How To Estimate Cape Design Engineering The Cost Of: Heartland Scenic Studio

October 2011
A M E R I C A N S O C I E T Y O F P R O F E S S I O N A L E S T I M AT O R S
by unique companies
How To Estimate
The Cost Of:
A “Green” Roof
Inside:
Cape Design Engineering
Heartland Scenic Studio
Mara Restoration
O’Connor Construction Management, Inc. Names New President
October 2011
Editor
Patsy M. Smith
Advertising
October 2011
A M E R I C A N S O C I E T Y O F P R O F E S S I O N A L E S T I M AT O R S
Patsy M. Smith
Design & Layout
Corey M. Seaborn
by unique companies
How To Estimate
The Cost Of:
A “Green” Roof
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Construction Estimators
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Fellowship & Opportunity for
Professional Development
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O’Connor Construction Management, Inc. Names New President
5
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Inside:
Cape Design Engineering
Heartland Scenic Studio
Mara Restoration
PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
member profile
18
mara restoration:
Certified Woman-owned
Business Enterprise
Heartland Scenic
studio: Building on your
2011 Chapter President of
the Year – Award Recipient
21
Cape Design
Engineering
24
how fast are you?
Industry Awareness
27
Chapter Meetings
Technical paper
29
new Members & cpes
Minority Business Enterprise
HTETCO: A “Green” Roof
imagination
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18
October 2011
3
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
2011 - 2012
President
B. Keith Jones, CPE
[email protected]
First Vice President
Joseph A. Flemming, CPE
[email protected]
Second Vice President
Daniel R. Davenport, CPE
[email protected]
Third Vice President
Doyle T. Phillips, CPE
[email protected]
Northwest Governor
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October 2011
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TO OUR MEMBERS
Message from
the President
B. Keith Jones, CPE | ASPE National President
I
n this issue of Estimating Today
you will find articles on some
of the various trades represented
in the Society. Generally when
we think of members of the
American Society of Professional
Estimators we think of estimators
for general contractors or major
construction subcontractors. I
encourage all members to do two
things. First, invite one or more
of your non-member estimating
friends to a chapter meeting
and second, consider asking
someone from a non-traditional
estimating trade. Occasionally
I will have interaction with a
trade like low-voltage wiring or
possibly a trade that is normally
subcontracted through the
owner like a security contractor.
We need these and other trades
in our Society. By asking these
estimators to a monthly meeting
you not only develop a stronger
friendship and business partner,
you help the Society by adding
potential new members and
new trades that can add variety
and contribute to our Standard
Estimating Practice manual.
Many of us, including myself,
would not be a member of the
Society if we had not been
invited to a meeting by a friend.
Now I want to take some time
to discuss college students and
student members. We all know
that students have limited time
to participate in activities outside
of school. However, students
involved in a construction related
field of study do have an interest
in ASPE. We need to introduce
our local chapters to these
college students and even high
school students. Each chapter
should pick at least one meeting
a year and focus on a topic that
would interest students and then
have the chapter members focus
their efforts on inviting students
to the meeting. We hope that
we will have a good experience
with the students and they will
be encouraged to join ASPE
when they graduate and get a
job in the industry if not joining
as a student member.
By now each chapter should
have outlined and planned their
year. As part of their meeting
schedule they should have
identified a meeting for students
as outlined above. This can
be your educational award
meeting or you can have a
separate educational meeting.
Each chapter should also have
a chapter awards chairperson
to help other chapter chairs
in identifying items from the
national awards guidelines to
incorporate into their individual
responsibilities. By following
the national awards guidelines
individual chapters will provide
superior services to members.
We are all looking forward to a
great year.
ASPE thanks the following Annual Sponsors for their on-going support of ASPE programs.
ProEst – Titanium Level
SmartBidNet – Titanium Level
Maxwell Systems – Silver Level
www.aspenational.org
October 2011
5
member profile
Michael Mills, CPE
2011 National Chapter President
of the Year Award Recipient
M
Michael Mills, CPE
Regional Manager of Estimating – Jacobs
Engineering
Number of Years in the Industry – 28
Years at Jacobs Engineering – 10
President of ASPE Chapter 3
Education – Washington State University –
BS Construction Management
Experienced in a wide variety of Estimating
including Hospitals, Courthouses, Retail,
Education, Military, Transportation, Heavy
Civil, Data Centers, Hospitality and Theme
Parks.
y career in construction began when I
was ten years old. My father was building
our house at the time in Redding, California.
I was nominated to be his gopher throughout
the entire construction duration.
I always had a flair for drawing and sketching
and when I reached college age, I decided
to study Architecture at Washington State
University in Pullman, Washington. I loved
the course work but spending night and day in
the design studio began to wear on me. After a
sales pitch from the Construction Management
department head, I switched majors and found
a new home and new calling. I never looked
back.
Upon graduation, I moved to Southern
California in 1985 and started working at
Lynch Construction as an estimator. John
Lynch was a great mentor and teacher and
truly took the time to show me the tricks of
the trade. I had the opportunity to work on
shopping centers, custom oceanfront estates,
and several manufacturing projects. After
several years I worked for several other local
General Contractors and started to build on
my estimating experience and skillsets.
In 1990 I accepted a position in the Estimating
department at Universal Studios, Hollywood. I
worked on a series of theme parks attractions
including Jurassic Park and Terminator II. I can
truly say that I was working with the best and
the brightest people in the industry. I had the
opportunity to take estimates from conceptual
level to contract documents to construction
and finally to post mortem.
6
October 2011
In 2000 I accepted my current position at
Jacobs Engineering as the West Coast Manager
of Estimating. I have had the opportunity to
work with one of the largest Architectural/
Engineering firms in the word working on a
diverse array of projects from underground
laser tunnels to Data Centers, to Corporate
buildings in Korea.
In 2010, I was voted ASPE President for
Chapter three, Orange County. I had the
privilege of working with a very dedicated
group of professional that helped me complete
our goals established at the beginning of
the year. I am still very active in the chapter
and we are poised to grow our membership
substantially this year. The ASPE has afforded
me the opportunity to stay in contact and
network with colleagues in the region as well
as stay on top of current technologies. We
also have a wonderful scholarship program
that I am proud to be a part that identifies the
best and brightest students in our industry.
It is gratifying to be able to give back to our
profession and be able to help graduates enter
the industry.
On a personal note, I have a lovely wife
Belinda and we live in Huntington Beach in one
of the most beautiful areas in the world. I enjoy
playing and adding to my collection of vintage
guitars as well as doing just about anything
outdoors. My wife is a very competitive cyclist
and I am just starting to get into the sport. Just
like estimating or life in general, you should
not be afraid to try something new or different.
It might change your life!
www.aspenational.org
December 5-9, 2011 :: Exhibition: December 7-8, 2011 :: Washington Convention Center :: Washington, D.C.
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October 2011
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multi-trade
Various Trades:
FLORIDA
A registered Minority Business Enterprise (MBE)
Written by Walter Kafuka, E.I.
T
he Estimating Department
at Cape Design Engineering
Company (CDE) is responsible for
compiling multi-discipline and multitrade construction cost estimates for
its design and construction branches.
In addition to providing construction
cost estimates for construction project
bids, CDE also provides conceptual
cost estimates for project budget
allocations, and budget cost estimates
for completed design projects.
CDE is also in the unique position
of providing cost estimates for
design projects completed for some
government entities. One of these,
an IDIQ (Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite
Quantity) contract with the US Air
Force, requires cost estimates for
various design projects on remote
bases overseas. The project scopes
are mainly MEP, Civil, and Structural
projects covering multiple divisions
including, Concrete, Masonry, Metals,
Site & Earth work, HVAC, Plumbing,
and Electrical, among others.
Estimating for these projects presents
some unique situations that would
necessitate a different approach to
calculating some of the related costs
in order to provide the government
with a detailed and accurate estimate
that will not provide any surprises
once the project moves from design to
construction.
Take into consideration of Ascension
Auxiliary Airfield, which is a facility of
the United States Air Force, a rocket
tracking station located on Ascension
Island. Ascension Island is an isolated
volcanic island in the equatorial waters
of the South Atlantic Ocean, around
994 mi from the coast of Africa, and
1,398 mi from the coast of South
America. There is only one flight a
week from the USA into this island,
and supplies and equipment are sent
to Ascension by ship. Therefore, when
compiling a cost estimate, the estimator
would need to take into consideration
unique variables like additional travel
costs, down time between completion
of projects and flights back to the US
that the contractor would still have to
be paid for (including ancillary costs like
per diem), and potential weekend work
to complete certain projects in time to
make the transport off the island. In
addition to this, approximately 95%
of the construction materials must be
bought in the US, to comply with the
Buy American Act and shipped to the
island via ship, so additional costs would
need to be taken into consideration, like
material handling on the US side and
on the Ascension side. These are just a
few of the situations that require unique
estimating procedures when compiling
a detailed cost estimate for the client.
More about Cape Design
Engineering Company:
Cape Design Engineering Principals, Kannan Rengarajan, PE, CEO (4th from
left) and Lutfi M. Mized, P.E., President (3rd from right) receive SBA award
8
October 2011
Cape Design Engineering is a
full-service Structural, Mechanical,
and Electrical Engineering design
firm, located in Cape Canaveral,
FL. In addition to this, Cape Design
Engineering is also a Florida Certified
Building and Mechanical Contractor
servicing
central
Florida
and
Jacksonville, FL. Initially starting in
1997 with only four individuals, CDE
now employs 26 full-time personnel,
including structural, mechanical, and
electrical Professional Engineers, and
construction managers, the majority of
whom are LEED certified, a complete
state of the art computer-aided design
department, a successful construction
division, an estimating department, and
a full spectrum of administrative staff.
CDE has grown into one of the area’s
leading design-build firms working with
such clients as NASA, Kennedy Space
Center, Naval Air Station Jacksonville,
Eglin Air Force Base, Patrick Air Force
Base, Florida Power and Light, Brevard
Community College, Palm Beach
State College, BRPH, School Board
of Brevard County, Health First and
Daytona State College.
Recently, Cape Design Engineering
was selected as “Alternate Winners”
of the “Minority Small Business
Person of the Year Award” from the
US Small Business Administration.
This is an award given to recognize
the outstanding achievements of
minority entrepreneurs based on
the challenges their business has
overcome, its total revenues, total jobs
created, innovation, and the economic
impact the business has had on its
community.
CDE has performed cost estimates
for over 500 construction projects over
the last 10 years, from design-build
projects, conceptual design projects,
completed design projects, and
already funded construction projects,
using state of the art WinEstimator
software and databases.
Cape Design Engineering Co. supports
Walter Kafuka, E.I., member of ASPE
Orlando Chapter 50.
www.cdeco.com
www.aspenational.org
awareness
Industry Awareness:
B
uilding design technology
continues to move rapidly
forward. A whole new
system of standards is being
established through the efforts of
the BuildingSmartAlliance (bSa).
This is a global effort. The bSa
has assembled work groups with
members from the major design
and estimating organizations such
as the AIA, the Association for the
Advancement of Cost Engineering
(AACE), the Royal Institution
of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
and the ASPE. Their work has
been continuing for 2 years and
the first phases will be ready for
Ballot in 2012.
The main thrust of bSa work
group No. 1 is to present a list of
definitions for the new standards
involved with the newly adopted
AIA Document E202 Building
Information Modeling Protocol Levels of Detail (LOD 100 thru
500). Included with the LOD
detail, there will be a list of each
Omniclass
table(s)
requiring
design and specification input for
each LOD. The AIA-LOD 100
thru 500, along with Omniclass
coding tables, were approved at the
December 2010 National Institute
of Building Sciences Convention in
Washington D.C. If everyone agrees
to follow these guidelines then we as
Estimating & BIM
estimators can reasonably expect the
same detail for each LOD specified.
Today this is not the case with the
traditional: Conceptual, Schematic
Design, Design Development, and
Construction Drawing documents.
visit the bSa website. You can be
individually involved in developing
and applying new technology.
David Battle, CPE
ASPE Industry Awareness
Committee Chair
member of Oklahoma City
Chapter 81
We will be presenting more
detail in our next note to the
membership as well as the complete
Ballot document when it is
available. This presents a question
for the membership. Do we need
to become involved individually?
Our ASPE is a member of the bSa
as an organization but we can have
greater input through individual
membership. If you are interested,
ASPE Member Benefit!
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email:
[email protected]
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t Data™
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magazine, the leading industry resource for actual
construction costs. Delivered electronically each
issue of DCD provides you:
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on Green Building and more
Go to www.dcd.com/aspe to sign up. Please
call us at 800-533-5680 if we can help.
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The #1 Ind
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What’s in Stor
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October 2011
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October 2011
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Technical Paper
What successful Cost Estimators know. . . . and you should, too.
>>>>>>> AN ESTIMATOR’S GUIDE TO POLICIES,
>>>>>>>>>>> PROCEDURES, AND STRATEGIES
ESTIMATE THE COST OF
A “Green” roof
submitted by Susan Gollon, CPE, LEED® AP
The author is Susan Gollon, CPE, LEED AP,
1) Introduction
Conceptual Estimator since 2006 with Fishbeck,
2) Types and Methods of Measurements
Thompson, Carr and Huber, Inc.: Engineers, Scientists,
Architects, Constructors.
estimates for FTC&H designed projects at all levels
of design from OM through CD, as well as third party
confirming estimates for FTC&H clients. Starting as a
clerical worker in 1974 for a heavy construction general
contractor, Susan earned an AS degree in construction
engineering from Lawrence Tech University and BS
Degree in Management and had worked as project
manager and hard bid project estimator in commercial
general contracting since 1984.
www.aspenational.org
3) Specific Factors That Affect Take-off & Pricing
Susan provides budget
4) Overview of Materials, Labor, Equipment,
Indirect Costs, & Markup
5) Special Risk Considerations
6) Ratios and Analysis - Testing the Bid
7) Misc. Pertinent Information
8) Sample Sketch
9) Sample Takeoff & Pricing Sheets
10) Glossary of Terms
11) References
October 2011
11
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
1. Introduction
The intent of this paper is to describe
how to estimate the cost of a vegetated
roof system, also known as a “Green
Roof”. It is important to first understand
that there are several different types of
green roof systems and secondly, that
the system is a living entity and therefore
requires certain considerations such as
selection of which plants and timing of
the live plant installation. Also, green roof
systems can be installed as an integral
part of, or in addition to, a conventional
membrane roofing system and therefore
can be installed by the roofing contractor if
they are qualified to do so, or installed by a
separate company such as a landscaper. For
the purposes of this paper, we assume the
conventional roofing system is completed
and inspected for water tightness by the
roofing contractor, that a loose laid 60 mil
EPDM membrane to protect the roofing
has already been installed by the roofing
contractor, and the green roof is to be
estimated for installation as a separate
contract scope.
Main CSI (2004) Division
Division 07 – Thermal and Moisture
Protection
Main CSI (2004) Subdivisions
07 01 00 Operation and Maintenance of
Thermal and Moisture Protection
07 05 00 Common Work Results for Thermal
and Moisture Protection
07 30 00 Roofing
07 33 00 Natural Roof Coverings
07 33 63 Vegetated Roofing
– 07 33 63.10 Green Roof Systems
07 50 00 Membrane Roofing
07 53 23 Modular Vegetative Tray Plant
Materials
07 76 00 Roof Pavers
– 07 76 16 Roof Decking Pavers
BRIEF DESCRIPTION
The current atmosphere of sustainable
and environmentally friendly building
practices has created the proliferation of
many strategies to improve the impact that
buildings have on both the environment
around them and on the people that
work and live within them. One of those
strategies is the addition of a vegetative
roof system, also known as a “green”
roof, to a conventional low slope building
roof. Typically, a green roof is a system
12
October 2011
of components that are in addition to a
typical single ply membrane or other flat
roof system. There are several different
types of green roofs. Most of them
incorporate at the least, a root barrier that
prevents the plant roots from penetrating
the roofing membrane, a means for
channeling or draining moisture through
the green roof system, a filter fabric, an
edge treatment to maintain planting area
edge shape, a growing medium such as
soil or engineered soil composites, and the
actual living plants/vegetation. Some of
the different types of green roof systems
include a conventional “built in place”
system where the different components
mentioned are installed in layers over
the area of the roof that is to be “green”.
This entails outlining the green roof area
by some means such as treated lumber
edging, installing the different layers
of components (root barrier, drainage
layer, filter layer, soil), then planting
the vegetation. There are also mat or
“carpet” systems where the vegetation is
pre-established and is rolled out like sod.
Another type of green roof system is a gridlike modular system in which the growing
medium and plantings are contained in
individual trays that can be set in place,
with the vegetation either pre-planted
and established prior to setting the trays,
or planted after the trays are installed. For
the purpose of this paper, another system
that is a hybrid, invisible, pre-vegetated,
modular green roof system (it provides
a uniform vegetative carpet look rather
than grid line look) will be estimated. This
system was developed by LiveRoof, LLC,
a subsidiary of Hortech, Inc. Optional
accessories may be incorporated into a
green roof system, depending on if the
roof is designed to be readily accessible for
use, or if human access is to be limited and
the green roof is desired more for only the
thermal insulating, noise reduction and
storm water runoff control advantages, to
name a few. Optional accessories include
walkway pavers that provide a means to
traverse the roof without stepping on the
vegetation and irrigation systems that can
be temporary for helping to establish the
plants, or permanent for assuring plant
viability during times of draught. We
further define this paper to the estimating
of a LiveRoof brand, pre-vegetated hybrid
modular green roof system, with pavers,
but without irrigation, although some sort
of irrigation is typically recommended.
Irrigation systems vary greatly depending
on the project design intent, soil depth
and climatic conditions. Irrigation is a
regional decision with it being an absolute
must in some regions. Irrigation is best
handled by a landscaping contractor. 1
2. Types and Methods
of Measurements
The initial overall measurement for
green roofs is the square foot of roof area
which is to be covered with the vegetated
modules. However, the design intent
for the roof determines how deep the
growing medium will be, and therefore
the depth of the green roof modules.
There may be what is termed either an
extensive green roof, or an intensive one,
with the defining factor being the depth
of the soil. An extensive system can be
intended simply to be an ecological roof
cover that requires minimal maintenance
and expects limited human access, or
a system that provides an inviting area
for visiting and enjoying the greenery.
An intensive green roof can be more
like a roof garden with a large variety
of plants, including small trees, to be
enjoyed as part of the outdoor living
space. Between the two, growing media
depths can range from 2 ½” to 12” and
more. The overall height of a modular
green roof system ranges from 2 ½” to
6” in depth. The shallower trays can also
be used for retrofit projects where load
limitations of an existing roof structure
are a consideration. The deeper trays
allow for more variety of plant species.
The depth of the modules should be
stated in the project specifications or
noted on the architectural plans. For this
estimate, I will be figuring 2 ½” modules
for a retro-fit roof that will be accessible
and therefore include roof pavers.
While taking off the square footage of
the green roof, it is important to also take
off the lineal feet of edge of the modules
that do not butt directly up to other
trays and are therefore exposed. This
includes edges around roof drains and
roof top mechanical equipment bases.
There is special edging required as part
of the modular system that come in 8’
lengths and are 3”, 4 ½” and 6” in height.
It is also important to note whether the
edges are straight or if they are curved.
For this estimate, all exposed edges
are straight, and require the 3” edging
and will be taken off at edges adjacent
www.aspenational.org
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
to roof pavers, mechanical equipment
bases, perimeter roof and set backs from
roof drains.
vegetating the trays to select plants that
meet the design intent and are appropriate
for the climate conditions.
Roof pavers provide a means for
people to walk about the roof without
treading on the plants. Roof paver
measurement depends on the type of
paver. They can be measured by the
square footage or by the lineal footage or
by count. There are pavers available that
are specifically designed for installation
with the modular pre-vegetated roof
system so the sides of the modules are
not exposed and there is a means for
water to move through them and not
pool at their edges. Other pavers can be
used as well. However, this estimate will
include 24” x 24” x 2” concrete pavers.
The method of take-off for this estimate
will be by the square foot. A count will
also be taken for a double check and to
discern the amount of paver cutting.
Small Quantities vs Large
Quantities
The overall square footage of the
vegetative roof area is a factor in pricing.
There are material and labor pricing
breaks for larger quantities, but certain
costs will be required no matter what the
size of the project. These include minimum
trucking charges for delivering the plant
modules, and a crane to lift the modules
to the roof top. Each project must be
analyzed individually for consideration of
economies of scale. 3
The modular system planting trays in
this paper are 1’ x 2’. It is expected that
the green roof area may not be exact
to accommodate a perfect fit of trays
and pavers. A recommended method
of making up any dimensional slack is
providing stone ballast between all or
some of the tray and pavers, and/or
between the trays and adjacent parapet
or other roof curbs to which the trays
abut. One way of determining the
amount of ballast is by measuring the
square foot area to receive the ballast,
then determining the tonnage of stone
using a factor of 10-12 pounds per
square foot. 2
3. specific FACTORS
THAT aFFECT TAKE-OFF
AND PRICING
Plant Selection
A major factor of the design intent,
and subsequently the cost, is the actual
plants selected for the green roof.
Plant selection will be unique to the
particular project and depends upon the
design intent, project location, the local
climate, other structures near the green
roof, whether irrigation is provided and
to what extent, and the desired visual
affect of the mature plants in terms of
color and texture. Plant selection should
be in the specifications. If the plant
selection has not been defined in the
specifications, it is important to consult
a local horticulturist that will be prewww.aspenational.org
Quantity/Complexity of Edging
A large amount of edging required vs
little or no edging affects pricing. Edging
labor cost can be part of the overall
per square foot cost of the green roof.
However, If the ratio of lineal feet of
edging is more than 20% of green roof
area (example: 6,000 s.f. x 20% = 1,200
l.f.) then the edging pricing will need a
closer look, adding about 4 man hours/100
l.f. of edging over the 20% threshold. Also
curved edges will add approximately 1
man hour per cut per tray to labor costs
for the time to cut the trays in the curve
shape. 4 For this estimate, the lineal feet
of edging is less than 20% of the green roof
square footage, therefore the edging labor
is a factor of the green roof labor.
Accessibility
The height of the roof to receive the
installation of the vegetative roof, and the
available crane staging area affects the size
of crane required. A one or two story roof
will be less expensive equipment wise,
than a taller roof. Also, a staging area that
will allow a crane to be staged close to the
building as opposed to further will affect
the required boom reach, and therefore,
the size of equipment.
Jurisdiction
Many municipality, education facility,
and government entity projects are
specifying green roofs. They are often
federally funded or federally assisted
projects and therefore, labor wages
are mandated to conform to federal
prevailing wage laws (Davis-Bacon Act).
Many states also have their own prevailing
wage mandates for state funded and
state sponsored projects. Workers on
prevailing wage projects must be paid
no less than the local prevailing wage and
benefits as established by the Federal
Department of labor and industries. The
specifications for the project will have
information about prevailing wage rates.
In Michigan, wage rates that are required
to be paid on Michigan prevailing wage
projects can be obtained from the
Michigan Department of Energy, Labor
and Economic Growth website.
Timing
The green roof is ideally the last scope
item installed on a construction project.
Depending on the geographical region
and climate, delivery and installation of
the green roof will be weather dependent.
In the Midwest, there is a delivery window
of June to September for a pre-vegetated
roof. A custom mix of plants require 8 to
12 weeks for established growth and the
danger of freezing temperatures at time of
install must be avoided to prevent freezing
of the modules before they are set in place.
Therefore, the delivery date will need to
be determined because, depending on
regional weather, the green roof install
may be delayed until following spring and
pricing will be dependent on escalation
factors for labor, material and equipment.
4. OVERVIEW OF LABOR,
MATERIAL, EQUIPMENT
AND OTHER COSTS
Material
This example uses a simple project to
demonstrate take off and pricing of a
green roof. The quantity take off of the
green roof area is the main component
of the estimate. Accessories such as
the lineal feet of straight and curved
edging and square feet of pavers are also
components of the material cost. This
example is for a LiveRoof brand hybrid
modular extensive pre-vegetated roof
system. Material pricing for the modules
with engineered soil and specified plants,
the edging, and the pavers that are
specifically designed to work with the
system can be obtained from LiveRoof,
LLC. Because of the uniqueness of each
job and climate region, LiveRoof has a
network of growers across North America
that specialize in plants for the green
roofs that best fit the growing conditions
of the project’s region. Also, since the
system is pre-vegetated and requires time
for the plants to take hold in the modules
(about 8 to 12 weeks), they must know
October 2011
13
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
when the expected delivery date of the
pre-vegetated modules will be in order to
factor in the planting season and growing
time as well as the project location for
factoring in delivery cost. Quantities to be
taken off and provided to the grower for
pricing are the overall square footage of
the vegetative area which will be square
footage of modules, the specified plant
mix and the lineal feel of edging, (straight
and curved).
Another material consideration is the
amount of stone ballast which should be
noted in the specifications or on the plans
but is typically 1” to 2” washed river stone
or pea gravel. Pricing can be obtained
from a stone supplier. In Michigan, it is
running about $15 to $20 a ton, delivered.
It is also important to add applicable sales
tax to all material costs.
Labor
Labor pricing is dependent on many
factors already mentioned: the size of
the project, the amount of edging, the
amount of curved edging, the height
and accessibility of the roof to receive
the green roof system and whether the
project is a prevailing wage or union
jurisdiction.
Another factor is the
expected delivery / installation date of
the green roof. It may not be for a year
or more from the bid date so escalation
for project labor costs must be applied. I
prefer to use productivity for calculating
labor because of how the labor wage
can vary by region or project. Layout
of the trays can be figured at 1 man
hour for every 8 to 10 trays which will
accommodate edging, as long as the
lineal feet of edging is less than 20%
of the overall square footage of the
green roof. This calculates to .05 man
hours per square foot (using 10 trays x
2 square feet = 16 sf.; 16 s.f. / hour = .05
hours / s.f. More than 20% of edging
may add about 4 man hours/100 l.f. of
edging over the 20% threshold. Also
curved edges will add approximately 1
man hour per cut per tray to labor costs
for the time to cut the trays in the curve
shape. Spreading the ballast to a depth
enough to completely cover the slip
sheet is calculated at about 1 man hour
per ton. The pavers must be laid out
and set prior to the green roof modules.
Setting the pavers for this estimate is
figured at 2 pavers per man hour, or .125
man hours per square foot. 5
14
October 2011
Equipment
Required equipment is dependent
upon the height of the roof to receive the
vegetated modules and the amount of
edging and pavers that may need to be
cut to fit. Also, a large area of green roof
may require a roller conveyor to move
the trays across the roof top efficiently
as opposed to workers hand carrying
the trays over long distances. The largest
equipment factor is what is required to
lift the roof modules and other materials
to the roof top, and how long the
equipment will be required on site. The
taller or more difficult the lift, the larger
the crane required. The larger the project
and number of trays, the more lifts and
the more time the crane is on site. Once
the crane size is determined, and the
amount of time the crane will be required
on site, pricing can be obtained from a
crane rental company, if the installer does
have their own.
The pre-vegetated modules are
delivered in pallets containing 24 trays
which can be hoisted to the roof top in
one lift. The number of lifts required is
determined by calculating the number of
trays required for the project. One way
is to divide the total square footage of
green roof area by 2 (each tray is 2 square
feet), rounding up, and dividing by 24.
The number of lifts are then determined,
taking into consideration the roof height,
the accessibility, and how long each crane
lift will take. For this estimate, there will
be around 950 modules (1,900 s.f. / 2 s.f.)
and therefore approximately 40 lifts plus a
few additional for the pavers and ballast.
This project is a one story roof with good
access so I am using an average of 28 lifts/
day. If modules and/or pavers are to be
cut on site to accommodate curved edging
or partial dimensions, a small cut-off saw
or reciprocating saw will be required.
Indirect Costs
Costs that are not part of the physical
green roof system but should to be
considered as part of the project cost and
added into the estimate include: Bonding
and special insurances if required by the
specifications; and pre-planning of the
tray layout. Some green roof projects
are designed with an elaborate mix of
plantings to create a pattern of color
and texture. The design may incorporate
patterns of different plant mixes over the
green roof area. If this is the case, it can
be time consuming to figure out how to
lay out the trays in the prescribed design
on the job site. It is advisable to include
time for a planning process on how best
to load the trays for shipping so they can
be unloaded and set in place in order
of the design, without double handling
the trays. 10 to 20 man hours for preplanning is advisable for complex plant
design patterns.
Markup
Green roofs are material intensive,
meaning the majority of the cost is for
the purchase of the modular roof system
components. The mark up on material
is generally between 10% to 15% for
overhead and profit. The mark up on labor
will be 20% which will cover supervision,
small equipment, overhead and profit.
5. SPECIAL RISK
CONSIDERATIONS
Down Payments
Growers of green roof plant modules
generally require a 50% down payment
before they will produce the vegetated
trays. If compensation to the contractor for
the down payment has not been worked
out with the owner, or a deal worked out
with the grower, the green roof contractor
will be carrying the interest cost of fronting
the down payment. This is an occasion for
increasing the markup for material to the
15% range to cover finance costs.
What is the schedule?
It must be determined how far out from
bid time will the pre-vegetated roof be
installed and factor escalation for material,
labor and equipment accordingly. Prevegetated green roof modules must be
planted during the regional growing
season with enough time for the plants
to be established in the trays to provide
95% coverage of the growing medium soil
before install, and must be installed when
the temperatures are above freezing. The
growing time frame can be a delaying
factor in certain regions, requiring that
the green roof modules be pre-planted
and installed months after the rest of the
project has been completed.
Access
Since the green roof is one of the last
items to be installed on the roof, it is
important to coordinate with ground level
work. A crane will need to be staged in a
place to allow stocking the modules onto
the roof. Viewing the site drawings and
www.aspenational.org
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
visiting the site at bid time to discern how
difficult access may be can help determine
if coordination will add to the cost of the
job. Conditions may be such that a road
will need to be closed to stage a crane,
which will require special permitting and
safety measures such as barricading and
traffic control. Or, there may be no usable
crane access and everything will need to
be essentially hand carried.
Irrigation
Green roofs are plants. Plants need
water, even draught resistant plants.
Irrigation is an important consideration,
depending on the depth of the tray soil,
the location of the plantings on the roof,
the climate region of the project and plant
selection. Whether irrigation is included or
not, it could affect the overall satisfaction
of the product. Ideally, there is a water
supply on the roof, or an irrigation system
designed specifically for the green roof.
Maintenance Contract
While not covered in this paper, it is
www.aspenational.org
important to read the specifications to see
if a maintenance contract is required as
part of the scope of work.
Evolving Industry
Although the current green roof industry
started in Europe about 25 years ago, it
is relatively new in North America, and
therefore it is still growing and evolving.
Long term performance information is not
readily available and concerns with leaking
can be difficult to address. Also, the industry
does not have the uniformity of materials
and methods that you may find in other
industries, such as the roofing industry.
Green roofs cross the line of both roofing
and landscaping trades. A pre-vegetated
modular tray system is purchased from
growers but can be installed as part of a
roofer’s scope, or a landscaper’s scope.
Other green roof systems, such as the built
in place and rolled-out mat systems may
be better left for landscapers. Sometimes
the specifications may direct which trade
will be expected to be the green roof
installer. 6
6. RATIOS AND ANALYSIS
Each green roof is unique and therefore
does not always lend itself well to a
quick per square foot check of the price.
However, a general rule for LiveRoof
system in south east Michigan is around
$22 to $25 per square foot. 7
7. MISC. PERTINENT
INFORMATION
Review the specifications to discern
the work to be included in the green
roof scope. Some items, such as the “slip
sheet” root barrier that is laid down to
protect the roofing membrane may be
missed by both the green roof installer
and the roofer because they figure the
other has picked up the work in their
bid (if they are not one and the same).
It is helpful for the green roof installer to
coordinate with the roofing contractors
that are bidding on the job or specifically
qualify the green roof bid as to whether
the slip sheet is included or not.
October 2011
15
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
8. SAMPLE Sketch
O Green Roof
roject
Layer
SF of Green Roof A
LF of Edge Roof A
SF of Green Roof C
LF of Edge Roof C
SF of ballast
SF of Paver
Paver Count
16
Color
October 2011
Quantity
634.42
127.08
1256.49
201.56
160.73
961.5
247
Unit
SF
LF
SF
LF
SF
SF
EA
Area
Length
Area
Length
Area
Area
Count
www.aspenational.org
Estimate the Cost of: A “GREEN” ROOF
9. SAMPLE estimate
EXAMPLE ESTMATE - HYBRID MODULAR GREEN ROOF SYSTEM W/EDGING AND PAVERS
01-00-00.00 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Takeoff
Quantity
Unit
Labor
Cost/Unit
Labor Wage
Labor
Amount
Material
Price
Material
Amount
Equip
Price
Equip
Amount
Total
Cost/Unit
Total
Amount
01-54-33.60 Crane Rental
Crane Rental w/ mobilization-demobilization
2.00 day
$800 /day
$1,600 $800.00 /day
$1,600
Note: 1900 s.f./ 2 s.f./tray = 950 trays; 950/24 trays/lift = 40 lifts; add for stone & edge, say 43 lifts req'd. @ 28 lifts per day, say 2 days
07-00-00.00 THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION
07-33-63.10 Green Roof Systems
Edging Material (Labor with Tray labor)
330.00 lf
$0.00 /lf
In tray labor
$1.80 /sf
$36.00 /mh
$5.56 /lf
$1,835
$5.56 /lf
$1,835
$13.28 /sf
$25,232
$15.08 /sf
$28,652
$7.89 /sf
$7,730
Note: Edging mateiral quote including shipping from LiveRoof grower
Hybrid Modular Trays- Basic Plant Mix
1,900.00 sf
$3,420
Note: Vegetrated tray material quote including shipping from LiveRoof grower; Labor: 10 trays/hour x 2 s.f. / tray = 20 s.f. / hour = .05 hrs/s.f. x $36/hour = $1.80/s.f.
07-51-13.50 Walkways For Green Roofs
Pavers 2' x 2' x 2", concrete
960.00 sf
$4.14 /sf
$33.10 /mh
$4,055
$4.00 /sf
$3,675
Note: 2 pavers per man hour (some cutting, fitting, leveling) x 4 s.f./paver = 8 s.f. / hour = .125 hrs/sf x $33.10/hr = $4.14/sf
Note: Paver count = 247, say 250 at $15/each, quoted price, say $4.00/sf
Stone Ballast
1.00 ton
$66.20 /ton
$33.10 /mh
$66
$35.00 /ton
$35
$101.20 /ton
$101
Note: 2 man hours per ton, small quantity, diverse area
SUBTOTALS
$7,541
$30,777
$1,600
$39,918
6% MI Sales tax on Material
$1,847
Subtotal
$41,765
OH&P Markup on Labor
20%
$1,508
OH&P Markup on Material & Equipment
10%
$3,422
TOTAL
$46,695
at 1,900 s.f. =
$24.58
Per s.f.
8. SAMPLE SKetch
10. GLOSSARY
The project for this sample estimate
is a re-roof of an existing building with
the inclusion of a green roof and pavers.
Although the roof plan included the square
footage quantities of green roof, a take-off
is still performed to check the quantity
provided and to determine the lineal feet
of edging.
Ballast: A material installed over a
roofing membrane to help hold it in
place. Ballasts are loose laid and can
consist of aggregate or concrete pavers.
1. Interview with Julie Ardner, Specialist,
LiveRoof, LLC
3, 4, 5, 6, 7
Interview with Kevin
Clausen, Estimator, Great Lakes Systems
Roofing
An on-line take-off program, ProEst, is
used to confirm the area of the green roof,
the lineal feet of edging, the square feet of
pavers and the square feet of ballast. The
first dimension I always take is to check
the scale of the drawing by making sure
dimensions are being calculated correctly
by the on-line program. I will pick either a
dimension line on the plan, or the drawing
scale notation. This plan did check out at
1/16” = 1’-0”.
Green Roof: “A conventional roof that is
covered with a layer of vegetation.” From
the “Green Dictionary” at http://www.
ecomii.com/ecopedia/green-roof
Growing Medium: A soil replacement
used for growing plants.
www.aspenational.org
Roof Pavers: A rigid building material
that is laid down on a finished roof to
provide a firm even surface for walking
on to protect the roofing membrane. Can
also be used as ballast.
11. REFERENCES
2. RS Means, Building Construction Cost
Data, pg 218 07-53-23.20.4600
Certification 2012
Applications to enroll in the winter
cycle are due January 1, 2012.
Sustainable Building Practice
(Sustainability): “Meeting the needs
of the present, without compromising
the ability of future generations to meet
their own needs.” (World Commission on
Environment and Development, http://
www.sustainabilitydictionary.com)
October 2011
17
restoration
Various Trades:
Pennsylvania
New Jersey | Delaware
Certified across three states as a Woman-owned Business Enterprise
Written by: Nicole Lombardi
Imagine this scenario: After years as a restaurateur you hire your choice of skilled
veteran chefs from a variety of upscale eateries and bring them together under one roof.
Now imagine the dining experience that awaits your clients -- each course the result of years
of skill coupled with the excitement and potential of a new endeavor.
Although more inclined toward pointing than pan-frying, Mara Restoration was established
with the same idea in mind: gathering construction veterans and promising up-and-comers
to build a new business on strong foundations.
N
aturally, Mara’s real emphasis
is on history. As president
and founder Patricia McNamara
knows, a building is only historic
after it’s stood the test of time. Her
own industry foundations were
laid in 1992, as an employee of her
family’s small-town construction
firm. Handling everything from
office administration and human
resources to client development,
she maintained her position with
the company through its sale in
2001, becoming equal partner
with her two brothers when they
retook ownership in 2004.
Deepening her understanding
with hands-on masonry training,
Patricia realized her lifelong dream
of independent business ownership
by establishing Mara Restoration,
Inc. in 2008. Certified across three
states as a Woman-owned Business
Enterprise, Mara joined the BAC
Local 1 in 2011, becoming a vital
resource for general contractors,
government clients and private
accounts.
Aiding her from Mara’s first
year was Vice President of Sales
and Estimating, John Cavalieri.
John was initially tasked with
18
October 2011
a huge responsibility: establish
and develop relationships among
general contractors and contacts
in the public sector, and physically
oversee
project
progress.
With a degree in Construction
Management Technology, John
hit the ground running and
established his own energetic and
decisive style, skillfully juggling
numbers-crunching, estimation
and network-style marketing.
Recognizing the importance of
strong leadership in the trenches,
Mara brought Gene Rose on
board in 2010 as Field Operation
Supervisor. With thirty years of
experience, including a stint with
the US Naval Reserve’s famed
“Seabees”, Gene’s dedication to
quality workmanship and schedule
adherence holds the field team to
exacting standards.
Estimator Charlie Cossman
joined in mid-2011, boasting 15
years experience in specialized
construction estimating. Familiar
with all aspects of the estimation
process,
including
proposal
composition, contract negotiation
and purchasing, his trade-centered
focus gives him a unique insight
into the needs and demands of
a small masonry firm, as well as
those of its clients.
But just as the success of even
the most seasoned chefs relies
on the skill and efficiency of its
kitchen staff, Mara required a
field team that would not only
compliment but complete its
professional resume.
Workers are selected from a
pre-qualified pool of available
labor, hand-picked for each
job according to their specific
specialties. Despite the fluctuating
labor needs from project to
project, Mara aims for longevity
in its field employees, offering
ongoing education, skill training
and apprenticeship programs.
Respect and communication
being key components in any
relationship, Mara engenders both
with its employees. One of Gene’s
daily responsibilities is not just
oversight of but contact with his
workers, addressing performance
quality as well as personal insights,
feedback and concerns. Most of
all, Patricia stresses the importance
of gratitude to the field team, and
a heartfelt appreciation for their
willingness to work their fingers
to the bone while still proudly
promoting the company.
In the beginning, of course,
it wasn’t so easy. Facing the
economic disaster that was 2009,
Mara’s first year of business was
a trial by fire, struggling to cast its
line into already overfished waters.
With a few key projects early on,
however, belts were tightened and
the company persevered, surviving
to see the tides turn by early 2010.
By then the company’s early jobs
came to completion, clients were
humming and references were
abuzz. Smooth sailing may be
an overstatement, but Mara’s
success and steady growth are a
testament to its ability to utilize
its inherent strengths and mitigate
the overhead that handicaps so
many young companies.
The establishment of Mara’s
bid screen process began long
before Mara itself.
Patricia
used her experience with her
family’s business to hone a
selection process that qualifies
opportunities, ensuring that
estimators won’t invest in bids
www.aspenational.org
restoration
with little chance of return. Using this formula means Mara is flexible
enough to manage resources and opportunities with the fluctuation of
the economy.
Project Profile: Kingston Armory Readiness Center
Client
Department of General Services
Additionally, person-to-person networking and personal referrals
remain keystones of Mara’s ongoing success. This “face time” marketing
strategy has secured more work than numbers alone, and keeps Mara’s
name coming up when projects are in the works.
Square Footage
5000 square feet
Project Duration
November ‘09 - November ‘10
Architect / Engineer
Bureau of Engineering & Architecture
It’s recognition of the quality behind the name that takes a company
from a mention at the planning table to an actual place in the plans.
General Contractor
S.J. Thomas, Inc.
Project Address
280 Market Street
Kingston, PA 18704
Estimator
John Cavalieri
Project Manager
John Cavalieri
Superintendent
James Greco
In the feeding frenzy of the typical estimating process, smaller
contractors often face the difficulty of building bids around the architect’s
or engineer’s mockups, with limited opportunity to investigate a jobsite
and understand the details that can make or break their profit margin.
While it may seem like more work and expense at the outset, Mara’s
unique approach – custom-creating project scopes, including mockups
and material samples – has a three-fold benefit: the customer sees the
estimator’s commitment, appreciates the true depth of their attention
to detail, and holds in their hand the plans for a job that is practically
“shovel ready.” No feeding frenzy required.
See full details of the Kingston Armory & the Versailles Apartments in PDF format.
Visit www.aspenational.org/estimatingtoday2011.aspx
When every penny counts, both for client and estimator, the ability
to not just bid a job but embrace it as something personal means the
difference between settling on the lowest bidder and signing on the
dotted line.
T
wo of Mara’s key projects accurately represent the best of
what the company has done, and is able to do.
Kingston Armory
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Kingston Armory has
been a fixture in Wilkes-Barre, PA since its construction in 1923. Originally
utilized as an armory for the Pennsylvania National Guard, it has also
weathered the years as a community center and military recruitment
and reserve center.
Even to a casual observer, the before-and-after transformation of the
armory’s second floor is outstanding, the difference between a bleak,
dingy façade and the clean, bright pop of renewed brick and mortar.
What the casual observer cannot appreciate, however, is the amount
of work that went into the transformation, not just once the cleaning
commenced but for months ahead of project start.
The coordination of complex methodologies took place between
Mara’s estimator, the project architect, and the manufacturer’s rep for
the selected materials used in the restoration. Each stage of the project
was orchestrated with everything in mind from mortar analysis and
matching to the amount of water pressure that the delicate brick and
limestone could withstand.
Even in the thick of work, Mara used its wealth of experience to
maintain a close eye on the client’s bottom line. Where the project
scope originally called for the removal and replacement of limestone
Dutchmen – an expensive procedure – Mara proposed the use of a
historic patching mortar at nearly half the cost. These one-off details,
seemingly small tricks of the trade, are what set Mara apart from newer,
greener contractors without the same depth of “real site” experience.
Versailles Apartments
Borne of the recently established Philadelphia Façade Ordinance, the
inspection and restoration at the historic Versailles Apartments is a prime
example of Mara’s “face time” marketing resulting in a chain reaction of
referrals, bids, and successes.
www.aspenational.org
Before
After
After designing a scope and subsequently losing the bid for a smaller
job, Mara was pleased to receive a referral for façade inspection work at
the Versailles. After a thorough swing-stage inspection, Mara provided the
client with a detailed report on all problem areas, with recommendations
for repairs to remedy immediate life-safety hazards.
The owner not only approved the emergency work, allowing Mara to
jump into action with the erection of pedestrian walkways, but asked to
expand the repair specification to the entire Southern elevation.
In these two examples, it was not the numbers that made the
difference but the earnest, thorough attention to detail. There will
always be jobs that come down to the lowest bid, but ultimately those
are the jobs that make your day, not your name. A wise mason never
builds their foundations out of block made with too much sand or too
little water, but seeks out blocks that are balanced and strong. A wise
estimator does the same, letting a history of quality work – not low bids
– be their foundation.
D
ecades of both diversified and trade-specialized construction
experience, an inside-out knowledge of the industry and its
resources, and the drive and passion to make something old into
something bold and new, both literally and figuratively; these are the
concrete foundations upon which Mara has chosen to secure its past,
and build its future.
Mara Restoration, Inc. supports John Cavalieri & Eugene Rose | members of ASPE
Philadelphia Chapter 61 | www.mararestoration.com
October 2011
19
www.aspenational.org/convention.aspx | www.silverlegacyreno.com
American Society of Professional Estimators
2525 Perimeter Place Drive, Suite 103 Nashville, TN 37214 | Phone: 615.316.9200 | Fax 615.316.9800
theatrical
Various Trades:
Nebraska
H
eartland Scenic Studio, Inc.
was founded in 1983 as a
design and fabrication shop for
theatrical scenery and displays
by Steve Wheeldon, president,
and Dick Mueller, owner of the
Firehouse Dinner Theater. In 1985,
the company was incorporated and
Mueller’s interest was purchased
by Wheeldon and A. Scott Hoyt,
vice-president. Both Wheeldon
and Hoyt were students in the
University of Nebraska at Omaha’s
Theater Arts Program. At this
time the company opened its’
retail division, selling theatrical
equipment and supplies.
In the beginning Heartland
Scenic Studio designed and
fabricated the scenery for the
Firehouse Dinner Theater and the
Emmy Gifford Children’s Theater
(now know as the Rose Theater/
Omaha Theatre Company for
Young People). The company
also designed and fabricated
scenery for numerous national
tours as well as the scenery for
local venues such as the Nebraska
Shakespeare Festival, Omaha
Ballet, and Nebraska Theater
Caravan. Television news sets and
commercials also played a large
part of the company’s product.
In the mid 90’s the production
side of the company changed
its focus from theatrical scenery
to museum exhibits, retail store
fixtures and displays. Over the
last twenty-eight years Heartland
Scenic Studio has established a
national reputation for fabricating
high quality, cost effective
museum exhibits. Clients include
the American Museum of Natural
History in New York City, the
Children’s Museum of Houston, the
Boston Children’s Museum, and the
www.aspenational.org
Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.
Current museum projects include
exhibits for museums in South
Carolina, Arkansas, Porto Rico,
Calgary and Las Vegas. Locally, the
Nebraska Furniture Mart is one of
Heartland’s largest client.
Heartland Scenic Studio is also
one of the Midwest’s largest
suppliers of theatrical equipment.
Products include lighting/dimming
systems, theatrical rigging, special
effects, theatrical paint, fabrics, and
hardware. They offer consulting
and installation services for stage
lighting and dimming control
systems for theaters, multi-use
facilities, museums, televisions
studios, churches, commercial
offices and retail spaces.
Permanent stage lighting and
rigging installations include the
recently
completed
Holland
Performing Arts Center, the
Orpheum Theatre, Wells Fargo
Arena, UNL Memorial Stadium,
Lied Theater at Creighton
University and the Red Oak,
Wilson Performing Arts Center,
as well as most of the high school
auditoriums in the Omaha Public
School District.
In the spring of 2006,
the company built a new
26,000 square-foot corporate
headquarters and production
facility located in the Riverfront
Industrial Park, northwest of Epply
Airport. The new facility, located
at 5329 Lindbergh Drive, allowed
them to add the latest technology
and increase their productivity.
The company currently employs a
staff of forty-five that includes sales
and project managers, carpenters,
painters,
artists,
designers,
marketing, service technicians,
rigging installers, and equipment
....building on your imagation
rental personnel. Heartland is a
ETCP (Entertainment Technician
Certification Program)Lighting and
Rigging Recognized Employer and
has been a long term member
of ESTA(Entertainment Services
and Technology Association)/
PLASA(Professional Lighting and
Sound Association).
CSI DIVISIONS ENCOMPASSED
The following CSI Divisions
are where we are likely to find
information pertaining to our
portions of the project for which
we will be assembling an estimate
and quotation.
CSI Divisions
- 11 01 60 Operation and
Maintenance of Entertainment
Equipment
11 06 60 Schedules for
Entertainment Equipment
11 59 00 Exhibit Equipment
11 60 00 Entertainment
Equipment
11 61 13 Acoustical Shells
11 61 23 Folding and Portable
Stages
11 61 33 Rigging Systems and
Controls
11 61 43 Stage Curtains
26 06 00 Schedules for
Electrical
26 06 20 Schedules for Low
Voltage Electrical Distribution
26 06 50 Schedules for Lighting
26 09 00 Instrumentation and
Control for Electrical Systems
26 09 23 Lighting Control
Devices
26 09 26 Lighting Control Panel
Boards
26 09 33 Central Dimming
Controls
26 09 36 Modular Dimming
Controls
26 09 43 Network Lighting
Controls
26 09 61 Theatrical Lighting
Controls
26 36 00 Transfer Switches
26 36 23 Automatic Transfer
Switches
26 52 00 Emergency Lighting
26 55 00 Special Purpose
Lighting
26 55 61 Theatrical Lighting
INTRODUCTION
Theatrical and Architectural
Lighting over the past years has
become more of a normal than
a specialty on many projects,
the advent of control for energy
management has made a push
into the mainstream. This paper
will focus on a lighting control
system that incorporates theatrical
and architectural lighting into
a combined package for overall
control. Every system is a unique
project with different variables,
there are multiple manufacturers
in the industry to meet the
requirements of the projects, in
assembling a effective bid you must
look at all of the manufacturers to
assemble the best pricing. Also in
comparing bids you must verify
that all services specified are being
provided.
TYPES AND METHODS OF
MEASUREMENT
There is not a good rule of thumb
for assembling measurements.
Conceptually you must determine
footage of cabling to be used for
the project, and some hard data
will be provided by the installing
electrical contractor based on
conduit paths as the project is
October 2011
21
theatrical
ongoing. Quantities must be
verified against all drawings, the
specification, and the system riser
as sometimes all components are
not detailed in all locations.
OVERVIEW OF LABOR,
MATERIAL, EQUIPMENT, AND
EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL
INDIRECT COSTS
The size of the system and the
complexity of the system have
a major impact on the take-off
and pricing for every project.
Simple controls allow for fewer
components required or to be
added in providing a complete and
functioning system, while complex
controls tend to require additional
network components to be added
to complete this task.
The following example is
intended to demonstrate a simple
take-off and pricing method for a
theatrical dimming and control
system, including materials and
services. In our industry there is
not a good economical form of
electronic take-off to account for
the conceptual estimations and
the unique equipment required
for every project. However, for
the purposes of this paper, I will
demonstrate a complete take-off
and pricing in Excel to demonstrate
the method being used. Prices for
this example are for demonstration
purposes only.
GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
MATERIALS
The location of a project may
have an influence on cost due to
site access, the ability to locate
additional materials if necessary,
and transit to the site.
All items are located and verified
to their details and notes on the
drawings and in the specification
and added to the estimate
form. Then the specification is
reviewed for all project services
that are required and these are
added. Once this is completed,
pricing requests are sent to all the
manufacturers that are specified,
or are priced from our local
suppliers of additional materials
or hardware.
SPECIAL FACTORS AFFECTING
TAKE OFF AND PRICING
SIZE AND CONTROL
REQUIREMENTS OF SYSTEM
RENOVATION PROJECT VS.
NEW CONSTRUCTION
Systems updating their older
counterparts
in
renovation
projects require additional costs
for project coordination with
the engineer and the electrical
contractor. Additional wiring may
be required to provide separate
neutral wires for individual circuits
compared to the shared neutrals
of the past. Also, asbestos wiring
may need to be replaced to
bring the system current. In new
construction, coordination with
the mechanical contractor may
be required to verify proper
clearences for proper installation
of the system.
LABOR
MATERIAL COST
Our labor is based on the
requirements for the project,
typically project management,
service technicians and installation
technicians are consulted to
determine the time required to
complete the work. This time is
calculated, any factors affecting
the work are added such as Davis
Bacon requirements, then the
labor expense is added to the
estimate form.
The cost of steel used in the
manufacture of the components,
and fluctuations in copper pricing
for the systems we provide have
been increasing and have jumped
in some instances 40% over the
past 3 years. Advances in system
technology have also added in
increasing costs, as electronic
components used in the past
for systems are no longer being
produced.
EQUIPMENT
RECEIPT OF ORDER
At this point additional
equipment for the installation such
as lifts, scaffolding, or specialized
tools for access and installation
are determined and verified as to
provision or inclusion in our costs
for the project.
As our system is one of the last
to be integrated into the building
project, we can sometimes see
a purchase order being issued
anywhere from immediately after
the bid opening to two years later.
This is typically dependant on the
size and scope of the project and
the path to market the bid has
taken, additional costs may need
to be incurred to cover this delay
in receipt.
INDIRECT COSTS
Indirect costs associated with
the installation could be safety
materials for fall protection,
associated taxes in individual
states, bonds required, and any
additional insurance requirements
for the specific project.
SPECIAL RISK
CONSIDERATIONS
When estimating the cost of a
dimming and control system there
is significant risk to mitigate. These
items include the following:
LEAD TIME OF PROJECT
As the dimming and control
system is typically special per
project, there is additional time
required to generate a proper and
accurate set of submittals for the
project. Also after initial submittals
are received then there is a period
where the project manager
must review the documents to
SAMPLE DIMMING SYSTEM RISER
COST OF DOING BUSINESS
There are factors that affect
pricing from manufacturers and
distributors/contractors that we
are quoting. Issues with timeliness
of response, amount of guidance
required on an extended basis
to complete a project, additional
trips incurred in working with a
manufacturer or contractor, track
record of manufacturers failed
product verses the warranty
period and the specification, and
track record of delayed payments
or extended terms in accepting a
contract can all add to additional
cost requirements in assembling a
estimate.
22
October 2011
www.aspenational.org
theatrical
verify that the items provided
by others such as LED fixtures
and fluorescent fixtures have
the proper equipment supplied,
as approved equals provided
on projects may have different
operational requirements for
them to properly function. Lastly,
once the submittals have been
approved, there is anywhere from
a one week to six week lead time
for production of the equipment
based on the factory’s on hand
projects and deadline dates.
bid information on how our bid
compared with others. If done
immediately after the bid, we
may have the chance to compare
bills of materials for accuracy and
equality, which is often the reason
for sharp differences. At that point
we must review our competition
and their associated costs and
hunger for attaining the project.
MISCELLANEOUS PERTINENT
INFORMATION
The importance of the dimming
and control system functionality
to the owner, consultant or
the electrical engineer must be
understood to achieve the proper
ANALYSIS
In this industry the only form
of analysis is by soliciting after
bill of materials to meet these
needs. A detailed scope of work
should be provided to eliminate
any misconceptions of materials or
services being supplied. As these
types of systems are typically
not created on a daily basis by
electrical engineers, there are
components that must be added or
corrected to provide the properly
functioning system. Therefore a
thorough in depth understanding
of theatre practices and materials
should be held by the estimator
before assembling the quote.
Dimming System Take‐off Form
Heartland Scenic Studio, Inc. supports
Jerry Onik | member of ASPE Great
Plains Chapter 35
www.heartlandscenic.com
Project Name: ASPE Sample
Estimator: Jerry Onik
Estimate Number: ASPE001
Estimate Date: 8/10/20**
Quantity
UM
Manufacturer 1
1 Running Sub Total
Manufacturer 2
Panels:
Dimmer Panel 1 ‐ 48 Arch Panel
1
Unit
$ 7,700.00
$ 7,700.00
$ 8,400.00
$ 8,400.00 $ 8,200.00
$ 8,200.00
Dimmer Modules:
D20 Dual Dimmer Modules
24
Unit/Pair $ 440.00
$ 10,560.00
$ 395.00
$ 9,480.00
$ 420.00
$ 10,080.00
Architectural/Theatrical Control Processor:
Advanced Architectural
Station Power Module
1
1
Unit
Unit
$ 2,000.00
$ 500.00
$ 2,000.00
$ 500.00
$ 2,400.00
NA
$ 2,400.00 $ 3,200.00
NA
$ 3,200.00
Architectural Stations:
10 Button Station
5 Button Station
Custom Labels
1
3
4
Unit
Unit
Unit
$ 350.00
$ 325.00
$ 100.00
$ 350.00
$ 975.00
$ 400.00
$ 425.00 $ 425.00
$ 400.00 $ 1,200.00
$ 125.00 $ 500.00
Theatrical Integration:
DMX Console Plug‐in Station
1
Unit
$ 50.00
$ 50.00 $ 50.00
Sensors:
Outdoor Photocel
Photocel Power Supply
Dual Tech Motion Sensors
1
1
11
Low Voltage Wire:
To ES1
To ES2
To ES3
To ES4
To Console Plug‐in
To Dual Tech Sensors
To Photocel
% of needed replacement wire
Distributed Circuit Strips/Boxes:
Grid Mount 3 Outlet Stage Pin
Numbering
2 Running Sub Total
Manufacturer 3
3 Running Sub Total
$ 400.00
$ 375.00
$ 75.00
$ 400.00
$ 1,125.00
$ 300.00
$ 50.00
$ 50.00
$ 50.00
Unit
Unit
Unit
$ 495.00 $ 495.00 $ 565.00 $ 565.00
Inc
$ ‐
$ 42.00 $ 42.00
$ 350.00 $ 3,850.00 $ 325.00 $ 3,575.00
$ 565.00
$ 42.00
$ 335.00
$ 565.00
$ 42.00
$ 3,685.00
50
65
40
55
75
420
150
10
Foot
Foot
Foot
Foot
Foot
Foot
Foot
%
$ 0.19 $ 9.50
$ 0.19 $ 12.35
$ 0.19 $ 7.60
$ 0.19 $ 10.45
$ 0.31 $ 23.25
$ 0.26 $ 109.20
$ 0.42 $ 63.00
NA
$ 23.53
$ 0.24 $ 12.00
$ 0.24 $ 15.60
$ 0.24 $ 9.60
$ 0.24 $ 13.20
$ 0.30 $ 22.50
$ 0.27 $ 113.40
$ 0.54 $ 81.00
NA
$ 26.73
$ 0.24
$ 0.24
$ 0.24
$ 0.24
$ 0.31
$ 0.27
$ 0.54
NA
$ 12.00
$ 15.60
$ 9.60
$ 13.20
$ 23.25
$ 113.40
$ 81.00
$ 26.80
16
150
Unit
Unit
$ 150.00
$ 0.50
$ 175.00
NA
$ 162.50
$ 0.75
$ 2,600.00
$ 112.50
$ 2,400.00
$ 75.00
$ 2,800.00
NA
SUB TOTALS
$ 29,613.88
$ 29,731.03
$ 30,654.35
Cost of doing Bussiness with Manufacturer
Problems/Slow with support/Prior issues
$ 1,500.00
$ 300.00
$ 750.00
TOTAL Equipment Costs
$ 31,113.88
$ 30,031.03
$ 31,404.35
IN House Services for any System
Services Required:
Commissioning
Terminations
Testing
Training
Return Inspection Site Visit
Travel Expenses
Submittals
Operation and Maintenance Manuals
Coordination Site Visit
In House Labor Total
www.aspenational.org
4
6
2
2
8
3
8
2
1
Hours
Hours
Hours
Hours
Hours
Unit
Lot
Lot
Lot
The author is Jerry Onik,
V.P. Theatrical Supplies and
Equipment and Theatrical
and Architectural Dimming
and Control Estimator with
Heartland Scenic Studio, Inc.
Jerry has been with Heartland
since 1986, and moved into
estimating in 1992, and
became the chief estimator
in 1999, he has a Bachelor of
Arts in Dramatic Arts from the
University of Nebraska at Omaha
in 1990, and has an extensive
background in technical and
performance theatre, having
appeared in or worked on over
100 theatrical productions in
multiple Omaha and Lincoln
based theatres.
$ 300.00
$ 450.00
$ 150.00
$ 150.00
$ 600.00
$ 600.00
$ 250.00
$ 250.00
$ 500.00
Estimate Basis
Manufacturer 2
Services
Mark‐up
$ 30,031.03
$ 3,250.00
$ 7,507.75
20%
Total for Bid
TAX
$ 40,788.78
$ 2,039.43
5%
TOTAL
$ 42,828.21
$ 3,250.00
October 2011
23
resourcefulness
HOW FAST ARE YOU?
How much time would it take you to answer all of the following problems?
Hours? Days? Members of the Los Angeles chapter of the ASPE would take less
than 30 seconds for each problem. No, the Los Angeles members are not smarter
than you – they simply have a copy of the ESTIMATING AIDES CD produced by
member Charles Munroe, FCPE. They simply type in the quantities called for and
the software does the rest. The CD contains over 100 software items cover most of
the CSI divisions and some 217 geometric figures that the length, area and volume
are automatically generated when dimension are entered..
Try to solve all the problems in 3 minutes. If you fail, then maybe it is time to consider
purchasing a copy of the CD. All proceeds go to LA chapter 1. A check in the amount of
$39.95 to –
Los Angeles chapter # 1 treasurer Sam Zitser, CPE
728 N. Genesee Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90046
and you too can whiz through tough problems in seconds, not hours or days.
CSI DIVISION 4 – MASONRY
A masonry brick wall 100 feet in length, 10 feet high
composed of Roman brick in Flemish Bond with #4
rebar vertically at 48 inches on center with ½ inch
mortar joints using M type mortar. Use 5% waste for
bricks and 20% waste for mortar.
Number of bricks: EA
#4 Rebar: LBs
94 Lb sacks of Portland Cement: SACKS
Sand: 50 Lb sacks of Hydrated Lime: CY
SACKS
CSI DIVISION 5 – METALS
A stand alone Channel C12 x 30 at 117 feet long
needs fireproofing.
Surface area for sprayed on fireproofing, no waste.
SF
or
Gypsum Board wrapping all around, no waste
SF
24
October 2011
www.aspenational.org
promotions
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 10 AUGUST 2011 O’CONNOR NAMES JUSTIN PETERSON AS NEW PRESIDENT IRVINE, CA: O’Connor Construction Management, Inc. announces that it has named Justin Peterson, CPE, PSP, LEED AP as President. Mr. Peterson has been with the company since 1994, and is a Principal and shareholder. He established O’Connor’s presence in Las Vegas in 1996, and has successfully served clients including the U.S. Government, State of Nevada, Clark County, the City of Las Vegas, the City of Henderson, and hundreds of contractors, architecture and engineering design professionals. “I am so pleased that Justin will lead us with energy and integrity,” said Colm O’Connor, the founder of the firm. “His commitment to our clients is unparalleled, and I am confident that he will provide O’Connor with many years of progress, growth, and stability.” Mr. Peterson holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Management from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. He is a Certified Professional Estimator, Planning & Scheduling Professional, and LEED Accredited Professional. O’Connor is an ENR Top 100 CM for Fee firm founded in 1982. The firm specializes in project and construction management, cost estimating, scheduling, construction audits, claims, and risk management for building and infrastructure projects. Based in Irvine, CA, the firm maintains offices nationwide, and serves a diverse mix of clients including the U.S. Government, state and local agencies, and design and contracting professionals. *** Contact: Garrett Terlaak, Vice President 8851 Research Drive Irvine, CA 92618 Phone 949.476.2094 [email protected] www.aspenational.org
October 2011
25
Better Contracts,
Better Project Results…
Construction Contracts by ConsensusDOCS
Owners, Contractors,
Subcontractors,
Designers and Sureties:
coming together for best
practice documents.
The Only Construction Contracts
with Coalition Members from
28 Leading Industry Associations
Forexcerptedsamplecontractsvisitwww.ConsensusDOCS.org.
•NationalAssociation
ofStateFacilities
Administrators(NASFA)
•TheConstructionUsers
Roundtable(CURT)
•ConstructionOwners
Associationof
America(COAA)
•WomenConstruction
ConsensusDOCS Coalition Members
•ConstructionIndustry
•NationalInsulation
•Associationofthe
RoundTable(CIRT)
Association(NIA)
•AmericanSubcontractors •NationalRoofing
Association,Inc.(ASA)
•AssociatedBuildersand
Contractors,Inc.(ABC)
•LeanConstruction
Institute(LCI)
Contractors
Association(NRCA)
•PaintingandDecorating
Contractorsof
America(PDCA)
•FinishingContractors
•PlumbingHeating
•AssociatedGeneral
•MechanicalContractors
•NationalSubcontractors
•AssociatedSpecialty
•NationalElectrical
Owners&Executives,
USA(WCOE)
Contractorsof
America(AGC)
Contractors,Inc.(ASC)
Association(FCA)
Associationof
America(MCAA)
Contractors
Association(NECA)
CoolingContractors
Association(PHCC)
WallandCeiling
Industry(AWCI)
Associationof
America(SFAA)
•NationalAssociationof
•ConstructionFinancial
•DoorandHardware
•Construction
ElectricalDistributors
(NAED)
Institute(DHI)
•NationalGroundWater
Association(NGWA)
•AmericanSociety
Alliance(NSA)
ofProfessional
Estimators(ASPE)
•SheetMetaland
•NationalAssociation
AirConditioning
Contractors’National
Association(SMACNA)
•TheSurety&Fidelity
ofSuretyBond
Producers(NASBP)
Management
Association(CFMA)
Specifications
Institute(CSI)
upcoming Chapter meetings
State by State. Chapter by Chapter.
Fellowship.
Because professional
associations really matter.
ARIZONA
Arizona Ch. 6
Where: Doubletree Guest Suites 320 44th St., Phoenix
Date: 2nd Tues. of the Month
Time: 5:30pm Social Hour • 6:30pm Dinner Meeting
Contact: Alan Skinner: 602.997.0000 [email protected]
Old Pueblo Ch. 53
Where: El Parador Restaurant
Date: 1st Wednesday of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:45pm Program
Contact: Matt Brogen, CPE
[email protected]
ARKANSAS
Arkansas Ch. 33
San Diego Ch. 4
Where: The Butcher Shop Steakhouse,
5255 Kearny Villa Rd., San Diego
Date: 3rd Tues. of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social Hour • 6:30pm
Dinner • 7pm Program
Contact: Frank Young, FCPE
619.980.4025 • [email protected]
Sacramento Ch. 11
Where: Rancho Cordova City Hall,
2729 Prospect Park, Rancho Cordova
Date: 2nd Fri. of Month: Sept. - May
Time: 11:30am Lunch • 12:15pm 1:15pm Program
Contact: Bill Potter 916.575.8888
• [email protected]
Santa Clara Valley Ch. 55
Where: TBD
Date: 3rd Fri. of Month
Time: 12:00 Noon
Contact: Kevin Messick, CPE
501.374.8677 • [email protected]
baldwinshell.com
Where: Martani’s
Date: 4th Tuesday of Month
Time: 6pm Social • 7pm Dinner •
7:30pm Program
Contact: Kevin Fennimore, CPE
831.684.0451 • [email protected]
Razorback Ch. 79
Inland Empire Ch. 68
Where: Varies - see website
Date: 2nd Fri. of month
Time: 11:30am – 1pm Lunch & Learn
Contact: Jon Pahl 479.659.7800 •
[email protected]
CALIFORNIA
Los Angeles Ch. 1
Where: The Barkley Restaurant: 1400
Huntington Dr., South Pasadena
Date: 4th Wed. of Month Jan.-Oct.
Time: 6pm Social • 7pm Dinner •
7:45pm Program
Contact: John Swartz,CPE
213.637.9146 [email protected]
Golden Gate Ch. 2
Where: Brennan’s 700 University Ave,
Berkeley, CA
Date: 3rd Wednesday of each month
Time: 6:30pm Social • 7:15pm Dinner
• 7:30pm Program
Contact: Doug Bibby, CPE
510.525.9499 • [email protected]
Orange County Ch. 3
Where: The Hastings Room at Ayres
Hotel - 325 Bristol St., Costa Mesa
Date: 2nd Wed. of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:15pm Dinner
• 7pm Program
Contact: Dan Schottlander, CPE
949.476.3365 • [email protected]
aecom.com
www.aspenational.org
Where: Marie Callenders, 29363
Rancho California Rd., Temecula
Date: 3rd Thursday of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner
• 7pm Program
Contact: Danielle Leyva, CPE
951.317.7691 • [email protected]
COLORADO
Denver Ch. 5
Where: Hotel VQ at Mile High - 1975 Mile
High Stadium Circle, Denver
Date: 2nd Tues of Month Sept. - May
Time: 5pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
7pm Program
Contact: Heather Boulanger
303.659.7861, Ext. 112 • [email protected]
rollingplains.com
CONNECTICUT
Nutmeg Ch. 60
Where: Confetti’s Restaurant, 393
Farmington Ave., Rt. 10, Plainville, CT
Date: 2nd Wed. of month
Time: 6pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner •
7pm Program
Contact: Ed Colon, CPE
860.828.2513
Yankee Ch. 15
Meeting Info: TBD - Contact Chapter
for info: 203.876.8331
DELAWARE
ILLINOIS
MAINE
Where: Hilton Hotel & Conference
Center, Newark
Date: Wednesday
Time: 5:30pm Social Hour • 6:30pm
Dinner • 7:30pm Program
Contact: Lou Liberti 610.240.4441 •
[email protected]
Where: Anyway’s Restaurant & Pub,
5 East Roosevelt Rd, Oakbrook Terrace
Date: 3rd Thurs. of month, excluding
June, July, Aug. & Dec.
Time: 5:30pm Social Hour • 6:30pm
Dinner • 7pm Program
Contact: Marvin Fitzwater II, CPE
630.678.0808 • [email protected]
Where: Varies - see website
Date: 1st Wed. of month: Oct., Dec,
Feb, Apr & June
Time: 5pm Social • 6pm Dinner
• 7pm Program
Contact: John Brockington, CPE
207.874.2323 x115 • [email protected]
pcconstruction.com
Delaware Ch. 75
DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA
Greater DC Ch. 23
Where: Hill International, Inc., 1225
Eye Street, NW, Suite 600
Date: 3rd Wed. of month
Time: 6pm Program
Contact: Keith Buchanan, CPE 202.
408.3043 • [email protected]
FLORIDA
Tampa Bay Ch. 48
Chicago Ch. 7
Central Indiana Ch. 59
Where: Varies each month
Date: 3rd Thurs. of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner
• 7pm Program
Contact: Keith Parker,CPE
317.787.5746 • [email protected]
circlebco.com
Old Fort Ch. 65
Gold Coast Ch. 49
IOWA
Where: Tropical Acres Steakhouse,
2500 Griffin Road, Ft. Lauderdale
Date: 3rd Tues. of month except June,
July & December
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:15pm Dinner
• 6:30pm Program
Contact: Stacey Miller 954.975.4304
• [email protected]
Orlando Ch. 50
Where: Announced in E-mailings one
week prior to meeting
Date: 2nd Weds. of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:45pm Program
Contact: Danny Chadwick,CPE
407.739.8912 • [email protected]
GEORGIA
Atlanta Ch. 14
Where: Cross Creek Café, 1221
Cross Creek Parkway, Atlanta
Date: 3rd Thurs. of month
Time: 11:30am Social • 12pm Lunch
& Program
Contact: LaTarsha Bailey 404.609.9006
• [email protected]
MARYLAND
INDIANA
Where: Brio-Tuscan 2nd level, 2223
N. West Shore Blvd, Tampa FL
Date: 3rd Thurs. of month except
Decemner 1, July & August
Time: 6pm Social • 6:45pm Dinner •
7:30pm Program
Contact: Steve Masucci,CPE
813.675.1987 • [email protected]
ManhattanKraft.com
Maine Ch. 37
Where: Elks Lodge No.155, 4935
Hillegas Rd., Fort Wayne, IN 46818
Date: 3rd Thurs. of Month except
Dec., May, June & Aug.
Time: 11:15am to 1pm Program
Contact: Todd Poinsett 260.489.7555
[email protected]
Baltimore Ch. 21
Where: TBD - see website
Date: 2nd Thurs. of month except
December, July & August
Time: 6pm Social • 7:30pm Dinner
• 7pm Program
Contact: Shana Opdyke 410.458.0289
• [email protected]
MASSACHUSETTS
Boston, Ch. 25
Where: Varies
Date: Last Thurs. of Month
Time: 6pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner •
7pm Program
Contact: Barbara Connolly
781.682.0150 • [email protected]
com
MICHIGAN
Detroit Ch. 17
Quad City Ch. 71
Where: Best Western Steeplegate
Inn, 100 W. 76th St., Davenport
Date: 4th Tuesday of Month
Time: 5-6pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:30pm Program
Contact: Dave Furness 563.386.5151
[email protected]
Greater Des Moines
Ch. 73
Where: Various Locations
Date: 3rd Thurs. of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner
• 7:30pm Program
Contact: Steve Watrous 515.264.0782
Where: Barton Malow Company,
26500 American Drive, Southfield
Date: 2nd T/W/Th. of month (Sept–June)
Time: 5:30pm Dinner • 6pm Program
Contact: Patrick Todd,CPE
248.436.5470 • [email protected]
bartonmalow.com
Western Michigan Ch. 70
Where: Grand Rapids BX
Date: 1st Weds. of Month
Time: Varies – Lunch or Dinner
Contact: Dave Delpiere,CPE
269.217.9542 • [email protected]
csmgroup.com
MINNESOTA
Viking Ch. 39
LOUISIANA
New Orleans Ch. 9
Where: Varies
Date: 2nd Wed. of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner
Contact: Christine Barnhill
985.863.5610 • [email protected]
Where: TBD - Varies
Date: 3rd Thurs. of month
Time: 5:30pm - 8pm Social / Dinner
/ Program
Contact: Richard Schwarzinger, CPE
763.522.2100 • [email protected]
mortenson.com
October 2011
27
upcoming Chapter meetings
MISSISSIPPI
NEW MEXICO
OKLAHOMA
TENNESSEE
VIRGINIA
Where: Farm Bureau Grill, Trustmark
Park, Pearl, MS
Date: 3rd Fri. of month
Time: 11:30am - 1pm Lunch & Program
Contact: Sid Newell 601.922.9164
• [email protected]
Where: Fiesta’s, 4400 Carlisle NE,
Albuquerque
Date: 1st Wed of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:30pm Program
Contact: Glynnette Hale,CPE
505.823.4449 • [email protected]
Where: Ingrids Kitchen - Wine Room,
NW 36th & Youngs, Oklahoma City
Date: 1st Weds. of month
Time: 11:30am – 1pm Lunch & Program
Contact: Phillip Brandt,CPE
405.254.1050 • [email protected]
manhattanconstruction.com
Where: Nova Copy Inc. 15 Lindsley
Ave., Nashville
Date: 1st Fri. of selected months
Time: 11am Social • 11:30am Lunch
• 12pm Program
Contact: Ricky Sanford: 615.206.6809
• [email protected]
- Chapter in Development
Info: psm[email protected]
Magnolia Ch. 81
MISSOURI
St. Louis Metro Ch. 19
Where: The Original Pancake House,
Chesterfield, MO
Date: Typically 4th Friday of month
Time: 7am Social • 8am Breakfast
• 7:30am Program
Contact: Paul Hanson, CPE
314.919.2360 • [email protected]
Heartland Ch. 32
Where: Prime Wood Grill 100 E. 20th
St., Kansas City, MO
Date: 3rd Tues. of month Sept – May
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:30pm Program
Contact: Kelly Jarman,CPE
816.292.8671 • [email protected]
NEBRASKA
Great Plains Ch. 35
Where: Grisanti’s Italian Restaurant
10875 W Dodge Rd, Omaha
Date: 2nd Wed of the month
Time: 11:30am Lunch • 11:45am Program
Contact: Chris Ahrenholtz, CPE
402.522.6016 • [email protected]
NEVADA
Reno Ch. 12
Roadrunner Ch. 47
NEW YORK
New York City Ch. 10
Where: Stuart-Lynn Consultants, 180
Varick St., 12th Floor, New York, NY
Date: 1st Tues. of March, June, Sept.
& Nov.
Time: 6pm - 8pm Program
Contact: Peter Wellstood 914.235.5650
• [email protected]
Empire State Ch. 42
Where: Butcher Block Restaurant,
Central Ave., Albany
Date: 3rd Wed. of Month Sept, Nov.,
Feb. & April
Time: 6pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner •
7:30pm Program
Contact: TBD
Western NY Ch. 77
Contact: John Hallenbeck, CPE
585.464.4600 x5456 • john.hallenbeck
@wegmans.com
NORTH CAROLINA
Charlotte
- Chapter in Development
Info: email [email protected]
Where: Atlantis Hotel & Casino, Reno
Date: 2nd Wed. of month
Time: 5pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
7pm Program
Contact: Donna Koepp 775.355.8500
• [email protected]
OHIO
Las Vegas Ch. 72
Where: Dimitri’s Restaurant 1830
Snow Road, Parma
Date: 3rd Tues. of month except Jul.,
Aug. & Sept.
Time: 5:45pm Social • 6:15pm Dinner
• 7:15pm Program
Contact: Mark Funfgeld 330.701.7435
• [email protected]
Where: Desert Pines Golf Club
Date: 2nd Thurs. of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:30pm Program
Contact: Chuck James,CPE
702.455.5895 • [email protected]
NEW JERSEY
Garden State Ch.26
Where: Pal’s Cabin, 285 West
Prospect Ave., West Orange
Date: 4th Tues. of month
Time: 6pm Social • 7pm Dinner
Contact: Jeff Senholzi 570.476.6907
• [email protected]
Buckeye Ch. 27
Contact: Carolyn Van Paepeghem,
LEED AP • 614.218.4988
• [email protected]
Northeastern OH Ch. 28
Southwestern OH Ch. 38
Where: Embassy Suites - Blue Ash
Date: 4th Thursday of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner
• 7:15 Program
Contact: Sherry Malott 513.528.4285
• [email protected]
Oklahoma City Ch. 80
OREGON
Columbia-Pacific Ch. 54
Where: University Place - 310 SW
Lincoln St., Portland
Date: 3rd Tues. of month except Dec.
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:15pm Dinner
• 6:45pm Program
Contact: Curt Kolar, CPE
503.962.8840 • [email protected]
Middle Tennessee Ch. 34
Memphis Ch. 62
Where: Fresh Slices, 6600 Stage
Road, Suite 106, Bartlett
Date: 1st Wed. of month
Time: 11:30am - 1pm
Contact: Brian Wirth, CPE
901.372.9600 • [email protected]
Eastern Tennessee
(Knoxville) Ch. 56
Contact SBO [email protected]
TEXAS
PENNSYLVANIA
Dallas/Fort Worth Ch. 43
Where: Fogelsville Holidy Inn, Rt 100 S.
Date: 3rd Weds of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner
Contact: Eric Scheler, Sr., CPE 610.
625.1700 • [email protected]
Rio Grande Ch. 40
Greater LeHigh Valley
Ch. 41
Philadelphia Ch. 61
Where: Double Tree Hotel, 640 W.
Germantown Pike, Plymouth Meeting
Date: 3rd Wed. of month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner/
Program
Contact: Karla Wursthorn, CPE
610.649.0400 • [email protected]
Three Rivers Pittsburg Ch. 44
Where: Varies
Date: TBD
Time: PM - Dinner provided
Contact: Richard Krapp, CPE
412.255.5400 • [email protected]
Central PA Ch. 76
Where: TBD
Date: 2nd Wed. of Month
Time: 6pm Social • 6:30pm Dinner
& Program
Contact: David Rodney, CPE
717.657.0909 • [email protected]
Where: TEXO Conference Center,
11111 Stemmons Freewy, Dallas
Date: 3rd Thurs. of each month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6pm Dinner •
6:30pm Program
Contact: Charlie Rachuig, CPE
972.243.7674 • [email protected]
Richmond
WASHINGTON
Puget Sound Ch. 45
Where: Rock Salt Restaurant
Date: 3rd Wed. of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social • 6:15pm Dinner
• 6:45pm Program
Contact: [email protected]
WISCONSIN
Packerland Ch. 66
Where: Liberty Hall, Kimberly, WI
Date: 1st Thurs. after the 1st Wed.
of the Month
Time: 5:30pm Social Hour - 6pm
Dinner & Meeting
Contact: Larry Petron: 920.969.7004
Brew City Ch. 78
Where: Charcoal Grill & Rotisserie,
15375 W. Greenfield Ave, New Berlin
Date: 2nd Tuesday of Month
Time: 5:30pm Social - 6pm Dinner
Contact: Scott Riemer: 414.831.1274
Where: Jaxson’s Restaurant, 1125
Airways Blvd, El Paso
Date: 1st Thurs. of each month
Time: 5:30pm Board Meeting 6:30pm Membership Meeting
Contact: Oscar Valverde:
915.526.0650 • [email protected]
Houston Ch. 18
Where: Spagetti Westerns, 1608 N.
Shepherd, Houston, TX
Date: 2nd Mon. of month
Time: 6pm Dinner - 7pm Program
Contact: Dennis Maale,CPE
832.351.7210 [email protected]
San Antonio Ch. 57
Contact: Mohammad Sadi:
210.248.2415 • [email protected]
westonsolutions.com
UTAH
Salt Lake City Ch. 51
Where: Mountainlands Plan Room,
583 West 3560 South, Salt Lake City
Date: 3rd Thursday of Month
Time: 5:30pm Dinner • 6-7pm Program
Contact: Jason McDonough:
801.627.1403 [email protected]
All Chapter Meetings are on a monthly basis unless otherwise noted.
If you do not see a Chapter Meeting listing in your state/area call 615.316.9200.
Chapter Presidents should contact the SBO with any updates needed.
28
October 2011
www.aspenational.org
The Society Business Office, Board of Trustees, and
the ASPE membership base would like to extend a
warm welcome to our newest Members!
New Members
Members
August 2011
Ch.# Chapter Name
New CPEs
September 2011
Ch.# Chapter Name Member Company
Member Company
Members
KC Maddox
3
Orange County
The Denovo Firm
John Tolman, CPE
3
Orange County
Bert L. Howe & Associates
Rudy Kubasta
5
Denver
Mechanical Insulation Systems, Inc
Anthony Trinca, CPE
4
San Diego
Gafcon, Inc.
Stacie W. Flynn
5
Denver
Jordy Construction
Steve Bradford, CPE
5
Denver
Acoustical Services Corp
Craig Evans
6
Arizona
Legacy Glass
Ronald Andrews, CPE
9
New Orleans
Madsen, Kneppers & Associates
Edward M. Fultz
6
Arizona
UMEC
Bradley Andrews, CPE
11
Sacramento
Madsen, Kneppers & Associates
James E. Harrington
9
New Orleans
Petrotech, Inc
David Northall, CPE
11
Sacramento
Madsen, Kneppers & Associates
Joseph P. John
10
New York
NYC Dept of Citywide Admin. Svcs
Wayne Mosely, CPE
14
Atlanta
Madsen, Kneppers & Associates
James Tizio
10
New York
Community Electric Inc.
Brad Fager, CPE
19
St. Louis Metro
Fager-McGee
Rick M. Bogart Sr.
21
Baltimore
Government Services IPT
Holly Schwatka, CPE
21
Baltimore
Fidelity Engineering
Daniel T. Brown
21
Baltimore
B&R Construction Services
Clint Townshend, CPE
21
Baltimore
Phoenix Engineering, Inc.
Godfred A. Opong
23
Greater D.C
Project Cost, Inc
Marilou Krause, CPE
25
Boston
National Grid
Kenneth Nassif
23
Greater D.C.
Alliance Consulting Group
Nasir Usman, CPE
38
Southestern Ohio
D.A.G. Construction Company
Olufemi Gbolagun
23
Greater D.C.
Projectcost, Inc
David Williams, CPE
38
Southwestern Ohio
The Quandel Group
Gabriel A. Ronk
35
Great Plains
Midlands Mechanical, Inc.
Michael Collins, CPE
38
Southwestern Ohio
Construction Process Solutions, Ltd
Lou D. McLeod
43
Dallas/Ft. Worth
DMI Corp.dba, Decker Mechanical
Marcus Bates, CPE
43
Dallas/Ft. Worth
Aguirre Roden
Justin K. Kroening
43
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Brandt Engineering
Roy Buckner, CPE
43
Dallas/Ft. Worth
Beck Group
Christopher A. Hysaw
43
Dallas/Ft.Worth
Schwob Building Company
Steve Hawkins, CPE
45
Puget Sound
McKinstry
J.D. Strickland
47
Roadrunner
Western States Fire Protection
David Lenz, CPE
48
Tampa Bay
Superior Structures, Inc.
Frank Nieves
48
Tampa Bay
Painters on Demand
Charles Funk, CPE
48
Tampa Bay
Holland Construction Corporation
Jon R. Scheele
55
Santa Clara Valley
Largo Concrete, Inc.
Melissa McBride, CPE
48
Tampa Bay
Firewatch Contracting of Florida, LLC
Jose L. Olguin
57
San Antonio
Nolan Hatcher Construction
Danny Chadwick, CPE
50
Orlando
CDM Constructors Inc.
Kevin F. Cocchiola
60
Nutmeg
Globe Electric, LLC
Jeff Dreyer, CPE
54
Columbia-Pacific
Christopher S. Spencer
68
Inland Empire
R.C. Construction Services, Inc.
Matthew Burress, CPE
59
Central Indiana
Aspen Group
Robb M. Crotts
79
Razorback
Nabholz Construction Services
Jay Kellogg, CPE
61
Philadelphia
The Kellogg Consulting Company
Ty A. Manning
79
Razorback
Walmart
Robert Stepler, CPE
65
Old Fort
SPS Corporation
Joe E. Nashert
80
Oklahoma City
JE Nashert, Inc
Danielle Leyva, CPE
68
Inland Empire
Mack5
James C. Strickland
81
Magnolia
TL Wallace Construction
Angela Newsome, CPE
68
Old Fort
Blundall Associates, Inc.
Jacob R. Harris
81
Magnolia
TL Wallace Construction, Inc
Jordan Brown, CPE
72
Las Vegas
The PENTA Building Group
David Spak
81
Magnolia
TL Wallace
Michael Davis, CPE
79
Razorback
Milestone Construction Company, LLC
Brett B. Phillips
91
SW M-A-L
Charles Huff, CPE
80
Oklahoma City
Boynton-Williams & Associates
Sheridan R. Jones
93
SE M-A-L
Tatitlek Construction Services, Inc
John Ewing, CPE
93
SE MAL
Civil Design & Construction Inc.
Paul J. Yandow
94
NE M-A-L
DEW Construction Corp.
Nicholas McIlwain, CPE
93
SE MAL
W. G. Yates & Sons Construction
NE MAL
NE MAL
PCEA
Non-Member
Non-Member
Non-Member
Roanoke Gas Company
Bureau of Capital Outlay Mgmt
MEMBER NEWS
Patrick Cooper, CPE
Ronald Semel, CPE
Cebert White, CPE
Jeremiah Gilliam, CPE
Dan Holdgreve, CPE
Carl White, CPE
94
94
PCEA
Lydig Construction Inc.
Van Con General Contractors
Carl S. White Construction Inc.
Share your news with us. We’ll post it, publish
it, promote you! We’d love to help get some
professional exposure your way!
• Accomplishments
• Awards
• Chapter News
• Promotions
• Special Events
• Etc.
A S P E N AT I O N A L
www.aspenational.org
Certification 2012
Applications to enroll
in the winter cycle are
due January 1, 2012.
For more information, contact your local Chapter
Certification Chair, email [email protected]
or visit www.aspenational.org
October 2011
29
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30
October 2011
Celebrating 35 years of award-winning
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October 2011
American Society of Professional Estimators
2525 Perimeter Place Drive
Suite 103
Nashville, TN 37214
PRESORT STD
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