Lab. on "Xen--how to install and use"

"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Lab. on "Xen--how to install and use"
PS. The following labs are implemented in CentOS 5.3.
Unit-0: Check if your machine supports xen virtualization.
Step-1.
Step-2.
Login as root
Check machine status
grep vmx /proc/cpuinfo -- for Intel CPU
grep svm /proc/cpuinfo -- for AMD CPU
NOTE. If flag "pae" and "vmx" not found in your machine, turn off the computer and
go home
Unit-1: Check if xen has been installed correclty.
Step-1.
Step-2.
Login as root
Check and turn off SELinux
vi /etc/sysconfig/selinux
Page 1 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-3.
[email protected] ICAL
Check installation status
rpm –qa | grep xen
xen has been installed
xen has NOT been installed
…nothing…
Step-4.
Install xen and related packages using yum
yum install kernel-xen
yum install xen
yum install xen-libs
or just
yum install kernel-xen xen xen-lib
Step-5.
check kernel-xen is a bootable OS in grub's menu
vim /boot/grub/menu.lst "L (lowercase)" not "1 (one)"
Step-6.
start xend
/etc/init.d/xend start
Step-7.
check xend's status
chkconfig –list xend
Page 2 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-8.
[email protected] ICAL
make xend as a service at boot time
chkconfig xend on
Step-9. reboot and select kernel-xen
Step-10. check if kernel-xen is booted correctly
Step-11. Refer to Appendix-A for the datasheet of Xen 3.4.0
Unit-2: Using xen manager -- xm.
Step-1.
Step-2.
Login as root
invoke xen's management program
xm list
Step-3.
xm full list of subcommands:
xm help
subcommands
console
create
destroy
domid
domname
dump-core
list
mem-max
mem-set
migrate
pause
reboot
descriptions
Attach to <Domain>'s console.
Create a domain based on <ConfigFile>.
Terminate a domain immediately.
Convert a domain name to domain id.
Convert a domain id to domain name.
Dump core for a specific domain.
List information about all/some domains.
Set the maximum amount reservation for a domain.
Set the current memory usage for a domain.
Migrate a domain to another machine.
Pause execution of a domain.
Reboot a domain.
Page 3 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
rename
restore
save
shutdown
sysrq
trigger
top
unpause
uptime
vcpu-list
vcpu-pin
vcpu-set
dmesg
info
log
serve
sched-credit
sched-sedf
block-attach
block-detach
block-list
block-configure
network-attach
network-detach
network-list
vtpm-list
vnet-list
vnet-create
vnet-delete
labels
addlabel
rmlabel
getlabel
dry-run
resources
makepolicy
loadpolicy
cfgbootpolicy
dumppolicy
[email protected] ICAL
Rename a domain.
Restore a domain from a saved state.
Save a domain state to restore later.
Shutdown a domain.
Send a sysrq to a domain.
Send a trigger to a domain.
Monitor a host and the domains in real time.
Unpause a paused domain.
Print uptime for a domain.
List the VCPUs for a domain or all domains.
Set which CPUs a VCPU can use.
Set the number of active VCPUs for allowed for the domain.
Read and/or clear Xend's message buffer.
Get information about Xen host.
Print Xend log
Proxy Xend XMLRPC over stdio.
Get/set credit scheduler parameters.
Get/set EDF parameters.
Create a new virtual block device.
Destroy a domain's virtual block device.
List virtual block devices for a domain.
Change block device configuration
Create a new virtual network device.
Destroy a domain's virtual network device.
List virtual network interfaces for a domain.
List virtual TPM devices.
List Vnets.
Create a vnet from ConfigFile.
Delete a Vnet.
List <type> labels for (active) policy.
Add security label to domain.
Remove a security label from domain.
Show security label for domain or resource.
Test if a domain can access its resources.
Show info for each labeled resource.
Build policy and create .bin/.map files.
Load binary policy into hypervisor.
Add policy to boot configuration.
Print hypervisor ACM state information.
<Domain> can either be the Domain Name or Id.
Unit-3: Build a virtual disk as a file
Step-1.
Step-2.
Login as root
Make a new directory (which retains all the materials to be used in this lab.)
Page 4 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
and change to the directory
mkdir /home/xen
cd /home/xen
Step-3.
Create a virtual disk a 6Gb disk image file for use by guest-OS.
dd if=/dev/zero of=xenguest.img bs=1024k seek=6144 count=0
you can check the file name and disk size
Unit-4: Understanding the configuration file
Step-1.
change directory to /etc/xen
Step-2.
open the example
vi xmexample1
vi xmexample2
Please refer to Appendix-B
Unit-5: Installing and Running Windows XP or Vista as a Xen HVM
domainU Guest
Page 5 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-1.
Step-2.
[email protected] ICAL
Change directory to /etc/xen
Create a disk image (8GB)
dd if=/dev/zero of=xenwin.img bs=1024k seek=8192 count=0
Step-3.
Prepare the XP installation disk (iso file)
cd /../../../
Step-4.
the directory where you retain Windows.iso
Prepare a configuration file
vi xenWinXP.cfg
import os, re
arch = os.uname()[4]
if re.search('64', arch):
arch_libdir = 'lib64'
else:
arch_libdir = 'lib'
kernel = "/usr/lib/xen/boot/hvmloader"
builder='hvm'
memory = 512
shadow_memory = 8
name = "xenWinXP"
vif = [ 'type=ioemu, bridge=xenbr0' ]
#disk = [ 'file:/home/xen/xenguest.img,hda,w', 'phy:/dev/hdb,hdc:cdrom,r' ]
disk = [ 'file:/home/xen/xenguest.img,hda,w',
'file:/home/xen/Windows.iso,hdc:cdrom,r' ]
device_model = '/usr/' + arch_libdir + '/xen/bin/qemu-dm'
# boot on floppy (a), hard disk (c) or CD-ROM (d)
# default: hard disk, cd-rom, floppy
boot="dc"
sdl=0
vnc=1
vncconsole=1
vncpasswd=''
stdvga=0
serial='pty'
usbdevice='tablet'
Step-5.
Check if VNC & its updates have been installed
yum install vnc
rpm –qa | grep vnc
Page 6 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-6.
[email protected] ICAL
Create a HVM for WindowsXP
xm create xenWinXP.cfg
If the following message pops up…
Error: HVM guest support is unavailable: is VT/AMD-V supported by your
CPU and enabled in your BIOS?
Power off and restart your machine and get into BIOS settings.
Find the setting for turning on VT flags.
Reboot CentOS and repeat Step-3~Step-5.
If it comes with the following messages, all settings are fine.
using config file "./xenWinXP.cfg".
Started domain xenWinXP
You may now see the installation of Windows XP on VNC.
Page 7 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-7.
[email protected] ICAL
Check the result by xm
xm list
Step-8.
Access to the Windows XP box via the Internet (in Windows remote
desktop or VNC)
Unit-6: Management VM with xm
Step-1.
Step-2.
xm <SUB-COMMAND> xenWinXP
xm list
<SUB-COMMAND> can be
domid
domname
dump-core
mem-max
mem-set
rename
uptime
vcpu-list
vcpu-pin
vcpu-set
network-list
Convert a domain name to domain id.
Convert a domain id to domain name.
Dump core for a specific domain.
Set the maximum amount reservation for a domain.
Set the current memory usage for a domain.
Rename a domain.
Print uptime for a domain.
List the VCPUs for a domain or all domains.
Set which CPUs a VCPU can use.
Set the number of active VCPUs for allowed for the domain.
List virtual network interfaces for a domain.
Page 8 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Unit-7: Pause, Shutdown, Reboot
Step-1.
Step-2.
xm pause xenWinXP
xm list
Step-3.
Step-4.
Step-5.
Step-6.
xm unpause xenWinXP
xm list
xm shutdown xenWinXP
xm list
Step-7.
Step-8.
xm reboot xenWinXP
xm list
Unit-8: Restore and save VM
Step-1.
Step-2.
reboot
check xm
xm list
Step-3.
recall the installed VM
xm create xenWinXP.cfg
Step-4.
xm save xenWinXP xenWinXP090803
Step-5.
Step-6.
xm shutdown xenWinXP
xm list
Step-7.
Step-8.
xm restore xenWinXP090803
xm list
Unit-9: Automatically boot xenWinXP
Step-1.
start a domain-U when xend starts
cd /etc/xen/auto
ln –s /home/xen/xenWinXP.cfg .
Page 9 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-2.
[email protected] ICAL
vi xenWinXP.cfg
# Configure the behaviour when a domain exits. There are three 'reasons' for a
# domain to stop: poweroff, reboot, and crash. For each of these you may specify:
#
#
"destroy",
meaning that the domain is cleaned up as normal;
#
"restart",
meaning that a new domain is started in place of the old one;
#
"preserve", meaning that no clean-up is done until the domain is manually
#
destroyed (using xm destroy, for example); or
#
"rename-restart", meaning that the old domain is not cleaned up, but is renamed
#
and a new domain started in its place.
#
# The default is
#
#
on_poweroff = 'destroy'
#
on_reboot
= 'restart'
#
on_crash
= 'restart'
#
Step-3.
reboot the machine and then check if domainU is booted automatically
reboot
xm list
Unit-10: Using the visual interface
Step-1.
Check installation status
rpm –qa | grep python-virtinst
rpm –qa | grep virt-manager
Step-2.
Install xen vistual tools using yum
yum install python-virtinst virt-manager
Step-3.
Lunch the tools
Page 10 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Step-4.
The Xen VM interface
Step-5.
Check machine (localhost) details (t)
You can check the basic information of the localhost (hostname, Hypervisor,
Memory, CPU, Architecture,…)
Page 11 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Check network connection of localhost. Notice to Device - virbr0 and IPv4
configuration – Network, DHCP
Step-6.
Check machine (Domain-0) details (t)
You can check the basic information of domain-0 (name, UUID)
Page 12 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Then switch to hardware descriptions for viewing basic information about
Processor and Memory defined in Domain-0
Check on Processor (s)
Check on memory size
Page 13 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-7.
[email protected] ICAL
Using the visual interface for domain-U VMs. In the Xen VM interface,
click the virtual machine xenhvm (a HVM for Windows XP). Click the
details (t). View basic information and hardware description
Page 14 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Unit-11: Using the visual interface to create a new domain-U VM
Step-1.
Continue previous unit. In the Xen VM interface, click on localhost and
invoke create a new VM (N)
Step-2.
Give a name to the new domain-U
Page 15 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
Step-3.
[email protected] ICAL
VM by paravirtualization or hardware-assist virtualization (full
virtualization)
Page 16 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Step-4.
Source of OS installation for domain-U
Step-5.
Where to store the virtual disk for the new domain-U
Page 17 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Step-6.
Settings for network connections for the new domain-U
Step-7.
Usage of CPU and memory
Page 18 of 19
"Xen--how to install and use"
[email protected] ICAL
Step-8.
Read to go!
Step-9.
check disk image at localhost
cd /var/lib/xen/images
ll
Page 19 of 19
Appendix A:
Xen 3.4 Data Sheet
Xen 3.4 Data Sheet
Xen 3.4 Secure Hypervisor
Xen.org proudly announces the release of
its state of the art open source hypervisor
solution, Xen® 3.4. Xen 3.4 delivers the
capabilities needed by enterprise customers
and gives computing industry leaders a
solid, secure platform to build upon for their
virtualization solutions.
The Xen 3.4 hypervisor is the fastest and
most secure infrastructure virtualization
software available today, supporting a wide
range of guest operating systems including
Windows®, Linux®, Solaris®, and various
versions of the BSD operating system. As
an open source project, customers can
easily deploy their virtualization solutions
based on Xen 3.4 or take advantage of the
broad industry support for Xen by working
with virtualization solutions from leading
computing vendors including Oracle, Red
Hat, Novell, Citrix, Sun, Lenovo, Samsung,
Fujitsu, and others that are built on Xen.
Open Source Hypervisor Supported by
Leading Enterprise Vendors
The Xen 3.4 hypervisor is a unique open
source technology, the result of a
tremendous community effort, with
contributions from over 150 developers
world wide, and more than 20 enterprise
infrastructure vendors, as well as the OSDL
and top tier universities. Major backers of
the Xen 3.4 hypervisor release include Intel,
AMD, HP, Citrix, IBM, Novell, Red Hat, Sun,
Fujitsu, Samsung, and Oracle.
Power Management
Xen 3.4 substantially improves the power
saving features with a host of new
algorithms to better manage the processor.
Schedulers and timers are all optimized for
peak power savings.
Desktop & Device Computing
Xen 3.4 delivers the first release of the Xen
Client Initiative - a Xen hypervisor for client
devices. This base client code delivers a
solid foundation for the community to
develop new features and extend the Xen
hypervisor operational reach from servers to
a wide variety of end-user devices.
Reliability – Availability - Serviceability
A collection of features designed to avoid
and detect system failure, provide maximum
uptime by isolating system faults, and
provide system failure notices to
administrators.
Performance & Scalability
Xen 3.4 significantly improves the already
impressive Xen performance by releasing
significant algorithm changes and improved
pass-through processing techniques.
Xen 3.4 Secure Hypervisor Virtualization for Mainstream Operating Systems
Xen 3.4 Feature List
The complete list of new features in Xen 3.4 includes:
•
•
•
•
Desktop and Device Computing
o Base Xen Client Hypervisor Code Availability
Reliability – Availability – Serviceability
PCI Pass-through
o All PCI Slots available including hot plug
o User selection of PCI slots
o HVM Pass-through
Power Management
o Better support to deep C-states with APIC timer/tsc stop
o More efficient cpuidle 'menu' governor
o More cpufreq governors (performance, userspace, powersave, ondemand) and
drivers (IA64) supported
o Enhanced xenpm tool to monitor and control Xen power management activities
o MSI-based HPET delivery, with less broadcast traffic when cpus are in deep Cstates
o Power aware option for credit scheduler - sched_smt_power_savings
o Timer optimization for reduced break events (range timer, vpt align)
Xen 3.4 Hypervisor Engine for Enterprise Virtualization
“We believe Xen 3.4 marks a significant step forward in the overall performance of our open
source hypervisor,” said Ian Pratt, founder and project chairman of Xen.org. “This new release is
consistent with our vision of providing a highly scalable and secure open source engine which is
increasingly becoming an industry standard.”
To obtain the latest source code and build of Xen 3.4 go to http://www.xen.org.
About Xen.org. Xen.org is the home of the open source Xen® hypervisor, a fast, secure industry
standard code base for operating system virtualization. Founded and led by Ian Pratt the
community benefits from the hundreds of contributors from leading hardware, software, and
security vendors. Xen.org is guided by the Xen Advisory Board, which is drawn from key
contributors to the project. For more information, visit www.xen.org.
Appendix B: Xen Configuration File Options
Xen Configuration File Options
Version: 1.0
Author: Stephen Spector ([email protected]) + Community Support on xen-users mailing list
Date:
June 16, 2009
UPDATES
All community members are invited to update this document. Please send updates to
[email protected]
SUMMARY
This file contains a complete summary of all the configuration options available in open source Xen. I
am using the Xen 3.4 source tree so some of these options may not be available in previous versions.
The complete list of options is viewable in the python source file create.py in
xen/tools/python/xen/xm/.
The file contains two types of configuration settings: options and variables. The options are listed
below with a ** before them and variables are listed below in bold/italics.
STANDARD CONFIGURATIONS
To assist the reader of the document, here are some sample configurations that are commonly used. A
complete list of examples can be found at /xen-3.4.0/tools/examples.
Example 1 (Comments in Italics)
(from http://www.linuxdevcenter.com/pub/a/linux/2006/01/26/xen.html)
Kernel image file
kernel = "/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.11-1.1366_FC4xenU"
Initial memory allocation (MB) for new domain
memory = 128
Name of domain (must be unique)
name
= "dokeos.x-tend.be"
Additional configuration settings
extra = "selinux=0 3"
Network Interfaces
vif
= ['ip = "10.0.11.13", bridge=xen-br0']
Disk devices domain has access to
disk
= ['phy:vm_volumes/root.dokeos,sda1,w'
,'phy:vm_volumes/var.dokeos,sda3,w'
,'phy:vm_volumes/www.dokeos,sda4,w'
,'phy:vm_volumes/swap.dokeos,sda2,w'
]
Set root device
root
= "/dev/sda1 ro"
Example 2 (Comments in Italics)
(Source xmexample1 from Xen source code)
Kernel image file
kernel = "/boot/vmlinuz-2.6.10-xenU"
Optional ramdisk
ramdisk = “/boot/initrd.gz”
Domain build function; default is 'linux'
builder = 'linux'
Initial memory allocation (MB) for new domain
memory = 64
Name of domain (must be unique)
name
= "ExampleDomain"
128-bit UUID for the domain
uuid = “06ed00fe-1162-4fc4-b5d8-11993ee4a8b9”
List of which CPUs this domain is allowed to use; VCPU0 runs on CPU2 & VCPU1 runs
on CPU3
cpus = [“2”, “3”]
Number of virtual CPUs to use (default is 1)
vcpus = 2
Network interface created with defaults
vif = [ '' ]
Frame buffer device; default is no frame buffer; example below creates one using
the SDL backend
vfb = [ 'sdl=1' ]
TPM instance the user domain should communicate
vtpm = [ 'instance=1,backend=0' ]
Root device for NFS
root = “/dev/nfs”
NFS server
nfs_server = '192.0.2.1'
Root directory on NFS server
nfs_root = '/full/path/to/root/directory'
Sets runlevel 4
extra = “4”
Domain exit behavior settings
on_poweroff = 'destroy'
on_reboot
= 'restart'
on_crash
= 'restart'
Configure PVSCSI devices
vscsi = [ '/dev/sdx, 0:0:0:0' ]
OPTIONS
Help
•
** help: Print this help.
help or h (default = 0)
•
** help_config: Print the available configuration variables (vars) for the "configuration script
help_config (default = 0)
Misc
•
** quiet:Quiet.
quiet or q (default =0)
•
** path: Search path for configuration scripts
path (default='.:/etc/xen')
•
** defconfig: Use the given Python configuration script
defconfig or f (default='xmdefconfig')
•
** config: Domain configuration to use (SXP)
config or F (default=None)
•
** dryrun: Dry run – prints the configuration in SXP but does not create the domain
dryrun or n (defaut = 0)
•
** xmldryrun: Dry run – prints the configuration in XML but does not create the domain
xmldryrun or x (defaut = 0)
•
** skipdtd: Skip DTD checking - skips checks on XML before creating.
skipdtd or s (default = 0)
•
** paused: Leave the domain paused after it is created
paused or p (default=0)
•
** vncviewer: Connect to the VNC display after the domain is created
vncviewer (default = 0)
•
** vncviewer-autopass: Pass VNC password to viewer via stdin and -autopass
vncviewer-autopass (default = 0)
•
** console_autoconnect:Connect to the console after the domain is created.
console_autoconnect or c (domain=0)
VARIABLES
Kernel + Memory Size
•
kernel: Path to the kernel image
kernel (Default=' '; Value='FILE')
•
loader: Path to HVM firmware
loader (Default=' ' ;Value='FILE')
•
features: Features to enable in guest kernel
features (Default=' ';Value='FEAUTRES')
•
ramdisk: Path to ramdisk image (optional)
ramdisk="/data/guest1/initrd.img"
•
builder: Function to use to build the domain
builder (Default='linux'; Value='FUNCTION')
•
memory: Domain memory in MB
memory (Default=128; Value='MEMORY')
•
maxmem: Maximum domain memory in MB
maxmem (Default=None; Value='MEMORY')
•
boot: Default Boot Device
boot (Default='c';Value='a|b|c|d')
•
shadow_memory: Domain shadow memory in MB
shadow_memory (Default=0; Value='MEMORY)
•
bootloader: Path to bootloader
bootloader (default=None; Value='File')
•
bootargs: Arguments to pass to boot loader
bootargs (default=None; Value='Name')
•
bootentry: DEPRECATED. Entry to boot via boot loader. Use bootargs.
bootentry (default=None; Value='Name')
•
s3integrity: Should domain memory integrity be verified during S3? (0=protection is disabled;
1=protection is enabled.
s3integrity (Default=1; Value='TBOOT_MEMORY_PROTECT')
•
machine_address_size: Maximum machine address size
machine_address_size (Default=None;Value='BITS')
•
suppress_spurious_page_faults: Do not inject spurious page faults into this guest
suppress_spurious_page_faults (Default=None;Value='yes|no')
CPU
•
cpu: CPU to run the VCPU0 on
cpu (default=None; Value='CPU')
•
cpus: CPUS to run the domain on
cpus (default=None; Value='CPUS')
•
cpu_cap: Set the maximum amount of cpu. CAP is a percentage that fixes the maximum
amount of cpu
cpu_cap (default=None; Value='CAP')
•
cpu_weight: Set the cpu time ratio to be allocated to the domain
cpu_weight (default=None; Value='WEIGHT')
◦
vcpus: # of Virtual CPUS in domain
vcpus (default=1; Value='VCPUS')
•
•
vcpus_avail: Bitmask for virtual CPUs to make available immediately
vcpus_avail (default=None; Value='VCPUS')
•
cpuid: Cpuid Description
cpuid (Default=[];Value=”IN[,SIN]:eax=EAX,ebx=EBX,ecx=EXC,edx=EDX”)
•
cpuid_check: Cpuid check Description
cpuid_check (Default=[];Value=”IN[,SIN]:eax=EAX,ebx=EBX,ecx=EXC,edx=EDX”)
Networking
•
hostname: Set the kernel IP hostname
hostname (Default='';Value=”NAME”)
•
ip: Set the kernel IP interface address.
ip (Default=' ' ; Value='IPADDR' )
•
interface: Set the kernel IP interface name.
interface (Default='”eth0”;Value=”INTF”)
•
dhcp: Set the kernel dhcp option
dhcp (Default='off'; Values=”off|dhcp”)
•
vif: Add a network interface with the given MAC address and bridge. The vif is configured by
calling the given configuration script. If type is not specified, default is netfront. If mac is not
specified a random MAC address is used. If not specified then the network backend chooses it's
own MAC address. If bridge is not specified the first bridge found is used. If script is not
specified the default script is used. If backend is not specified the default backend driver
domain is used. If vifname is not specified the backend virtual interface will have name vifD.N
where D is the domain id and N is the interface id. If rate is not specified the default rate is
used. If model is not specified the default model is used. If accel is not specified an accelerator
plugin module is not used. This option may be repeated to add more than one vif. Specifying
vifs will increase the number of interfaces as needed.
vif (Default=[]; Value="type= TYPE, mac=MAC, bridge=BRIDGE, ip=IPADDR, script=
SCRIPT," + \ "backend=DOM, vifname=NAME, rate=RATE,
model=MODEL, accel=ACCEL" )
•
vtpm: Add a TPM interface. On the backend side use the given instance as virtual TPM
instance. The given number is merely the preferred instance number. The hotplug script will
determine which instance number will actually be assigned to the domain. The associtation
between virtual machine and the TPM instance number can be found in /etc/xen/vtpm.db. Use
the backend in the given domain. The type parameter can be used to select a specific driver
type that the VM can use. To prevent a fully virtualized domain (HVM) from being able to
access an emulated device model, you may specify 'paravirtualized' here.
vtpm (Default= [] ; Value= "instance=INSTANCE,backend=DOM,type=TYPE")
•
netmask: Set the kernel IP netmask
netmask (Default=' ' ; Value='MASK' )
•
gateway: Set the kernel IP gateway.
gateway (Default=' ' ; Value=”IPADDR” )
•
nfs_server: Set the address of the NFS server for NFS root.
nfs_server (Default=None;Value=”IPADDR”)
•
nfs_root: Set the path of the root NFS directory.
nfs_root (Default=None;Value=”PATH”)
•
device_model: Path to device model program.
device_model (Default=None;Value='FILE')
•
uuid: xenstore UUID (universally unique identifier) to use. One will be randomly generated if
this option is not set, just like MAC addresses for virtual network interfaces. This must be a
unique value across the entire cluster.
uuid (Default=None;Value='')
•
ioports: Add a legacy I/O range to a domain, using given params (in hex). For example
'ioports=02f8-02ff'. The option may be repeated to add more than one i/o range
ioports (Default= [] ; Value= 'FROM[-TO]')
PCI
•
pci:Add a PCI device to a domain, using given params (in hex). For example 'pci=c0:02.1'.
If VSLOT is supplied the device will be inserted into that virtual slot in the guest, else a free
slot is selected. If msitranslate is set, MSI-INTx translation is enabled if possible. Guest that
doesn't support MSI will get IO-APIC type IRQs translated from physical MSI, HVM only.
Default is 1. The option may be repeated to add more than one pci device. If power_mgmt is
set, the guest OS will be able to program the power states D0-D3hot of the device, HVM only.
Default=0.
pci (Default=[]; Value=BUS:DEV.FUNC[@VSLOT][,msitranslate=0|1][,power_mgmt=0|
1]
•
vscsi: Add a SCSI device to a domain. The physical device is PDEV, which is exported to the
domain as VDEV(X:X:X:X)
vscsi (Default= [];Value= 'PDEV,VDEV[,DOM]')
•
pci_msitranslate: Global PCI MSI-INTx translation flag (0=disable;1=enable)
pci_msitranslate (Default=1; Value='TRANSLATE')
•
pci_power_mgmt: Global PCI Power Management flag (0=disable; 1=enable)
pci_power_mgmt (Default=0; Value='POWERMGT')
•
xen_platform_pci: Is xen_platform_used?
xen_platform_pci (Default=1; Value='0|1')
•
serial:Path to serial or pty or vc
serial (Default=' ';Value='FILE')
•
keymap: Set keyboard layout used
keymap (Default=' '; Value='FILE')
•
usb: Emulate USB devices
usb (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
usbdevice: Name of USB device
usbdevice (Default=' '; Value='NAME')
HVM
•
viridian:Expose Viridian interface to x86 HVM guest?
viridian (default=0; Value='VIRIDIAN')
•
pae: Disable or enable PAE of HVM domain
pae (default=1; Value='PAE')
•
acpi: Disable or enable ACPI of HVM domain.
acpi (default=1; Value='ACPI')
•
apic: Disable or enable APIC mode
apic (default=1; Value='APIC')
Timers
•
rtc_timeoffset: Set RTC offset
rtc_timeoffset (default=0; Value='RTC_TIMEOFFSET')
•
timer_mode: Timer mode (0=delay virtual time when ticks are missed; 1=virtual time is
always wallclock time
timer_mode (default=1; Value='TIMER_MODE')
•
localtime: Is RTC set to localtime?
Localtime (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
vpt_align: Enable aligning all periodic vpt to reduce timer interrupts
vpt_align (default=1; Value='VPT_ALIGN')
•
vhpt: Log2 of domain VHPT size for IA64
vhpt (default=0; Value='VHPT')
•
hpet: Enable virtual high-precision event timer
hpet (default=0; Value='HPET')
•
hap:Hap status (0=hap is disabled;1=hap is enabled.)
hap (Default=1; Value='HAP')
Drivers
•
irq: Add an IRQ (interrupt line) to a domain. For example 'irq=7'. This option may be repeated
to add more than one IRQ
irq (Default = []; Value = 'IRQ')
•
blkif: Make the domain a block device backend.
blkif (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
netif: Make the domain a network interface backend
netif (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
tmpif: Make the domain a TPM interface backend
tmpif (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
vfb:Make the domain a framebuffer backend. Both sdl=1 and vnc=1 can be enabled at the same
time.For vnc=1, connect an external vncviewer. The server will listen on ADDR (default
127.0.0.1) on port N+5900. N defaults to the domain id. If vncunused=1, the server will try to
find an arbitrary unused port above 5900. vncpasswd overrides the XenD configured
default password. For sdl=1, a viewer will be started automatically using the given DISPLAY
and XAUTHORITY, which default to the current user's ones. OpenGL will be used by default
unless opengl is set to 0. keymap overrides the XendD configured default layout file
vfb (Default=[];Value= "vnc=1,sdl=1, vncunused=1, vncdisplay=N, vnclisten=ADDR,
display=DISPLAY, xauthority=XAUTHORITY,vncpasswd=PASSWORD,
opengl=1, keymap=FILE")
Disk Devices
•
root: Set the root= parameter on the kernel command line.
Use a device, e.g. /dev/sda1, or /dev/nfs for NFS root
root (Default =' '; Value='DEVICE')
•
disk: Add a disk device to a domain. The physical device is DEV, which is exported to the
domain as VDEV. The disk is read-only if MODE is 'r', read-write if MODE is 'w'. If DOM is
specified it defines the backend driver domain to use for the disk. The option may be repeated
to add more than one disk
disk (default=[] ; Value='phy:DEV,VDEV,MODE[,DOM]')
•
access_control:Add a security label and the security policy reference that defines it.
The local ssid reference is calculated when starting/resuming the domain. At
this time, the policy is checked against the active policy as well. This way,
migrating through save/restore is covered and local labels are automatically
created correctly on the system where a domain is started / resumed.
access_control (Default= [] ; Value=”policy=POLICY,label=LABEL")
Behavior
•
on_poweroff: Behavior when a domain exits with reason 'poweroff
on_poweroff (Default=None; Value='destroy|restart|preserve|rename-restart')
•
on_reboot: Behavior when a domain exits with reason 'reboot'
on_reboot (Default=None; Value='destroy|restart|preserve|rename-restart')
•
on_crash: Behavior when a domain exits with reason 'crash'
on_crash (Default=None; Value='destroy|restart|preserve|rename-restart|coredump-destroy|
coredump-restart'')
•
on_xend_start: Action to preform when xend starts
on_xend_start (Default='ignore'; Value='ignore|start')
•
on_xend_stop: Behaviour when Xend stops:
- ignore: Domain continues to run;
- shutdown:
Domain is shutdown;
- suspend:
Domain is suspended;
on_xend_stop (Default='ignore'; Value='ignore|shutdown|suspend')
•
target: Set domain target
target (Default=0; Value='TARGET')
Graphics and Audio
•
console: Port to export the domain console on
console = /dev/console
•
nographic: Should device models use graphics
nographic (Default=0;Value='no|yes')
•
soundhw: Should device models enable audio device
soundhw (Default=' ';Value='audiodev')
•
sdl:Should the device model use SDL?
sdl (Default=None;Value='')
•
opengl: Enable\Disable OpenGL
opengl (Default=None; Value=' ')
•
vnc: Should the device model use VNC?
vnc (Default=None;Value=' ')
•
vncunused: Try to find an unused port for the VNC server. Only valid when vnc=1
vncdunused (Default=1;Value=' ')
•
videoram: Maximum amount of videoram a guest can allocate for frame buffer
videoram (Default=4; Value='MEMORY')
•
vncdisplay: VNC Display to use
vncdisplay (Default=None;Value=' ')
•
vnclisten: Address for VNC server to listen on
vnclisten (Default=None; Value=' ')
•
vncpasswd: Password for VNC console on HVM domain
vncpasswd='xxxxx' (default=None)
•
vncviewer: Spawn a vncviewer listening for a vnc server in the domain. The address of the
vncviewer is passed to the domain on the kernel command line using
'VNC_SERVER=<host>:<port>'. The port used by vnc is 5500 + DISPLAY. A display value
with a free port is chosen if possible.\nOnly valid when vnc=1.\nDEPRECATED
vncviewer (default = None; Value = 'no|yes')
•
vncconsole: Spawn a vncviewer process for the domain's graphical console. Only valid when
vnc=1
vncconsole (default=None; Value = 'no|yes')
•
stdvga: Use std vga or Cirrhus Logic Graphics
stdvga (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
isa: Simulate an ISA only system
isa (Default=0; Value='no|yes')
•
guest_os_type: Guest OS type running in HVM
guest_os_type (Default='default'; Value='NAME')
•
extra: Set extra arguments to append to the kernel command line
extra (Default=' ' ; Value = “ARGS” )
•
fda: Path to fda
fda (Default=' ';Value=FILE)
•
fdd: Path to fdb
fdb (Default=' ';Value=FILE)
•
display: X11 display to use
display (Default=None;Value='DISPLAY')
•
xauthority: X11 authority to use
display (Default=None;Value='XAUTHORITY')