A Patient’s Guide: How To Stay Safe In a Hospital

THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL
™
A different view of the world
Monday, February 11, 2013
Volume 3, Issue 5
A Patient’s Guide: How To
Stay Safe In a Hospital
by Blair Hickman, ProPublica
Falls are a common hospital hazard.
Propping up a patient’s hospital bed at a 30degree (1) angle can help prevent hospital-acquired
pneumonia. Using alcohol wipes kills staph bugs, but
you need bleach wipes (2) to kill C. diff germs. Highprotein snacks can help (3) prevent bed sores.
However, most patients don’t know these things.
And doctors and nurses can easily overlook these basic care practices.
Karen Curtiss makes it her mission to remind
them. After her father and husband both experienced
adverse events in the hospital, Curtiss says, she
founded Campaign Zero (4) to arm patients with the
information they need for a safe stay. Her book, “Safe
& Sound in the Hospital: Must-Have Checklists and
Tools for Your Loved One’s Care (5),” collects scores of
these simple actions and details that can make a big
difference in a patient’s recovery.
Checklists have become more common for surgeons
in the operating room. But according to Curtiss, she’s
the only one producing checklists on hospital care for
patients and families.
To make the checklists, Curtiss read everything she
could get her hands on: nursing textbooks, information from the CDC, academic publications. She took
her work to specialists and focus groups. And then
distilled all of the information into something so simple a sixth-grader could read it.
We sat down with Curtiss, who is a member of ProPublica’s Patient Harm Community (6), to find out
more about patient-centered checklists.
Why checklists?
Too soon to start hoping?
Conventional wisdom says that when you go to the hospital,
you take someone with you. However, nobody is prepared.
There’s nothing in college that teaches you how to be an advocate. There’s nothing in your life experience. We have an army
of people sitting bedside, who are ripe for education.
We put a checklist out on Campaign Zero, but I could tell from
the traffic that people were finding it only after a problem had
occurred. They were Googling bed sores and how to treat them,
contd. on p. 17
Supermarket Secret: You Can Buy Half
a Cabbage
by Kathryn Sukalich
During Earth911's Google+ Holiday Hangout Series when we discussed food and dining, we learned
from Shane Valentine, an author
and chef instructor for Whole
Foods Market, that when you're
shopping in the produce department at Whole Foods, you should
pay close attention to the items
sold by weight. Why? Because
when foods are sold by weight, you should only buy as
much as you need.
This sounds obvious, but Valentine gave a helpful example: if you only want one celery stalk and not the whole
bunch, you can break off that one stalk and purchase it. Or
when you want half a head of
cabbage, you can have a produce representative cut it for
you.
We'll admit, Valentine's suggestions blew our minds a little
bit. We can buy half the head of
cabbage? Really? Just think of
how much produce waste we
could eliminate by not buying
all that stuff we know we'll
never use. So, we wanted to investigate this a bit further and find out how this works at
Whole Foods and whether this same practice can be used
in other produce venues. Will other supermarkets allow
this? Will farmers markets, where customers often buy by
contd. on p. 18
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 2
Everything You Need to Know About
Buying in Bulk
by Mary Mazzoni
We all know that buying in
bulk is good for the environment. Heading to the bulk section not only allows you to skip
the packaging when purchasing
pantry staples, but it also dramatically shrinks the carbon
and energy footprint of your
meals, as bulk goods require
less overall transportation before arriving at the grocery
store.
But let's be honest: Between
lugging your own containers to
the supermarket and weighing
out each item you purchase,
buying in bulk can seem downright annoying. Even here at
Earth911, many of our staffers say they'd love to try bulk
but feel it would be too much of an added hassle for them.
To satisfy our curiosity about just how tricky bulk-buying
really is, we sat down with a team of experts and got to the
bottom of this alternative shopping tactic.
And, after all of our research, we're pleased to let you in
on a little secret: Even for the laziest among us, buying in
bulk really isn't that hard.
We know, we were surprised too. But after arming ourselves with knowledge and a few reusable shopping bags,
we were set to take on the bulk section. Ready to do the
same? Read on to finally put all those qualms to rest and
give bulk-buying a try - saving money, reducing waste and
shrinking the footprint of your nightly meals.
1. Getting started in the bulk aisle
"I can see how [bulk-buying] can be intimidating at first,"
Shane Valentine, chef, author and chef instructor for
Whole Foods Market, told Earth911. "We don't normally
shop this way. So, when something is not in a package
we're sort of like 'What? Do I have to weigh it or what do I
have to do?'"
Despite the knee-jerk reaction that may lead us
away from buying nonpackaged items, Valentine
and the rest of our experts
assure us that bulk-buying
really isn't much different
from picking up groceries from the rest of
the store. To break it
down simply, the bulkbuying process is made
up of four steps:
Fill your container
with the bulk food of
your choice (you may
have to complete one
more step if you're
bringing your own container, but we'll get to
that later).
Label your purchase
with
the four-digit
Photo: Shutterstock
PLU code provided by
the store.
Bring your bulk purchase to the register to be weighed.
Pay for your purchase and go!
"It's really not that different from buying produce, and
everybody buys produce," said Clint Landis, a Bulk is
Green Council board member and chief marketing officer
for Frontier Natural Products Co-op. "It may take a tiny
bit more effort, but it can become both fun and well worth
the effort."
2. The container conundrum
While bringing your own containers like glass jars or
plastic storage sets helps you reduce waste while buying in
bulk, it's not your only option. Reusable cloth bags, like
these from ReuseIt.com, are a simple, easy-to-carry alternative to bulkier picks.
And don't be afraid to use the storage options your local
store provides. Whether it's a small container or a plastic
bag, the choices in your local bulk aisle will be far less
waste-intensive than standard food packaging. Both bags
and containers can also be reused for multiple shopping
trips before you recycle them.
"If you forget your containers at home and you use the
ones that the store provides...at the end of the day it's going be way greener to do that than to buy a package," Valentine said.
If you decide to bring your own bag or container, stop by
the register first to have the container weighed. A store
attendant will mark it with its tare weight, so you'll only
be charged for the food you're buying, not the container.
After you get used to the concept of buying in bulk, try to
train yourself to leave a few reusable
containers in your car or desk for impromptu shopping trips. Much like getting into the habit of using a reusable
shopping bag, it may take you a few
trips before it becomes second nature.
But after you get over that initial
hump, coming to the store prepared
becomes business as usual, our experts
said.
contd. on p. 18
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
Copyright 2011—2012
All Rights Reserved
By Barbara A. Dunn
www.themountainsentinel.com
We reserve the right to refuse subscription service
or advertising to anyone
Contact info:
Barbara A. Dunn,
Editor/Publisher
171 Deer Creek Crossing
Mountain City, TN 37683
423.727.1438
[email protected]
On This Day, February 11 …
1960 - Jack Paar walked off while live on the air on the
"Tonight Show" with four minutes left. He did this in
response to censors cutting out a joke from the show the
night before.
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Ready: Drought
By Katherine Hegemann
Nearly every part of our country
experiences periods of reduced rainfall. If we plan for drought, then we
can enjoy the benefits of normal or
rainy years and not get caught unprepared in dry years.
Although we, here in northeast Tennessee, are not presently in a drought, we were in a short one last summer.
There are things you can do before a drought hits.
Strategies for drought preparedness focus mainly on water conservation. Make these practices a part of your daily
life and help preserve this essential resource.
Indoor Water Conservation Tips Prior to a Drought
GENERAL
Never pour water down the drain when there may be another use for it. For example, use it to water your indoor
plants or garden.
Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers. One drop
per second wastes 2,700 gallons of water per year.
Check all plumbing for leaks and have any leaks repaired
by a plumber.
Retrofit all household faucets by installing aerators with
flow restrictors.
Install an instant hot water heater on your sink.
Insulate your water pipes to reduce heat loss and prevent
them from breaking.
SECTION A ~ PAGE 3
Install a water-softening
system only when the minerals in the water would
damage your pipes. Turn
the softener off while on
vacation.
Choose appliances that
are more energy and water
efficient.
BATHROOM
Consider purchasing a low-volume toilet that uses less
than half the water of older models. Note: In many areas,
low-volume units are required by law.
Install a toilet displacement device to cut down on the
amount of water needed to flush. Place a one-gallon plastic jug of water into the tank to displace toilet flow (do not
use a brick, it may dissolve and loose pieces may cause
damage to the internal parts). Be sure installation does
not interfere with the operating parts.
Replace your showerhead with an ultra-low-flow version.
KITCHEN
Start a compost pile as an alternate method of disposing
of food waste or simply dispose of food in the garbage.
(Kitchen sink disposals require a lot of water to operate
properly).
Outdoor Water Conservation Tips Prior to a
Drought
GENERAL
Check your well pump periodically. If the automatic
pump turns on and off while water is not being used, you
have a leak.
Plant native and/or drought-tolerant grasses, ground
covers, shrubs, and trees. Once established, plants
adapted to your local climate do not need water as frequently and usually will survive a dry period without watering. Small plants require less water to become established. Group plants together based on similar water
needs.
Install irrigation devices that are the most water efficient for each use, such as micro and drip irrigation, and
soaker hoses.
Use mulch to retain moisture in the soil. Mulch also
helps control weeds that compete with landscape plants
for water.
Avoid purchasing recreational water toys that require a
constant stream of water.
Avoid installing ornamental water features (such as
fountains) unless they use re-circulated water.
Consider rainwater
harvesting where practical.
Contact your local water provider for information and assistance.
LAWN CARE
Position sprinklers so
water lands on the lawn
and shrubs and not on
paved areas.
Repair sprinklers that
spray a fine mist. Most
misting issues result
from a pressure problem,
contd. on p. 19
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 4
Food and News Shorts
TMS management believes the material posted in this column constitutes fair use
Two area sheriffs oppose expanded
gun control
by Beth Burger
As President Barack Obama continues touting proposals to
reduce gun violence, two area sheriffs said they oppose expanded
gun control measures.
Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Hammond and Bradley County
Sheriff Jim Ruth are among 267 sheriffs across the country who
have signed on to a conservative sheriff's association website
protesting gun control measures. Hammond and Ruth are the
only Tennessee sheriffs listed on the Texas-based Constitutional
Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association website.
"I would hope that the legislature at the federal level would not
mess with Second Amendment rights. I feel very strongly about
the rights of Americans under the Second Amendment,"
Hammond said. "I want to let them know how I stand as a sheriff."
Ruth said bans on guns and high capacity magazine do not
work.
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/feb/05/2-areasheriffs-oppose-expanded-gun/
Authority to end its reliance on coal as a source of
power.
More than 200 people attended the event at Nashville’s Looby Theater. It was aimed at gathering input
about TVA’s plan to spend $1 billion upgrading the
Gallatin Fossil Plant with new pollution controls.
TVA did not hold a formal public hearing after it
released a draft environmental report on the upgrades late last year.
Many of those attending dressed in yellow “Beyond
Coal” T-shirts that the Sierra Club provided and
urged TVA instead to invest in conservation and energy efficiency programs.
“We can draw the line here and say no,” said Louise
Gorenflo, a Crossville resident and Sierra Club activist. “Our job is to move TVA to close down coal plants.
We have no other choice.”
Calling it a “people’s public hearing,” the Sierra
Club and other environmental groups Thursday night
called on the Tennessee Valley Authority to end its
reliance on coal as a source of power.
http://www.tennessean.com/article/20130208/
NEWS11/302080084/Sierra-Club-activists-urge-TVAmove-beyond-coal-
Sierra Club activists urge TVA to move Rep. Slaughter on NARMS: “We
'beyond coal'
Are Standing on the Brink of a
Public Health Catastrophe”
Written by Duane W. Gang, The Tennessean
Calling it a
“people’s public hearing,”
the Sierra
Club and
other environmental
groups
Thursday
night called
on the Tennessee Valley
By News Desk
Congresswoman Louise Slaughter (D-NY) reacted to
the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring
System (NARMS) report this week, calling the increases in certain types of drug resistance among bacteria found on retail meat and ground poultry
“alarming.”
“We are standing on the brink of a public health
catastrophe,” said Rep. Slaughter. “The threat of antibiotic-resistant disease is real, it is growing and
those most at risk are our seniors and children. We
can help stop this threat by drastically reducing the overuse of
antibiotics in our food supply, and
Congress should act swiftly to do
so today.”
According to the statement put
out by Slaughter’s office, more
antibiotics are fed to food animals
in North Carolina than are given
to all Americans. “Thanks to this
kind of misuse, antibioticresistant diseases now kill more
Americans than HIV/AIDS,” reads
the statement.
http://
www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/02/
rep-slaughter-on-antibioticresistance-we-are-standing-onthe-brink-of-a-public-healthcatastrophe/#.URZ8K_KBWSp
Gun-control fears
have guns, bullets
contd. on p. 20
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 5
How Addiction to Plastic Poisons
Our Planet
By Dr. Mercola
We live in a throwaway society. The next time you’re in a
grocery store, take a look around you and note the number of
items packaged in plastic.
The problem is, these petroleum-based plastics are designed
to last forever. So you have products for short-term consumption packaged in materials that survive for centuries.
This throwaway mindset is a relatively recent phenomenon.
Your parents and grandparents used products in reusable, recyclable or degradable containers made from glass, metals and
paper. But today, discarded plastics are circling the globe at a
significant human and environmental cost.
This “out of sight, out of mind” mentality is suffocating our
oceans and choking our wildlife — but the damage doesn’t end
there.
Plastic chemicals are finding their way into your body and
accumulating over time. The potential for catastrophic biologi-
cal consequences for the human race is growing with
every discarded bottle or bag.
Plasticizing chemicals like BPA disrupt embryonic
development and are linked to heart disease and cancer.
Phthalates dysregulate gene expression and cause
genital anomalies, especially in baby boys, that may
pass down several generations. DEHP may lead to
multiple organ damage. So, whether you look at environmental or biological effects, our careless use of
plastics has created a monster needing immediate attention.
20 Billion Pounds of Plastic Makes its Way into Our
Oceans Every Year
According to Greenpeace, the world produces 200
billion pounds of plastics every year. Ten percent of
contd. on p. 22
Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver return to Northeast State Feb. 22
Northeast State Community College welcomes beloved bluegrass legend and local son Doyle Lawson and his band Quicksilver to campus for a performance on Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m.
One of the popular performers ever to take the stage at Northeast State, Lawson and Quicksilver will perform at the Wellmont Regional Center for the Performing Arts on the College’s
main campus at Blountville, adjacent to Tri-Cities Regional
Airport. Advance tickets can be purchased online now at
www.northeaststate.edu/RCPA.
Lawson ranks as one of the most respected artists in bluegrass music. His name has been synonymous with high-octane
acoustic bluegrass music. Lawson began playing the mandolin
at age 12 and picked up the guitar and banjo soon thereafter. He went on to play with bluegrass artists Jimmy Martin
and J.D. Crowe before joining his first band, The Country Gentlemen. He founded Quicksilver in 1979 and began a rise as
one of the genre’s most popular and critically praised artists.
Although the lineup has changed many times over the years,
the DLQ sound remains true to its founder’s intentions.
DLQ burst onto the national spotlight in 1996 when their album, There’s a Light Guiding Me earned a Grammy Award for
Best Bluegrass Album. They went on to receive three more
Grammy nominations in the Best Bluegrass Album category.
Doyle Lawson and Quicksilver: Doyle Lawson and
Quicksilver’s new line up of (from left) Jason Barie,
Mike Rogers, Josh Swift, Joe Dean, and Corey
Hensley.
Lawson, winner of the National Endowment for the
Arts National Heritage Fellowship, has garnered no
less than 14 International Bluegrass Music Awards
and four Grammy nominations. The band also earned
four previous Dove Award nominations for the Best
Bluegrass Gospel Album and Best Bluegrass Gospel
Song awards for their 2008 release, Help Is on the
Way.
DLQ won several awards from the International
Bluegrass Music Association, winning Vocal Group of
the Year six consecutive years from 2001-2007. The
Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music in
America has honored the group with numerous
awards for albums and recorded gospel songs. The
Gospel Music Association honored DLQ again in 2011
with a Dove Award nomination for Bluegrass Album
of the Year.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. For more information call
the Northeast State Box Office at 423.354.5173.
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 6
What’s Cheaper than Solar, Slashes Carbon Emissions, and Creates Jobs in
Kentucky?
Having an energy-efficient home saves the owners
money, but they often procrastinate on improvements.
When energy companies in Kansas and Kentucky figured out a way to sweeten the deal, the results brought
good news for homeowners, contractors, and for the
planet.
by Erin L. McCoy
Jamie Blair had owned his own business for about
seven years when he started to think it was missing a
crucial piece. He was installing heating, ventilation,
and air conditioning systems in and around Paintsville, Ky., but heated air isn’t much good if it leaks out
through poorly sealed doors or underinsulated attics.
That was right around the time he discovered
How$martKY, a collaborative program designed to
encourage better energy efficiency in Kentucky homes.
“Ten years ago, you never really thought about it,”
Blair explained. “You went in and put the unit in, and
you didn’t care how tight the house was or how well it
was insulated.”
But all that is beginning to change. In 2011, Blair
and his employees joined up with How$mart for
hands-on training, learning how to perform energy
audits and install higher-efficiency insulation. The
homes where this training took place belonged to customers of four local energy cooperatives, which had
partnered with How$mart.
“Now we feel pretty comfortable that we can come in
and do a full-service retrofit,” Blair said.
Operated by the Eastern Kentucky-based Mountain
Association for Community Economic Development
(MACED), which seeks "economic alternatives" to "to
make Appalachian communities better places to live,"
How$mart collaborates with homeowners, energy coops, and contractors to make local houses more energy-efficient. The houses get better insulation, HVAC,
heat pumps, sealing—or all of the above—and the
homeowners pay for everything on their utility bills, so
there’s relatively little paperwork. The program not
only helps the homeowner save money on every bill,
but also creates an economic ripple effect by training
contractors and cutting expenses for energy companies.
The potential environmental impact is profound. The
pilot program has cut energy usage by an average of
20 percent in How$mart homes. That amounts to an
annual projected savings of 552,829 kWh—equivalent
to 390 metric tons of climate-warming carbon dioxide.
It’s more energy than the entire country of Vietnam
saved during Earth Hour 2010, when 20 cities and
provinces turned off their lights for an hour—an impressive feat for just 108 Kentucky homes.
The program hasn’t just cut carbon emissions—it’s
also spurred small-business growth. Since starting
with How$mart, Blair has hired three new people to
keep up with the extra work. His company now conducts energy audits with customers whether they’re
with How$mart or not. And in the next few months, he
plans to expand his business to include insulation and add on
another three men.
Training local professionals
East Kentucky Power Cooperative (EKPC) first approached
MACED with what might seem like an unlikely problem for an
energy generator: Its customers were using too much power.
As a result, EKPC had to purchase power from other providers, which was hurting its bottom line.
As it happened, MACED was already exploring ways of making energy efficiency more appealing to people in Appalachia.
That’s how How$martKY was born.
In two years of cooperation with four energy co-ops powered
by EKPC, How$martKY has created five to 10 jobs for local
contracting companies and saved customers almost $61,000,
according to program coordinator Bill Blair.
The process starts when a homeowner asks his or her energy
co-op for an efficiency audit. How$mart or a co-op staffer conducts the audit, though local contractors like Jamie Blair join
in to learn the ropes. If the homeowner qualifies for the program, the contractor sets about repairing or replacing anything that is driving up the bill—whether it’s insufficient attic
insulation or an oversized furnace. Finally, How$mart checks
the quality of the contractor’s work. The contractor is welcome
to come along during these inspections, but either way, he’s
responsible for fixing any problems. It’s a part of the education
process, Bill Blair explained—a way for contractors to learn
from their mistakes.
Homeowners pay for their retrofitting in installments on
their monthly bill. The average monthly installment comes out
to just under $40, but homeowners save about $50 a month on
average. In fact, How$mart won’t take on a project unless it’s
sure the homeowner will save money each and every month.
Blair doesn’t like to call that financing a loan, perhaps because it makes it sound riskier for co-ops than it is. After all,
customers pay back installments at 3 percent interest like any
other loan—but unlike most loans, customers end up with
more money in their pockets and fewer reasons to skip payments.
John Smith, owner of Smith Insulation Inc. in Flemingsburg,
Ky., says he’s had trouble convincing customers that highly
efficient spray foam insulation is ultimately a worthwhile investment.
cont. on p. 24
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Monday, February 11, 2013
SECTION A ~ PAGE 7
~ 2012—2013 911 Calls ~
Courtesy of 911 Interim Director Jerry Jordan
OCT 2012
Nov 2012
DEC 2012
JAN 2013
10-7 Out of Service
1
0
1
1
10-43 Need Investigator
0
0
0
1
10-81 Checking Vehicle
63
80
55
35
Alarms (10-42)
9
10
9
21
Alarms_False
1
0
0
0
Alarms_Actual Break In
1
2
0
1
Animal related
10
9
3
4
Assaults
1
0
7
4
BOLO
6
9
3
2
Break Ins in Process (10-27)
1
0
0
1
Break Ins not in Process (10-27)
7
2
4
7
Child Abuse (10-61)
2
1
0
1
Disorderly House (10-92)
0
0
0
0
Disorderly Person (10-26)
1
1
0
0
Disturbing the Peace (10-87)
5
0
1
2
Domestic Violence (10-86)
8
3
9
9
Drag Racing (10-76)
0
0
0
1
Driving With No License (10-51)
0
0
0
0
Drugs Present (possible) (10-84)
3
5
1
3
Drunk Driver (possible) (10-49)
2
1
2
0
Exposure of Person (10-60)
0
0
0
0
Extra Patrol Requested
5
5
0
5
Fight (10-59)
1
4
6
3
Fire Alarm
0
2
2
2
Fire Brush
1
0
0
0
Fire Structure
0
0
1
1
Fire Calls (10-72)
2
0
1
2
Funeral Escort
3
4
3
3
Gas Drive Off
0
0
0
0
Harassment
0
9
5
1
Hazard
7
4
6
2
Hit & Run
4
2
1
2
Illegal Dumping
1
1
0
0
Law – Other
18
16
24
23
Mental Transport
0
0
1
0
Missing Adult
0
0
1
0
Missing Child
0
0
1
0
Motorist Assist
1
5
3
1
Prowler (10-56)
2
2
2
0
Public Drunk (10-58)
2
3
1
0
Rape (10-55B)
0
0
0
1
Reckless Driver
11
7
10
3
Shoplifting (10-88)
4
6
1
0
Smoke Investigation
0
0
1
1
Speak to an Officer
23
28
17
26
Stolen Vehicle (10-44)
0
2
2
0
Suicide or Attempted (10-94)
1
2
1
1
Suspicious Person
8
4
4
4
City Law Enforcement Calls
Please
Tell
Them
You
Saw
Their
Ad in
The
Mountain
Sentinel
"Man is the only kind of varmint
sets his own trap, baits it, then
steps in it."
~ John Ernst Steinbeck III, 19021968, Nobel & Pulitzer Prizewinning American author ("The
Grapes of Wrath")
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Monday, February 11, 2013
SECTION A ~ PAGE 8
~ 2012—2013 911 Calls ~
Courtesy of 911 Interim Director Jerry Jordan
Suspicious Vehicle
8
6
5
3
Theft
17
8
7
8
Threats
2
5
1
1
Trespassing
1
2
0
0
Unruly Juv
0
1
1
0
Unwanted Guest
0
2
2
1
Vandalism
6
2
1
6
Violation of Order of Protection
1
2
1
1
Welfare Checks
6
6
2
4
Wreck with animal
3
2
1
2
Wreck with out injury (10-45)
11
14
18
14
Wreck with injury (10-46)
2
0
1
1
272
279
229
215
Totals
Report submitted by Interim Director Jerry
S Jordan
OCT 2012
Nov 2012
DEC 2012
JAN 2013
10-7 Out of Service
2
1
0
7
10-43 Need Investigator
1
0
1
3
10-62 DOA
0
0
0
1
10-81 Checking Vehicle
80
126
114
95
Alarms (10-42)
30
28
28
36
Alarms_False
0
1
0
1
Alarms_Actual Break In
4
5
0
5
Animal related
32
36
24
23
Assault
1
1
2
2
BOLO (Be on look out)
16
11
19
17
Break Ins In Progress (10-27)
2
1
2
2
Break Ins Not In Progress (10-27)
4
9
5
12
Child Abuse (10-61)
1
0
0
0
Disorderly Person (10-26)
0
0
1
2
Disturbing the Peace (10-87)
1
3
5
2
Domestic Violence (10-86)
14
13
22
16
Drag Racing (10-76)
1
0
0
0
Drugs Present (possible) (10-84)
6
6
5
6
Drunk Driver (possible) (10-49)
4
4
9
1
Extra Patrol Requested
5
8
4
6
False Call ( 10-69 )
0
0
0
1
Fight (10-59)
4
4
1
1
Fire Vehicle
1
0
0
1
Fire Alarm
4
2
0
1
Fire Brush
2
8
1
1
Fire Structure
1
1
5
6
Fire Calls (10-72)
1
5
3
7
Funeral Escort
0
0
1
0
Harassment
1
1
1
2
Hazard
11
11
33
26
Hit & Run
0
1
1
0
Illegal Dumping
0
0
1
0
County Law Enforcement Calls
Please
Tell
Them
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in
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Mountain
Sentinel
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Monday, February 11, 2013
SECTION A ~ PAGE 9
~ 2012—2013 911 Calls ~
Courtesy of 911 Interim Director Jerry Jordan
Law – Other
27
29
41
36
Mental Transport
0
0
0
0
Missing Adult
2
1
1
2
Missing Child
1
1
1
2
Motorist Assist
2
8
2
3
Prowler (10-56)
10
3
5
0
Public Drunk (10-58)
0
0
2
0
Rape 10-55B
0
0
0
0
Reckless Driver
16
10
15
11
Runaway Child
1
1
2
0
Shooting (10-38)
0
1
0
0
Shoplifting (10-88)
0
0
0
0
Smoke Investigation
3
1
0
4
Speak to an Officer
19
27
17
22
Stolen Vehicle (10-44)
1
2
4
2
Suicide or Attempted (10-94)
5
3
4
3
Suspicious Person
14
6
7
8
Suspicious Vehicle
9
13
16
14
Theft
11
17
11
17
Threats
5
6
3
5
Trespassing
7
7
2
3
Unruly Juv
0
2
0
2
Unwanted Guest
7
8
5
0
Vandalism
6
7
1
9
Violation of Order of Protection
0
2
0
1
Welfare Checks
16
20
16
8
Wreck with animal
11
15
10
2
Wreck without injury (10-45)
23
14
25
37
Wreck with injury (10-46)
8
6
6
10
350
369
369
378
OCT 2012
Nov 2012
DEC 2012
JAN 2013
Toothache .M
0
0
1
0
Abdominal .M01
6
7
10
7
Allergies .M02
3
2
2
0
Animal Bite .M04
1
1
3
1
Back Pain .M05
5
7
3
3
Breathing Problems .M06
26
40
43
40
Cardiac .M09
0
1
0
1
Chest Pain .M10
11
23
29
14
Choke .M11
0
2
1
0
Convulsions / Seizures .M12
4
6
4
3
Diabetic Problems .M13
6
2
6
2
Falls Under 6 Feet .M17
28
17
35
23
Falls Over 6 Feet (Traumatic) .M17A
2
0
0
0
Headache .M18
3
1
3
2
Heart .M19
2
2
1
4
Hemorrhage / Lacerations .M21
10
11
5
5
Totals
Medical Calls
Please
Tell
Them
You
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THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Monday, February 11, 2013
SECTION A ~ PAGE 10
~ 2012—2013 911 Calls ~
Courtesy of 911 Interim Director Jerry Jordan
Overdose .M23
2
4
0
1
Pregnancy .M24
1
0
0
2
Psychiatric .M25
1
0
1
0
Sick Person .M26
29
28
41
44
Stab or Gun Shot .M27
1
0
0
0
Stroke (CVA) .M28
4
10
4
4
Trauma .M30
0
0
1
1
Unconscious / Fainting .M31
10
15
11
9
Unknown .M32
2
1
3
3
Transfers .M33
0
1
3
1
Med Related .M34
28
17
32
21
MDOA
1
0
1
2
186
198
243
193
City 911 Calls-Hung Up
1
2
2
7
County 911 Calls-Hung Up
8
14
18
13
Voids-Zone 798
34
44
39
50
Unk's-Zone 799
4
12
8
14
Incident Cards Made By Fire Dist
OCT 2012
Nov 2012
DEC 2012
JAN 2013
Trade
30
44
48
45
Shady Valley /
26
20
21
32
0
1
5
2
70
64
85
80
2nd Dist.
201
201
205
192
City
335
337
315
272
Neva
72
93
80
87
Dry Run
38
33
33
33
Butler
43
85
62
60
Doe Valley
81
99
94
88
896
977
948
891
Totals
/ Sutherland
1st Dist / Laurel Bloomery
Totals
Report submitted by Interim Director Jerry S
Jordan
"When a thing is funny, search it carefully for a hidden truth."
~ George Bernard Shaw, 1856-1950, Nobel Prize-winning Irish playwright
("Pygmalion")
Please
Tell
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Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 11
Read All About It
by Pettus L. Read
Practical or Non-Practical
Doesn’t Apply To I Love You
In just a few days, it will be that time of the year when women think of
romantic things, men panic and florists hope for early retirement. Yes, I
am referring to February 14 and Valentine’s Day, and if you are a man
and think it is too early even to be thinking about that sort of thing,
then think again. I know it seems like it hasn’t been long since Christmas time, but you have been hearing those mall advertisements for the
last several weeks. How about letting me give my fellow man an early
warning about a special day that could be the difference between hearing “I love you” from the one you love or that extremely cold word when
the man asks her what is wrong and she says, “Nothing.” Burrrrr…
Cards, flowers and candy seem to be the main purchases expected by
the ladies, followed by jewelry and some items of clothing. Men seem to
be the only ones who consider the clothing purchases important and
usually those gifts never see the light of day again after they are opened.
Many of us could be the poster children for “what not to buy your
sweetie for Valentine’s Day.” Some of the surprises I have heard husbands buy for that special day over the years have been a new cast iron
skillet, an ironing board, new support hose, a garden hoe, and a year’s
supply of washing powders, just to name a few. Those individuals are
what I would call practical men, and practicality may work when it
comes to dealing with the household or farm budget, but when it comes
to that day of the year when ladies want a little more than practicality,
and if the husband wants to receive more than a “practical” amount of
response for the gift he gives, I would suggest non-practical buying on
February 14.
One of my favorite stories I have heard and shared with you before, is
one about a farm couple who always seemed to be the practical type.
Gifts were simple and useful on all occasions, as well as their time spent
together involved nothing more than home cooked meals by the wife. On
one special Valentine’s Day, the wife was in the kitchen getting ready to
fix the evening meal. It seems the farm husband had given her a new
set of kitchen knives on that Valentine’s Day and she was getting them
out of the box. Without her knowing it, her husband stepped up behind
her and said, "Would you like to go out, Girl?"
Being totally surprised she spun around and hugged him and said, "I'd
love to!"
That night they traveled down to the local cafe and had an evening
that the farm wife would never forget. They had the house special of
pork chops, mashed potatoes, turnip greens and lots
of sweet tea. The old farmer even put a
quarter in the jukebox and played one of
their favorite songs.
The farmer was also a person who
couldn’t tell a lie, and on their way home
that night, he confessed that his question
about going out, that the wife had
thought was addressed to her, had actually been directed to ole Kate, the family
dog lying near the wife’s feet on the
kitchen floor.
I don’t remember where I heard this
story, but it proves that it doesn’t hurt to
be a little impractical at times, especially
when it comes to showing your love for
those who hold a special place in your
life. This will make the fourth Valentine’s Day without my special one, and
you know, I wished I had been a lot less
practical in those 35 years of marriage as
I look back today. At the time it sounded
like a good idea, but now it really doesn’t
matter since my memories are now chiseled in stone.
So men, take your girl out this Valentine’s Day and put the practicality aside
for one night. Who knows? It may become
a habit and every day may become a nonpractical day when it comes to showing
your love for that special one in your life.
Pettus L. Read is Director of Communications for the Tennessee Farm Bureau
Federation. He may be contacted by email at [email protected]
"The word 'aerobics' came about when
the gym instructors got together and
said: If we're going to charge $10 an
hour, we can't call it jumping up and
down."
~ Rita Rudner, 1955- , American comedian & author ("Naked Beneath my
Clothes")
Monday, February 11, 2013
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION A ~ PAGE 12
SECTION A ~ PAGE 12
~ P.A.C. PETS FOR ADOPTION ~
"Excuse me, but why are there cars named after the jaguar, the cougar, the mustang, the colt, the stingray &
the rabbit, but not one named for a dog? How often do
you see a cougar riding around? We dogs love a nice
ride! Would it be so hard to rename the Chrysler Eagle
the Chrysler Beagle?"
~ Unknown dog
"An ordinary kitten will ask more questions than
any five-year-old boy."
~ Carl Van Vechten, 1880-1964, American writer,
photographer & literary executor of Gertrude Stein
Cuti is a sweet and playful girl with soulful eyes and a mellow disposition who definitely lives up to her name. Give this
cutie-pie a home in your heart and add a little delight to your day! 1-yr-old Retriever mix.
Gizmo is very friendly, but has shown some slight dominance-aggression towards a couple of our other dogs. He is energetic and playful and needs an active person who can keep up with him! 10-mo-old Collie mix.
Maya is a true beauty, inside and out. She is very sweet and loving, but never demanding, with a calm and demure demeanor. 1-yr-old DLH.
Star is a such a little lady, dainty and sweet and well-mannered, with a beautiful coat and an elegant black “necklace”.
She’s a little shy at first, but warms up very quickly. 6-mo-old Calico DSH.
Nimbus is such a beautiful boy, but is still very fearful of people. He has gotten better with attention from our volunteers, but really needs a patient person to give him more one-on-one affection. Won’t you open your heart to this abandoned
kitten and give him the home he needs? 6-mo-old DSH
Roo is an independent young lady who is sweet and affectionate, but not too big on being held. If you’re looking for a cat
who will enjoy your company without being too needy, Roo is the right girl for you!
Mara is playful and sweet, with beautiful markings and a very loving heart. She will make a wonderful feline companion.
For more information, please contact the Johnson County Humane Society at (423) 768-0896 or visit our website at
www.jchsi.org. Our Pet Adoption Center, located at 4125 Pine Orchard Rd, Butler, TN, is open to the public Mondays,
Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10am to 2pm. You can also contact us by email at [email protected]
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Please note: Notice of deadlines for community announcements and classifieds: New entries, or changes to existing entries, must be turned in by 12 p.m.
on Fridays. All entries must be in electronic format (in the body of an email or
as an attachment). Entries will run one month at a time but you may renew
your entry by resubmitting. Thank you.
Docket
General Sessions docket is on the website. Please click on the
following link:
http://www.themountainsentinel.com/court_docket.htm
Johnson County Property Transfers are available at
http://www.themountainsentinel.com/
~ Things To Do ~
Winter Pickin’ Party for United Way at Heritage Hall
On Saturday, February 23, at 6 pm, in an effort to reach their
goal for 2013, the Johnson County United Way will present a
benefit concert, featuring Faultline, Fire in the Kitchen, Laurel
Creek Trail, New Covenant, and Slice of Bluegrass on the Heritage Hall stage. These groups boast some of the area’s top musicians, specializing in bluegrass, gospel, and Celtic music. For
only $10 for adults & $5 for kids at the door, you will not only
have great entertainment, but also an auction featuring quality
items such as quilts, TN Titan stuff, woodworking and art work
items, and a photo shoot, along with several door prizes and TN’s
Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey as the auctioneer. Johnson County
United Way benefits the Emergency Heating Assistance program, the JC Cancer Support Group, JC Safe Haven, the Senior
Center, the Community Center, 4H, Legal Aid and the American
Red Cross, along with Cold Springs/Forge Creek , Trade, Neva,
Butler, and Shady Valley Fire Departments. What a great way to
kick the winter doldrums, enjoy good music with your friends and
neighbors, and support your community all in one night.
Heritage Hall News: On Sat., Feb. 23, at 6 pm, Johnson
County United Way will present Winter Pickin’ Party, a mini
mountain music festival featuring five local bands: Faultline,
Fire in the Kitchen, Laurel Creek Trail, New Covenant, and Slice
of Bluegrass, along with door prizes, and an auction of quality
items between sets – all for only $10 at the door, $5 for 12 & under.
Tues., Feb. 26, at 7 pm, Heritage Hall will present the Barter
Players’ production of Miss Nelson is Missing, a contemporary
children’s classic: At Horace Smedley Elementary School the
kids of Room 207 are famous…for being bad. Despite the best
efforts of their kind teacher Miss Nelson, these fifth graders
wreak havoc each day in the classroom. Spitballs fly, paper airplanes soar, and no one has done their homework in weeks. After
one particularly bad day, Miss Nelson simply does not return to
school. In her place comes a substitute teacher who would make
a crocodile look cuddly: the nefarious Viola Swamp. She is
dressed like a witch and gives them so much homework that they
are certain they will die. Finally the kids of 207 decide to take
matters into their own hands by hiring a detective to find their
dear Miss Nelson, and FAST! Sponsored by Dr. Don and Carole
Tarr. All tickets $5 at door; Season Pass seats will be reserved.
AND on Sat., March 2 at 7 pm, The International Tenors, will
make their debut on the HH stage. The International Tenors
bring you everything you could hope to hear in a three tenor concert: Opera, Musical Theater, Operetta and Pop ... performed as
only true tenors can, with authenticity and a little humor! An
incredible show coupled with a multimedia video. The tenors perform on stage with a big screen showing scenes and footage of
Italy, Spain, and France… and of your favorite artists. The audience will almost believe they are sitting in a little café watching a
great show in the Piazza…. a wonderful little getaway! Sponsored by Danny Herman Trucking, Inc., Adams Lawn Service, &
H & R Block, Adv $18/Door$20.
"Few things are harder to put up with than a good example."
~ Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens], 1835-1910,
American humorist & author ("Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn")
SECTION A ~ PAGE 13
Heritage Hall is a nonprofit organization whose mission
it is to bring quality performing arts events for affordable
pricing to Johnson County and the surrounding area and
to provide a nice facility for local schools and organizations
to perform. Tickets may be purchased by phone with a
credit or debit card and retrieved the night of the performance at the door. For further scheduling information, visit
www.heritagehalltheatre.org .For tickets, or reservations,
visit the Box Office @ 126 College St., Tues. – Fri., 12 – 2,
or call 423-727-7444 and leave a message. A staff member
will contact you within 48 hrs.
Missing Dog: Missing male Chihuahua
from Crackers Neck Rd. white and red last
seen 1/12/13 in our yard $300 reward for
return, no questions asked. Please send
info to TMS editor at [email protected]
JCHSI Monthly Meeting: The Johnson
County Humane Society will be holding
our monthly meeting on Monday, Feb 11
at 6:30 PM at our Pet Adoption Center, located at 4125
Pine Orchard Rd in Butler. Whether you are already a
member, interested in becoming a member, or would simply like more information about our organization, all are
welcome. Call 768-0896 for directions or more information.
Seeds of Change : Limited space is available for this
important Seeds of Change Appalachia event! We are looking for farmers seriously interested in learning more about
farm to institution/restaurant/grocery in the High Country.
Small Farms, Large Markets: Proven strategies for selling to Institutions and retail buyers with Anthony Flaccavento; Tuesday, February 12th from 1-4:00 at Ashe Family Central
RSVP to
Online Registration Now Required for Tennessee
Hunter Education Course: Scheduled Class Instructors:
Harold Shoemaker, Ed Hoak, Terry & Jerry Jordan; Questions call 423-727-7238 ask for Jerry; Location: Johnson
County Rescue Squad Crewette Building; 203 Vandilla
Street Mountain City, Tennessee.
Week long class Starts Monday 3-18-2013 conclude Saturday 3-23-2013; Mandatory class time 12 hours plus
shooting event; Must be at least 9 years of age by 3-182013 to take & register for class; This class is free of
charge. Per state and federal statutes, your Social Security
Number is required. If you wish to register for this course
but do NOT have a Social Security Number, please call
615-781-6538 for assistance; The web site link and steps
for registration listed http://state.tn.us/twra/; Click on (For
Hunters) top left side of page; Click on (For Hunters) 2nd
column 11 links down; Click on (Find a Class).
There will be different types classes listed be sure to
Scroll down to the following class:
Hunter Education Classroom Course click on upcoming
events
Find events near you
Click on Use my current location or click on Use a ZIP
Code
Click on Overview
When you view an upcoming event it will list the class
dates and times, how many students will be allowed and
number of current openings. It will show if registration is
opened now and or when class registration can begin. Any
special instructions will be noted. Please note you need to
have an e-mail address for confirmation. Please use upper
case letters when filling out your registrations.
County Government Announcements:: The Johnson
County Planning Commission will not meet February 11,
2013. The next scheduled meeting is March 11, 2013 in
the upper courtroom in the Johnson County Courthouse,
222 West Main Street Mountain City Tennessee.
Doe Mountain Recreation Authority Roads and
Trails Subcommittee: Doe Mountain Recreation Au-
thority Roads and Trails subcommittee will meet February 25th at 6:00 pm in the Johnson County Courthouse (lower courtroom), 222 West Main Street Mountain City Tennessee.
contd. on next page
Monday, February 11, 2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
Jo. Co. Sheriff’s Department Report
Check back next week
TTD
from previous page
Doe Mountain Authority: Doe Mountain Authority is not
open. Please call 423.302.8990 should you need additional information.
Sycamore Shoals Fife & Drum Corps: On Saturdays 11 am.
The Fife & Drum Corps performs at historical events, dedications, and parades. This group is open to anyone ages 13 & up.
Musical experience is welcome but not necessary; just come with
a willingness to learn. Meet our volunteer coordinator John
Large at the Sycamore Shoals Visitors Center. Lessons are free
of charge, just call and let us know you’re coming!
Sobriety Checkpoints
Week of March 24, 2013: Doe Creek Road
Week of April 14, 2013: US Hwy 421 S
Week of May 19, 2013: Hwy 67
Week of June 9, 2013: US Hwy 421 N
Week of July 14, 2013: Cold Springs Road
Week of August 11, 2013: Crossroads Drive
Week of September 8, 2013: Hwy 167
This project is funded under an agreement with the State of
Tennessee.
Community Notice: The office hours for groundwater protection services (septic permits) are available on Wednesdays from
10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., in the County Mayor’s office, 222 West
Main Street, Mountain City TN 37683. To schedule an appointment to meet with the environmentalist, please call Mr. J.K. Perkins at (423) 547-5885 or (423) 298-5355.
Weather Trends: Keeping an eye on weather conditions?
Check http://www.themountainsentinel.com/weather_trends.htm
to find out the weekly CDC winter weather tip, the weather for
the week, long range weather forecast, air quality forecast, allergy report, and snow forecast for winter 2012-2013.
Did you know? That the number of homeless animals we are
able to take in for adoption is limited, not by the number of available spaces, and certainly not by the number of Johnson County
animals in need, but by the shortage of reliable volunteers. Your
commitment to just a few hours, one morning a week, could make
all the difference in our ability to care for another colony of cats
or fill another empty kennel. To help us give another homeless
pet a chance, please contact: Ryan Guzman, 423-433-7787.
Reece Cemetery Maintenance: The Reece Cemetery on Bulldog Road in Trade has been nicely maintained by donors whose
family members are buried there, and we really appreciate that
assistance. If you have one or more family members in this
cemetery, and would like to continue to or begin to donate money
toward its upkeep, please send your contribution to Bobby Wills,
903 Harbin Hill Rd., Mtn. City, TN 37683. Also, if you are interested in mowing this cemetery, please send your bid to the same
address.
Children's Storytime: Join us at the Johnson County Library
the second Friday of each month for stories and poems. Hope to
see you there!
Free Medical Service: Crossroads Medical Mission, the free
medical service sponsored by First United Methodist Church,
comes to Mountain City’s St. Anthony’s Church, where a food
pantry is also located, on the first Thursday of each month. The
next scheduled visit is Thursday, March 7. Patients are seen
beginning at 9:00. Crossroads is a mobile medical clinic and
Christian mission providing free healthcare to the uninsured and
underserved of the Mountain Empire. The Doctor’s Office on
Wheels provides medical care and can often help with testing, lab
work, minor surgeries, and in some instances medications. For
more information, call Crossroads Office at 276-466-1600. Schedules and directions can found on the internet at
www.crossroadsmedicalmission.org. If schools in area are closed
for weather, the clinic will be canceled.
JCHSI Recycling Programs: The Johnson County Humane
Society collects printer cartridges, toner cartridges and digital
cell phones for recycling. We accept all printer cartridges except
for Epson brand and those that have been previously recycled.
This environmentally responsible fundraising effort supports the
foster dogs and cats while they await adoption. If you work for or
own a business, go to a church or belong to a club, ask if they
would allow you to collect these cartridges and phones for the
SECTION A ~ PAGE 14
benefit of the animals. Printer cartridges and phones may
be dropped off at High Country Online, 873 South Shady
Street or you can call 423-727-2566 for drop off locations.
The Society also collects aluminum cans for recycling. (If
it sticks to a magnet, it's not aluminum and we
can't use it.) Our collection bins are at the Mountain
City Food Lion, just outside the north entrance near the
soda machines and phones, and at Food Country, in between the east entrance and Auto Zone, next to the soda
machines.
Unique Boutique Open: Unique Boutique, sponsored
by First United Methodist Church, is a thrift store with
something for everyone. Located at 122 Butler Lane in
Mountain City, you can shop on Wednesdays, when the
‘open’ sign is out, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Over 80% of
all profits made at the thrift store are donated to community organizations and local missions. None of the money
leaves the community.
Cans to Cash Program: The A.C.T.I.O.N. Coalition/
Johnson County Volunteer Center is recycling aluminum
cans to fund youth programming in the county. You can
drop your aluminum cans off at the A.C.T.I.O.N. Coalition Office on 138 East Main St. from 8 am to 4 pm MF.The cans must be in bags when they are dropped off.
For further information on the collection of aluminum
cans, you may contact Denise Woods at 727-0780.
First United Methodist Church: First United Methodist Church, 128 N. Church St., has an open heart, an
open mind, and an open door for all to come in and be
welcomed by a gracious and friendly church family. We
have a traditional service with strong preaching, children’s church, and an exceptional music program. One of
our major areas of concern is local missions to which we
donate, along with member contributions, the earnings
from our Unique Boutique, located behind the church on
Butler Street. Each Sunday morning Coffee begins at
9:30; Sunday School at 10:00; and Morning Worship at
11:00.
Trade United Methodist Church: Sunday Worship
9:00 am; Sunday School 10:00 am; Wednesday Choir Rehearsal 6:30 pm; Holy Communion is the first Sunday of
each month.
Regular organization meetings:
A.C.T.I.O.N. Coalition, Inc.: The ACTION Coalition
meetings are on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the
Community Center @ 11:30 a.m - 1 p.m. www.jctnac.org
Contact Person: Angela Wills, 727-0780
Alcoholics Anonymous: AA meets on Thursday at
7:00 p.m. at the community center. Call Chuck at 7680643 for more info.
Amateur Radio Club: The Johnson County Amateur
Radio Club meets in the conference room at the Johnson
County Hospital. The meetings are on the 2nd Tues. of
each month at 7:00 P.M.. For information, call Danny
Herman [K4DHT] AT 423-727-0723.
Butler Ruritan: meets the 4th Monday of every month
at the Butler Ruritan Hall. Time is 6:30 PM for the potluck and 7:00 PM meeting. We welcome any interested
seasonal and permanent residents, as well as businesses,
to our meetings. Located just one block off Hwy. 67, on
Piercetown Rd., above the Butler Fire Dept. Inquiries?
Call 423-768-3936 or 423-768-3159.
Chamber of Commerce: The J.C. Chamber is organized for the purpose of advancing the economic, industrial, professional, cultural and civil welfare of the Johnson County area. The Chamber meetings are each month
on the 3rd Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. at the Johnson County
Welcome Center.
http://johnsoncountytnchamber.org/
Crossroads Medical Mission: Crossroads Medical
Mission is held the first Thursday of each month at St.
Anthony’s Catholic Church from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. They
perform urgent care, screenings, minor surgery, patient
education, referrals, pharmacy and labs. This is done
without regard to one’s ability to pay, although they will
accept donations. This service is open to the public, and is
sponsored by the First United Methodist Church.
contd. on next page
Monday, February 11, 2013
TTD
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
from previous page
Fibromyalgia support group: Fibromyalgia support group
meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month at 2 p.m.,
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church 3385 Roan Creek Rd Mountain
City, TN 37683.Enter through lower level rear door. 423-7270345.
Friends of the Library: Meets quarterly and supports the
library through fund-raising events Contact Linda Icenhour 7276544 for details.
Higher Ground Peer Support Group: This is a social support group for those recovering from mental illness and/or substance abuse. Call 727-8685 for more information. We are now
open three days a week Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday)
from 9 - 5. Activities are subject to change, and Higher Ground
does not run a pickup service on those days with snow.
Johnson County Trails Committee: Meets as needed
throughout the year. For more information email
[email protected], visit http://
johnsoncountytrails.org, or write to P.O. Box 16 Mountain City,
TN 37683
Mountain City NAMI: NAMI is a support and education
group for people with a mental illness and for their family,
friends and caregivers. Someone you know has a mental illness.
That's why there is NAMI. Meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month, 7:00 pm, at 1404 Crossroads Drive. Call Coy
Lauer at 727-4794 for more information.
SECTION A ~ PAGE 15
Newcomers Club: The Newcomer’s Club will be meeting the second Thursday of each month at 6:30 pm. If
you’re new to the area and enjoy good food, conversation,
and meeting new friends, please come and join us! Contact Carol Frank at 727-5487 for directions and other
information.
Rotary Club: The Mountain City chapter of Rotary
International, a service organization with both local and
international projects, meets on the 2nd and 4th Mondays
at noon at the Library conference room For more info,
call Howard Moon at 727-3009.
Senior Citizens Advisory Council: Meeting 1st Monday of each month at 12:15 pm at the Senior Citizens
Center, 727-8883
Shady Valley Ruritan Club: Regular meeting dates:
2nd Thursday of each month. Contact person: Jean Sparger 739-4326
TEA Party Meeting: TAFL TEA Party Meeting. When:
Monthly on the 4th Tuesday of each month. Where:
American Legion Hall on Hwy. 91 in Mountain City
(North Church St.), TN. Time: 6:30 PM until ? Free Admission and free finger food and drinks
United Way of Mountain City/Johnson County:
Regular meeting dates: monthly – then weekly during
campaign. Contact person: Judy McGuire 727-6737
Watauga Watershed Alliance/Sierra Club: Meets
the 2nd Tuesday of every month. Contact Gloria 727-4797
or Dennis 423-534-4804 for details.
Please Tell
Them You Saw Their
ad in The Mountain
Sentinel
Monday,
Monday, February
February 11,
11, 2013
2013
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
SECTION
SECTION A
A~
~ PAGE
PAGE 16
16
~ OBITUARIES ~
JOHNNY E. SHELTON
Johnny E. Shelton, age 56, of Mountain City, Tennessee, passed away on
Saturday, February 2, 2103 at his
residence. Johnny was born on November 24, 1956 to Shirley Shelton
and the late John Henry Shelton. In
addition to his father, Johnny was
preceded in death by a brother, Rick
Shelton, and uncle and best friend,
Fred Ashley.
Johnny loved antiques and collecting Indian Artifacts.
He also enjoyed Nascar and was an avid Dale Earnhardt fan and collector. He was a retired truck driver.
In addition to his mother, Shirley Shelton of Mountain
City, TN, Johnny is survived by his fiancé, Darlene
Orndorff, of the home; sons: Johnathon Shelton of
Mountain City, TN, Michael Dunn of Elizabethton, TN,
Ryan Shelton of Mountain City, TN, Brian Shelton of
Mountain City, TN, Tandy Williams, of Mountain City,
TN and Christopher Arnold of Mountain City, TN;
daughter and son-in-law, Tabitha Cornett Grindstaff
and Jesse of Mountain City, TN; sisters and brothersin-law: Debbie and Robert Roark of Trade, TN, Leza
and Michael Mast of Fleetwood, NC; Tracie Shelton of
Mountain City, TN, Kim and Dennis Main of Creston,
NC; brother, Jeff Shelton of Mountain City, TN; sistersin-law: Annette Shelton and Michelle Salyer; grandchildren: Kendra Shelton and Synthia Shelton, both of
Mountain City, TN; Johnny’s companion and friend,
Precious; several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.
Funeral Services were conducted at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 6, 2013 at the Mountain City Funeral
Home with Pastor Barry Dunn officiating. Graveside
Service with Military Honors followed at the Phillippi
Cemetery and were conducted by the Johnson County
Honor Guard.
Active Pallbearers were: Ricky Ray Shelton, Robert
Shelton, Joshua Dollar, Three Orndorff, Chris Arnold,
Tandy Williams, Jessie Grindstaff, Eric Main and
Jerimiah Main.
Honorary Pallbearers were: Michael Blevins.
Eddie Leathern, Rick Grindstaff, Larry Dunn,
Larry Shelton, Michael Mast, Robert Roark,
Conley-Bud Taylor, Eddie Taylor, Scott Orndorff,
Preston Orndorff, Dennis Main and Tom Main.
Memorials may be made to the family, 1738 Red
Brush Road, Mountain City, TN 37683.
Condolences may be sent to the family through
our website at www.mountaincityfh.com
The family of Johnny E. Shelton has entrusted
his services to Mountain City Funeral Home, 224
S. Church Street, Mountain City, Tennessee
37683.
ROSA FORRESTER
Rosa Forrester, age 81, of
Elizabethton, Tennessee, passed
away on Monday, February 4,
2013 at the Sycamore Shoals
Hospital. She was born on April
14, 1931 to the late Boone and
Dove Campbell Holden. In addition to her parents, Rosa was
preceded in death by her husband, Dallas Forrester; one son,
Martin Forrester and one brother Mack Holden.
Rosa was born in Johnson County and had lived
in Lenoir, North Carolina for several years, before
moving back to Tennessee. She was of the Baptist
faith.
Rosa is survived by her daughter and son-in-law,
Sheila and Kurt Davis of Jonesborough, TN; sons
and daughters-in-law: Stephen and Sarah Forrester of Hampton, TN and Lewis Michael and
Patricia Forrester of Butler, TN; sisters: Hazel
Vines, May Tester and Sue Laws; brothers:
James Holden, Jess Holden and Bill Holden;
grandchildren: Lisa Cantrell, Shawn Forrester,
Mekesha Shores, RoseAnn Shores and Adam
Shores; several great grandchildren; special
friends: Anna Ruth Atwood, Joyce Bullard and
Gloria Jenkins and Jeff and many more, and several nieces and nephews.
The funeral service was
held at 12:00 p.m. Friday,
February 8, 2013 at the
Mountain City Funeral
Home with Pastor Leonard
Fletcher officiating.
Graveside Service and Interment followed from the
Dry Hill Cemetery.
Family and Friends served
as pallbearers.
Condolences may be sent
to the family online at
www.mountaincityfh.com
The family of Rosa Forrester has entrusted her services to Mountain City Funeral Home, 224 South
Church St., Mountain City,
TN 37683.
Monday, February 11, 2013
Patient’s
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
from page 1
staph infections. People do not prepare to be sick. So I
wrote the book.
I learned during my research that there are repeated
problems that put people back into the hospital that nobody ever tells you about. For example, if you have congestive heart failure (7), you need to weigh yourself
(8) every single day. If you gain two pounds in a day, you
have to get to a doctor right away.
But I don’t know how many people are told that. Even if
you are told that when you’re discharged, many people
are still on drugs and not thinking clearly. And it’s a hurried process. They need someone there with faculties intact to ask the questions, sweat the details, know what to
look for and be encouraged to ask questions. The simple
affirmation that it’s OK to ask questions makes people
more comfortable.
Furthermore, we know checklists work. Atul Gawande,
the author and surgeon, wrote in “The Checklist Manifesto” (9) that the ideal checklist is no more than ten
items. And they are effective. It’s been proven with other
checklist projects, some that are being rolled out throughout the country.
So I said OK, if checklists work for the medical community, then they can work for families. It’s a potential winwin.
A lot of people in ProPublica’s Patient Harm Community (10) say that when they ask questions, providers
push back. What would you say to them?
I relate to that so much. And it’s unfortunate, but it
does happen.
First of all, before you choose a hospital, make sure to
vet them. Some hospitals talk the talk, and others walk
the walk. You can look at their Leapfrog (11) score or
their Consumer Reports (12) rating, if you have access to
it. [Editor’s Note: You can also check Medicare’s Hospital
Compare (13).]
But that’s hindsight. If you have problems after you’ve
committed to a hospital, you can always call the hospital
advocate. You can call a Condition Help (14), also called a
Condition H, if you feel like your loved one isn’t being
heard, or cared for properly, and a team will respond. It’s
also sometimes called a rapid response team – hospitals
call it different things. But very few are transparent
about the fact that you can do that.
I’ve heard of doctors quitting patients because they ask
too many questions. Obviously, you find another doctor.
You find another hospital. A recent study (15) suggested
27 percent of doctors and nurses feel it’s inappropriate for
patients to ask them to wash their hands. It’s because
they feel chastised. Their egos are bruised.
So what should a patient do? Stick to your guns. Be
humble, and play to those egos. “I know you’re the expert,
but I want to protect you as much as my loved one.”
That’s why in my book I have pullout cards. Sometimes,
it’s easier for people to read a note than hear people say
it. That’s also why some of those cards are silly; humor
can help break the ice.
A lot of items on the checklist seem to address communication.
Communication is the number one challenge. In the
1970s, there were two or three doctors involved in a patient’s care. Now, there are up to 15. That’s good news.
But the bad news is how do they communicate? Care is
much more fractured because it’s specialized.
I encourage people to be a part of the shift change,
which is called the hand-off. That’s when they share notes
with the doctors starting their shift. It’s a huge opportunity to spot inaccurate information, fill in gaps and raise
questions. Ideally, the hand off should occur bedside. If
they resist, you can always ask to go to where they’re doing it. It might be in a break room.
How are providers responding to the checklists?
We’ve had a lot of support. And not just from providers.
Blue Shield of California is giving the book to patients at
SECTION A ~ PAGE 17
University of California, San Francisco, who are employed
by the city and county of San Francisco. Community Trust
Bank in Kentucky, which has 1,000 employees, is giving
everyone who has a pre-planned admission a copy of the
book.
I also collaborated with Mary Foley, who’s a prominent
leader in nursing innovation and head of nursing research
and innovation at the UCSF, to create a companion nursing
workshop. Nurses on the front line probably haven’t had
up-to-date education on the basics of patient safety because
they’re really busy and went to nursing school a long time
ago. Plus, people can walk in with these checklists, and one
look from a nurse who isn’t on board can make them feel
like they were thrown under the bus. The workshop is
meant to help nurses understand how engaging families
and supporting safe care practices can benefit them.
What would you say is the one most important thing
someone can do?
I have two: Ask people to wash their hands. The greatest
hazard in hospitals is infection, and the number one thing
you can do to prevent infections is hand washing. Don’t let
people give you flack about it.
The second thing is to take notes. Take notes to ask questions and be organized. When the doctors and nurses come
in, if you’re prepared with your questions in notes, then you
use your time wisely.
Also note when medications are given, when tests are ordered and the test results. You could have tests ordered at 9
a.m., and the results might be critical for next steps. If they
don’t come until 9 p.m., that’s a problem. And a detail like
that can get lost.
People respect stuff that’s written down. And if the doctors and nurses know you’re on it, they will be more accountable. It’s very subtle, but it takes the drama and emotion out of it, and makes the experience more businesslike.
Footnotes:
1.
2.
http://www.ihi.org/knowledge/Pages/Changes/Elevatio
noftheHeadoftheBed.aspx
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cdifficile/DS00736/DSECTION=prevention
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/bedsores/DS00570/
DSECTION=prevention
http://www.propublica.org/article/campaignzero.com
http://www.amazon.com/Safe-Sound-Hospital-Must-HaveChecklists/dp/0615490646
http://www.facebook.com/groups/patientharm/
http://www.ghc.org/healthAndWellness/index.jhtml?ite
m=/common/healthAndWellness/conditions/heartDisease/c
hfBasics.html
8.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/0001
58.htm
9.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312430000/ref=ol
p_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=
10. http://www.facebook.com/groups/patientharm/
11. http://www.leapfroggroup.org/cp
12. http://www.consumerreports.org/health/doctorshospitals/hospital-ratings.htm
13.
http://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/?AspxAuto
DetectCookieSupport=1
14. http://www.josieking.org/conditionh
15. http://health.usnews.com/healthnews/news/articles/2012/09/06/third-of-hospital-staff-sayhand-washing-reminders-unwelcome
Source: http://www.propublica.org/article/a-patients-guidehow-to-stay-safe-in-a-hospital
Monday, February 11, 2013
Supermarket
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
from page 1
weight already, permit us to break off a stalk of celery?
Keep reading to find out. What you learn might just cut
your grocery bill and your household food waste at the
same time.
One of Whole Foods' Core Values is to satisfy and delight shoppers, and allowing customers to purchase only
what they need is one way they do that.
"We understand that not every consumer is looking for
the same size or amount of product, and that by offering
this service, we can provide our guests with exactly what
they’re looking for," Kevin Doty, Associate Global Produce
Coordinator for Whole Foods, told Earth911 in an email.
In addition to cabbage, other items that the store often
cuts for customers are winter squash and cauliflower.
Celery, broccoli and daikon radish are also common candidates for being cut into smaller portions, Doty explained. If you're looking to buy smaller pieces or portions
of fruit, Doty also suggests looking to prepackaged cut
fruits like pineapple, papaya and berries. What you need
may already be pre-cut.
What Whole Foods does with the remaining halves of
things varies by location. "Each store has different policies and practices due to our decentralized nature, but we
try to avoid waste by providing produce for pre-pack produce and also share produce with our prepared foods section," Doty said.
If you're at Whole Foods and want to buy half of something that is sold by weight, all you have to do is ask a
produce representative to cut it for you.
Does My Local Supermarket Do This?
Perhaps when you first learned that Whole Foods will
cut produce for you, you were a little skeptical that this
practice is widespread. A quick survey of major grocery
store chains near Earth911 headquarters confirmed,
though, that many supermarket produce departments
have no problem catering to your needs.
Produce managers at a Safeway location, a Fry's Food
Store (whose parent company is Kroger Foods) and an
Albertsons store (whose parent company is SuperValu
Inc.) all said they regularly cut produce for customers.
Everything
SECTION A ~ PAGE 18
The produce manager at our local Fry's added that customers should ask for assistance before trying to break
something apart themselves. Like Whole Foods, Fry's commonly cuts items like cabbage and lettuce.
Our Albertsons store also suggested checking their prepackaged produce section because many items that are sold
in smaller portions are already cut.
All the stores indicated this is a common practice, not a
secret.
Next time you're in need of a small amount of a produce
item, take the time to ask a produce representative if they'll
cut it for you. While there is no guarantee that all stores
will be willing to cut all products, it doesn't hurt to ask.
What About My Farmers Market?
Many vendors at farmers markets already sell their fruits
and vegetables by weight, so the next question is whether
those items can be cut or divided in any way.
Farmers markets, whose vendors are often small farmers,
face unique challenges. For this reason, cutting produce at
markets is not widespread.
"If consumers at our markets were to cut into or break off
a piece or part of a vegetable or fruit it would destroy the
value of the product and it actually would be a health hazard," Samantha Franklin, media representative for the Arizona Community Farmers Markets, told Earth911 in an
email. "As much as I love the theory of reducing waste and
purchasing what you are to consume, it is just not likely for
most products in most situations."
Dee Logan of Farmers Market Support Services at the
Arizona Community Farmers Markets confirmed this. "In
order to cut produce and present it a market - it must be
done in a certified commercial kitchen which is why grocery
stores can do that," Logan said. She also explained that the
FDA 's new food safety regulations impact how farmers
markets sell produce, making it difficult to cut produce on
site.
If you're at a farmers market, it can't hurt to ask vendors
about their policies for buying by weight, but when supporting your local farmer at a market, you may have to buy an
entire cabbage.
http://earth911.com/news/2013/01/18/supermarkets-cutproduce-portions
from page 2
"It will be a little awkward at first, but if you just stick to
it, not only will you save a ton of money but it's also going
to be way better for the environment," Valentine said.
3. Getting over the 'sticker shock'
When you head to the bulk aisle, one thing you may notice right away are the high prices posted on some items.
Oregano for $30 a pound? Sounds a bit pricey!
Calm down, our experts say, and look a little closer.
Posted prices are for one pound of product, which is typically way more than you will purchase at once. For example, if you filled a standard 1-ounce spice jar with dried
oregano from the bulk section, that purchase will cost less
than $2, compared to a $6 price tag on oregano from the
spice aisle.
"Typically, bulk foods are 89 percent cheaper than packaged foods," said Bulk is Green Council member Ellen
Bouchard, citing a study conducted by the council last year
in partnership with Portland State University.
Buying in bulk also helps you control portion size, reducing waste and saving money, added Bouchard, who also
serves as brand manager for Frontier Natural Products
Co-op, a distributor of bulk spices.
"If we just look at things differently, packaged food is
way more expensive per pound," Valentine said. "You fill
up a little container of a spice, bring it up to the front and
when it's literally under a dollar, you get it. It's instantaneous, and now you're hooked."
It's tough to deny the environmental benefits of buying
in bulk after taking one look at this graphic, which is featured in a bulk-buying study conducted by the Bulk is
Photo: Bulk is Green Council (BIG)
Green Council in partnership with Portland State University.
4. Learning to buy what you need
After you get the hang of the bulk-buying basics, like
getting the tare weight of your containers and having purchases weighed at checkout, you can start making the
most of what the bulk section has to offer. In addition to
skipping the packaging, buying in bulk also allows you to
directly control portion size - meaning you're no longer
paying too much for excess food you don't need. Landis and
Bouchard coined the phrase "buy a pinch or a pound," and
contd. on next page
Monday, February 11, 2013
Everything
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
from previous page
when it comes to bulk shopping, that edict couldn't be
more true.
"It's actually counter-intuitive. When you think of bulk,
the first thing that comes to mind is Costco, and it's the
direct opposite," Valentine said. "You could literally buy
one peppercorn if you wanted to."
The next time you're planning a recipe, bring a few small
containers and a set of measuring spoons to the bulk aisle,
Valentine suggests. Measure out spices you need for your
recipe, and pour them right into your containers. By following this simple step, you'll never end up paying $5 or
more for a whole jar of a spice you may never even use
again.
Beyond that, purchase bulk coffee, tea, grains and dried
fruits in portions you will realistically use before your next
trip to the grocery store. You'll save money, your foods will
be fresher when you use them and nothing will go to
waste, our experts said.
App. Spirit
from page 3
properly regulating pressure in an irrigation system will
prevent misting.
Check sprinkler systems and timing devices regularly to
be sure they operate properly.
Raise the lawn mower blade to at least three inches or to
its highest level. A higher cut encourages grass roots to
grow deeper, shades the root system, and holds soil moisture.
Plant drought-resistant lawn seed. Reduce or eliminate
lawn areas that are not used frequently.
Avoid over-fertilizing your lawn. Applying fertilizer increases the need for water. Apply fertilizers that contain
slow-release, water-insoluble forms of nitrogen.
Choose a water-efficient irrigation system such as drip
irrigation for your trees, shrubs, and flowers.
Turn irrigation down in fall and off in winter. Water
manually in winter only if needed.
Put a layer of mulch around trees and plants to reduce
evaporation and keep the soil cool. Organic mulch also improves the soil and prevents weeds.
Invest in a weather-based irrigation controller—or a
smart controller. These devices will automatically adjust
the watering time and frequency based on soil moisture,
rain, wind, and evaporation and transpiration rates.
Check with your local water agency to see if there is a rebate available for the purchase of a smart controller.
POOL
Install a new water-saving pool filter. A single back
flushing with a traditional filter uses 180 to 250 gallons of
water.
Cover pools and spas to reduce evaporation of water.
DROUGHT RESTRICTIONS
Always observe state and local restrictions on water use
during a drought. If restricted, for example, do not water
your lawn, wash your car, or other non-essential uses, to
help ensure there is enough water for essential uses. Contact your state or local government (http://www.ready.gov/community-state-info) for current information and suggestions.
Tips for a Period of Drought
I live in Trade, and the well is over 700 feet deep. When
dug, no water was hit at that depth. The well company had
to use explosives to crack the stone and create a fissure for
water. It’s like living in a drought all the time. Oh, there’s
water, but managing it is a constant. Watering the garden—no more than 20 minutes in the morning; washing a
load of clothes—no more than one per day; and taking a
shower—keep it short.
Indoor Water Conservation Tips While in a
Drought
SECTION A ~ PAGE 19
5. Set a goal and get started
If you're new to bulk-buying, start by setting an attainable goal for yourself until you get into the swing of things.
For example, pledge to begin buying one type of food in
bulk, such as spices, grains or flours. Once you're used to
it, move on to the rest of the bulk section.
If the bulk selection at your local grocer is only so-so, use
these databases from the National Cooperative Grocers
Association and Independent Natural Food Retailers Association to discover new bulk-buying options near you.
Still unconvinced that bulk-buying will help you save
time and money while reducing waste? Check out this fun
video from the Bulk is Green Council, and follow two shoppers as they browse the bulk aisle and the rest of the grocery store. You may be surprised by how much time and
money the bulk-buyer saved compared to her companion.
http://earth911.com/news/2013/02/04/bulk-buyingguide/3/
BATHROOM
Avoid flushing the toilet unnecessarily. Dispose of tissues, insects, and other similar waste in the trash rather
than the toilet.
Avoid taking baths—take short showers—turn on water
only to get wet and lather and then again to rinse off.
Avoid letting the water run while brushing your teeth,
washing your face or shaving.
Place a bucket in the shower to catch excess water for
watering plants.
KITCHEN
Operate automatic dishwashers only when they are fully
loaded. Use the “light wash” feature, if available, to use
less water.
Hand wash dishes by filling two containers—one with
soapy water and the other with rinse water containing a
small amount of chlorine bleach.
Clean vegetables in a pan filled with water rather than
running water from the tap.
Store drinking water in the refrigerator. Do not let the
tap run while you are waiting for water to cool.
Avoid wasting water waiting for it to get hot. Capture it
for other uses such as plant watering or heat it on the
stove or in a microwave.
Avoid rinsing dishes before placing them in the dishwasher; just remove large particles of food. (Most dishwashers can clean soiled dishes very well, so dishes do not
have to be rinsed before washing)
Avoid using running water to thaw meat or other frozen
foods. Defrost food overnight in the refrigerator or use the
defrost setting on your microwave oven.
LAUNDRY
Operate automatic clothes washers only when they are
fully loaded or set the water level for the size of your load.
Outdoor Water Conservation Tips While in a
Drought
CAR WASHING
Use a commercial car wash that recycles water.
If you wash your own car, use a shut-off nozzle that can
be adjusted down to a fine spray on your hose.
LAWN CARE
Avoid over watering your lawn and water only when
needed:
A heavy rain eliminates the need for watering for up to
two weeks. Most of the year, lawns only need one inch of
water per week.
Check the soil moisture levels with a soil probe, spade or
large screwdriver. You don’t need to water if the soil is still
moist. If your grass springs back when you step on it, it
doesn't need water yet.
contd. on next page
Monday, February 11, 2013
Monday, February 11, 2013
App. Spirit
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
A DIFFERENT VIEW OF THE WORLD ...
from previous page
If your lawn does require watering, do so early in the
morning or later in the evening, when temperatures are
cooler. Note: Only water your vegetable garden in the
morning.
Check your sprinkler system frequently and adjust sprinklers so only your lawn is watered and not the house, sidewalk, or street.
Water in several short sessions rather than one long one,
in order for your lawn to better absorb moisture and avoid
runoff.
Use a broom or blower instead of a hose to clean leaves
and other debris from your driveway or sidewalk.
Avoid leaving sprinklers or hoses unattended. A garden
hose can pour out 600 gallons or more in only a few hours.
In extreme drought, allow lawns to die in favor of preserving trees and large shrubs.
For more information:
Drought also creates environmental conditions that increase the risk of other hazards such as wildfire, flash
flood, and possible landslides and debris flow.
Related Websites
Find additional information on how to plan and prepare
for drought and learn about available resources by visiting
the following websites:
Federal Emergency Management Agency
(http://www.fema.gov/)
American Red Cross (http://www.redcross.org)
F&N
SECTION A ~ PAGE 20
SECTION A ~ PAGE 20
National Integrated Drought Information System
(http://www.drought.gov)
US Drought Monitor (http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/)
Current U.S. drought conditions
US Economic Costs of
Drought (http://www.ppi.noaa.gov/economics/?goal=climate
&file=events/drought/) NOAA Economics
National Drought Mitigation Center
(http://drought.unl.edu/Home.aspx)
Save Our Water (http://www.saveourh2o.org/) California's statewide program aimed at helping reduce everyday
water use, created by the California Department of Water
Resources and the Association of California Water Agencies.
US Environmental Protection Agency
(http://www.epa.gov/naturalevents/drought.html)
Listen to Local Officials
Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government
(http://www.ready.gov/community-state-info). In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local
emergency management officials.
Final Thoughts
Many of the natural disasters in this series are rare in
our area, but they do happen. Use the information presented in this series to help you prepare and avoid the
worst outcomes no matter when a natural disaster hits.
Source: http://www.ready.gov/drought
from page 4
flying off shelves in Chattanooga
area
by Tim Omarzu
Roughly 60 new rifles and shotguns hang on display at
GT Distributors, a Rossville store that caters to law enforcement personnel.
But they're for display only.
On Thursday, the gun store was sold out of new rifles
and shotguns.
"We do have some handgun models left in stock, but the
most popular models we're out of," General Manager Bruce
Robins said.
Demand for guns and ammunition has surged as gun
owners anticipate gun control measures from President
Barack Obama in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary
School massacre in Newtown, Conn.
Some police agencies report months-long delays in getting supplies of ammunition for their officers and for training and certification needs.
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/feb/08/guncontrol-fears-have-guns-bullets-flying/http://
www.timesfreepress.com/news/2013/feb/08/gun-controlfears-have-guns-bullets-flying/
Escalating Trade Dispute, Russia
Bans Turkey Over Ractopamine
Residues
policy for ractopamine residues in meat and poultry products.
A USDA spokesperson said the department is “extremely
concerned” with Russia’s recent actions, which jeopardize
more than $500 million in U.S. meat exports.
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/02/escalating-tradedispute-russia-bans-turkey-over-ractopamine-residues/
#.URZ9gfKBWSo
How a Canned-Food Chemical Affects Men's Health
BPA sparks abnormal breast development—and not just
in females.
By Leah Zerbe
A chemical commonly found in canned food could be affecting men's health, too.
Cracking open a can of soup seems convenient, but a
chemical found in the can's liner is quietly tinkering with
delicate hormonal processes that help us live healthy, normal lives. Long able to evade the public because its heath
impacts may not show up for decades, bisphenol A, or
BPA, is revealing itself as likely throwing our hormones
into a dangerous—and sometimes irreversible—tailspin,
as scientists catch up to the damage it causes and even
finding new ways it may be doing us harm. BPA health
problems in men are coming to light now, thanks to new
research.
http://www.rodale.com/bpa-health-problems-men?
cm_mmc=TheDailyFixNL-_-1193496-_-02062013-_How_a_Canned-Food_Chemical_Affects_Mens_Health
By Helena Bottemiller
Russia will ban U.S. turkey products over concerns about
the controversial animal drug ractopamine, the country’s
Veterinary and Phyto-Sanitary Surveillance Service
(VPSS) announced this week. The news comes a few days
after Russia announced it will block U.S. beef and pork as
of Feb. 11 due to a lack of compliance to its zero-tolerance
Bacon wrecks the best-laid plans
By Sarah Miller
contd. on next page
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I have now gone 30 days without eating meat. Well, that
is not entirely true: The other day, I was making my boyfriend a bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwich and without
even thinking about it, I ate a piece of bacon.
It was pretty small — about the size of a postage stamp.
But I ate it.
I told a friend, and he asked me if I felt guilty. I have to
say I really didn’t. Maybe I am too easy on myself, but I
am conducting a sort of experiment, and what I do or don’t
do is just data, results, information. The information here
was: I really wanted to not want to put the bacon in my
mouth. And I clearly wasn’t there yet. So it was probably a
good thing that this week I was focusing on the part of the
book Eating Animals that describes how pigs are killed.
(I’m saving cows for next week, because I am going to compare grass-fed and grain-fed, which is a big and complicated topic.)
http://grist.org/food/bacon-wrecks-the-best-laid-plans/?
utm_campaign=weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_source
=newsletter
15,000 Pounds of Country Fried
Steaks Recalled
By News Desk
AdvancePierre Foods, an Enid, Oklahoma. establishment, is recalling approximately 15,328 pounds of frozen,
fully cooked country fried steak products because they may
contain foreign materials—pieces of plastic, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced late Friday.
The products subject to recall include:
-22.75-oz. pouches of “Fast Classics Country Fried
Steaks.”
-8.5-lb. cases, each containing six pouches of “Fast Classics
Country Fried Steaks.”
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2013/02/15000-poundsof-country-fried-steaks-recalled-nationwide-for-potentiallycontaining-plastic/#.URZ_8PKBWSo
Blue Crab Spread Recalled
GoldCoast Salads, a Naples Florida firm, is voluntarily
recalling it's Blue Crab Spread that may be contaminated
with Listeria.
The product being recalled is coded EXP 1-31-13.
The following products are being recalled: Blue Crab
Spread, in containers with a weight of 1 pound and containers with a weight of 8 ounces.
The product was produced December 3, 2012 and distributed to stores in the North East and South East United
States.
http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm338606.htm?
source=govdelivery
Home Depot to beef up staffing
The home improvement giant is hiring 80,000 people for
the spring season
ConsumerAffairs
By James Limbach
Looking for a job and like the home improvements business? The Home Depot may have just what you're looking
for.
The world's largest home improvement retailer says it
has started filling more than 80,000 seasonal positions to
assist customers during the company's busiest selling season. This year, the company is hiring ten thousand more
spring associates than it did last year to support anticipated sales growth in the spring.
"Spring is always a special season for us, when we can
offer employment opportunities for literally tens of thousands of Americans," said Tim Crow, executive vice president - Human Resources. "We find some of our best associates during our peak season, and many of them have built
long, meaningful careers with us."
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/home-depot-tobeef-up-staffing-020613.html
Cocaine users warned about flesheating additive
CDC says users could lose parts of their nose or ears
By Mark Huffman ConsumerAffairs
There are many good reasons to stay away from cocaine,
starting with the fact that it's addictive, expensive and
illegal. But the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is sounding the alarm about another good
reason.
Drug dealers increasingly use a veterinary de-worming
agent, levamisole, to cut both cocaine and heroin. In a
study based on U.S. emergency room reports, CDC says
levamisole-contaminated cocaine is "an important emerging public health concern" in view of the nearly two million
cocaine users in the U.S.
The drug, also used in the past as a cancer treatment,
has caused infectious diseases and skin lesions among cocaine users. In fact, the effects of the drug have, in some
cases, caused large patches of flesh to die.
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/cocaine-userswarned-about-flesh-eating-additive-020413.html
Some great products to help seniors keep living independently
There's a countless amount of gadgets out there for seniors, and we picked out some good ones.
By Daryl Nelson, ConsumerAffairs
When it comes to describing our parents or the people
that took care of us, it’s often futile to try and come up
with the proper words that explain what they’ve done for
us and in many cases what they continue to do.
And one thing that a lot of parents have taught many of
us is how to be independent and how to do things on our
own.
In many cases Mom and Dad gave us that ever-so-needed
nudge that finally got us out of the nest and off the cliff, so
we could test our own flying capabilities and see just how
far we could go.
But fast forward to the present, when you’ve tested those
wings over and over and found out they’re pretty darn
good thanks to your parents, and now that same independence they taught you growing up is harder for them to
maintain for themselves, especially since they’ve gotten
much older and find it harder to do some of the things they
used to.
http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news/some-greatproducts-to-help-seniors-keep-living-independently020813.html
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SECTION A ~ PAGE 22
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from p. 5
that ends up in our oceans. Seventy percent sinks
(Polycarbonate, Polystyrene, and PETE), causing damage
to the ocean floor, and the remaining 30 percent that floats
(LDPE, HDPE, Polypropylene and foamed plastics) accumulates into massive islands of trash that many consider
an embarrassment to the human race.1
Virtually every molecule of the six billion pounds of polycarbonate tossed into landfills each year, stays there forever. Only a very small percentage of plastic waste is remade into durable goods. In spite of our green campaigns,
we currently recycle only five percent of the plastics we
produce. Consider the following:
Americans discarded more than 22 billion water bottles
in 20062 and about a billion plastic shopping bags every
year, creating 300,000 tons of landfill waste3
More than seven billion pounds of PVC are thrown away
annually in the U.S., and only about one-quarter of one
percent is recycled
Approximately 50 percent of plastic waste goes to landfills where it will sit for hundreds of years due to limited
oxygen and lack of microorganisms to break it down; the
remaining 45 plus percent “disappears” into the environment where it ultimately washes out to sea, damaging marine ecosystems and entering the food chain
A United Nations report claims there are 46,000 pieces of
plastic in every square mile of ocean4
You Mean Fish and Turtles aren’t Supposed to Eat Plastic?
Fish and other sea creatures are being found with plastic
in or around their bodies. Forty-four percent of all seabird
species, 22 percent of Cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises), all sea turtles and a growing list of fish have been
found contaminated with these materials.5
Why would any creature knowingly EAT plastic?
All plastic starts as “nurdles,” or little plastic resin
beads. These nurdles appear to sea creatures like fish eggs
or other food sources, so they simply mistake them for
food. Loggerhead sea turtles often mistake plastic bags for
jellyfish, their favorite food. And the effects are disastrous,
including internal blockages, dehydration, starvation, and
potentially death. Albatrosses are frequently found strangled by the plastic rings that hold six-packs of soda together. Other creatures meet a painful end by getting tangled up in plastic netting.
Debris also blocks sunlight from which plankton and algae sustain themselves, and this has negative implications
on up the food chain. In some ocean waters, plastic exceeds
plankton by a factor of six to one.1
Not only do sea creatures suffer the effects of consuming
chunks of plastic, but they’re also at risk from the organic
pollutants plastic absorbs. Plastic particles are like
“sponges” for waterborne contaminants such as PCBs, pesticides like DDT, herbicides, PAHs, and other persistent
organic pollutants. When PCB concentrations in resin pellets were compared with the surrounding seawater, the
accumulation factor was found to be one million. This phenomenon makes plastics far from benign, and scientists
have yet to determine the full extent of the dangers posed
by their consumption or the effects higher up the food
chain. We have more questions than answers.
From Heart Valves to Hula-Hoops, Massive Plastic Islands Float upon Our Oceans
What has become of all the plastics humans have casually discarded? Scientists have discovered massive accumulations of plastic trash in each of the world’s five major
oceanic gyres. Gyres are large, slowly rotating oceanic
whirlpools, driven by global winds and ocean currents.6
Garbage and debris is funneled into the center of these
gyres, in a kind of toilet bowl effect.
One of these gyres, the North Pacific Gyre, is in the middle of the Pacific Ocean about a thousand miles from the
Western coast. In its midst is a huge mass of trash (90 percent plastics), which floats in a soup of smaller pieces that
have been broken apart by wave action.
Some call it the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” and others the “Pacific Trash Vortex,” but regardless of its name,
it’s the largest “landfill” in the world. In it you will find
everything from plastic netting to bottles and bags and
buckets, paint rollers, hula-hoops and medical equipment.
Most of the garbage patch, however, is not made up of
large items but rather microplastics you can’t see with the
naked eye, such as the nurdles previously described.
No one knows exactly how vast these garbage patches
are because so much of them can’t be visualized.7 The garbage-laden gyres are all located in remote areas, out of
public view, which contributes to the “out of sight, out of
mind” problem. As a side note, we’ve learned a good deal
about ocean current patterns and the gyres they create —
believe it or not — from 28,000 rubber duckies lost at sea
in 1992, which continue to wash ashore in surprising locations!8 Rubber duckies notwithstanding, the chemicals in
plastic have a number of problematic biological effects.
Dangerous Levels of BPA Found in More than 95 Percent
of People Tested
Perhaps the most well known plastic chemical is BPA
(bisphenol-A), widely used in the lining of food cans, dental
sealants, paper money, receipts and other products. Unfortunately, BPA is so prevalent that 95 percent of people
tested have potentially dangerous levels in their bodies.
BPA leaches out of can linings and into the foods they contain, such as soups and sodas. BPA is not the only chemical that does this — science has recently discovered that
melamine, once thought stable, leaches chemicals as well,
particularly when heated. Consistent low-level melamine
exposure has been linked to kidney stones in children and
adults.9
Studies show that adults with the highest levels of BPA
in their urine are more than twice as likely to develop narrowed arteries and coronary heart disease as those with
the lowest levels. A British health survey correlated higher
levels of urinary BPA with an increased risk of heart disease. One study found that eating canned goods increases
urinary BPA concentrations more than 1,000-fold.
BPA is an endocrine disrupter, which means it interferes
with your body's hormonal system. An animal study found
that BPA damages chromosomes and interferes with egg
development, which could lead to spontaneous miscarriage, birth defects, and Down syndrome. In other studies,
BPA has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance and
cancer. According to Texas A & M geneticist Dr. David
Busbee, less than one trillionth of a gram of BPA per one
milliliter of food is sufficient to change the functioning and
development of cells in your body.
BPA studies have captured the public’s attention, and
there is growing legislation to limit its use, as a result. The
state of California just declared BPA a reproductive health
hazard10. The message is clear: BPA is harmful and should
be avoided.
BPS May Be Even Worse than BPA
As the public has grown increasingly wary of BPA, a slew
of BPA-free plastics have hit the market, from water bottles to plastic toys. However, many companies are simply
swapping out BPA for another bisphenol, bisphenol-S
(BPS), which is now showing up in human urine at levels
similar to those of BPA. Research suggests BPS has hormone-mimicking characteristics similar to BPA, but it may
be significantly less biodegradable, and more heat-stable
and photo-resistant, which means it may be even more
toxic than BPA over time.
Phthalates: The Plastic Gender-Benders
Another group of toxic chemicals coming from plastic are
the phthalates. Phthalates function as plasticizers in everything from vinyl flooring to detergents, hoses, raincoats,
adhesives, air fresheners, medical supplies, shampoos and
even toys. Phthalates belong to "gender-bending" chemicals group that causes males of many species to become
more female. Phthalates have been linked with chronic
contd. on next page
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Addiction
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
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from previous page
diseases such as allergies, asthma and autism, and can
cause inflammation for at-risk infants. Children have been
found to absorb phthalates from crawling around on soft,
flexible plastic flooring and plastic play mats.
One of the more pervasive phthalates is DEHP, used primarily in the medical industry. Manufacturers add it to
polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to make plastic equipment more
flexible. In PVC, DEHP extends the shelf life of red blood
cells, so you’ll find it in IV tubing, catheters, blood bags,
nasogastric tubing and the like. Familiar with that “new
shower curtain smell”? That’s the aroma of offgassing
DEHP.
Groundbreaking research just published in PLoS One
and Reproductive Toxicology11 found that rats exposed to
phthalates produced offspring with higher rates of kidney
and prostate disease, and their great-grandchildren
showed greater obesity and diseases of the reproductive
organs. This is the first time environmentally induced inheritance of disease has been demonstrated scientifically.
The authors write12:
“This is the first study to show the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease, such as obesity."
Unfortunately, every single person may have measurable
phthalates in their bodies. In 2000, the CDC discovered
high levels of phthalates in all 289 adult Americans tested.
Dr. Busbee reports that every phthalate tested disrupts
gene expression. This disruption is not only harmful to the
person exposed, but the effects may be passed on to future
generations, as the latest scientific study reveals.
Are Bioplastics the Pollution Solution?
Numerous companies have jumped onto the plantplastics bandwagon in fervent efforts to come up with the
perfect bioplastic material. As of 2010, more than 2.5 billion plant-plastic bottles were already in use around the
world, including the PlantBottle by Coca-Cola Co.13 Despite all of the buzz, plant-based bottles are largely nonbiodegradable, so they do nothing to relieve the garbage
problem.
But even when bioplastics are compostable and made
from “renewable resources,” they fail miserably when you
SECTION A ~ PAGE 23
SECTION A ~ PAGE 23
look at their carbon footprint. Plant-based plastics run into
the same problem as plant-based fuels — they have an
impact on food production, turning valuable farmland to
cornfields.14 There are concerns over the harmful effects of
the pesticides and genetically modified crop strains used to
create many of these bioplastics. And many require intensive chemical processing that is even dirtier than petroleum-derived plastics15.
So what is the answer?
The featured documentary, Addicted to Plastics, presents
several examples of truly eco-friendly solutions that take
all of the above factors into consideration — for example,
making biodegradable plastics from chicken feathers.16
But perhaps the most important thing is what you can do
TODAY to reduce your own plastic footprint.
What You Can Do Right Now
Discarded plastics are clogging up our oceans and threatening marine life from plankton on up. Massive islands of
plastic waste now occupy the centers of the five major oceanic gyres. Our “disposable culture” has left a trail of destruction, in terms of both environmental and human impact. Chemicals like BPA, BPS, and phthalates disrupt the
reproductive function and genetic expression of multiple
species — including humans — causing infertility and potentially disastrous health effects like metabolic dysfunction, organ damage, and cancer.
There is no single solution to the plastic waste problem.
But you can do your part by taking the following action
steps that reduce your plastic consumption, which will
benefit your health as well as the environment.
Reduce plastic use: Purchase products that are not made
from or packaged in plastic. Here are a few ideas... Use
reusable shopping bags for groceries. Bring your own mug
when indulging in a coffee drink — and skip the lid and
the straw. Bring drinking water from home in glass water
bottles, instead of buying bottled water. Store foods in the
freezer in glass mason jars as opposed to plastic bags.
Take your own leftover container to restaurants. Request
no plastic wrap on your newspaper and dry cleaning.
These are just a few ideas — I’m sure you can think of
more.
Recycle what you can: Take care to recycle and repurpose
products whenever possible. For example, here’s a video
demonstrating a simple way to turn your plastic shopping
bags into very strong rope.
Support legislation: Support legislative efforts to manage
waste in your community; take a leadership role with your
company, school, and neighborhood.
Be Innovative: If you have a great idea, share it! Your
capacity to come up with smarter designs and creative
ideas is limitless, and many heads are better than one.
Innovations move us toward a more sustainable world.
Assist Recovery: Return deposits on bottles and other
plastic products, and participate in “plastic drives” for local schools, where cash is paid by the pound.
Sources and References
1 Science
2 Life Less Plastic December 17, 2007
3 Clean Air Council
4 UNEP
5 5gyres
6 NOAA
7 National Geographic
8 MNN March 1, 2011
9 Time Health & Family January 22, 2013
10 Scientific American January 25, 2013
11 PLoS One January 24, 2013
12 BBC News January 25, 2013
13 Scientific American October 26, 2010
14 Smithsonian August 2006
15 University of Pittsburgh News October 21, 2010
16 Science Daily April 1, 2011
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/
archive/2013/02/09/plastic-dangers.aspx?
e_cid=20130209_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medi
um=email&utm_campaign=20130209
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from page 6
“I’ve always been looking for ways to help the
homeowner to be able to afford spray foam insulation
by looking for tax credits and rebates,” Smith said,
“and that’s how I found MACED.”
Experienced contractors like Smith appreciate
How$martKY because it offers third-party validation
of their work and the chance to spark word-of-mouth
interest. But for those contractors seeking more extensive training, How$martKY’s namesake program
in Kansas offers continuing education credits and a
set of standards for HVAC size. The Kentucky pilot
works with 17 contractors, but Kansas works with
hundreds—all of them now advocates for energy efficiency.
Green customers are happy customers?
When Barb and Steve Ritchie signed up with
How$mart to install a new furnace and insulation in
their house in Ewing, Ky., the bill came to nearly
$14,000.
It’s a daunting number. But a Kentucky Home Performance rebate helped, and their monthly bill is
lower than it was before.
The results were striking: In 2011, the Ritchies
used 28,406 kWh of energy. In 2012, that number
dropped to 14,651 kWh. Barb Ritchie estimates
they’re saving $400 a month now that they no longer
have gas delivered for heating—not to mention the
savings on their bill.
“I just feel like I was very blessed,” she said. “This
is the warmest and coolest our house has ever been.”
Ritchie’s reaction isn’t unique.
“Most of the time they’re not going to say, ‘I’m saving a lot of money,’” Blair explained. “They say, ‘I’m
actually comfortable in my house.’”
Customer satisfaction is a powerful incentive for
utilities to take on programs like How$mart, Blair
added. And Mike Volker, director of regulatory and
energy services at Midwest Energy, Inc., in Kansas,
has the numbers to prove it.
Midwest Energy took its inspiration for the original
How$mart program from Pay As You Save, a plan
developed by the Vermont-based Energy Efficiency
Institute. After making a few tweaks, How$mart
Kansas became the first utility in the world to implement the concept comprehensively, starting in 2007
with a four-county pilot.
Since then,
Midwest Energy
saw customer
satisfaction
among
How$mart participants soar to
97 percent.
Compare that to
the 85 percent
customersatisfaction rate
the company
observes overall, and you can
see why the program has ex-
panded to 41 counties covering most of western Kansas.
Scaling it up
In Kansas, the original How$mart program now
saves more than 1.9 million kWh of electricity and
234,000 therms of gas per year. Over 20 years, the
reduction could amount to nearly 50,000 tons of CO2.
Midwest Energy has invested $5 million in
How$mart, but the program has also disproved the
notion that green-friendly projects must be a financial drain.
In fact, How$mart consistently breaks even and
could do even better. Midwest Energy doesn’t turn a
profit on the program because its funding options are
designed to be accessible to a wider demographic,
including low-income households. But according to
Volker, it has the potential to be just as profitable as
regular utility service.
That profitability is possible in large part because
efficiency measures beat out renewables for costefficiency hands-down. A 2009 report from consulting
firm McKinsey & Company estimates the U.S. could
cut energy consumption 23 percent by 2020 by implementing efficiency measures alone. Another study
estimated that while wind power costs $38 per ton of
CO2 saved, replacing incandescent lights with LEDs
saves $159 per ton.
That means any utility, co-op or not, could find a
program like How$mart beneficial, Volker said.
Similar programs have already sprung up in Georgia and South Carolina. And when MACED launched
How$martKY, Volker was there to help.
“Doing energy efficiency is a lot less sexy, shall we
say, compared to putting in some shiny black photovoltaics or a wind turbine,” Volker says. “But very
few people would disagree with me when I say the
most cost-effective kilowatt hour is the one you never
use.”
MACED and three of its partner co-ops have applied for a tariff with the Kentucky Public Service
Commission to transform How$mart from a pilot to a
permanent program.
“We’re hoping to add four or five new co-ops this
year,” Blair said. “Our goal really is to see every electric provider in the state pick it up.”
For contractors like Jamie Blair and customers like
Barb Ritchie, environmental benefits are just an
added bonus. Better lives and livelihoods are the everyday results they see — and that might just be
enough to inspire grassroots efforts that help reign in
carbon emissions on a nationwide scale.
Erin L. McCoy wrote this article for YES! Magazine,
a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses
powerful ideas and practical actions. Erin worked as
a newspaper reporter and photographer in Kentucky
for almost two years. She is now a Seattle-based freelance writer specializing in education, environment,
cultural issues, and travel, informed by her time
teaching English in Malaysia and other travels. Contact her at elmccoy [at] gmail [dot] com or on Twitter
@ErinLMcCoy.
Source: http://www.yesmagazine.org/neweconomy/cheaper-than-solar-cuts-carbonemmissions-creates-jobs-kentucky
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~ January Property Transfers ~
Monday, February 11, 2013
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~ January Property Transfers ~
THE MOUNTAIN SENTINEL™
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Monday, February 11, 2013
SECTION A ~ PAGE 27
U. S. Congressional Voting
Courtesy of Katherine Hegemann
Rep. Phil Roe (http://roe.house.gov)
H.R.444 Require Presidential Leadership and No Deficit Act;
On Passage: H R 444 To require that, if the President’s fiscal
year 2014 budget does not achieve balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the President shall submit a supplemental
unified budget by April 1, 2013, which identifies a fiscal year in
which balance is achieved, and for other purposes;
Aye (with party); February 06, 2013
H.R.444 Require Presidential Leadership and No Deficit Act;
On Motion to Recommit with Instructions: H R 444 To require
that, if the President’s fiscal year 2014 budget does not achieve
balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the President
shall submit a supplemental unified budget by April 1, 2013,
which identifies a fiscal year in which balance is achieved, and
for other purposes;
Nay (with party); February 06, 2013
H.R.444 Require Presidential Leadership and No Deficit Act;
On Agreeing to the Amendment: Amendment 2 to H R 444;
Nay (with party); February 06, 2013
H.R.444 Require Presidential Leadership and No Deficit Act;
On Agreeing to the Amendment: Amendment 1 to H R 444;
Nay (with party); February 06, 2013
H.Res.48 Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 444) to
require that, if the President's fiscal year 2014 budget does not
achieve balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the
President shall submit a supplemental unified budget by April 1,
2013, which identifies a fiscal year in which balance is achieved,
and for other purposes. On Agreeing to the Resolution: H RES
48 Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 444) to require
that, if the President’s fiscal year 2014 budget does not achieve
balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the President
shall submit a supplemental unified budget by April 1, 2013,
which identifies a fiscal year in which balance is achieved;
Aye (with party); February 05, 2013
H.Res.48 Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 444) to
require that, if the President's fiscal year 2014 budget does not
achieve balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the
President shall submit a supplemental unified budget by April 1,
2013, which identifies a fiscal year in which balance is achieved,
and for other purposes. On Ordering the Previous Question: H
RES 48 Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 444) to require that, if the President’s fiscal year 2014 budget does not
achieve balance in a fiscal year covered by such budget, the
President shall submit a supplemental unified budget by April 1,
2013, which identifies a fiscal year in which balance is achieved;
Aye (with party); February 05, 2013
H.R.297 Children's Hospital GME Support Reauthorization
Act of 2013; On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass: H R 297
To amend the Public Health Service Act to reauthorize support
for graduate medical education programs in children’s hospitals;
Aye (with party); February 04, 2013
H.R.225 National Pediatric Research Network Act of 2013; On
Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass: H R 225 To amend title
IV of the Public Health Service Act to provide for a National
Pediatric Research Network, including with respect to pediatric
rare diseases or conditions;
2013
Sen. Lamar Alexander (http://www.alexander.senate.gov)
S.47 Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting Act of 2013;
On the Motion to Proceed S. 47;
04, 2013
Aye (with party); February
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On Passage of the Bill H.R. 325;
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table H.R. 325;
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 9 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Aye (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 8 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 7 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 6 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
Sen. Bob Corker (http://www.corker.senate.gov)
S.47 Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting Act of 2013;
On the Motion to Proceed S. 47;
04, 2013
Aye (with party); February
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On Passage of the Bill H.R. 325;
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table H.R. 325;
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 9 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Aye (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 8 to H.R. 325
Aye (with party); February 04,
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 7 to H.R. 325
"Of remoter ancestors I can only discover one who did
not live to a great age, and he died of a disease which is
now rare, namely, having his head cut off."
~ Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 1872-1970, Welsh
philosopher, historian & mathematician
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013
H.R.325 To ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013, and
for other purposes. On the Motion to Table S.Amdt. 6 to H.R. 325
(No short title on file);
Nay (with party); January 31, 2013