16 How to change cultural attitudes towards bushfires

16
ASMm
October 2009
How to change
cultural attitudes
towards bushfires
Taking Mine Safety To China
New degree to meet demand
for safety professionals
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Cover story:
How to change cultural
attitudes towards bushfires
Taking mine safety to China
4
12
2009 OHS Conference
16
Drug Feature:
Turn to the experts on drugs
and alcohol in the workplace
26
Safety Institute of Western Australia Committee Members
Produced by the Safety Institute of
Western Australia
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Editorial and design: Media Support Services
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Gavin Waugh
Managing Editor: Howard Wilcockson
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Ron Adams
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email: [email protected]
President
Gavin Waugh (2008/10)
0409 295 781
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19 Maquire Way
BULLCREEK WA 6149
Vice President
Alan Meagher (2008/10)
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[email protected]'
Secretary
Bruce Campbell (2009/11)
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Dr Janis Jansz (2008/10)
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Tommy Adebayo (2009/11)
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Liz Wallis-Long (2009/11)
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President’s comment
From the President
A
Gavin Waugh
[email protected] Mob: 0409 295 781
Safety Institute of Australia National Secretary
WA Division President
special thank you to all of
you who have taken the time
to express your excitement
at the content of Safety Matters.
I would also like to thank those of
you who responded to our address
records check with the last issue.
“May I congratulate the WA Branch and the
production team on a first class publication. I
found it particularly informative and thankfully,
free from highly academic debate about esoteric
arguments to which there is no real world
answer.” Greg (South Australia)
And from John in the USA;
“Congratulations to the team that have
resurrected this publication, I have just read
it from front to back and back to front, an
excellent job, well done. The content is broad
based, interesting and not just statistics and
scientific goobly gook.”
Congratulations to the WA division on being
so proactive as to produce a good safety magazine.
There surely would be no harm if WA found
suitable sponsorship to go SE Asia wide. Gary
(Vic)
I saw your Safety matters magazine today
and was very impressed. Can you tell me how
I can obtain a regular copy and how to become
a member of the Safety Institute? Hannelie
(WA)
These testimonials are examples of the
frustrations that led to the initial creation
of Safety Matters magazine.
It is also heartening to know that from
a WA-only start, we now also have an
international following. Our only interest
is to produce a magazine you want to read.
Thankyou also for all the suggestions
and material. We have received so much
that we could fill the next three editions
with quality info already.
WA Events
Write these dates into your diary now!
For our 2010 breakfast series, we have already booked in;
• Women in Safety events for; March 12; June 11 and September 10,
• Safety Law events for; April 16; July 16 and Nov 12,
• General series for Feb 26; Mar 26; April 30; May 28; June 25; Jul 30; Aug 27; Sep 24; Oct 29; Nov 26.
• The WA Safety Conference will be in mid August.
By the time you receive this magazine the WA committee
will have completed its second Corporate Governance training
course – this has been very popular with excess places taken up at
discount rates by general members.
We expect to be the first SIA division to have all its committee
members having completed this valuable training.
The National Front
By the time this magazine is
distributed the SIA National
elections will be nearly over. Please
make your vote count.
This election may be the most critical
in the history of the SIA for the future
of the organisation. If you are not
currently a member or have not kept
your membership financial; please now
visit www.sia.org.au/membership/
apply.aspx and ensure your eligibility.
Recently SIAWA was privileged to
have Roxayne West visit from the NSW
division, here to explore the services WA
provides to its members. I was gratified
by this quote from her report.
Our dilemma is in deciding what to
exclude! It does make us weep that we
cannot give you everything.
Our major constraint is the amount of
advertising received.
As the advertising pays for the printing
and distribution we ask for your help
in identifying companies and members
willing to support and sponsor the
further expansion of this, your magazine.
Please keep sending in your
contributions, suggestions, advertising
tips and testimonials.
To further improve our service we
are working to offer you the choice of
electronic or hard copy in future editions.
If you would like to receive future
editions of Safety Matters in electronic
format please email me your details so I
can change your record.
([email protected])
SIAWA is now working up alliances with the Australian
Institute of Occupational Hygienists (AIOH); Australasian
Institute of Dangerous Goods Consultants (AIDGC) on top of
the recent conference collaboration with IFAP.
This is all part of our agenda of bringing together all the
peripheral safety, health and injury prevention associations to a
collaborative voice.
We look forward to contact from any other like minded
organisations who may care to join in for mutual benefit.
With all this sharing we are now generating a ‘nice’ problem –
that of having too many events available to our members.
It won’t be long before we will have to start rating the quality
of events to only have the best on offer.
“After meeting with the WA committee
members and seeing what they are
achieving, I would like to be part of an
Association that can model this, not only
in NSW but throughout Australia.”
The sole reason we could have attracted
this commendation is because we live by
our unwritten motto; ‘our members are
the owners of this organisation and they
are the key to our continued growth’.
So if you are an SIA member visiting
WA – please take the time to call me or
one of our team so we can make you
welcome. The contacts are all on our
website.
The latest membership count shows
the SIA now has over 3,700 members
nationally – a good number getting ever
2
S.I.A.
closer to that needed to start having a real
influence on the Australian safety politics
agenda.
On the international front; the SIA
representative to the International
Network of Safety and Health
Professional Organisations (INSHPO)
has been working diligently on
transportability of membership and
qualifications between countries.
This is making “Eligibility for
membership of the SIA” not only a
term being more widely included in job
applications but soon also to be useful in
cross border safety work.
Make your job more secure; be a
member with a voice today!
Visit. www.sia.org.au
Letters
R
ef the article: ‘Going
to work can be bad for
your health’ in the last
edition of Australian Safety
Matters magazine:
I took umbrage with the
article’s analysis and parting
comment that men account for
some 68% of all serious claims
and are therefore the careless
gender.
I have worked in the mining
and construction industry for
some years; prior to that with
ex-Workcover prosecutors and
as a consultant from Childcare
Centres to Power-stations.
The article, having just
completed telling us that
manufacturing, transport,
agriculture, fishing and
construction had a serious
injury claim rate, higher than the
national average of 14 per 1000
employed, then said the Finance
& Insurance Industry had a “mere
3.1 serious claims per 1000” (sic).
I would venture to say the
manufacturing and finance/
insurance industries would both
have a high proportion of female
workers; certainly far higher than
mining or construction.
Yet one of these two industries
(manufacturing) hits the top score
at 27.6 claims per 1000 and the
other (Finance/Insurance) hits
the bottom score (3.1 per 1000
claims).
This would suggest it is not the
worker’s gender but the nature of
the work and the inherent level
of risk associated with it,that
contributes to the serious injury/
claim rate!
I would further suggest that
construction, mining, agriculture
and forestry have higher risk
levels than manufacturing and
finance/insurance or retail.
If men were truly careless then
surely the industries that were
high risk (construction/mining/
agriculture) would outstrip (or at
least equal) manufacturing (which
has a far lower proportion of
male workers.
This rather “popsy review”
does not describe the type/
category of these serious injuries
(high energy short duration
exposures OR low energy long
duration exposures.
T
hanks for the copy of Safety Matters; well done, that’s all I
can say!
It was interesting to read the article on Cip - I reckon I’d run
him a close second as the longest serving member of SIA, and like him I
was privileged to have had Harold Greenwood -Thomas as a mentor.
I may add, I was also fortunate to have had Eric Wigglesworth as
a mentor. He got me to take over from him as a lecturer at the South
3
Perhaps a “risk based
analysis” to the conclusions
comparing the level of risk
between those industries with
high male populations (mining,
construction, forestry, fishing etc)
when compared with industries
with higher female populations
(manufacturing, finance,
insurance, retail etc would have
been more appropriate.
Playing loosely with facts and
being light hearted with analysis
can turn fudgy figures into
false perceptions of reality and
eventually become embedded in
the culture as truth.
Andrew Colman
National HSE Manager
Fellow of the SIA.HSE Manager,
Grad Dip Ergonomics
M.App.Sc (OHS)
Melbourne Tech certificate course; add to this he was my
supervisor for my dissertation at Ballarat - a daunting experience!
Basically the purpose of the email was not to talk about me but
to say really well done on your magazine and it’s a pity that the
other divisions don’t follow suit.
Glyn Williams,
Manager Risk Services
How to change cultural attitudes towards bushfires –
or a repeat of ‘Black Saturday’ is likely
A ‘Community Fire Safety Culture Maturity Grid’ could be the answer!
By Kelvin Blackney MASSE, FSIA, RSP (Aust)
T
he tragedy of Victoria’s
‘Black Saturday’ bushfire is
highly likely to be repeated
unless there are attitude changes
whereby people take greater personal
responsibility for fire preparedness.
The Victorian Bushfire Royal
Commission’s interim report released
17.8.09 with 51 recommendations http://
www.royalcommission.vic.gov.au/InterimReport is intended to be implemented
before the 2009/10 bushfire season.
If the recommendations are put into
practice, there’s no doubt Victoria will be
better prepared than on February 7 2009.
An area of concern, however, is with
Recommendation 7.2 that calls for more
useful advice being given to people within
bushfire prone areas and the CFA give
consideration as to how it should advise
residents about the defendability of their
homes.
The Safety Institute’s National Technical
Panel made the point in its submission to
the Victorian Bushfire Royal Commission
on 18.5.09 that: “Consideration should
be given to how a positive community fire
safety culture can be developed in Victoria.
Focused purpose needed
Policies and pronouncements can’t
achieve this alone, there must be practical
evidence of a focused, collective purpose”.
http://www.sia.org.au/news/updates/
rc_siasubmission.html.
In essence we believe that going on
past experiences not much is likely to be
achieved unless there is a really sound
system for involving and motivating people.
• If the usual system is adopted some
people will listen to the advice and take
some action to improve the defendability
of their homes.
• Others will take insufficient
precautions, or none at all, believing it’s just
more bureaucratic interference, coupled
with the mindset of “My home is my castle
and I will guard the drawbridge”.
We believe a system that properly
engages the community to develop a ‘safety
culture’ is the only way to change attitudes
and get people to accept that they are
in fact contributors to the response to a
bushfire threat.
A ‘culture maturity grid’ as follows
should be distributed for people to
complete and hand in so that a group
statistical analysis can be made without
casting reflections on any individual.
Continued next page
COMMUNITY FIRE SAFETY CULTURE MATURITY GRID 2009
Maturity Level
VALUE
0-Ignorance
1-Entry Level
2-Novice
3-Mediocrity
4-Excellence
5-Perfection
Value No 1
ESTABLISH
PREVENTION IN
BUSHFIRE PRONE
AREAS
There is widespread
uncertainty about
essential fire risk
prevention
Total Fire Ban day
restrictions are
adhered to. Media
announcements
and TFB signs are
displayed.
Planned fuel reduction
burning is conducted
in consultation within
the community that it
is intended to protect.
Community/
visitors know if
and where there
are designated
Community
Fire Refuges or
Emergency Shelters
Reporting methods
for the movements
of suspect people
or activities have
a ‘feedback’
component.
Both communities
and visitors to fire
prone areas are well
informed of the
bushfire risks and
preventive strategies
Value No 2
WE PREPARE FOR
BUSHFIRES
We don’t do anything
specific to prepare
for bushfires
Spring cleaning
outside is evident.
Gutter cleaning, tree
pruning and dried
grass and leaves
being racked up and
removed.
Walk around looking
for and removing all
ember attack entry
point exposures is
completed.
Active defence
equipment
including
independent water
supply and delivery
systems has been
tested.
Residential and
out buildings are
ready to withstand
an ember attack if
necessary without
an active defence.
We know exactly what
we need to do to
prepare for bushfires
and we always do it.
We have not
formalized what
people’s needs
are or what fire
equipment is
available
Neighbours talk
about their
preparations towards
a defensible dwelling
and where they are
at with their efforts.
Everyone participates
in fire authority
supported community
bushfire safety
meetings.
Bushfire defensive
strategies are
widely sourced and
decisions are made
collectively within
the community.
Plans to help
with vulnerable
people, animals
and pets have
been considered
with variability’s in
extreme weather.
Community support
information is well
known and kept up-todate on a community
level internet
network. All activities
are tracked and
recognized.
Value No 4
WE DEVELOP
AND SHARE OUR
RESOURCES
Whatever we do it is
done in isolation to
everyone else.
Individual physical
effort and capability
limitations for
actual fire defence
activities, is made
known for planning.
Access to and use of
neighbour’s water
delivery equipment
has been shown if
the owner becomes
unavailable any time.
Neighbour’s homes
that are easily
defended have
been assessed as a
‘place to relocate’
if the need arises.
Where Residential
Safe Fire Refuges
exist in defensible
dwellings, access
limitations have
been established.
Our activities are
continually driving us
towards self reliance
as a community.
Value No 5
WE KNOW WHEN TO
STAY AND DEFEND OR
LEAVE EARLY.
We have yet to
develop our own
bushfire plan.
Plans to leave
early to relocate
have been made
after considering
our limitations and
consequences.
Local open spaces free
of fuel and vegetation
as safer locations has
been factored into
leave early and safe
returning plans.
Plans to stay
and defend have
been made after
considering options
and consequences.
Everyone has
resolved not to
travel in a car
while the area
is likely to come
under an ember
attack.
We review and
practice our bushfire
plan for simplicity
and effectiveness
continuously.
BSP Workbook p 11-27
Value No 3
WE DRAW ON
COMMUNITY SUPPORT
Community Fireguard
BSP Workbook P 8-10
4
Fire Safety and Emergency
Training Technologies
From page 4
The scorecards would provide an indication of the
community’s ‘collective assessment of their preventive
measures’ in place at that point in time.
Feedback would then be presented in the form of percentage
bar graphs to highlight shortcomings.
The second step would be to develop a ‘Community Fire
Safety Maturity Grid’.
The residents within the community would again consider
what’s needed to close the gaps for moving to a higher level of
‘organisational maturity’.
BullsEye digital fire simulator
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Grid ready to go
We have a Fire Safety Culture Maturity Grid fully developed
and ready to go. It has been drafted as a guide, given the
prevailing seasonal timing limitations before summer bushfire
period.
The residents would review the levels and take necessary
steps as they believe appropriate.
Developing their own ‘safety culture maturity grid’ would
go way beyond an information session at the local community
hall.
The grid would enable everyone to see at a glance where
they’re at and enable trained facilitators to support them in
taking the appropriate levels of action.
“What gets measured and rewarded, gets done”. (Larry
Hansen www.12hsos.com)
Will culture measurement help prevention?
If previous use of these social concepts in the building and
construction industry is anything to go by, it will.
The outcomes of the ‘safety culture maturity grid’
introduced by the Launceston City Council in Tasmania and
other industries in the US show that attitudes can be changed
for favourable improvement if the right approach is taken.
“Culture predicts performance” (Don Eckenfelder
www.cuturethesos.com)
Community Fire Culture scorecards and Fire Culture
Maturity grids could be completed within weeks and with the
community engaging in self reliance actions, most of the
Royal Commission’s recommendations could be implemented
promptly.
Gas Detector Training System
Footnote:
Kelvin Blackney was a fireman in the
1960’s trained in aircraft crash and rescue
and a member of the Lara Rural Fire Brigade.
In January 1969. his township sustained
significant fire losses. During mopping up
operations he realised how close he’d come
to losing everything and vowed he’d never let that happen
again.
At the beginning of every summer season he refines
defendability requirements of his home as it applies to
bushfires.
In 1993 he was awarded for outstanding contribution
in the field of fire awareness in Victoria in the category of
Community Individual.
As chairman of the Safety Institute of Australia (Geelong
Branch) he became aware in 2001 of a culture improvement
process called ‘Values-Driven Safety (VDS)’ and introduced
the concepts into the construction industry.
He believes VDS has a place in Community Fire Safety
culture as he organises bushfire awareness with residents for
the 2009-10 season.
ITS LPG Live-fire simulator
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•
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•
Breathing Apparatus Blindmask Electronically simulating BA mask fogging.
Mob: 0466 598 969 Email: [email protected]
www.bullexsafety.com.au
Winner of the 2008 Victorian
Fire Awareness Award
5
Workplace Safety
‘Safe Work Australia
Week’ focuses on need
for safety
Safe Work Australia’s annual ‘Safe Work Australia Week’ will
again focus national attention on safety in the workplace and the
importance of improving OHS throughout Australian workplaces.
It aims to encourage employers in particular, to concentrate on workplace
measures to reduce death, injury and disease.
With more than 140,000 Australians seriously injured at work each year
and more than 250 killed as a result of work-related injuries, it’s a muchneeded initiative.
This year’s event from October 25 to 31 will be very much a D-I-Y safety
event, with employers being encouraged to stage events in their workplaces
to raise awareness of safety issues affecting their workers, preventing
workplace incidents and managing injuries.
2009 Work Safe
Forum
The Perth 2009 Work Safe Forum
will be held October 27 at the Perth
Convention Exhibition Centre as
WA’s key event during Safe Work
Australia Week.
Key note speaker, Dr Alison Dale,
from safety consultancy Sentis, will
speak about the inevitable plateauing of
improvements to behaviour-based safety
systems and the move to cognitivebased safety systems.
Plenary speakers include:
Professor Steve Allsop, Director of
the National Drug Institute of Australia
and Adjunct Professor with the Centre
for International Health, Division of
Health Sciences at Curtin University
will speak about drugs and alcohol in
the workplace; and Mark Leverence,
HS & E Manager at RCR Engineering
will speak on thought processes and
motivating factors of peoples’ decision
making.
National campaign
to improve
scaffolding safety
Workplace safety authorities
across Australia are undertaking
a nationally coordinated targeted
intervention campaign to improve
scaffolding safety in the construction
industry.
The national campaign will see
workplace safety inspectors from all
states visit residential and commercial
construction sites to ensure safe work
procedures are in place to address the
risks of erecting and using scaffolding.
Sydney Safety Conference will be big!
This year’s Sydney Safety
Conference and Show to be held
October 27 to 29 seems set to be
one of the biggest events of its
kind to be held in Australia.
The event will present more than
50 Australian and international
speakers in its program.
The first day of the program
will be focused on the subject of
national harmonisation with a series
of speakers discussing legislation and
how it will be implemented.
Day two will cover a range of
hands-on topics among them Best
Practice OHS Reporting; Australia
Post’s experience with Safety Positive
Performance Indicators; the
OHS implications with an ageing
workforce and leadership in a crisis.
Day three topics will mainly relate
to health issues.
One key note topic will relate
to the death of a welder who was
wearing damp clothing and what
should be done in the interests
of welder safety in high humidity
climates.
Other topics to be covered
include turning stress into success;
returning workers from injury time
off to employment and the effect of
6
workplace hazards on the human body.
The conference will conclude with a
mock trial of a company being prosecuted
for breach of OHS regulations.
In addition to the conference there will
be interactive live demonstrations of a free
fall prevention workshop and Workcover
NSW workshops on workplace bullying,
workers compensation claims and the
smart move toolkit.
The exhibitor list is expected to have
more than 300 companies taking part.
Further info:
www.thesafetyshow.com.au/
Offshore industry urged to focus on
causes of incidents affecting safety
of offshore facilities in the 2009-10
A strategic
period.
approach
“We are looking for leadership across
to planning
the sector to take a more strategic
for safety on
approach to planning for safety in
offshore petroleum facilities is needed,
Issue
80in what
August
operations
is a high2009
hazard
according to the acting CEO of the
environment.”
National Offshore Petroleum Safety
“Although each facility operator
Authority, Simon Schubach.
Guidance
Instrumented
Systems
develops
a detailed safety case
to
“Planning for safe operations
shouldon Safety
describe how they will manage risks
be guided by findings from extensive data
on their and
particularly
facility
– NOPSA’s(EEMUA) has recently published
collected from industryThe
over Engineering
the past five Equipment
Materials
Association
common findings on root causes across
years,” he said.
Application of IEC 61511 to Safety Instrumented Systems in the UK Process Industries (EEMUA
industry should be addressed in forward
NOPSA data shows that the top three
Programs focus
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maintenance requiring improvement,
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protecting the safety of offshore personnel.
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of
the
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are
to show
that to
they have A
met
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under the Offshore Petroleum and on the
Mr Schubach said NOPSA
intends
wealth
industry
safety
data is
NOPSA website or it can be ordered from
available
the NOPSA
website (Submerged
look for evidence that industry
is acting
on Storage
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[email protected]
Safety
on Offshore Facilities)
(MoSOF).
indicatorsRegulations
section and in1996
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incidents during its audits
and inspections
The section on legal aspects is not applicable in its entirety to Australian law, but concepts such
as ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable) and comments about application of the standard
to existing installations should be familiar to operators of offshore petroleum facilities in Australia.
Of particular interest is the document’s guidance on technical matters. For example, the
appendices contain guidance on SIL determination, functional safety plans and competency
management that is not covered in the standard itself. The document can be obtained from the
EEMUA website. 2
HSR forum proves popular
This year’s Health and Safety Representatives (HSRs) Forum was again held in conjunction with
the APPEA National Oil and Gas Safety Conference. This integrated approach created
opportunities for improved communication between industry and the workforce. This year
NOPSA led the steering group that managed the agenda for the HSR Forum. A record number of
attendees (180) participated in the forum, and many remained to attend the Safety Conference.
The two major themes of the HSR forum were:
•
process safety culture and safety leadership
•
the utilisation of the safety case by HSRs
7
Chem Centre at Curtin University
A
ChemCentre finds a new
home at Curtin University
fter more than 60 years at its current location,
ChemCentre is relocating to the Resources
and Chemistry Precinct, a $116 million facility
located at Curtin University of Technology in Bentley.
ChemCentre, in the south wing of the building, will
incorporate four levels of specialised laboratory and
working space, as well as customised housing for its safety,
forensics and emergency response units.
CEO, Peter Millington, believes the move will enhance
ChemCentre’s current operations, leading to greater
collaboration with partners from a range of sectors.
‘The customised modern laboratories and resources will
not only improve our efficiency, they will also allow us
to further develop our capabilities for industry,’ said Mr
Millington.
The Precinct also houses Curtin’s Department of
Chemistry, and is adjacent to the Australian Minerals
Research Centre.
The move is a substantial undertaking, as individual
ChemCentre departments will be moved over an eight-week
period, so as to remain fully operational during this time.
For up to date information, call (08) 9422 9800, or visit
chemcentre.wa.gov.au.
Mining industry fatality rate lower
than what the industry is credited for
The incident rate of fatalities
per 1000 employees in the mining
industry has dropped dramatically
over the past 30 years and is much
lower than seems to be generally
recognised.
According to the ‘Monitor,’
newsletter of the Mining and
Resource Contractors Safety Training
Association there is an unwarranted
alarmist reaction to fatalities occurring
in the mining industry.
It makes the point that while there
is no acceptable fatality incident rate,
the mining industry is one industry
that has markedly improved its safety
rating in the past 30 years.
The underground mining sector
has seen fatality rates reduce from an
average rate in the 1980s of 1.6 to .2 –
a reduction of almost 90%
Rock falls
It says the major cause of fatalities
before 2000 was rock falls which have
since been almost eliminated. The 10
fatalities since 2000 have been due to
five different causes.
The surface sector has seen an
incident reduction from an average in
the 1980s of .15 to .06 in the 10 years
since 2000 – a reduction of almost
60%.
Most fatalities have occurred in the
8
use of plant and machinery used in
transporting ore.
The newsletter makes the point that
this reduction has occurred despite a
massive increase in the workforce, many
of whom have had little or no prior
industry experience.
It makes the point that in 2007/2008
the fatality incidence rates per 1000
employees in various industries were:
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing Construction Transportation & Storage Manufacturing Mining .16
.04
.12
.04
.03
OHS training for heavy vehicle
drivers gaining wider acceptance
T
raining programs for drivers of
trucks and machinery in order
to keep them fitter and healthier
is gaining wider acceptance.
Exercise physiologist, Mikala Pougnault,
said that while workplace injury rates
across Australia were starting to bear the
fruits of a greater enlightenment towards
injury prevention, the frequency of injuries
resulting from operation of heavy vehicles
remains concernedly high.
She said that injury statistics for the WA
mining industry indicate that in 2005/06,
10% of all injuries were attributed to heavy
vehicle operation while driving, or getting
in and out of the vehicle.
“The causes of these injuries commonly
involve shock and trauma, time period
behind the wheel, ergonomics of the cabin,
seat set-up, posture, and serviceability of
seats, seat capacity, vibration, and operator
control.
“Whole Body Vibration (WBV) is a
common experience for vehicle operators,
particularly in bulldozers, dump or haul
trucks, graders, loaders, and equipment
transport machines.
“The operators of these
vehicles are subject to jolts and
jars, in addition to a vibration
throughout their entire body
while working in the cabin.
“Research shows that jarring
and shock alone, is responsible
for up to 30% of injuries to the
back,” she said.
The effects of being subjected
to WBV can range from a mild
discomfort and feelings of
fatigue, to the development of
moderate to severe back and neck
injuries.
Musculoskeletal injuries alone
account for 50% of all injuries sustained
by individuals who drive vehicles as part of
their job, with the majority of these injuries
occurring in the lower back, neck, knees
and ankles.
Driver/operator training is essential to
address the setup and positioning of the
seat within the cab while awareness of how
to position the vehicle when stationary is
also of value.
Ms Pougnault said the training progam
provided by Worksite Fitness and
Rehabilitation trains operators on seat
adjustment, postural habits, rest breaks,
physical conditioning and procedures for
safe entry and exit of the vehicle.
For further information on implementing
the Healthy Driver program contact WFR at
[email protected] or on
08 9325 8333.
Spot the killer?
Call Molescan TODAY to visit YOUR worksite
Mobile Scanning & clinics Australia wide
Visit: www.molescan.com.au for locations
 1300 665 337
9
Staff behaving badly
I
t’s Friday afternoon and the boss has decided
it’s time to reward his hard working staff with
a few beers to wind down the working week
and get them in the mood for the weekend.
A reminder regarding
the Melbourne Cup
and Christmas parties
One beer leads to another, which leads to another
and another and by knock-off time young Frank,
who’s had more than his fair share and who’s been
leering at the receptionist all afternoon and making
more than the odd off-colour suggestion to her,
decides it’s time for home.
He staggers into his car, squeels his tyres and roars off.
He runs a few amber lights, mounts the kerb a couple
of times and three blocks from home his luck runs out. A
child darts out from behind a car chasing a ball and into
the path of Frank’s car.
Dulled by too much alcohol, his reactions are slow. He
brakes and swerves to miss her, but hits her with the car’s
fender, throwing her onto the kerb. Now out of control, he
slams into a power pole, bringing it down on top of him
and trapping him.
The child is left a paraplegic and Frank is severely
injured. Her parents sue him.
Frank’s lawyer, Mr Diddle of Furphy, Rort and Diddle,
advises him to sue his boss who failed to ensure Frank’s
safety at work by irresponsibly serving him alcohol.
So what are Frank and his enterprising lawyer’s chances
of success in the midst of this tragedy?
In Australia we’re yet to see a legal case where an
employee has taken legal action against their employer
for irresponsibly serving alcohol at work but the case of
Rosser v Vintage Nominees Pty Ltd, licensee of the Liars
Saloon in Victoria Park, possibly opens a can of worms.
In this case the licensee was held partially responsible
for an accident in which Mr Rosser crashed his car after
drinking at the premises.
10
While the situation of Friday afternoon drinks at work,
or other causes for workplace celebrations, doesn’t involve
licensed premises, Ian Curlewis, Partner of Perth firm,
Lavan Legal warns that festivities that get out of hand
could involve:
• A damages claim by an employee injured in a fight;
• Sexual harassment at the party which could be vicariously attributed to the employer; and
• Dismissal of an employee as a result of conduct at the party resulting in an unfair dismissal application.
Legal action as a result of an alcohol induced car crash is
another possibility.
Mr Curlewis says that without becoming total killjoys,
employers need to adopt basic guidelines as the provision
of a safe workplace is every employer’s responsibility.
“When liquor in particular is provided by an employer to
staff, the responsibility for the appropriate and safe intake
rests heavily on the employer,” Mr Curlewis said.
He says responsible practice includes:
• having liquor served by professional bar staff
• making sure anyone serving alcohol doesn’t serve it to someone already intoxicated;
• providing food, water and non alcoholic drinks;
• ensuring juvenile employees don’t consume alcohol;
• monitoring boorish or sleazy employee
behaviour or unwanted attention to co-employees.
“Responsible liquor practices will partly reduce the
potential for litigation but they’re no substitute for sound
management and precautionary reminders to staff about
proper conduct and protocols before events like the
Melbourne Cup or Christmas parties,” Mr Curlewis said.
11
Mine Safety
Taking mine
safety to China
Min
Re
CoalSAFE
C
hina’s massive mining industry is regarded
as the deadliest in the world with thousands
dying each year in mining accidents.
Last year 3,215 mining industry employees lost their lives
in China’s coal mines alone, and that was the good news –
the numbers were a 15.1% improvement on 2007.
They were victims of the nation’s poor safety standards
and illegal operations.
China closed some 1,054 illegal coal mines in 2008, but
with 80% of its 16,000 mines illegal, there’s still a long way
to go.
However, China is getting a little help from Australia in
the shape of a major mine safety demonstration project at
the Xuandong coal mine 150 km from Beijing.
It’s being managed by Queensland’s Safety in Mines
Testing and Research Station (SIMTARS).
The mine will demonstrate Australian mine safety
technology, training and education in risk management
while adopting leading practices and technologies to
minimise injuries and fatalities, according to the web site,
Mining Safety.
The lessons learned at the Xuangdong demonstration
project are aimed at improving the standard of coal
mine safety at coal mines throughout China according
to Queensland Mines and Energy Minister, Stephen
Robertson.
Coal-S
CoalSAFE
Coal Research Institute (SYCCRI) that will see its safety
chambers distributed throughout the country.
MineARC has been working with SYCCRI to develop
®
and introduce regulations for compulsory
refuge chambers
in all licensed underground coal mines, Designed
using its CoalSAFE
to provid
Refuge Chamber as the model for industry best practice.
for
coal
miners in e
The company says SYCCRI’s move on
behalf
of the
Chinese Central Government demonstrates its commitment
to bringing the country’s mining safety up to the standards
ofthE
developed
nations such®as Australia and the USA.
CSS CoAl-SAFE
t
ChAmbEr pAtEnt pEnDing 2008903738
C
Coal-SAFE
MineARC Coal-SAFE®
CSS Model
Safety Chambers
Meanwhile, closer to home, West Australian safety
chamber manufacturer, MineARC has signed a distribution
agreement with the Shenyang branch of the China
Providing occupational and environment al
noise measurement and assessment
products and support for 20 years...
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12
www.minearc
Scary prospect of directors being
charged heightens HS&E awareness
By Sue Watt, Senior SH&E Consultant, SAI Global
T
he possibility of company
directors and executive
management facing criminal
conviction for workplace murder and
manslaughter has catapulted Health,
Safety and Environment (SH&E) risk to
the top of the corporate mind.
While SH&E may be considered
administratively onerous because of the
sheer number of obligations (up to 10,000),
it means it is imperative a model delivering
management for protecting businesses and
their directors be implemented.
SH&E professionals need to cover the
gamut – from a comprehensive knowledge
of relevant laws and legal obligations, to
managing a consistent communications
framework both vertically and horizontally,
to ensuring compliance and reporting on
the SH&E program.
As business leaders become personally
liable for breaches and corporate
reputations hang in the balance, SH&E
professionals will need to step up to the
Board and executive management to
demonstrate that obligations are being met
and the systems will stand scrutiny.
• But with so many obligations
to be aware of and usually
limited resources, what can a
SH&E professional do to create
a model for protecting a business
and increasing productivity?
A key challenge is to maintain a clear
line of sight to the Board and executive
management, and to influence a business’s
risk policy.
The key elements to effective approach
to SH&E are leadership, culture, assurance
and improvement, framework and system
and most importantly, a comprehensive and
up to date obligations register.
•How can we ensure that
SH&E professionals have access
to the board and are able to
influence risk policy?
There are key elements to leadership
that the SH&E practitioner aiming for
governance excellence can manage:
• Develop Key Risk Indicators (KRIs) and engage with the board to ensure these are considered business critical (by going beyond personal risk and emphasising the effects on productivity, reputation and the risk of prosecution)
• Influence risk policy
• Help set short and medium term performance objectives
• Drive a culture of open communication from the top down and bottom up.
Open communications
Open communications that encourage
reporting of risks and incidents will allow
a practitioner to drive risk down to an
individual level which should be supported
by effective staff training and assessments.
This can help maintain a positive SH&E
culture and drive performance against the
business’s KRIs. Open communications
will also demonstrate to staff that reports
will be acted on and changes made - so
that openness in communication engenders
continuous improvement in practice.
As we saw from the Longford gas
explosion (Esso was sued for failing to
meet several obligations under the Work
Health and Safety Act 1985, even though
the Victorian Workcover Authority
had conducted an audit and made no
recommendations), external audits are no
guarantee of compliance.
Even internal audits rarely look beyond
the business’s procedures and policies
and into the maintenance and standard
of the obligations register. The SH&E
professional has a vital role in assurance
and improvement. By knowing all the
legal obligations and having an effective
management system, they can ensure a
change from framework into behaviour.
Obligations Register
An obligations register is the cornerstone
of a successful SH&E governance system,
helping a practitioner keep track of Acts
and regulations, Standards, Statutory Codes
and Policies and other documents – but it’s
a living document that must be managed.
Knowing the relevant legislation,
and maintaining a system that complies
with certification standards is the key to
completeness – just knowing black letter
law, or just complying with standards,
won’t meet the needs of the business. Both
are necessary, together with managing
compliance, as part of an excellent
management system.
13
• How does a SH&E
professional make sure that the
obligations register is translated
into positive actions and
instructions for task owners?
Obligations need to have owners, and
those owners need to have business
processes and behaviours that make sure
those obligations are fulfilled. At the very
least, SH&E obligations should be broken
down into 140 process elements – each
process and each task incorporating the
relevant black letter law.
But keeping an obligations register up
to date is a daunting task, with up to 1,500
changes a year that need to be actioned and
the need to maintain currency across the
entire register.
This brings us back to the question of
how a practitioner, who does after all need
to know in detail the legal obligations of the
business, can step back from the detail to
gain the necessary exposure at board level.
Traditionally, an SH&E practitioner
would communicate with hundreds, if not
thousands, of employees and end up with a
jumble of documents and reports – certainly
no model for governance excellence.
Is there a better option?
An enterprise-wide technology solution
spanning KRIs, incidents, identification
of new risks and audits would enable a
practitioner to deliver communications and
responsive reporting.
A system and framework supported by
technology lays the groundwork, while
the SH&E professional’s knowledge of
obligations makes the system fully integrated.
A SH&E professional has to play a role
in positive cultural change, and aim for
acceptance at all levels to really achieve
governance excellence. A strong system
supported by a technological solution to
the administrative aspects of managing risk
will ultimately reduce losses to businesses,
decrease the personal risk to directors and
enhance productivity – delivering a model of
governance excellence.
For more detail on the framework
discussed above, you can request a copy
of the white paper, SH&E Governance
Excellence: From Worker to Boardroom
from SAI Global by going to our web site or
emailing: [email protected]
Education
New degree to meet demand
for safety professionals
A
new four year Bachelor of
Occupational Health and
Safety Science degree from
the University of Queensland,
offering career opportunities in
a diverse range of workplaces,
from mines to movie sets, will be
available to students in 2010.
UQ Professor of Occupational
Health and Safety, Mike Capra,
said he believed its graduate OHS
specialists would be in demand due to
a workforce shortage.
“The program was developed at the
request of the OHS industry, including
the Safety Institute of Australia,
which saw the need for a professional
qualification in the field,” Professor
Capra said.
“The lack of well-qualified OHS
professionals is causing alarm among
members of major OHS associations,
government authorities and employers.
“Historically OHS education has
been a career ‘add on’, often a short
course or minor area of study in a
broader degree, so UQ consulted
with stakeholders and practising OHS
professionals to develop a program to
meet their needs.
“The result is a four-year degree
that includes a strong scientific focus,
a significant practical component and
covers mental health workplace issues,
which was a specific request from
industry.”
Students will learn about a variety
of issues in the workplace including
chemical, physical, mechanical,
14
psychological and biological hazards.
They will also study law, ergonomics,
risk management, behaviour change
and workplace conflict as part of the
program.
The in-depth knowledge and
practical skills provided by this
program means graduates will be
considered highly-trained professionals,
Professor Capra said.
For more information on this new
program go to
www.uq.edu.au/health/ohsdegree
ICL Plastics explosion: are there
lessons for Australia?
A
catastrophic explosion in a
Scottish plastics factory may
hold safety lessons for Australia
in the safe use of LPG.
On May 11 2004 a leaking LPG pipe
caused an explosion at the ICL Plastics
factory in Maryhill, Glasgow killing nine
people and injuring many more.
LPG had leaked from the underground
metal pipe into the factory’s basement and
when it ignited, the explosion brought
down the four storey Victorian era factory.
Lord Brian Gill, Scotland’s second most
senior judge, chaired the inquiry into the
disaster to find it was caused by a pipe that
was “out of sight and out of mind” and
which “would have cost about £400 to
replace.”
The use of reticulated gas in the Perth
metropolitan area stretches back to the
1920s and even further (the City of Perth
Gas Company was formed in 1882) so
there’s obvious potential for similar “out
of sight, out of mind” gas piping.
The consequences of poor inspection
and inadequate monitoring and
maintenance were amply demonstrated by
the explosion at Apache Energy’s Varanus
Island gas plant in June 2008.
Luckily no one was killed by this
explosion but the state’s domestic gas
supplies were cut by approximately 30%,
causing massive economic disruption until
supplies were restored months later.
Alinta Gas were approached for
comment but declined.
Photograph sourced from the Scottish Sun
Coroner highlights need for better
mine lighting and ground support
A
Coroner’s report on a mining fatality has highlighted the
need for better lighting underground.
The West Australian Coroner has highlighted the need for
better mine lighting and better information on ground support for
miners in a report on the death of an airleg miner in September 2006.
The miner had been struck by a large rock while drilling stripping
holes in the sidewall of his work area.
The inquest found a possible factor in the death was the difficulty
of distinguishing between two similar looking rock types using light
available to him – a standard cap-lamp.
This made it difficult to identify rock structures and discontinuities
that may have revealed a wedge-shaped block of rock that could fall if
not adequately supported.
The Coroner said the case highlighted the need for additional light
sources in mining areas where it might be important to distinguish
differences in rock type and to easily identify potential adverse
structures in it.
It was also recommended that:
“ … when airleg miners are working as contractors underground and are
required to install ground support, they be provided by mine management with a
short document which clearly identifies the precise extent of ground support required,
including the circumstances in which it is appropriate for those miners to exercise
their discretion to provide additional support.”
He also suggested mine managers should supply airleg miners with a
short document clearly identifying the precise extent of ground support
that was required.
15
Feature Report
2009 WA OHS Conferen
T
Notes by Gavin Waugh
he collaborative WA OSH Conference
recently held in Fremantle with IFAP
was a great success with thanks due
to Stewart McDonald and his team from
Vertical Events for their very professional
event management.
This event broke new ground for the
unification of the safety industry in WA, creating
a momentum to include more organisations
in next years’ August conference at the Perth
Exhibition Centre.
I would love to be in a position to dedicate an
entire issue of the magazine to writing up the
outcomes of each SIA conference but that will
have to wait until finances permit.
An interesting focus of the event’s preconference session was the vast chasm existing
between safety qualifications and employment
requirements.
Pam Pryor spoke of the need to set
sound benchmarks for standards, content
and consistency among courses offered by
universities across Australia as identified through
research out of QUT.
More funding needed
There’s still much work to be done in this area
so I’m sure Pam would be grateful for any ideas
or sources for funding to further promote this
work. Look out for more later about “you and
your safety employment”.
The main body of the conference flowed
with consistency across the steams, much to the
efforts of Arianne George (IFAP) in chasing,
harassing and getting the speakers coordinated.
The overall trend now appearing and strongly
noted in this event is for a greater emphasis
on jurisdiction compliance and other broader
management matters. ie: Where are we in the
bigger picture?
This seems to be a maturing progression
from the past view of “what we did on the shop
floor”. I believe, the more knowledge we can
give to the industry the more professional will be
growth of the safety industry overall.
Bryan Russell is our event coordinator for
the 2010 conference and is already developing
program concepts. Express your interest through
www.siawa.org.au
Also visit. www.sia.org.au and
www.siaconference.com.au
Thanks to the WA OSH sponsors and exhibitors
Active Injury Management
Aggreko
Body Active Consultancy
Coffey Environments
Constructatruck
Deb Australia
Edith Cowan University
First Aid Health and Safety
Gemini Medical Services
GIO
16
Hartac
Hostile Environment Services
IFAP
Instrulabs Pty Ltd
Konekt Australia
nce with IFAP - Fremantle
www.
2.2
Total Cholesterol
Cholesterol is a type of fat (lipid) made by the body and is p
essential for good health; however, a high cholestero
(hypercholesterolemia) is associated with an increase risk of
as coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular
bloods were taken during a non-fasting period, candidates’ res
Cholesterol Profile
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60
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55.17
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50 44.83
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proactively 2.2
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that 46.6%
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high blood pressure; 55.17% had high levels of cholesterol; 55.17% high levels of
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30
65.52% had increased
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had highwith
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(hypercholesterolemia)
is associated
risk of health problems, such
20
glucose.
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stroke
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The assessments were a brief snapshot of Prime’s corporate health services that
10
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The assessments include body composition measures that take in waist girth, hip
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girth and waist hip ratio; blood screening that includes cholesterol, blood glucose,
PSA testing, liver and iron studies while fitness measures can assess flexibility, lung
Cholesterol Profile
function, cardio vascular fitness and strength.
Results can provide a comprehensive overview of the key health issues within a
workplace. Prime can then provide
assistance in implementing health and wellness
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Worksafe notes
Inspection of home based care reveals concerns
W
orksafe WA has reported
a recent inspection
of home based care
organisations revealed concerns,
particularly with protecting workers
against communicable diseases.
Inspectors found that employers
were generally complying with
legislation for the majority of
hazards, but one area of concern
was communicable diseases because
employers were either not aware of the
communicable disease hazards or were
not taking action to reduce the risks.
Inspectors found workers were not
provided with the option of Hepatitis
B vaccination or information on
the transmission of communicable
diseases and how to minimise risks of
contracting diseases.
Other issues identified related to
the provision of personal protective
equipment such as gloves for infection
control and chemical exposure, systems
to maintain communication with
workers working alone and the provision
and testing of RCDs as protection
against electrical hazards.
WorkSafe intends to release
guidance material for home based care
organisations that will address the
hazards common in the industry and
advise employers on how to minimise
the risks associated with these hazards.
Laundries and powder coaters to come under scrutiny
A
campaign of inspecting
commercial laundries and
businesses that undertake
powder coating is being undertaken
between now and April 2010.
According to Commissioner,
Nina Lyhne the campaign follows a
pilot study that uncovered a lack of
awareness of some of the hazards in
these industries.
“She said powder coating was a
process in which the coating is applied
electrostatically and then cured under
heat to allow it to flow and form a
“skin”.
In the past, the powder contained a
hazardous substance known as TGIC.
TGIC had been removed from major
brands, but some cheap imported
powders may still contain TGIC.
Fined for pedestrian danger
Bassendean motor body
building company, Park
Motor Body Builders (WA)
Pty Ltd was recently fined
$1500 – plus $1600 in costs
for failing to minimise the
risk of injury to pedestrians
from vehicles moving
around its yard.
WorkSafe inspectors
investigating an incident at the
company’s premises in March
2007 observed that movement
and speed of vehicles and
plant were not managed
to minimise injury risk to
pedestrians, as required under
OH&S regulations.
Pedestrian employees were
not isolated from traffic nor
were there signs warning of
the presence of trucks moving
through the area.
WorkSafe WA
Commissioner Nina Lyhne
said 18 West Australian
workers had died over
the past eight years in
incidents involving plant and
pedestrians.
She said a major concern
was that operators of
mobile plant could not see
pedestrians especially when
they were close to the vehicle
or machine
A Guidance Note on the
Safe Movement of Vehicles
at Workplaces is available via
WorkSafe – telephone 9327
8777 or on the website at
www.worksafe.wa.gov.au.
18
She said there’s also a suspected lack
of awareness of the hazardous nature
of other chemicals used, especially
hydrofluoric acid solutions and chromic
acid solutions, a known carcinogen.
Laundries and drycleaners
Ms Lyhne said the past five years, had
seen the number of reported injuries
in laundries and drycleaners increase
significantly, with 46 workers seriously
injured and not able to return to work
within 60 days.
Most of the injuries were muscle and
joint sprains and strains sustained while
handling or lifting or as a result of falls.
The campaign will look at priority
areas such as manual handling,
electricity, hazardous substances and
slips, trips and falls, as well as guarding
of machinery, operation of pressure
vessels and fire and emergency safety.
Powerline contact costs
a company $5000
Underground installation company, Buckby
Contracting Pty Ltd was recently fined $5000 after
an excavator boom came into contact with overhead
powerlines.
The company pleaded guilty to failing to ensure plant
controlled by an employee did not enter the danger zone
of an overhead powerline after it was contracted in May
2007 to install sewerage and water services and perform
sub-soil drainage works at a site in Maddington.
The company had consulted Western Power about
isolating or insulating the powerlines so the work could
be performed safely underneath them but were told this
could not be done.
Western Power proposed alternative measures but these
were not followed with the result an excavator operator
began excavation and clearing works on May 10, and when
he slewed the machine around, it struck the 22,000kv
powerlines, scorching the boom and cutting power to the
surrounding area.
Trolley collection company fined
$12,000 for false information
A South Australia-based
trolley collection company
has been fined $12,000 in
the Joondalup Magistrates
Court for providing falsified
training documents for a
trolley collector killed in a car
park in 2007.
Honest & Frank Pty Ltd
pleaded guilty to providing an
inspector with information that
was false or misleading after
a trolley collector employed
by the company was killed as
a result of falling off a trolley
trailer in the car park of the
Lakeside Joondalup Shopping
Centre in September 2007.
As part of the investigation
into the death, the WorkSafe
inspector required the employer
to produce training and
induction records for the trolley
collector.
The document submitted
bore a signature the company
claimed was that of the
deceased worker. It was a copy,
and the inspector requested
to see the original document,
which the company claimed
could not be located.
The signature on the
induction record and the
signature on the man’s passport
were examined by the Police
Handwriting Analysis Division,
which concluded that the
signature on the induction
record was a photographic
reproduction of the one on the
passport.
New rules for RCDs and smoke alarms now apply
Sellers of residential property are now
required by state law to have two Residual
Current Devices (RCDs), installed in the
property.
These safety devices must be installed by
the Settlement Date.
The same law applies to owners with rental
properties: All residential premises being
newly leased must comply from August 9 this
year.
For existing tenants where no new lease is
required, the RCDs must be fitted by 9 August
2011.
RCD devices are designed to save people
from electrocution and to protect against
fires which can start from wires with
damaged or perished insulation.
Any licensed electrician can supply and
fit the RCDs on the switchboard of your
property.
The new regulations will mainly affect
properties built before 2001, when it became
compulsory to fit at least two RCDs in all
newly built properties.
In addition to this RCD requirement, there
will soon be an additional requirement to
have hard-wired smoke alarms installed in
all residential properties being sold or made
available for lease.
This law is expected to come into effect in
October this year. Battery operated smoke
alarms will no longer suffice.
For more information about RCDs you can
contact the Division of Energy Safety at the
Department of Commerce in Perth on
9422 5200.
19
News and notes
Dean describes OHS standards
as a ‘regulatory paradox’
Dr Geoff Dell, Dean of the SIA
College of Fellows has described
Australia’s standards on OHS as a
regulatory paradox.
Speaking at the inaugural SIA
Victoria Division Education Awards
in Melbourne, Dr Bell said he found it
ironic that OHS remains a A$30 billion
annual cost to our society, a cost bigger
than the gross GDP of some Pacific
Island nations, yet Australia’s regulatory
framework in every other State and
Territory largely infers that anyone,
regardless of education and experience,
can provide safety and health related
guidance to industry.
“However, if a company needed to
get a water pipe repaired, the Australian
regulatory framework everywhere
mandates a licensed plumber.
I’m sure I am not the only one here
who can see the regulatory paradox in
that regard, he said.
His address was a forerunner to the
presentation of awards which indicated
at least that the standards on OHS
education are increasing substantially.
The principal award went to David
Borys for his thesis titled “Exploring
risk-awareness as a cultural approach
to Safety: Exposing the gap between
work as imagined and work as actually
performed.”
Borys made an ethnographic study
of risk awareness programs at two sites
within a large contract maintenance
organisation. He found that risk
awareness programs split the workplace
approach to safety where the managers
focused on paperwork and the workers
focused on the application of safety
through a “common sense” approach.
Award winners
Category 1: Diploma of
Occupational
Health and Safety
Barry Tanner: Swinburne
University of
Technology
Category 2: B.Sc (OH&
S)
Jesse Saunders of RMIT
University
Category 3: Post Graduate
Diploma in
Occupational Health & Saf
ety
Rob Stewart of La Trobe
University
Category 4: Doctor of Ph
ilosophy,
PhD Thesis in Safety & He
alth
David Borys University of
Ballarat
Graduate Certificate in
OH&S
Shraddha Shah La Trobe
University
Elise Robinson RMIT Un
iversity
Industry welcomes safe work bill
Minerals Council of Australia
Chief Executive Officer Mitchell
Hooke says the passage of the Safe
Work Australia Bill through Federal
Parliament represents a significant
milestone in the move towards a
national Occupational Health and
Safety regulatory regime.
The legislation establishes Safe
Work Australia as an independent
statutory agency to give effect to the
Intergovernmental Agreement for
Regulatory and Operational Reform
and Occupational Health and Safety
agreed by COAG on 3 July 2008.
New Mines
Safety bulletin
The WA Department of Mines
and Petroleum (DMP) has updated
its safety bulletin regarding
the earthing of underground
ammonium nitrate (ANFO) loaders.
The report, ‘Mine Safety Bulletin No
83’ replaces the 1993 Safety Bulletin
and takes into account a range of
Safe Work Australia will have the
critical role of developing a draft
Model OH&S Act.
“The MCA supports a single
OH&S Act covering all sectors and
jurisdictions and industry specific
national regulations, where required,
complemented by national codes of
practice and guidelines,” Mr Hooke
said.
“The minerals industry has been
advocating legislative and regulatory
reform that enhances the protection
of workers and is consistent with the
industry’s goal of zero harm in the
workplace.
changes to industry practices and
regulations.
The bulletin outlines controls to
avoid electrostatic charge accumulation
during ANFO pneumatic loading and
includes methods to provide efficient
discharge paths with semi-conductive
hosing and earthing.
The updated bulletin now requires
workers to use loaders that comply with
a range of stringent manufacturer and
supplier recommendations.
20
“There are currently 10 principal
statutes – six state, two territory and
two Commonwealth – governing
OH&S in Australia as well as numerous
regulations and codes of practice.
This raft of overlapping OH&S
laws, standards and requirements is
confusing for workers and diverts
business from the primary goal of
improving workplace health and
safety.”
The MCA has called for the National
Mine Safety Framework to form the
basis of national minerals industry
specific regulation within the Model
OH&S Act.
Users must also ensure explosives
are loaded through a semi-conductive
hose or tube with a resistance of at
least 15,000 Ohms per metre.
Workers should not use water lines,
compressed air lines, or permanent
electrical earthing systems as a means
of earthing and must use protected
detonators when loading and firing.
The DMP is prompting mines to
display the updated requirements in
a prominent position to minimise the
risk of premature explosive ignition.
What Hazards and Explosive environments are
going unnoticed on production facilities due to
the problems caused by CUI?
A lesson from Hurricanes Katrina
and Rita has a Louisiana refinery
changing the way it protects some of
its tank exteriors.
Several tank exteriors with foam
insulation are now being protected with
a coating that also provides insulation.
The reasoning? Hurricane/Cyclonic
winds can rip away foam insulation from
storage tanks, but an insulative coating
will keep protecting and performing,
despite the weather.
Valero acquired the refinery in St.
Charles, LA, in 2003 and launched a
yearly maintenance painting program
shortly thereafter.
After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
damaged the insulating systems on
several storage tanks in the autumn
of 2005, the company undertook the
coating of three carbon steel storage
tanks as part of its maintenance
program.
The company needed the replacement
system for insulation and aesthetics.
The system would have to provide
thermal insulation to maintain
the stored product at the correct
temperature.
How can the surfaces of pipes and tanks be inspected when they are
covered by conventional insulation and cladding systems?
Following a presentation by the
coating manufacturer’s representative,
Valero chose a water-borne acrylic
coating containing hollow ceramic
particles to protect the tanks.
The insulative coating can protect
surfaces up to 200 C, with peak loads to
260 C, the manufacturer says.
Two of the tanks measure 51m in
diameter and 10 m high. The third tank is
54m in diameter.
DELTACOAT PTY LTD
Authorized Australian & New Zealand distributors of Mascoat Products.
Contact : Mark Hughes
Email : [email protected]
Mob : 0488 190 046
21
Work on the first tank began near the
end of 2005. Based on the appearance
and the thermal retention properties
of the coating on the first tank, the
company decided to go forward with
coating the additional two tanks.
The contractor notes that the waterborne acrylic coating is user friendly and
has no recoat or overcoat requirements,
an important consideration in the humid
climate of Louisiana.
In addition, overspray was not a
concern because the dry fall range of the
insulative coating is relatively narrow at
0.9 to 1.5 m.
The contractor provided all quality
control, monitoring surface preparation
and application as well as measuring wet
and dry mil thicknesses of the coating.
In all, 11,340 sq m of carbon steel had
to be coated.
“We’re very satisfied with what we
got out of the product. It’s maintaining
product at the proper temperature,” he
says.
When Valero’s painting season begins
next year, it will use the insulative
coating on other storage tanks.
“We can eliminate the problem of
corrosion under insulation with this
spray-on coating”.
Mercedes safety
innovations may
have wider
applications
I
nnovations created by Mercedes
Benz for vehicle safety may soon
find wider applications in industry.
Mercedes Benz has created the ‘ESF
2009’, the company’s first Experimental
Safety Vehicle to be produced since 1974
for showcasing a range of safety features
being developed by their engineers.
Features include:
• The PRE-SAFE® Structure system –
the latest innovation in impact
protection consisting of metallic
structures waiting in a collapsed,
space-saving state until they’re inflated
in a collision with airbag gas generator
technology to protect vehicle
occupants.
• The experimental vehicle has another innovative twist
to the airbag with a Braking Bag, an under-car air bag
that inflates before a
collision, increasing braking
performance and reducing damage.
Interactive Vehicle
Communication
uses the increasing number of sensors, cameras and control units in modern cars as information
gathering devices, then networks the information with other vehicles on
the road to provide the driver with an early warning of possible problems.
• PRE-SAFE® Pulse are
airbags in seat belts that move occupants towards the centre of the car at impact.
• The ESF 2009 also has a range of between-seat occupant protection.
• Finally, the vehicle has a spotlight lighting function to specifically
illuminate potential hazards such as kangaroos or pedestrians.
The potential for enhanced car safety
in all of this is obvious, but the PRESAFE® Structure and Interactive Vehicle
Communication technology in particular
could also prove invaluable in a range of
mobile plants.
When it’s needed, an airbag-style gas
generator builds up an internal pressure of
10 to 20 bars which unfolds and deploys it.
An inflatable metal safety barrier
activating in fractions of a second could
provide life saving protection to a machine
operator confronting tons of falling metal
or a collision with another vehicle for
example.
The big problem with this system is that
its active deformation is not reversible and
must be deployed
shortly before impact,
hence the pre-crash
sensor must provide
extremely reliable
signals.
Cost is also a
problem, leading
Mercedes to describe
its crash responsive
metal structures as
a technology of the
future, though as they
point out, so were
airbags, ESP® and ABS a few years ago.
Interactive Vehicle Communication
may also have potential for mobile plant
applications, with its ability to warn
operators of unseen hazards, road surface
conditions, obstacles and even pedestrians
who are out of view to initiate emergency
braking or other evasive action.
Localised traffic control systems on a
wharf, for example, could send information
about the location of semi trailers around
bends or behind buildings or container
stacks and predict their movement to
a forklift operator, eliminating “nasty
surprises” lurking round the corner.
Mercedes Benz ESF 2009
22
Mining companies recognised
for their innovations
Mining companies that made significant improvements to their work safety received special recognition
at the recent Queensland Mining Industry Health and Safety Conference.
BMA Coal’s Gregory Crinum Mine took out the 2009 Queensland Mining Industry Health and Safety
Innovations Award for a safety guard to prevent falls onto exposed longwall miner conveyor belts.
BMA made it a clean sweep as its Saraji Mine won the people’s choice award for its feeder blockage removal
device.
The device enables blockages under coal stockpile feeders to be cleared remotely, taking workers out of harm’s
way.
A highly commended award went to Anglo Coal Australia’s, Dawson Mine for a work platform that provides
better access to the CAT 797 haul truck to enable maintenance to be carried out more safely.
An audience of mine workers voted for the people’s choice award.
This year’s awards attracted 44 entries.
Briefs
Mike Meaney, technical sales representative for Airmet Scientific Pty Ltd in WA, has moved to BOC
gases to take up a state wide position as Scientific Specialist focusing on laboratory gases.”
********************************************************************************************************
Australian Industry Training Providers have relocated to Unit 5, No. 4 McGrath Rd in Henderson from their
previous address in Cockburn Central.
23
What’s new
Frontline Diagnostics meets
NATA’s new AS4308:2008
screening accreditation
Cut resistant
gloves
investment was required to ensure
Frontline Diagnostics has
strict quality control.
been accredited to sections
He said the accreditation means
of the Australian Standard
customers can be assured of the
AS4308:2008 for collection
quality of service received in addition
and on-site screening by the
to having greater legal defensibility.
National Association of Testing
“Incorporating this new Standard
Authorities,
Australia
(NATA).
APTC
Australia
Pty Ltd
into
an organisation’s
Their onsite
screening
procedures
1a Roper Street, Moorabbin, Victoria,
3189. alcohol and
other drugs policy will ensure an
for specimen collection and the
(P.O. Box 113, Highett, Victoria, 3190)
organisation is following the latest
detection and quantitation of drugs
Tele: 03 9532 0609 Fax: 03 9532 0171
of abuse in urine is the first awarded standards and receiving the best
aptcaust.com.au
by NATAWeb:
for the
on-site component legal protection against potential
disputes.”.
of the new Standard.
Adhering to the new Standard
Frontline Diagnostics’ General
means that Frontline Diagnostics
Manager, Richard Varnish said
is compliant with the benchmarks
gaining the accreditation had
“ Unot
L Tbeen
I M AanT easy
E Sprocess,
EALIN
G S O L U for:
TIO
N S ” collection, storage,
taking
specimen
many months of hard work as
handling and dispatch, integrity
and identity and on-site screening
all systems and procedures were
heavily scrutinised and a large capital procedures.
RCR International has added another
level 5 cut resistant glove to its Pro-Val
glove range, the “Tufflex”.
The Tufflex cut resistant glove provides
high grade cut resistance, four times higher
than standard level 5 cut resistance to achieve
the highest abrasion and tear resistant test
results under the European Standard EN388.
The gloves are claimed to have outstanding
dexterity, being made from a combination of
ultra high molecular weighted polyethylene
and glass fibre.
They have a breathable foam nitrile black
palm,
with a safety orange back for high
• MTi
High
Quality
European
Manufacture
Group
has become
the first producer
of gasbags to obtain
visibility
and polyethylene lining to eliminate
(National
Association ofPU
Testing
•NATA
Single
Component
FireAuthority)
Rated certification
Foam for
glass
fibre
contact with the skin.
non flammability with its BlastBag, Solo.
They’re
being
used extensively in the sheet
• NATA
Independently
Tested
testing is compliant
with the Australian Dangerous Goods Code
metal
and
steel
industries
and are also ideally
edition,
the latest Australian
Standard
AS2278-2008, and the United
•7thFire
Ratings
of up to
4 hours
suited
for
the
glass,
automotive,
construction
Nations test criteria for hazardous substances 4th edition and is recognised
•throughout
Testedthetoworld.
AS1530.4-1997 & AS4072.1-1992
and engineering industries.
APTC Australia Pty Ltd
For further information on the Procertification
representsup
a step
• The
Heat
Resistance
toforward
1500forºcbetter mine safety.
1a Roper Street, Moorabbin, Victoria, 3189.
Val glove range, visit www. pro-val.com.
(P.O. Box 113, Highett, Victoria, 3190)
• Easy to Apply
email
or phone RCR
Tele: 03 9532 0609au,Fax:
[email protected]
9532 0171
International
on
03
9558
2020.
• Designed for Interior & Exterior Use Web: aptcaust.com.au
NEW PRODUC T RELEASE
F I R E R AT E D F O A M
Blast bag rated non flammable
Fire resistant
•foam
Suitable
for Many
Substrates
and
silicone
• Large 750ml Can
APTC Australia has
released the European
Soudal range of fire resistant
foam and silicone products.
The single component PU
fire rated foam has a fire rating
up to 4 hours – tested to
AS1530.4-1997Manufacture
and AS 4072.1High Quality European
1992.
ire Rated Neutral
Cure
Silicone
It is heat
resistant
to 1500 Sealant
C and comes in a 750 ml
ndependentlydeg
Tested
pressure can.
ire Ratings of up
to 4 hours
The neutral cure silicone
ested to AS1530.4-1997
AS4072.1-1992
sealant also has fire&rating
to
4
hours
and
is
tested
olour Fast & UV Resistant to
AS1530.4-1997 and AS 4072.1emains Permanently
Elastic After Full Cure
1992.
The
makers
claim itSubstrates
remains
xcellent Adhesion to Most
permanently elastic after full
Very Easy to Apply
cure and has adhesion to most
substrates.
F I R E R AT E D S I L I CO N E
APTC Australia Pty Ltd
1a Roper Street, Moorabbin, Victoria, 3189.
(P.O. Box 113, Highett, Victoria, 3190)
Tele: 03 9532 0609 Fax: 03 9532 0171
aptcaust.com.au
“ U L T I M A T E S E A L I N G Web:
SOLU
TIONS”
New first aid boxes
NEW PRODUC T RELEASE
F I R E R AT E D F O A M
NEW PRODUC T RELEASE
• High Quality European Manufacture
“ U LT I M AT E S E A L I N G S O LU T I O N S ”
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
24
Single Component PU Fire Rated Foam
Independently Tested
Fire Ratings•ofHigh
up toQuality
4 hoursEuropean Manufacture
Ferno
Australia,
suppliers of rescue
Tested to AS1530.4-1997
& AS4072.1-1992
• Single
PUhas
Fire
Rateda Foam
andComponent
safety equipment
released
Heat Resistance
up
to
1500
ºc
• Independently
new range of Tested
purpose designed first aid
Easy to Apply
boxes.
• Fire Ratings
of up to 4 hours
Designed for
& Exterior
Use sizes
in five different
and
• Interior
TestedAvailable
to
AS1530.4-1997
& AS4072.1-19
configurations,
they come with removable
Suitable for•Many
Substrates
Heattray
Resistance
up to
1500
dividers, tamper
proof
lock,ºcmetal
Large 750ml• Can
Easy to Apply
F I R E R AT E D F O A M
hinges and resistance to water, dust, oil and
most chemicals.
• Designed
for Interior & Exterior Use
• Suitable for Many Substrates
• Large 750ml Can
F I R E R AT E D S I L I CO N E
Rockwell Automation
launches safety light curtain
A
new family of slimline compact
safety light curtains has
been launched by Rockwell
Automation.
With just a 15mm by 20mm housing
profile, the Allen-Bradley Guardmaster
GuardShield Micro 400 light curtain is
claimed as being the smallest Type 4 safety
light curtain on the market.
“A slim profile housing allows the
GuardShield Micro400 to fit into
applications where space is at a premium,”
said Rockwell Automation’s Safety Area
Manager, Gary Milburn.
New product
for first aid
trainers
With the National Health Training
Package becoming the national
standard for all first aid training, first
aid trainers have had to re-apply for
accreditation.
Survival Emergency Products, a supplier
to the First Aid Training Industry with
resources such as practice bandages,
workbooks, assessment sample answers,
Power Point etc has developed generic
training course mapping documents that
can be used for the process of applying
for reaccreditation.
The documents can be purchased
for $165 per unit of competency
ie HLTFA301B, HLTFA201A,
HLTCPR201A.
The training program mapping
includes cross referencing per topic to
the company’s publications, ie First-aid
Emergency Handbook (HLTFA2301B),
Basic Emergency Life support Handbook
(HLTFA201A), CPR Handbook
(HLTCPR201A) – including refresher
CPR courses + defib training and
workbooks with teachers marking guide,
practical assessments + sample answers,
(Assessments are True False and multiple
choice questions)
For further information, contact
Liz Hopwood or Paula Walker on 02
98169912 or mob 0414816496.
www.survivalemergencyproducts.com
“It is particularly
suited to applications
utilising small
assembly machines,
or industries such as
pharmaceuticals—where
the scale is smaller and
you don’t want a bulky
light curtain.”
In addition to a slim
profile, the GuardShield
Micro400 features
expanded functionality
via its MSR42
controller, a multifunction safety module with hard-wired or
software-configurable operating modes and
solid state safety outputs. If safety relay
outputs are required, up to three safetyrelay expansion modules (MSR45E) may be
easily connected to the controller.
A cascadeable model offers ease of
installation and configuration, particularly
where multiple light curtains are required
as it enables multiple light curtain segments
to be connected together on a single cable,
configured to a single controller meaning
there’s no need to run a cable from each
light curtain segment.
Energy Association relocates
The W.A. Sustainable Energy Association has relocated to new quarters.
It is now located at 1186 Hay Street, West Perth, tel 9481 3169;
email [email protected]
New work glove from Prochoice
ProChoice Safety Gear has launched its latest offering to the world of workgloves – the ‘Stinga’.
Ideal for tradies, farmers, road workers,
mechanics, manufacturers… all whose hands
are at risk and who are often reluctant to
wear gloves because they claim they’re
uncomfortable and ungainly.
The company says that excuse
won’t hold up any more because the
new Stinga gloves have addressed the
comfort issue with woven, seamless,
apparel-grade nylon construction.
The feel and grip factors are satisfied
with what ProChoice calls “Bare Hand
Technology”; PVC foam impregnated
palms that grip in wet and dry conditions,
without hindering dexterity or sensitivity.
The glove has a high abrasion and tear
resistance - a CE rating of EN388 4131.
For further information call Paramount
Safety Products on 08 9240 1165 .
25
Drug Feature
Turn to the
experts on
drugs and
alcohol in the
workplace
D
rugs and alcohol are one
of the most persistent
problems in the workplace
contributing to accidents and
illness, poor relations with coworkers, poor decision making and
absenteeism.
In an alcohol and drug consuming
culture such as Australia it’s little
wonder that safety professionals
dedicate a lot of time and effort
addressing substance abuse problems
in the workplace.
World experts
Fortunately they’re not alone in
tackling the problem. It is interesting
to note that Australia has some of the
world’s leading experts in the field and
some really outstanding research work
is being done in the area.
South Australia’s National Centre
for Education and Training on
Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders
University specialises in Alcohol and
Other Drugs Workforce Development
research and has a wealth of
Workplace Dru
g & Alcohol
Use
Information
& Data Series
Information
& Data Sh
eet
1
Workers’ Pat
terns
of Alcohol
Consumption
Ann Roche &
Ken Pidd
Identifying
the alcohol
consumptio
wellbeing of
n patterns
workers and
of the workfo
also from the
rce is importa
and safety
employers’
issues. How
nt in terms
perspective
ever, until rec
of the health
of Australian
in terms of
ently relative
and
workers. Acc
performanc
ly little was
urate informa
e, productivit
development
known abo
tion about
y
ut the drinking
of appropriat
wo
rke
e and effectiv
rs’ drinking
patterns
patterns is
e policy and
essential for
intervention
the
strategies.
Work-related
Drinking
Traditionally,
work-relate
d drinking has
conceptualise
been
d as drinking
that occurs
workplace and
in the
during actu
al work hou
prior to com
rs or immedia
mencing wor
tely
k. This is a
conceptualisa
very narrow
tion of work-re
late
include drin
d drinking.
king that occ
It does not
urs outside
that may be
normal wor
influenced by
k
hours
workplace soc
expectation
ial norms and
s or other wor
kplace factors
.
Relatively little
alcohol is con
sumed by Aus
before work
tralian workers
or during wor
k hours, how
proportions
ever, large
of the workfor
ce engage
drinking. Suc
in work-relate
h work-relate
d
d drinking mig
socialising with
ht include
co-workers
at the end of
The workpla
working day
ce is increas
.
ingly recongis
shaper of beh
ed as a pow
aviour, includin
erful
g drinking.
What is Risk
y Dr
inking?
Drinking per
se is not nec
essarily pro
a worker’s pat
blematic. It
tern of drinking
is
that is importa
includes whe
nt. This
re, when, how
much and how
is consumed.
often alcohol
Australia’s Nat
ional Health
Research Cou
and
ncil (NHMR
Medical
C) defines risk
ways. The
y drinking in
first is in term
two
s of harm tha
in the short-te
t might be incu
rm i.e., the
rred
more immedia
the second
te effects, and
is the effects
of drinking ove
Different pat
r the long-ter
terns of con
m.
sumption can
or long-term
con
tribute to sho
harms as sho
rtwn in Table
1.
information that’s readily available for
safety professionals.
Click on their website,
www.nceta.flinders.edu.au and you’ll
find a comprehensive list of useful
material including workplace resource
kits and fact sheets.
Booklets to download
You can download a range of
booklets in pdf form on topics
such as Responding to Alcohol and
other Drug Issues in the Workplace
containing a comprehensive list of
useful resources and contacts as well as
fact sheets on drugs and alcohol.
It’s all part of NCETA’s Information
and Resource Package which is
accompanied by a Training Kit
designed to translate the latest research
into practical guidelines for a best
practice approach to alcohol and other
drug related harm in the workplace.
NCETA says its material is
particularly useful for:
• supervisors, managers, human
resource and OHS&W personnel
Table 1: Nat
ional Health
and
Council Aus
tralian Alcoho Medical Research
l Guidelines
Risk of sho
rtterm harm
Males
(on any one
day,
no more than
3
days per wee
k)
Females
(on any one
day,
no more than
3
days per wee
k)
Risk of long
term harm
Males
On average
day
Overall wee
kly
level
Females
On average
day
Overall wee
kly
level
Low risk
Up to 6
(on any one
day)
Up to 4
(on any one
day)
Low risk
Up to 4
(per day)
Up to 28
(per week)
Up to 2
(per day)
Up to 14
(per week)
Risky
(Standard drin
High risk
ks*)
7 to 10
(on any one
day)
5 to 6
(on any one
day)
11 or more
7 or more
Risky
High risk
(Hazardous
**) (Harmf
ul**)
(Standard drin
ks*)
5 to 6
7 or more
(per day)
(per day)
29 to 42
43 or more
(per week)
(per week)
3 to 4
5 or more
(per day)
(per day)
15 to 28
29 or more
(per week)
(per week)
* a standard
drink equals
10
** NHMRC
old (1992) term grams (12.5 millilitres)
of alcohol
inology whic
h only applied
to long-term
risk
It is also imp
ortant to kno
w how frequen
drinks. Drin
tly someone
king at a risk
y level on a
different con
weekly basis
sequences
has
to doing so
basis e.g., mo
on
a less frequen
nthly or yea
t
rly.
• representatives of employee and
employer organisations
• representatives of EAP and
other workplace service
counselling providers
• workplace trainers and
representatives of training
organisations
• community health and/or drug
and alcohol workers.
NCETA also offers advice on
workplace alcohol and drug issues
that can be tailored to individual
workplaces.
At the time of writing NCETA
was developing a new website, so it’s
worth checking their site occasionally
for the latest information from this
internationally recognised research
centre.
National Centre for Education and
Training on Addiction
Flinders University, GPO Box 2100,
Adelaide SA 5001
Phone: 08 8201 7535
email: [email protected]
Strong policy on drugs pays says screening company
Drug and alcohol screening company,
Frontline Diagnostics has found that mines
with a proper drug-safe workplace policy
and regular drug testing have about four per
cent of their staff testing positive to drug and
alcohol screening.
26
This is in comparison to 17 to 20 per cent for
mines which have not introduced a policy or
testing. These mines attract drug users because
staff are generally aware of which mines do not
enforce a policy.
27
Workplace drug testing
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Interpretation
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Expert
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NATA testing
to AS/NZS
4308:2008
(urine)
Contact us today to discuss
your testing needs
Police tests keep
ChemCentre busy
O
ne of the biggest clients for the services of
ChemCentre, the new facility that’s been relocated
to the Curtin University campus is the West
Australian Police.
The Police Department use ChemCentre extensively through
their Commercial Agents section, that issues licences for security
and crowd control agents.
In accordance with the Security and Related Activities (Control)
Act, 1996 licensed agents regularly undergo random drug testing.
Random sampling of urine is performed whilst licensed agents
are at work.
Sampling agents while they’re at work has been a change in
procedure that has resulted in an increased rate of positive cases.
Prior to this. advanced notice of sampling was given to agents
which in effect provided them with the opportunity to clear drugs
from their system.
ChemCentre also works with the Police, providing them with
sampling kits and confirmation testing, as well as customised
analyses and expert testimony where required.
The screening services provided by ChemCentre followed
by subsequent laboratory confirmation testing covers the four
main drugs of abuse – amphetamines, cannabis, opiates and
benzodiazepines.
Anabolic steroids are targeted upon request.
Other drugs can be can be tested for on request, though
the overwhelming majority of positives indicate cannabis or
amphetamine use.
A spoksesperson for ChemCentre said the testing conducted on
agents ensured not only a safer workplace for employees but also
safer communities.
She added that though their major drugs testing user was the
Police Department, companies also used its services from time to
time.
ChemCentre is accredited to NATA standard AS/NZS
4308:2008 for urine testing and is currently the only laboratory
accredited to NATA standard AS 4760:2006 for oral fluid (saliva)
testing.
Robert Hansson
T +61 8 9422 9850
F +61 8 9422 9831
[email protected]
Dr Francois Oosthuizen
T +61 8 9422 9851
F +61 8 9422 9831
[email protected]
CONTENT
WRITING SERVICES
Do you need text for brochures, newsletters, company
reports, websites or white papers prepared?
Media Support Services are specialists in the
development of written material with a team of
business writers and journalists available.
chemcentre.wa.gov.au
Call 1300 557 660.
28
Pub breathalysers found to
be dangerously inaccurate
W
ith increasing awareness
of the dangers of drink
driving and the likelihood
of being caught if you’re over
the limit, breath analysis units in
licensed premises could potentially
provide drinkers with an important
source of information on whether
they’re fit to drive. Or could they?
If they’re relying on the accuracy
of Perth’s ‘coin-in-the-slot’ hotel
breathalysers they might as well rely on
sheer guess work and pot luck.
A study of 36 hotel breathalysers
conducted in 2002 by Dr Rina
Cercarelli, a Senior Research Fellow of
the National Drug Research Institute
and Greg Hay of the West Australian
Police, found only 25% of them
accurate.
Most alarmingly, some 45%
underestimated the actual level of blood
alcohol content (BAC), in effect telling
drivers they were safe to drive when
they weren’t.
Servicing and calibrating the
instruments was a grey area for
managers and licensees so it’s
hardly surprising these machines are
inaccurate.
Half of them were unaware of the
servicing and calibration intervals, while
no one seemed to know whether they
were calibrated at the monthly or bimonthly services when the straws were
replenished and the cash removed.
And it’s not just managers and
Police test foun
d
licensees in the dark over ‘coin-in- to match readingspopular breathalysers failed
of police instru
them a risky co
ments makin
the-slot’ breathalysers.
mmodity to re
g
ly on.
Studies have shown that
only 30% of users wait the
necessary 10 minutes or more
after drinking before they test
themselves and many users
are unaware that their BAC
can keep rising if their body
is still absorbing alcohol.
Despite the research being
published back in 2004, Dr
Cercarelli believes nothing
has changed despite “pretty
clear recommendations
about what we needed to
do about breath testing
devices in public drinking
places.”
“There’s no reason for it to
change - it’s not like all of a sudden
purchased from pharmacies and service
the public has decided to get serious
stations.
about it,” Dr Cercarelli said.
There’s little Australian research on
Time bomb
While it’s yet to be tested before
the courts Dr Cercarelli predicts
it’s something of a legal timebomb,
with licensees, managers and
the manufacturers potentially
liable should an accident occur
to an intoxicated patron after
an inaccurate reading from a
breathalyser.
Dr Cercarelli believes it’s a similar
story with the cheap, consumer
breathalysers that can be readily
their accuracy, though Choice Magazine
tested six models in 2005 to conclude it
couldn’t recommend any of them.
Dr Cercarelli believes it’s reasonable to
assume they’re inaccurate.
One British test of commonly available
hand-held breathalysers conducted by
car review website, Parker’s with the help
of the West Yorkshire Police, found
that every unit tested failed to match the
reading of the police instrument, with
more than half registering it was safe to
drive when the police unit measured over
the legal limit.
Back belts out of favour
Back belts, also known as lumbar or weight lifters’ belts or back support devices, designed to be worn by
people performing some form of manual handling, particularly lifting weights are out of favour, being deemed
as being of little value.
According to a report from Worksafe Victoria the belief that they give support can be misleading as the support from
the back belt doesn’t translate to a significant reduction in the stress on the spine and surrounding muscles and ligaments.
Research by the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), says that back belts provide a
minimal reduction in compressive force and do not significantly reduce the risk of injury.
Some research has found the highest compressive and shearing forces in the spine occur when wearing a belt.
Furthermore they don’t reduce strain on muscles or reduce fatigue or increase the maximum weight a person can lift.
The report says that studies have shown that wearing a back belt has a similar effect on the abdominal muscles to
holding your breath.
This causes increased pressure on the abdominal muscles which can lead to stiff and exaggerated postures. These
postures may increase the potential for injury while the effect of increasing blood pressure and rate of respiration may
increase the risk of heart attacks in susceptible people.
29
An absolute shocker
Overseas happenings
This shocker features workers failing to wear life vests,
working overhead without eye protection, working on a
scaffold not rated to support lateral pull from the tender
boat plus a 6 metre salt water crocodile had been seen in
the area only a week before.
Major report into
British construction
fatalities
T
Photo cour tesy of
WorkSafe Victoria
personally responsible for injuries or
he report and
deaths on their building sites.
recommendations
The report says the construction
of one of the most
This week’sinquiries
industry
doesn’t appreciate the
comprehensive
into
Absolute Shock
er hig
htrade
positive
role
unions
caneplay
the
underlying
of
lights
con
structiocauses
som
n near waterway
hazar
ands.
labels the low level of reporting ds present in
fatal accidents in the British
of serious accidents as “a disgrace”.
construction
industry was
Health and safety advisers need
We’ll let th
e reader who se The report was welcomed by
delivered in
July.
accreditation to ensure they meet
nt in these phot
explain th
a lobby group in Britain os
called
The Inquiry chaired by Rita
e situatstandards
appropriate
ion: of professional
“I
sa
w entitled
theseOne
‘Families
Against
Corporate
Killers’
Donaghy,
Death
Is
Too
blokes working
competence, the Chair of the Health and
. on the pier and noted
Many began with a review of the
Safety Executive (HSE) has said.
:
A spokesperson for the group,
causal
over the
ƒ factors
Judith Hackitt told guests at an International
No lifofe fatalities
vests - ha
ve yoLinda
died while
last 10 years before examining
more
u evWhelan
er triewhose
Institute
of Risk and Safety Management
d to son
swim w
E on?reception in London this week that
demolishing a factory chimney
in ith PP
recent construction fatalities.
(IIRSM)
ƒ Weight
orkin
g overhead with
2002 said “To allow directors of
Twenty
recommendations
although HSE did not intend to run such a
out ey protectio
companies e
to be less responsible
have been made covering
n. and scheme, it did consider one was necessary.
ƒ representatives,
accountable for their actions
safety
Is the scaffbuilding
Ms Hackitt said: “We believe there is a
old rated toless
su
pporand
on
health
control,
the
legal
system,
training
t asafety
latethan
running tide?”
ralany
an accreditation system within the
puother
ll from need
the for
tender
person, is immoral and an insult
and competence, and public
(boat)for
inhealth
competency
framework
a and safety
to
my
son
Craig,
and
all
the
others
procurement.
professionals.
He also noted th
at a“positive
killed in construction and
They included imposing
6 metreneedlessly
“Accreditation must include continuing
long sa
arduties”
lt-water crocod
ea onon
lyDirectors
a weekof pconstruction
other
workplaces.”
ile wprofessional
rior to this wor
as
repordevelopment
ted in thasisa requirement
k occurring!
firms that would see them held
as well as a means of sanction,
with real
“Safety advisers need
accreditation”
teeth, for anyone who acts unethically in their
professional activities - including providing
inappropriate advice or guidance.”
She said that those involved in health and
Absolute Shoc
Inke
what
must
rate as one of the most unlikely accidents of
r of th
e Week is publ
mining and quar
safety
needed to be competent to assess and
ish
ed
by Wof
rying.aItman
the year
German city
Dusseldorf
up his
orkS
afe Victoriablew
may in
be the
freely copied for
to promote safer
manage
by applying common sense, taking
su
wo
ch
go
rk
to ww
practices risk
oses.air
w.work
apartment
while
attempting
to repairpu
a rp
leaky
To mattress.
in construction
safe.vic.gov.a
receive Safety
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Soapboxa a
ilities
proportionate
approach
and
exercising
,
fre
an
e
weekly em
folthe
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The 45 year old used tire repair solvent on a holed in
aire bed
ailed newsletter
links to the subs
,
criptionabout
judgment
what
is
reasonable.
pa
ge
.
and left it overnight.
Competence is one of the cornerstones of
When he went to inflate it the following day a spark from the
the
new health and safety strategy for Great
electric air pump ignited it, causing a blast that pushed the living
Britain,
and HSE wants to see increased
room wall into the building’s stairwell and extensively damaging
competence
as the basis of a more sensible and
the walls, windows and furniture.
proportionate
approach to managing risk.
The 12 apartment building was evacuated along with a
HSE
wants
employers
to have access to
neighbouring house while fire fighters checked for structural
competent,
sensible
advice
from professional
damage.
advisors
so
that
risks
are
properly
managed and
The hapless handyman suffered burns on his arms while a three
unproductive
measures
and
paperwork
are not
year old girl suffered first degree burns.
pursued.
Bed goes off with a bang
30
1
5
2
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
18
16
19
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Across
2. A special pile of dirt in mining
5. A type of law that may govern industrial
manslaughter
8. Type of parking to enable a quick exit if
required
10. Found in the toe of a work boot
11. Chronic respiratory disease
13. Work related hearing disorder (abbreviated)
16. A specific drug detected in urine
18. A line used in coal mining
19. Drug test regime
21. Something to do with welding
24. A wooden or steel spike used to prevent a rib
from falling.
26. Where Ross River is
27. Used when working in a confined space
28. A disease transmitted via an animal's urine
Down
1. Large lump of coal
3. Something you have to do before entering a
workplace
4. West Australian OSH Department
6. Health test conducted every five years in WA
(abbreviated)
7. New Australian OSH Laws aim to be....
9. A serious strain of influenza (two words)
12. Seen as not performing a duty of care
14. Large mobile plant
15. A code that is not mandatory
17. ammonium nitrate mixed with fuel oil for
explosives (abbreviated)
20. Location between the face and the surface of
a mine
22. Type of access card
23. High visibility clothing worn around forklifts
25. When a seam is displaced upward
31
Fast track to suppliers
contact details
Custom hearing protection
Healthy people. Healthy business
www.soundhearing.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 1300 726 818
www.primehealth.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 1300 793 004
Protective clothing & respirators
Satellite phones
www.pro-val.com.au
[email protected],au
Phone 03 9558 2020
www.satellitephones.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 02 6335 5216
OHS courses on line
Fire safety
www.reachyourpotential.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 134 328
www.bullexsafety.com.au
[email protected]
Mobile 0466 598 969
Making safety count
Noise & vibration measurement
www.alegrasafety.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 089 314 2926
www.nvms.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 089 489 2099
Safety ladders
Chemical testing
www.branach.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 1800 244 624
www.chemcentre.wa.gov.au
[email protected],au
Phone 089 422 9800
Safety management systems
First Aid & training resources
www.protocolsafetymanagement.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 03 9449 1445
www.survivalemergencyproducts.com
[email protected]
Phone 02 9816 9912
Insulation coating materials
Mole inspections
www.mascoataustralia.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 089 240 5978
www.molescan.com.au
[email protected]
Phone 07 3378 6555
32
PUT SAFETY FIRST
GET A SAT PHONE!
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One that is rugged, and
everything is in the box?
Then the Iridium 9555 could be the right choice for you!
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33
YOUR FEEDBACK IS THE KEY
Behaviour Based Safety: Making the Workplace a Safer
Place to be
One of the keys to reducing defensiveness is having
structure when you provide feedback. So when giving
feedback refer to the SAFER way™.
People in the workplace continue to suffer debilitating
and sometimes fatal injuries. In light of this, it is critical that
organisations constantly monitor their safety strategy and
review tools utilised to improve workplace safety.
Giving feedback the SAFER way™:
Behaviour Based Safety is one such tool that is aimed at
preventing injuries and fatalities before they happen and
promoting a positive safety culture.
What is Behaviour Based Safety?
a Start with all of the safe behaviours observed and
be specific. For example, “Good to see you have the correct barricading in place”.
a Ask how they feel they can carry out their job safer and
engage them with an open ended question. For
example, “Now that you have had a chance to step
back, what do you think could be done safer?”
a Feedback on any of the at-risk behaviours you have
observed. “One thing I noticed was these tools might
be a trip hazard, what are your thoughts?”
a Explore solutions to at-risks together. “What can we do
with these tools?”
a Reinforce one or two outstanding safe behaviours
observed. End on a positive.
Behaviour Based Safety focuses on the safety related
behaviours of people in the workplace. Once implemented,
Behaviour Based Safety involves the following key factors:
1.
Observation of safe and at-risk behaviours.
2.
Providing positive feedback on safe behaviours observed.
3.
Providing corrective and constructive feedback on at-
risk behaviours observed.
4.
Correcting systems and procedures that prevent people from working safely.
Although all of the elements above are essential parts of a
Behaviour Based Safety process, feedback and more so, the way
it is delivered, is essential to achieving success and facilitating the
behavioural change process.
Who are we at PSB Solutions?
By providing feedback the SAFER way™, you are not
only providing balanced feedback but are also facilitating
engagement.
PSB Solutions are specialists in facilitating positive lasting
change due to their intricate knowledge and application of
psychological strategies to the areas of People, Safety and
Business improvement.
Our solutions to organisational concerns include
Occupational Health and Safety Solutions, Behaviour Based
Safety, Leadership Coaching, Employee Selection, Training
and Development. Contact us for more information and visit
our website at www.psbsolutions.com.au
The Importance of Feedback
The way you provide safety feedback to a person, will
either break or make the change effort and the integrity of
your Behaviour Based Safety process. So how is it that we
can provide feedback the right way to help people accept
feedback and reduce their defensiveness?
To order PSB Solutions’ The SAFER Way™ of
Feedback pocket cards for your Leaders and
Personnel to use in the field as a prompt
please call us on 08 9489 3900
The pitfall with safety feedback is that we only tend to
provide it when something is wrong. This means that people
often start and finish with the negatives. This immediately
puts people on the defensive and cancels out any positive
feedback.
PSB Solutions,
Suite 5, Level 1, 337 Rokeby Road,
Subiaco, WA 6008
www.psbsolutions.com.au
[email protected]
Tel: 08 9489 3900
34
`