied to acupuncture points and meridians; or apply special limbstretching movements to prevent and treat diseases. Tui-na can regulate
meridians, soothe joints and sinews, promote circulation of Qi and
Blood, balance Zang-fu organs and strengthen the body's resistance.
therapeutic
“Another Excellent class offered at the Chi Institute. The instruction is
superior. I believe Tui-na will be a valuable addition to my practice and I
plan to utilize it immediately. Thank you all for providing such wonderful
support in the classroom and outside the classroom. I enjoy feeling part of
the Chi family and it is an honor to study with Dr. Xie”
- Anne Hyle, DVM, Sarasota, FL
To enhance acupuncture and herbal therapy
Useful as part of a daily home-care program for owners.
Some animals dislike acupuncture but enjoy Tui-na therapy.
Can be widely applied in musculoskeletal conditions, geriatric and
pediatric disease, and internal medicine.
Veterinary Tui-na Class Schedule
Class 2009
Tuition
Class 2010
Tuition
Nov 12-15 , 2009
$ 975*
Dec 9-12 , 2010
$ 1050*
* Application Fee: $100 (new student only);
Take-home Exam, Case Report & Certification Fee: $150 (optional,
only required for the students willing to be certified)
Chi Institute of Chinese Medicine
9700 West Hwy 318, Reddick, FL 32686, USA
Tel: (800)891-1986 Fax: (866)700-8772
Yin Yang, Five Elements and Eight Principles (5-lectures) are
part of the basic Veterinary Acupuncture program. For those who
haven’t taken this training, these lectures must be studied on
DVD before the class.
Since the first certified Veterinary
class was conducted in 2003,
181 veterinarians have attended our certified Veterinary
Program and 64 of them have been certified as a Certified Veterinary
Tui-na Practitioner. They have integrated this special medical body
work into their daily practice. Feedback from the practitioners, owners
and patients has been very positive.
6
Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine Treatment of Cruciate Tear in Poodle
Western Diagnosis: Torn cruciate ligament.
GB 34 is Influential point for tendons and
ligaments, LIV Qi stagnation, stifle pain
ST 36 for pain and general Qi tonification
For Liver Yin deficiency: LIV 3, SP 9
To nourish Liver Blood: SP 10, BL 17, BL 18
TCVM Examination: Tongue pink, a bit lavender, moist. Pulses – a bit wiry. History of
liver disharmony—ligament tear, red sclera,
cataract, seizure following vaccination. History of loose stool – Earth weakened by
Wood, Ke cycle. Walker has an Earth personality.
By Cydria Manette Schaefer, DVM
Walker, a 12 year-old Black poodle weighing 25 pounds, first came to see me for
acupuncture six days after he started limping while going down the stairs. He was
non-weight bearing lame on his right-hind
leg.
Walker’s physical exam: He had a positive
draw sign on the right hind leg and slight
effusion at his stifle, indicating a torn cruciate ligament. His owner did not want him to
have surgery. Also noted during the exam:
his left eye had chronic red sclera and was
non-visual from cataract. His right eye had
a moderate cataract but was still visual. He
had a history of a seizure following vaccination. For 2-3 months he had soft, loose
stool, sometimes with mucus, no blood. His
stool symptoms were palliated with Science
Diet. He had a good appetite and no history
of vomiting. The hair on his rump tended to
get dry and changed to the color of the dry
kibble. He had moderate dental tartar.
Walker was very friendly and cooperative.
TCVM Diagnosis: Qi-blood stagnation, liver
blood or Yin deficiency. Disorder of Jin
(tendons, ligaments, fascia). Injury blocks
flow of Qi, leading to local stagnation (pain
and lameness).
TCVM Treatment: Change diet. The primary focus of Walker’s treatment was to move
Qi to stop pain (Qi-blood stagnation causes
pain), and nourish liver blood and tonify liver
Yin deficiency to strengthen Jin (tendons,
ligaments, fascia).
Walker had four acupuncture treatments,
one month apart and was on Jing Tang
Tendon Ligament Formula, BID with food
for six months.
Walker had both DN and EA. The following
acupuncture points were chosen:
For Qi-Blood stagnation
LIV 3 to smooth liver Qi, circulate Liver
Blood and relieve stagnation (pain)
BL 54 as Master point for hind limbs
BL 60 to relax muscles and provide pain
reliefGB 33 for stifle pain
Tendon/Ligament Formula
Walker responded very well to his diet
change and TCVM treatment. The next day
after his first acupuncture was the first day
Walker came out of his kennel on his own
since he hurt his leg. One month later his
right hind-leg was toe-touching. Two
months after his initial treatment, he was
using his leg more and starting to stand on
right hind leg to urinate. By the third month,
he was continuing to improve slowly, but
was showing atrophy of the hind muscles.
By the following month, muscle mass was
returning with controlled exercise and he
was balancing on both hind legs when he
had a bowel movement.
Eight months after his initial injury, Walker
was walking significantly better and was
able to stand on his right hind leg and lift his
left hind to urinate. Ten month follow up:
Walker is walking evenly on all four legs and
able to stand up (rear) on hind legs.
TM
Tendon/Ligament Formula focuses on nourishing Liver Yin and
Blood and strengthening ligaments and tendons. It can be used
for chronic ligament and tendon problems. In order to hasten
healing of injuries, combine the formula with topical application of
Relief Salve (K9010). After three months of administering Chinese herbal medications to affected horses, there was sonographic evidence of completely healed tendons.
General Dosage:
Horse: 15 g BID as top dressing on feed
Dog/Cat: 0.5 g per 10 to 20 lb body weight BID
This formula is available in:
100g, 200g, 600g, 900g Powder
100/200 counts 0.5g Capsules
Other points used: Bai hui as master point
for overall condition; Shen-shu for hindquarter pain; ST 34 for stifle pain and swelling;
ST 36 for general Qi tonification and stifle
pain; BL 23 for pelvic limb weakness; and
SP 3 as brief prick after initial acupuncture
treatment for stifle pain and also as Yuansource point for his personality
Ingredient
Actions
Bai Shao Yao
Nourish Blood and Yin, soothe Liver Yang
Bu Gu Zhi
Nourish Kidney Yang and Yin
Chuan Xiong
Move blood, resolve stagnation
Dang Gu
Nourish Blood
Gou Qi Zi
Nourish Liver Yin and Blood
Gui Zhi
Activate the Channels and limbs
Niu Xi
Strengthens Kidney and benefit knees
Sang Zhi
Smoothen limbs
Shan Zhu Yu
Nourish Liver Yin
Shu Di Huang Nourish Blood and Yin
100 counts 0.2g Capsules
200 counts Teapills
7
Wu Jia Pi
Strengthen ligaments and tendons
Yin Yang Huo
Nourish Kidney Yang and Yin
Quick Questions and Answers with Dr. Xie
Q: What does tremor or quivering in dogs mean in the TCVM?
A: Tremor, quivering, shuddering, shaking/trembling in dogs can be
caused by one or more of the following patterns:
1) Internal Wind due to Liver Blood or Yin Deficiency leading to Liver
Yang Rising, which causes tremor, or quivering;
2) Qi Deficiency, which fails to hold the body, leading tremor of the
body, or limbs;
3) Qi or/and Blood Stagnation (the body is trying to shake stagnation away);
4) Fear or submissive behavioral issue which is associated with the disharmony between the Heart and Kidney.
Q: Are there the TCVM therapeutic that may help in cases of Headshaking Syndrome in horses?
A: If the causes of mechanical problems (cervical, TMJ etc) are ruled out, then headshaking in horses must be
associated with behavior issue (Heart-Shen). Heart Blood and Yin anchor the Mind (Shen). Shen Disturbance
including headshaking is often caused by Heart Blood or/and Yin Deficiency, Liver Qi Stagnation, Phlegm, and
Excess Fire. The TCVM therapy is based on Pattern Differentiation (other clinical signs, tongue, pulse etc). If
the pattern is NOT definite, I would do the following steps:
1) Points: Aquapuncture at An-shen (10 cc of saline per point) if applicable. Dry needle at PC-9, HT-9/7, BL14/15/43/44/47/69, GB-44;
2) Herbal Medication: Shen Calmer, 30 g bid for 1 month. It can soothe Liver Qi, nourish heart blood and yin
to calm the Mind;
3) Use cooling foods (barley, celery, watermelon rim etc);
About 80% of headshaking horses respond to above TCVM treatments. If no improvement in one month, you
have to figure out the underlying PATTERN, and treat the pattern.
Q: What does polyphagia tell me?
A: Polyphagia can be caused by one or more of the following factors:
1) Excess Stomach Heat or Fire;
2) Global Heat (excess heat or false heat);
3) Strong Earth Constitution;
4) Fear to starve (associated with Shen Disturbance);
5) To calm down stress associated with Liver Qi Stagnation or Liver Yang Rising.
Q: What is the difference between Atractylodes Bai Zhu and Atractylodes Cang Zhu?
A: Atractylodes Cang Zhu and Bai Zhu are two main different herbs for the Spleen (going to Spleen Meridian).
Their taste and actions are similar because they are very similar plants (the same family) even though not the
same species. Cang Zhu is darker while Bai Zhu looks much pale. They can be substituted for each other in a
shortage. However, Atractylodes Cang zhu is preferred to Atractylodes Bai Zhu for damp conditions, whereas
Atractylodes Bai Zhu is preferred as a Spleen Qi tonic. In addition, Atractylodes Bai Zhu is more expensive.
8
Conventional Approach
Prostatitis Resolved by a Conventional Protocol plus Acupuncture
and Chinese Herbal Medicine
Owners just accepted therapeutical treatment and the
hormonal part was also rejected. Treatment was follow as
detailed:
• Baytril 150mg: 10mg/kg SID for 5 days, then 5mg/kg
SID for 7 days.
Melissa Alvarenga Haddad. MV.
MS. CVA. CVT.
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
• Prednisolone 20mg: 1mg/kg BID for 4 days, then
1mg/kg SID for 4 days.
History
But owners requested alternative or different treatment
as the dog did not show behavioral change, was still no
eating well, no defecating neither with normal urination
and mass still felt present by palpation.
A 9 year old, intacted male Akita-Chow,
showed signs of abdominal discomfort.
While dog was palpated, a rounded mass was felt on the
upper abdominal area, behind urinary bladder location and
under sacral area, by the same time, the dog showed signs
of pain. Through rectal palpation, prostate was dislocated
cranially, what suggest an increase on the prostate size.
With this, the patient was submitted to radiological and
ultrasound assessment.
TCVM Approach
The dog was presented to the Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine (TCVM) practitioner for assessment and
treatment.
Evaluation through TCVM showed:
By radiography, an increase on prostate size was confirmed as shown in Figure 1., then was confirmed by ultrasound (Figure 2.). Measure was 2.77cm and 3.54cm of
width and height, respectively. Referral veterinarian suggested castration and hormones as conventional treatment,
which was rejected by owner, the dog is epileptic since one
month old and the life risk was a major worry to the owner,
then just therapeutical conventional treatment was follow.
Tongue: pale and wet (color cannot be evaluated on
behalf of natural purple tongue color).
Pulse: thin, weak and fast, weaker on right side.
Shen: low.
Prostate: by abdominal palpation between 2.53.0cm in diameter and by rectal palpation was unreached and during process, signs of pain.
Body temperature: most of the body normal, warmer
on lumbar and sacral area.
History of idiopathic epilepsy, some Liver Yin/Blood
issues before, because of seizures and skin problems and Spleen Qi Deficiency when sometimes
malformed feces. Urination was frequent and in
small amounts.
TCVM Diagnosis: BL Excess Heat and certain level of Qi
Stagnation. Shen disturbance.
Acupoints treated were Bai Hui, Da Feng Meng, GV-14,
LI-4, LI-11, BL-23, BL-28, BL-39, BL-40,BL-60, LIV-2,
LIV-3 and SP-6.
Figure 1. Radiograpgh of a nine year old Akita-Chow
with prostatitis.
Main Herbal Formula recommended: Prostate Invigorator
(Table 1). This was used for 25 days on a dosage of 0.5g
/5kg of body weight BID and then was recommended to
follow 1-2 months with half of last dose. By the end of first
part of the Chinese herbal protocol, size of the prostate
was decreased (Figure 3 and Figure 4).
During the first three days of treatment, diarrhea was
developed on the patient. Dosage on herbal recommendation was not altered, but another herbal formula was
prescribed to control diarrhea, Eight Gentleman (Table 1
and Table 2). This formula was given on a basic dosage
Figure 2. Ultrasound of a nine year old Akita-Chow
with prostatitis.
9
Conclusions
of 0.5g /5kg of body weight BID for 5 days, although diarrhea was controlled by the second day of this last prescription. No antibiotics for this developed diarrhea were
prescribed.
After one acupuncture session and 25 days of herbal
treatment, prostate size decreased from 3.54 to 2.00cm
(44%) in height and from 2.77 to 1.42cm (49%) in length.
In general, 50% of the prostate size was diminished. On
prostatitis cases, TCVM can help on assessment and
treatment, integrated with conventional treatment. Furthermore, with the TCVM approach, castration is not
always recommended for this kind of cases. With TCVM
treatment resolution of prostatitis can be achieved and
better quality of life can be given.
Table 1. Chinese Herbal Formulas used in a prostatitis case1
Herbal
Formula
Figure 3. Ultrasound of a nine year old Akita-Chow
with prostatitis after 25 day treatment with Chinese
Herbal Medicine (Prostate Invigorator).
Figure 4. Ultrasound of a nine year old Akita-Chow
with prostatitis after 25 day treatment with Chinese
Herbal Medicine (Prostate Invigorator).
TCVM
Principles
Indications
Prostate • Prostate stagnation
Invigorator • Prostate mass
• Prostatitis
• Pulse: wiry
• Tongue: purple
• Move blood
• Clear heat
• Resolve stagnation
• Stop the pain
Eight
• Chronic GI problems
Gentleman • Poor apetite
• Abdominal pain or
fullness
• Vomiting
• Spleen Qi Deficiency
with stagnation of
Cold-Damp
• Tonify Qi
• Strengthen Spleen
• Move Qi
• Eliminate Damp
Table 2: Ingredient and action of Prostate Invigorator1
Ingredient
Actions
Bai Jiang Cao - Patrinia
Clear Heat, detoxify
Bai Zhi - Angelica
Resolve stagnation, relieve pain
General Dosage:
Horse: 15 g BID as top dressing on feed
Dog/Cat: 0.5 g per 10 to 20 lb body weight BID
Chi Shao Yao - Peony
Cool Blood, resolve stagnation
Dan Shen - Salvia
Move Blood
Hong Hua - Carthamus
Break down Blood stasis
Contraindications: Do not use during pregnancy
Mo Yao - Myrrh
Move Blood
Directions: Use as needed up to 3 months
Pu Gong Ying - Taraxacum
Clear Heat, detoxify
This formula is available in:
100g, 200g, 600g, 900g Powder
100/200 counts 0.5g Capsules
100 counts 0.2g Capsules
200 counts Teapills
Qing Pi - Citrus
Move Qi
Ru Xiang - Olibanum
Move Blood, relieve pain
Tao Ren - Persica
Break down Blood stasis
Wang Bu Liu Xing Zi Vaccaria
Move Blood
How To Order:
www.tcvmherbal.com (save 5%)
Call 800-891-1986
Fax 866-700-8772
Email: [email protected]
Xiao Hui Xiang - Foeniculum
Warm the lower jiao
Ze Lan - Lycopus
Clear Damp
Prostate Invigorator TM
References
1. Xie H. Chinese Veterinary Herbal Handbook. Chi Institute
of Chinese Medicine. Reddick, Florida. p. 84, p. 122. 2004.
10
Study On-Site / On-Line
Class Syllabus
Limit On-Site Class
Size to 30 Students
8:30 -12:30: TCVM Dermatology: Overview, Etiology
and Pathology, and Treatment Strategies
Topical Application for Skin Conditions
- By Dr. Huisheng Xie
13:30-17:30: Herbal Studies - By Dr. Shaolin Deng
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-ji Practice
8:30 -12:30: TCVM Clinical Application for Skin
Conditions - Shi-zhen
TCVM Oncology
- By Dr. Huisheng Xie
Veterinary
Herbal Medicine
13:30-16:30: TCVM Approach for Clinical Cases
(Demo/Lab)
- By Dr. Greg Todd (Canine)
- By Dr. Dinatale (Canine)
- By Dr. Shen (Equine)
Dermatology, Oncology and Immune-mediated Diseases Module
17:00-18:30: How to Approach Canine Cases (Wet-lab)
- By Drs. Greg Todd and Connie Dinatale
features tongue and pulse diagnosis, real case studies (wet lab), a
TCVM approach to Western diseases, herbal medicine, advanced
TCVM theories & principles.
Major Speakers
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-ji Practice
8:30 -12:30: TCVM for Skin Diseases
TCVM for Tumor Patients
- By Dr. Connie DiNatale
13:30-17:30: Chinese Medicine in Immune-mediated
Diseases - By Dr. Greg Todd
Dr. Xie received his DVM at the Sichuan CVM in China 1983, his
Master of Science in Veterinary Acupuncture in 1988 and his PhD
from University of Florida in 1999. He is the Director of Veterinary
Acupuncture Internship Program at the Veterinary Medical Center of
the University of Florida. He has been invited to lecture veterinary
acupuncture and herbal medicine all over the world. He has published 10 books and over 100 scientific papers.
Dr. Constance DiNatale owns a holistic practice in Winter Park,
Florida. She uses predominantly herbs, acupuncture, nutrition, and
spinal manipulation to treat patients. She took the IVAS acupuncture
course in 1989, and has studied and taught with Dr. Xie at Chi
Institute since 1999. Her favorite things to do in her spare time are to
spend time with her son, Valenttine, and to teach and learn at the Chi
Institute.
Dr. Gregory Todd graduated from the University of Florida with a
D.V.M. in 1988. In 1993 Dr. Todd became an apprentice to Dr. Patrick
Sullivan A.P., and began studying Traditional Chinese Medicine. In
1996 he became certified by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society. His studies continue at the Chi Institute. He has lectured
and instructed nationally for IVAS, the North American Veterinary
Conference and the Chi Institute. Dr. Todd practices integrative
veterinary medicine at the Animal Hospital of Dunedin in the Tampa
Bay area.
11
7:45 - 8:25: Tai-ji Practice
8:30 -12:30: TCVM Immunology in Clinical Application
- By Dr. Huisheng Xie
Chi Institute of Chinese Medicine
9700 West Hwy 318, Reddick, FL 32686
Tel: (800)891-1986 Fax: (866)700-8772
www.tcvm.com
[email protected]
On-Site: $750; On-Line: $850; On-Site+On-Line: $900
3-month Online Access
to 24 hrs Lectures and 5
hrs Lab Demo
Homework Assignment
Daily Email Mentorship
Class Notebook Binder
in Mail
Class Herbal Samples Kit
in Mail
Eligible for the Diploma
of the Certified Veterinary
Chinese Herbologist
(CVCH)
32 C.E. Hours by RACE
Please visit www.tcvm.com or call
800-891-1986
for questions or registration.
Zhen Zhao, MS
Chester Wheeler, BS
We are very proud to announce that Dr. Justin Shmalberg has
joined Jing Tang Herbal case consultation teams. Please send
your case consultation email to [email protected] in order
to get your answer promptly.
20%
off
CVC East in Baltimore, MD
on April 24-27, 2009
Limited Time Offer.
Valid through
04/15/09.
Atlantic Coast Vet. Conference
in Atlantic City, NJ
on Oct 12-15, 2009
On 200ct Teapills of
AAEP Conference
in Las Vegas, Nevada
on Dec 4-9, 2009
Published by Dr. Xie’s Jing Tang Herbal, Inc.
Serving Veterinarians Exclusively Since 1999
Tel: 800-891-1986
URL: www.tcvmherbal.com
Dr. Xie Jing Tang Herbal
9700 W. Highway 318
Reddick, FL 32686, USA
12
Email:[email protected]
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