How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts Consultant

How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
& Planned Giving Terms You Should Know
May 6, 2010 | 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Katherine Swank, J.D., Consultant
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Your Presenter
Consultant,, Target
g Analytics™,
y
, a Blackbaud Company
p y
Law degree, Drake University School of Law
• Member, Arizona State Bar
20+ years as a d
development
l
t officer,
ffi
including
i l di
• National Director of Planned Gifts, $10 million annual revenue
• Lead manager, $20 Million Capital Campaign
• Internal fundraising consultant to 60+ national and chapter offices
• Over $215 million raised during career
10 years as adjunct faculty
faculty, Regis University
University, The College for Professional
Studies
• Masters in Global Nonprofit Leadership Program
• Wealth
W lth and
d Philanthropy;
Phil th
Fi
Financial
i lR
Resource D
Development
l
t
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #2
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Our Agenda
Motivations of Giving
g
Be a Teacher and a Student
Focus on Your Best Prospects
Si l M
Simple
Marketing
k ti Id
Ideas th
thatt Work
W k
Consider Your Legacy
Reach Out; Get Out
Ask for Planned Gifts
When You Need Help from Others
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #3
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Motivations of Giving
Which Statements Are True for You?
Friend, family member or colleague asked
In honor or memory of a person or pet
Cl th
Clothes,
personall ititems, ffurniture,
it
appliances
li
Urgent need in my community or the world
Routine gifts to church, school, public radio, etc.
Gifts to keep an organization around for future generations
Largest gift possible is through my estate plan
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #4
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Be a Teacher and a Student
You checked one or more boxes?
You’ve made a gift without regard to tax consequences!
65% of Americans cannot take federal tax deduction
• Only
O l people
l who
h ititemize
i gett the
th deduction
d d ti
Most people are just like you ☺
Tax consequences are not the first or even the second reason people make gifts
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #5
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Making the Case for Bequests
Many
y people
p p agree
g
that their largest
g
g
gift to charity
y would be through
g their estate
plan
Facts about Bequests
% of Planned Gifts are Bequests
% of population that has a will
% that have included a bequest to charity
% that say they will consider doing so
Average Bequest Gift
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #6
United States
Canada
90%
90% - 95%
40% - 50%
44%
7% - 8%
7%
10% -14%
27%
$35,000 - $70,000
$30,000
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Future Opportunities
When it comes to high net worth households, well over half say they have
already made a planned gift
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #7
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Considering Your Organization’s Legacy Program?
How many
y legacy
g y donors does it take to g
give $
$1,000,000?
,
,
• 15
• 15 x $70,000 = $1,050,000
A person a week,
k leaving
l
i you $70
$70,000
000 as a fifinall gift
ift b
becomes $7
$7,280,000
280 000 iin jjustt
two years
How many people did you talk to last year about
making a planned gift?
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #8
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Focus on Your Best Prospects
Segment
g
• Constituent modeling
• Organization or Industry specific
T
Target
t market
k t
• By gift type
Don’t blanket market multiple
vehicles
• Dilutes your message
• Co
Confuses
uses your
you audience
aud e ce
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #9
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Be Inclusive with Marketing
Individuals that have alreadyy notified yyou of a p
planned,, deferred or legacy
g yg
gift
Those who are deemed likely to make a planned gift to your organization
• Identified through an analytics project or other vendor-related scoring
D
Donors
off stocks,
t k securities
iti and
d mutual
t l ffund
d shares
h
no matter
tt the
th amountt off the
th
gift
All board and committee members; professional-level staff members and
employees
l
off 10 years or llonger
Volunteers
Donors who have made gifts at any level for 10 or more years or have given your
organization 25 or more gifts including recurring/monthly gifts
All donors who have made single-year gifts of $10,000 or more
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #10
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Start by Marketing Simple Gifts
Bequests
q
Easy to understand
Easy to talk about
P id simple
Provide
i l llanguage examples
l
Bequests account for 9 out of every 10 planned gifts made
• But as many as 80% of these may be unknown at present
• It not hard to get people to consider a gift in their will or trust
• It’s hard to get people to share that they have done so
• Consider the Best Marketing Practices in this presentation
• Make time to reach out personally to a planned giving prospect
every week
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #11
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Start by Marketing Simple Gifts
Charitable Gift Annuities
5%-6% of all planned gifts
Range from $5,000 to over $1,000,000
B t annuity
Best
it prospectt
• Existing annuitants
• They know the organization
• They know you
• They are comfortable with the process and your stewardship
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #12
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Start by Marketing Simple Gifts
85% of respondents
p
to a national survey
y said that they
y found out about charitable
gift annuities through one of several informational channels initiated by the
organization including:
• written materials,
• a visit with a representative, and
• financial seminars
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #13
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Start by Marketing Simple Gifts
Other Gift Vehicles
• Including charitable trusts
Fewer than 2% of the general public
Hi hl ttechnical
Highly
h i l gifts
ift very diffi
difficult
lt tto market
k t
• Most high net worth households that have made CRTs learned about the
vehicle from their financial advisor
• Fewer and fewer prospects are seeking information from charities on this gift
type
Market only to highly qualified prospects
• Don’t be surprised if they don’t come to you for advice or education
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #14
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Goal of Planned Giving Mass Marketing
The #1 g
goal of planned
p
gift
g marketing
g is to get
g a face-to-face appointment
pp
with an interested prospect
Planned gift marketing is a small part of your overall planned giving program and
should be conducted in conjunction with personal visits to top prospects
Successful planned giving programs are active and build relationships with top
prospects
• Passive marketing produces passive results
Combine your Annual Giving and Planned Giving cultivation, solicitation and
stewardship efforts to achieve the best results
R l on marketing
Rely
k ti as your second
db
bestt method
th d off obtaining
bt i i planned
l
d gift
ift prospectt
leads
• The best method of gaining qualified leads is through personal discussions
with
i h prospects
• Referrals from other development officers are also very effective
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #15
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Contact Conversion Rates
Face-to-face visits are byy far the most effective wayy to close planned
p
g
gifts
Activity
y
% of Contacts to
Gift
Gifts
Personal visits (face to face)
30%
Personal Telephone
p
Conversations
20%
Mail/Phone contact by a vendor service
Mass Mail Marketing (newsletters, postcards, etc.)
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #16
5% - 10%
<1%
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Marketing Ideas that Work
Create a marketing
gp
plan that works for y
your organization
g
• Do not rely on what others do
• Find your best combinations of marketing activities that produce results
Targeted Marketing
• Market simple planned gifts to the right prospects
• Simple message
• Single subject brochures
• Eliminate technical language
For all marketing pieces
• Sell big, write small
• Use few words to market a big concept
• In
I marketing
k ti materials,
t i l it iis th
the giving
i i concept,
t and
d nott itits ttechnical
h i l
operation, that will promote interest
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #17
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Marketing: Start by Learning
You Are Your Own Example
p
Get on other organization’s marketing lists
Watch your own reaction to their cultivation and solicitation
D t
Determine
i why
h you reacted
t d th
the way you did
• What did you like about the action?
• What didn’t you like?
If you felt motivation to respond, determine the element of the piece that moved
you
Determine
ete
e how
o ca
can you use tthis
s lesson
esso when
e ta
talking
g to p
prospects
ospects
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #18
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Donor Stories and Their Motivation
Are the most effective marketing
g
tactic for planned gifts
Focus on your message
Tell stories,
stories capture hearts
It is about why the legacy was
made, not the amount of the gift
C ti iinterest
Creating
t
t and
d appeall
• Make it personal
More examples can be found at
www.leavealegacy.org
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #19
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Effective Visual Components
Use visual aids that p
promote yyour mission
Evoke emotion or memories
Show how the gift will provide impact
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #20
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Personal Letter
Dear Mr. Smith,
This is quite a difficult letter for me to write and I do
so with the hope that you will read it over carefully,
consider what I have to say and give me your honest
reaction to it.
it
First, let me introduce myself. I’m Jeff Liba, Director
of Individual Giving for Grant MacEwan College. In
my position here, it is part of my responsibility to
help
p MacEwan ensure the every
y student in Alberta
that desires an advanced education to fulfill his or her
potential receives one. To do this we are reliant not
only current giving but also on future income from
legacies. I can only do this by directly asking existing
supporters if they intend to leave money to MacEwan
in their will or estate planning. That is the reason why
I am writing to you. . . . .
Make it Personal
Write a letter to one person
• Use your own experience
• Use a donor’s experience
• Ask a surviving family
member
• Ask a recipient of services
for quotes
Ask for a response
• Provide the reply device
. . . . And that is why I have to ask you this important
question – one that I hope you don’t mind me asking.
Can you consider leaving a bequest to Grant
MacEwan College in your will?
You see,, y
your support
pp may
y make the difference in
helping students like Angela. The need will never go
away. We know that no matter how prosperous . . . .
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #21
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Give the Donor a Reason to Notify
• Most donors don’t even realize that their intended beneficiaries would like to be
informed, or why it is important to tell
“If you have made an estate provision for the Gardens, or a
planned or deferred gift,
gift please let us know so we can
welcome you into the Perennial Friends Society and make
sure your gift intentions are properly carried out.”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #22
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Donor Contact Goals
Amount of Time Devoted to
PG Activities
25% or Less
25% - 50%
50% or More
A ti it
Activity
# Average
g Monthly
y
Appointments*
Personal visits
1-5
Contact at Events
1-5
Telephone Conversations
6-10
Personal Letters
6-10
Electronic Mail Contacts
6-10
Personal visits
6-10
Contact at Events
1-5
Telephone Conversations
11-15
Personal Letters
11-15
Electronic Mail Contacts
6-10
Personal visits
6-10
Contact at Events
5-15
Telephone Conversations
16-20
Personal Letters
11-15
Electronic Mail Contacts
6-10
* National survey results
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #23
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Know How to Reach Your Goals
If yyou have a goal
g
of closing
g 20 g
gift annuities or g
getting
g 20 confirmed bequest
q
intentions/trust beneficiary designations in a year through personal contact
• You will need to meet with a minimum of 60 prospects per year
• 5 per month x 12 months
If your conversion rate from phone contact to appointment is 4:1 you will need to
talk to 240 people a year to get those 60 appointments
If your conversion
i rate
t ffrom callll attempts
tt
t tto completed
l t d calls
ll iis 5
5:1
1 you will
ill need
d
to attempt 1,200 calls per year to reach 240 people
• 23 calls per week or 5 calls per day
Set aside a minimum of 1 hour per day to make prospect/donor calls
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #24
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #25
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Make Your Planned Gift Commitment
When y
you make yyour own legacy
g yg
gift yyou become:
• An expert on the topic
• An advocate for the gift vehicle, not a solicitor
• A lik
like-minded
i d d ffriend
i d tto others
th
who
h also
l make
k and
d consider
id planned
l
d gifts
ift
• A living example
• A resource
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #26
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Make Your Planned Gift Commitment
Planned g
gifts that yyou can make with little or no cost
• Bequest or codicil – when making or updating your will add your charitable
gifts
• Beneficiary designation for
• Retirement account
• Life insurance – dollar amount or percentage
• Pay on death – bank accounts for instance
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #27
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
Think of this as dating!
g
You make the first move
Ask for a personal visit
Create “natural”
natural opportunities to
contact
• Recent gift
• Event attendance
• Loyalty benchmarks
• Reply cards to PG marketing
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #28
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
I m calling to thank you…
you ”
“I’m
“We’re
We re reaching out….
out ”
Your opinion – your
“Your
thoughts – your input…”
“We met at the …….”
“The President suggested I
call y
you…”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #29
“Would you be available to
meet with me for lunch
next week?”
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
“I’m new to the organization . . . hope to meet as many loyal
d
donors
as iis possible
ibl iin the
h next ffew weeks.
k . . Th
The president
id
has suggested that you would be a very important person for
me to meet.
meet . . I’m
I m hopeful that you might have 30 minutes in
the next two weeks to meet me for breakfast, lunch, or another
convenient time.”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #30
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
Be p
prepared
p
to overcome the most common objections
j
• Can’t give you a gift right now
“I am not coming to ask you for a gift. I would like to
introduce myself
y
and learn about yyour association with us
and update you. . . I don’t feel it would be proper to ask
you for anything at this visit.
I can assure you that I will keep my promise and not ask
for nor accept any gift at this time.”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #31
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
Be p
prepared
p
to overcome the most common objections
j
• Can’t meet with you now
“II understand that you
you’re
re busy and I appreciate your
honesty . . . We’re taking time to talk to as many people
as possible . . . Would you be able to schedule lunch or a
quick meeting at the end of the month?”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #32
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Reach Out; Get Out
First date
• Usually informal
• Meet at a neutral setting like a restaurant or a café
• Unless
U l
you h
have a greatt ffacility!
ilit !
Objective
• Learn why the prospect is involved
• Explore his/her interest in programmatic areas
• Explore his/her interest in the community
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #33
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Listen More Than You Speak
Use a series of open-ended
p
questions
q
• What first brought your attention to our organization?
• What have been your past experiences with our organization?
• Are you receiving any of our publications? Did you see the last issue? What
article or story was most interesting or most hopeful to you?
• What do you think we do best?
• Is there any area of the organization where you could see yourself becoming
more involved?
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #34
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Talk about Giving Decisions
Find out why
y this p
prospect
p
is involved in g
giving
g
• How did you come to include our organization in your charitable giving?
• Are there other organizations that are important to you as well?
• What is the single most important reason you continue to contribute to us?
Ask general questions about planned giving
• We’ve found many of our supporters are also choosing to make charitable
gifts in their estate plan – have you ever thought about including a charity in
your estate plan?
If the prospect says “Yes”
• Have you ever thought of including our organization in your estate plan?
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #35
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Keep the Relationship Going
Take the opportunity
pp
y to set a second meeting
g
• Most people like to tell you what they think
• Most people want to get further involved
insider
• Most people want to know more and feel like an “insider”
Create events and seize opportunities to allow your prospects these things
Have a calendar of things/events to offer
• Keep it small and personal
• You are looking for a second meeting not a short “meet and greet”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #36
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Other Meetings
Be creative and appropriate
pp p
• Back at the café
• Tour
• Meet
M t with
ith an expertt
• See something in action
If others are involved, meet alone before you part
• Go to the cafeteria
• Sit in the atrium
• Walk in the garden and find a nice place to sit
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #37
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Asking for Planned Gifts
Prepare for the ask; be confident and review your steps
Targeted likely prospects with information about specific gift types
Your prospect has responded favorably to the information
You know mission components most interest him or her
You have told the story of your own planned gift
You have shared information about the levels of funding that are needed to
supportt his
hi or h
her areas off iinterest
t
t
Where appropriate, involved leadership and key players
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #38
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
When it’s Time to Make the Ask
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #39
The most simple
p ask is to p
prospects
p
who yyou
expect to make gifts of less than $100,000
Can be informal or formal
• “As
As you plan for the future
future, would you
consider making a legacy gift to us? A gift
of $70,000 or higher will make the impact
you are interested in. We would expect a
gift of that size to affect the lives of
thousands.”
• “In
In addition to your ongoing annual
support, would you join me as a Legacy
Society member? Our average bequest gift
is usually between $15,000 and $30,000.
Are you in a position to consider a gift of
that amount?”
• “If
If it would be helpful, I can provide you
with sample gift language for your
review and consideration.”
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
When it’s Time to Make the Ask
Larger
g p
planned g
gift asks are often formal
Use a proposal that provides additional information:
• Case statement on planned gifts
• Formal ask letter and ask amount
• Representative donor legacy story or description of
the expected impact of the future gift
• Short list of the gift restriction language that you
prefer, including your desire for unrestricted gifts
• “In
In addition to your ongoing annual support,
support II’d
d like to ask you
consider joining me as a Legacy Society member. Your desire to see
a steady increase in our services can be met with a legacy gift at the
$200,000 level or higher. I’ve
I ve gathered some information that I think
you will find useful and I ask you to read and consider our proposal.”
• “If you don’t mind, I’ll follow up with you at the end of the week. If
you have any additional questions or would like more information
before then please contact me.”
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #40
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
You Already Know 95% of What there Is to Know
Usually
y sample
p bequest
q
language
g g or simple
p instructions are all that is needed
• Include a disclaimer that information is educational; should consult advisor of their own
choosing
Most gifts are bequests in a will or trust
• Most planned gifts are gifts of cash
Nearly seven out of ten bequests is a residuary provision
• Two
T
off the
th remaining
i i th
three are a specific
ifi gift
ift
• That leaves one in ten that will be a percentage gift or a contingent gift or
something else
Gift annuities are contractual and standard
• Most gift annuities are funded with cash
• Others are funded with stock
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #41
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
A SIMPLE Glossary of Planned Giving Terms
Charitable Bequest
q
• A provision in a will, trust or estate plan that allocates a gift to a designated charity
• Specific amount (i.e. $10,000)
• Percentage amount (i.e. 25% of my estate)
• Remainder amount/Residual amount (i.e., after other bequests have been paid……. The
remainder to X charity)
• Contingent bequest (i.e. gift is made as an alternate provision to a superseding directive)
Ch it bl Gift A
Charitable
Annuity
it (CGA)
• Irrevocable transfer of cash/property in exchange for a contract to pay the
donor/designee for life or a number of years; partial gift/partial income
Pl
Planned
d Gift (Pl
(Planned
d Giving)
Gi i )
• Once called deferred giving. Any charitable gift that requires more thought and
planning to execute than the average donation
B
Bequest
t IIntention/Planned
t ti /Pl
d Gift Intention
I t ti
• Donor’s non-binding indication of an intent to leave a future gift
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #42
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
A SIMPLE Glossary of Planned Giving Terms
Bequest
q
Notification/Planned Gift Notification
• Estate representative’s official notice that a bequest or other estate gift has come to
realization
Bequest Expectancy/Planned Gift Expectancy
• Used within a planned giving program to unofficially report the potential value of a gift
to be received in the future
Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT)
• Irrevocable trust that pays a specific annual amount to one/more person(s) for a fixed
period (often the life of the donor(s))
• Annuity Trust (CRAT)provides a fixed payment as determined by the trust document
• Unitrust (CRUT) provides a variable payment usually recalculate annually based on the value
of the trust
Charitable Lead Trust (CLT)
• Similar to a CRT except current payments are made to the charity and the principle
reverts to the donor/designee
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #43
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
A SIMPLE Glossary of Planned Giving Terms
Capital
p
Gains
• Investments held for longer than a year then sold or gifted are subject to taxation on
the gain of value
• Investments that have lost value have a capital loss
Split Interest Gift
• Usually property or business interest; idea is to gift a portion/keep a portion
Life-Income
Life
Income Gift
• Generic term for a variety of gifts that provide an income, usually for life, to a donor/
designee.
CGAs,
s, CRTs
C s and
a dC
CLTs
sa
are
ea
all life-income
e co e g
gifts
ts
• CG
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #44
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Getting Help From Others
Look to y
your Board for expertise
p
• Development committee
Network at this meeting ☺
A k for
Ask
f referrals
f
l off local
l
l advisors
d i
Find a mentor
Read articles and books on planned giving vehicles
• Marketing and Qualifying Leads
• Getting face-to-face with prospects
• Simple planned gift topics
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #45
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Summary
Decide which p
planned g
gift vehicle(s)
( ) are right
g for yyou
Focus your efforts
Make marketing simple
M k your own planned
Make
l
d gift
ift commitment
it
t
Plan success by making outreach your #1 responsibility
Get out and date!
Open-ended questions – enjoy your time with people
Ask for the commitment
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #46
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
A Few References
Starting
g and Enhancing
g a Planned Giving
g Program
g
• Example Blackbaud White Papers:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Are Your Ready to Start a Planned Giving Program?
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
23 Planned Giving Terms you Should Know
How the Right Marketing Strategies Can Enhance Your Planned Giving Program
Why You Need Gift Acceptance Policies
http://www.blackbaud.com/resources/white-papers.aspx
• Written resources: Partnership for Philanthropic Planning
• http://www.pppnet.org/
htt //
t
/
• Courses: The Fundraising School at The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana
University
• http://www.philanthropy.iupui.edu/TheFundRaisingSchool/CourseDescriptions/pla
nnedgiving.aspx
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #47
© 2010 Blackbaud
How to Talk with Donors about Planned Gifts
Questions
Contact me:
Katherine Swank, J.D., Consultant
Based in Denver
Denver, Colorado
_______________________________________________________
Target Analytics, a Blackbaud Company
2000 Daniel Island Drive
Charleston, SC 29492
Phone 843.216.6200, ext. 3926 | Fax 843.216.6100
[email protected]
katherine
[email protected] com
www.blackbaud.com/targetanalytics
www.twitter.com/katherineswank
Katherine Swank, J.D. | Page #48
© 2010 Blackbaud