GLOBE T C H

GLOBE
Wednesday, February 13, 2013
The
he GLOBE
The Independent Voice Tof
Salt Lake Community College
A3
FREE
Wednesday
JUNE19, 2013
Issue 2 / sUMMER'13
Visit us online at globeslcc.com
C H A L K I N G IT U P
FO R CHAR IT Y
Photo by Jimmie Breedlove
Trent (left) and Melody Tripp work on a chalk drawing for Utah Foster Care.
Metal sculpting teacher shows
how to do what you love
Rick Prazen teaches the Basic
Metal Sculpting classes at
SLCC and is also a renowned
artist.
Redwood Campus with morning
and evening classes during summer
and fall semester. The metalsculpting class that Prazen teaches
differs from regular industrial
metal welding by focusing on
Aldo Gomez,
building art using metal.
Keith Chalmers
“Whatever [students] love or are
Staff Writers
passionate about is what I want to
Rick Prazen is the instructor see them bring out,” said Prazen
for the metal-sculpting class at when asked about what students
Salt Lake Community College.
Not only is he a teacher, Prazen is
also an accomplished artist with
his works decorating the Salt Lake
Valley.
“I always had an interest for art,”
Rick Prazen
said welding instructor Prazen. “I
(center) shows
found that a lot of the technique
his students
that I learned in the structural end
how to add
of the business became useable in
color to metal
art.”
using welding
Prazen teaches the Basic Metal
techniques.
Sculpting class at the Taylorsville
create in the metal-sculpting class.
Students in Prazen’s class start
out by building a simple cube in
order to learn the basics of welding
and planning. Towards the end
of the semester, students weld a
rose and a final project. Students’
final projects have ranged from
elaborate scenes to family crests
SCULPTING see page A2
Photo by Keith Chalmers
Rachael Folland
Staff Writer
Artists of all ages and artistic
backgrounds gathered together to
chalk and support a good cause.
The 11th Annual Chalk Arts
Festival took place on Saturday,
June 15 at The Gateway, where
spectators could come enjoy a
stroll through the chalk art gallery.
Over 20,000 were in attendance to
not only admire chalk drawings but
also to support Utah Foster Care.
This year’s theme for artists
was “Best in the West.” From Toy
Story to Looney Tunes to cowboys,
the festival showed a variety of
interpretations of what the West
means to each artist.
“The best part of art is being
able to have an idea in your head
and being able to physically portray
it,” said artist Melody Tripp.
Tripp and her husband, Trent,
spent hours drawing a depiction
from a photo of their son in Zion.
The contest began on Friday, when
many of the artists started working
on their chalk art pictures. Some
estimated they spent 16 hours or
more drawing.
Sponsors, donors and volunteers
were in attendance to give to Utah
Foster Care that helps the lives of
over 2,600 foster children.
The festival was organized 11
years ago with the intent to raise
awareness in the community about
foster care.
“We were looking for an event
that would draw attention to our
cause, and we thought about
Writers on your mark
Writing for one and all The Wasatch Iron Pen
Writing Competition is a 24-hour writing contest
held annually at the Utah Arts Festival and is open to
all ages and levels of writing.
Rachael Folland
Staff Writer
The Wasatch Iron Pen Writing Competition can
provide writers with endless opportunities in the field
of the literary pen. The SLCC Community Writing
Center will host the competition at the Utah Arts Festival
beginning on Friday, June 20, 2013.
The 24-hour contest is open to all ages and levels of
writing in the categories of fiction, non-fiction or poetry.
For those who want to take the Ultra Iron Pen Challenge,
they can take on all three categories.
“I find that this is a great jump start for writers to get
their foot in the door. If something wins a prize like this
– to put it on a resume when you’re seeking publication –
is really helpful,” said SLCC Community Writing Center
Director Andrea Malouf.
Writers have the opportunity to share their voices and
be creative through their pieces. The writers will be given
a visual prompt at 6 p.m. on Friday, and then have the next
24 hours to come up with a piece relating to that prompt.
WRITERS see page A2
CHALKING see page A3
Opinion
Student Loan
Interest Rates
Rising
pg. 5
Stephen Romney
Responds to ‘Sex,
Lies and Scouting’
pg. 5
Movies
“Man of Steel”
Review
pg. 4
Community
Moab Brewery
pg. 3
Festival draws out students for celebration of the arts SLCC students enter 48 Hour Films
Aaron Clark
Staff Writer
On Thursday, June 20, the
2013 Utah Arts Festival (UAF)
will kick off the summer season
in spectacular style with four
straight days of live music and a
showcase of the myriad talented
artists that Utah has to offer.
For Salt Lake Community
College students, the UAF
provides an opportunity to enjoy
the first big party of summer in
the company of energetic local
bands and a chance to experience
the beautiful genius of local
artists in living color.
“The festival has been a
jumping-off point for local
bands starting their first national
tours. The local music is the
biggest attraction for college
students,” said Teri Mumm,
marketing manager for the UAF.
“The biggest night for music is
Thursday which attracts many
young people because it’s the
first real outdoor party of the
summer.”
Thursday marks not only
the opening of the festival, but
the arrival of some of the most
exciting new bands in Utah.
FESTIVAL see page A3
Students from SLCC entered into the
Salt Lake 48 Hour Film Project by
writing, directing, starring in and
filming a movie in just 48 hours from
start to finish.
Djinni Yancey
Staff Writer
On Wednesday, June 12, 2013, winners
of the 2013 Salt Lake 48 Hour Film Project
were announced. Premiere screenings
were presented on Wednesday, June 5 and
Thursday, June 6, 2013, at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m. at the Broadway Centre Cinema in
downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.
Participant Sara McFarland, SLCC
fashion student, compared it to running
a marathon with no training. Starting
on Friday May 31, 2013, in the evening
and turning in a finished production by
Sunday evening, each filmmaker was
assigned a genre and the same required
elements.
FILMS see page A3
The GLOBE
A2
1
STUDENT EVENTS
WED/19
THURS/20
11:00am-2:00pm
12:00pm-1:00pm
Dakaboom Comedy/Music
Duo
@ TRC
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
12:00pm-1:00pm
8:00pm-10:30pm
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
Movie Underneath the stars:
“G.I.Joe: Retaliation”
@TRC, West Lawn
* Free popcorn, pizza and
drinks!
Sat/22
FRI/21
12:00pm-1:00pm
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
6:30pm-7:30pm
Community Reading:
DiverseCity Writing Series
@ SLCC Community Writing
Center, 210E 240 S
MON/24
TUE/25
6:30pm
12:00pm-1:00pm
9:00am-1:00pm
Community Reading: Youth
Voices
@ SLCC Community Writing
Center, 210E 240 S
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
Recruiter Visit: The Art
Institute of Salt Lake City
@ SLCC South City Campus,
West Foyer
9:00am-11:00pm
6:30pm-8:30pm
9:00am-1:00pm
West Fest , SLCC Bruin
Parade Band
West Valley City
DiverseCity Writing SeriesGay Writes Group
@ SLCC Community Writing
Center, 210E/400S
Recruiter Visit: University of
Utah
@ SLCC South City Campus,
W138 Outside Advising Office
thurs/27
Fri/28
wed/26
1:00am-1:00pm
1:00am-1:00pm
12:00pm-1:00pm
Recruiter Visit: Westminster
College
@ SLCC South City Campus,
West Foyer
Recruiter Visit: Western
Governnors University
@ SLCC Jordan Campus,
HTC Foyer
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
12:00pm-1:00pm
12:00pm-1:00pm
8:00pm-11:00pm
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
Friday Night Flicks
@Reservoir Park
42S. University Street
sat/29
9:00am-10:00am
Taylorsville Dayzz, SLCC
Bruin Parade Band
@ SLCC TRC,
Mon/30
12:00pm-1:00pm
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
Wednesday, June 19th, 2013
sculpting
continued from A1
on a shield, all created with
welding techniques taught in
Prazen’s class.
“All my brothers were
in welding and in art,” said
Prazen, “and being around them
inspired me to start [welding]
too.”
Prazen is a third generation
blacksmith. He applied his
knowledge of welding to
give life to metal by creating
complicated textures and using
the heat to create colors.
Prazen’s art extends past
the
being a hobby having
writers
According to Malouf,
continued from A1 Center, we believe everyone
can write and that there’s no people of all different ages and
backgrounds can put a pen to
paper and develop something.
In past competitions, some
“I think what makes
There are various ways to
prompts included a Utah
someone produce good
interpret a piece of writing.
license plate, a graffiti wall,
an old newspaper photograph writing is curiosity, tenacity Judges at the competition will
and confidence.”
have different expectations of
and a salt shaker.
contestants’ pieces depending
- Andrea Malouf
Writers are judged based
on their skill levels.
on how they incorporate
“I think what makes
the prompt in their writings, such thing as a good or bad
creativity and quality of their writer. There is such a thing someone produce good writing
submissions.
as good or bad writing,” said is curiosity, tenacity and
confidence,” said Malouf.
“At the Community Writing Malouf.
Writers can register for the competition up until 6 p.m. on June 20. The cost is $12
in one genre or $30 dollars for all three. More information about the contest can
be found on the SLCC Community Writing Center website: www.slcc.edu/cwc.
tue/1
12:00pm-1:00pm
Lunch Bunch Concerts
@ The Gallivan Center,
239 South Main Street
* Free Admission
Submit student events to [email protected]
Visit www.uaf.org for Utah Arts Festival tickets
Visit www.globeslcc.com/calendar for more student events
the globe team
Edited by Will Shortz
ACROSS
1
Photographer
Jimmie Breedlove
James Nguyen
Layout Designer
Nadia Dolzhenko
Advisor
Julie Gay
[email protected]
edu
Advertising
Paul Kennard
[email protected]
chronicle.utah.edu
8
15
measurement
5
18
19
Thousands of fans
45
Golf standard
27
28
might do it
46
13-digit library
32
33
hurry
50
Day before
Who, What and
51
Civil War side:
I Don’t Know,
in Abbott and
Costello’s “Who’s
on First?” routine
19
Neither’s partner
20
Abnormal part
of Voldemort’s
visage
21
Concern of Freud
22
Layer of the earth
Sushi ingredient
57
55
Sealed, as a
60
staple
58
man!”
59
60
Napped
62
Grand Canyon
“Just ___!” (“Be
right there!”)
66
Hotel amenity
67
often near the
Alternative to a
forward pass
elevator
68
Cowboy seats
Make, as an
69
Pinto and
income
62
20
Crossword
title teen in a 2004
Abbr.
University of New
Mexico team
9
Wipes off
63
65
PUZZLE BY JOHN LIEB
41
See 5-Down
44
Undyed
47
South America’s
largest country
Cipher”
indie hit
8
Amateur detective
Clue in the
Capitol Hill V.I.P.:
64
56
59
With 41-Down,
7
create one
55
in 1967’s “The
A lifeguard’s
whistle might
54
me!”
Pig out
36
50
69
5
35
45
49
61
“You can’t make
14
41
44
58
6
Kapital”
48
53
locale
Marx’s “___
40
13
31
34
68
Thurman of “Pulp
Fiction”
30
67
4
12
26
66
“Don’t have ___,
11
25
43
52
10
21
39
47
9
20
29
38
46
53
Thanksgiving
24
42
51
57
23
37
Abbr.
driveway
No. 0514
8
17
22
Horse color
7
16
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info
6
15
43
49
28
4
Beirut’s land
Unwrap in a
26
3
X-ray units
17
18
2
42
Japanese art form
27
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to attend or cover every event or issue submitted. The Globe encourage emails/
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Pool
16
25
Phone: 801.957.4019
Fax: 801.957.4401
Email: [email protected]
www.globeslcc.com
41
1
films
and the core
Technology Building
Room 325-G
4600 South Redwood Road
Salt Lake City, Utah 84124
Olive ___
(Popeye’s gal)
and several Bond
between the crust
the globe office
39
Locales for
“Ocean’s Eleven”
Editor-in-Chief
Assistant Editor
Julie Hirschi
Shad
[email protected] Engkilterra
edu
Copy Editor
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Ellen
[email protected]
Drummonds
slcc.edu
Online Editor
Opinion Editor
Aldo Gomez
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slcc.edu
Reporters
Stephen Romney
Photography
Kachina Choate
[email protected]
Rachael Folland
slcc.edu
Aaron Clark
Djinni Yancey
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opportunity of forging eagles the Lagoon ride “The Spider”
for the USAF Thunderbirds, the and other commission pieces.
giant black widow featured in Prazen even held the original
copyrights to the wire deer that
are often seen during Christmas
time.
“You walk away with a
hobby that pays you rather than
costs you,” said Prazen.
Prazen helps to bring out a
student’s creative side, students
walk away with valuable
knowledge that is both artistic
and practical.
“I’ve told students that
‘yes, you can make a living at
this,’” said Prazen, “and if you
Photo Courtesy of Richard Prazen love doing it, why not do what
you love?”
A welded rose.
22
Roger Bannister,
notably
23
Amtrak high-
29
Christianity’s ___
Creed
51
Anatomical sacs
“Song Sung Blue”
52
Yemen’s capital
singer
54
Secret writings
56
Demolished
speed train
24
48
1983 Duran
10
Cut in half
Flounder, in
11
Ripen
31
Ginger ___
61
Antiquated
“Animal House”
12
Status-seeking
35
Ward (off)
62
Austrian peak
sort … or a solver
36
Destroy, as
63
Alternative to
30
Sun
32
Hawaiian garland
33
Suffix with neur-
34
Destruction
1
Middle: Abbr.
37
Talk show host
2
Yellowfin tuna
13
Last Greek letter
DeGeneres
3
Aug. follower
14
Boys, in Bogotá
Duran hit
of this puzzle,
DOWN
initially?
documents
38
40
Suffix with
.com
shepherd
64
Scottish denial
Virgo preceder
65
Franken and Gore
The Globe is an independent student newspaper published Wednesday during Fall and Spring Semester (excluding holidays) and Wednesday during Summer Semester. The Globe editors and staff are solely responsible
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The GLOBE
Wednesday, June 19th, 2013
A3
Community
chalking
continued from A1
holding a race, but everybody
does that,” said community
manager for Utah Foster Care
Deborah Lindner. “Somebody
had heard about street painting
in California, so I did some
research and found it was big out
there and so we brought it here.”
When the festival had its
first year, the organizers of the
foundation had to beg artists
to participate—and now they
have to turn people away,
says Lindner. In fact, artists
are specially invited to draw
at the festival, with some
coming from miles away.
One such artist is Holly
Bailey, who has been completing
works of art for 22 years. Since
the start of the festival, she has
won an award every year except
one. This year, she was invited
by KSL to be a guest artist and
not a contestant. She also raised
money in her community to
donate to the foundation.
“I do murals for a living,
so there are a lot of companies
I work for [who donated];
friends and family – any local
companies that had to do with
children [who] I thought might
be interested [in donating],”
says Bailey.
To donate or to be a volunteer for Utah Foster Care call
877-505-5437 or visit the website:
www.utahfostercare.org.
For a more in-depth review, be sure to check out the
online edition at www.GlobeSLCC.com and to view more
photos of the event.
festival
continued from A1
There will be performances
by King Niko and Royal Bliss
on the Ampitheater Stage
beginning at 8:30 p.m. as well
as The African Showboyz and
New Orleans fusion rockers,
The Iguanas.
The Bay Area vertical
dance troupe, BANDALOOP,
will make the first of twicedaily festival appearances
by entertaining crowds with
thrilling performances using
the curved facade of The
City Library as their stage.
Additionally,
Thursday’s
festivities will have an early
bird special of $6 admission
before 3 p.m. and $10
afterwards.
The festival provides
students with more than just a
chance to listen to live music
as this marks the first year that
the UAF will be partnering
with the Leonardo to give
students and patrons alike an
opportunity to explore the
museum.
“We
are
partnering
with the Leonardo to allow
entrance to the museum with
paid admission to the festival,”
said Mumm. “The Leonardo
Used with permission of the Utah Arts Festival;
photo by Nicole Morgenthau.
[email protected]
CLOCKWISE
from upper left:
Andy and
Sarah of Wink
Illustration
working in the
early stages
Holly Bailey
working on her
Lone Ranger
chalk drawing.
Chalk
drawing by Paige
Gardner and
Jenny Seely.
Halle
Schiefelbein
(at top) and
Mckenna Jensen
work on a chalk
drawing for Utah
Foster Care.
Photos by James Nguyen and Jimmie Breedlove
is an opportunity for students
to explore their artistic side
under the instruction of local
artists.”
Access to the Leonardo’s
new exhibit “101 Inventions
That Changed the World” will
only be $5 more with paid
festival admission. The exhibit
recognizes many of the turning
points in our history from the
use of stone tools to the era of
the Internet with an immersive
display that incorporates forty
high-definition
projectors,
multi-channel motion graphics
and cinema-quality sound.
The SLCC Community
Writing Center will have a
large presence at the festival
this year as they host the 11thAnnual Wasatch Iron Pen
Competition, a 24-hour writing
marathon where budding
writers face off against each
other in a battle of mental and
creative endurance.
“The
SLCC
Writing
Center is one of our bigger
collaborations this year at the
festival. They will be holding
workshops dedicated to helping
develop writing skills within
the community,” said Mumm.
films
continued from A1
“It’s
such
a
quick
turnaround,”
said
Brian
Higgins, city producer for
the 48 Hour Film Project in
Salt Lake City. “So Friday
night, you don’t have a film,
and Sunday night you do, and
Wednesday you are watching
it in the cinema.”
All filmmakers get a
chance to see their film make it
to the big screen before a large
audience and they could win
a city award: Movie Magic
Screenwriter Software 6, and
the grand prize of $5,000 at
The 48 Hour Film
Project will return to
Salt Lake City at the
end of spring in 2014
for another 48-hour
film competition.
More information is
available by visiting
the following website:
www.48hourfilm.com/
en/saltlakecity.
Visit globeslcc.com to
see the winners of the
48 Hour Film project.
the international level.
“I think it’s a wonderful
time to get people to get out
and make a film. You see a lot
of first-time filmmakers who
can just have the opportunity
to make something and
guarantee that they’re going
to see it on the screen,” said
Higgins. “A lot of times in
independent film, you go to
make something, and it’s going
to be five years before it even
sees the light of day, even if
it ever does get released, but
with this, you know you’re
guaranteed.”
Some challenges faced by
teams included a lead actor
breaking his ankle during
filming and a crew member
with heat stroke.
One film in particular stood
out for the amount of locations
in one film. Transjumbled, a
science-fiction film by Zobec,
used 15 locations.
“We (8-bit film’s Dungeons
and Spies) filmed at Dragon’s
Keep in Provo. Jonathan had
actually filmed there for his
24-hour project and so it was
really good because he knew
the people, and they were really
great. Actually, we got ten
more extras from the Dragon’s
Keep,” said Juliet DeVette,
SLCC film student. “We just
kept going through the night –
Friday and Saturday night.”
Photo by James Nguyen
Mustafa Oudah from 8-bit films “Dungeons and Spies.”
From the Farmers Market to the table Local Brewery Review: Moab Brewery
Local goods are fresh and
help the economy. The
Downtown Famers Market
has been meeting this need
for 21 years.
Kachina Choate
Staff Writer
The Downtown Salt Lake
City Farmers Market has
grown from humble roots to fill
Pioneer Park every Saturday
morning during the summer
and fall. No matter if a person
wants to buy or sell the farmers
market is a way to test out new
products and be entertained
while you shop.
“Our goal is to put on
a community event for the
community to help these
vendors
help
the
local
population of Salt Lake City,”
said
Downtown
Alliance
communications director Nick
Como.
Twenty-one years ago, Bob
Farrington, former director of
the Downtown Alliance, was
looking for a way to improve
the area around Pioneer Park.
He decided that he wanted a
farmers market.
He drove up and down I-89
stopping at every farm stand he
saw asking if they would come
to Salt Lake City and set up shop
on Saturday mornings in a park
in a troubled neighborhood.
Many people thought that
Farrington was crazy to even
try.
“It probably took a little
crazy to get something like this
going, and here we are twenty
years later. It’s grown and
grown,” said Como. “We were
in half the park, now the whole
park, and we have everything
from art and craft vendors to
prepared foods to packaged
foods, like breads and hummus,
and of course fruits and
vegetables which is how we all
started and is the nucleus of the
farmers market.”
Not only is the farmers
market a great place to shop—
it is an experience. Nestled
between vendors are buskers or
street performers. At 11:30 a.m.
on the music stage, people are
treated to popular local bands.
“For me, it’s not going
there (the farmers market)
for the food or prices. It’s just
something to do to get out of the
house,” said SLCC instructor
Andrew Wilson. “It’s more like
an activity than actually trying
to get bargains on food.”
The farmers market has
helped entrepreneurs including
Rico who started out selling
beans at the market and now
owns a restaurant and factory.
“This is a place where you
can test out our product to
10,000 people all at once, and
it’s like a big test kitchen,” said
Como.
With demand for local
goods so high, the Downtown
Alliance tested out the winter
markets this past year.
“We are hoping to do a year
round public market that’s in
a location every day or once
a week or something like that
throughout the winter months,”
said Como.
The Moab Brewery has been
brewing ales and quenching
tourist’s thirst for 17 years,
but Salt Lake Community
College students don’t need
to venture all the way to
the home of Utah’s famous
arches to get a taste of Moab.
Clinton Baker
Contributing Writer
Moab
Brewery
rates
3/5
The Moab Brewery specializes
in brewing ales and is inspired
by the unique environment of
the Moab area. Moab Brewery
creates refreshing hand crafted
ales which pack powerful flavor.
The brewery offers many
noteworthy beers, from hop-filled
IPAs to malty amber ales that
taste even better in the middle of
the Utah desert.
While Moab is home and
birthplace of these unique ales,
the brews can be found in places
throughout Salt Lake City. Moab
Brewery offers three of their top
selling beers in cans available in
supermarkets and gas stations.
Moab Brewery’s most popular
beer is their Dead Horse Amber
Ale. This amber ale gets its
name from a scenic overlook in
Canyonlands National Park.
It packs a strong flavor of
malt that overpowers the less
noticeable hints of hops. The beer
has a medium-light, sweet, crisp
feel, which is very refreshing.
Dead Horse Amber Ale is a beer
that provides plenty of flavors, yet
its most noteworthy attribute is
the drinkability.
Ale
purists
might
be
disappointed by the thinner feel
of this particular brew, but thanks
to the low alcohol content and the
amber color, Dead Horse Amber
Ale is great for summer sessions,
especially in the scorching desert
of Moab.
One of the newer beers
produced out of Moab’s hot desert
is Johnny’s American IPA. It
is a unique and flavorful beer
that satisfies beer-enthusiasts’
demands for a hoppy brew.
While delivering on the
expected dominant flavor and
aroma of hops, this India pale ale
has an unusually low percentage
of alcohol. Coming in at 4%
ABV, making a flavorful IPA to
meet Utah’s state liquor laws was
a tall order, but Moab Brewery
delivered.
With an overpowering taste of
hops and subtle hint of fruit, this
beer is suited for seasoned beer
drinkers with a love for hops and
might be slightly overwhelming
for those new to craft beers.
Despite the strong flavor of
hops, the lower amount of alcohol
makes this beer more drinkable
than some IPAs and would be a
good beer to try for a first IPA.
One of the most distinguished
aspects of this beer is its
appearance in a glass. It has
a medium to high amount of
carbonation and a golden orange
color and, once poured, produces
a foamy head that hangs above the
glass for a considerable amount of
time.
Johnny’s American IPA looks
great and delivers on taste. While
a beer with a low amount of alcohol
is usually considered a bad thing
in the world of microbreweries, it
could be argued that the 4% ABV
works in this particular beer’s
favor. The lower alcohol content
makes this beer fun to session and
allows the consumer to enjoy even
more of this great tasting IPA.
For students at Salt Lake
Community College who enjoy
a good ale, Dead Horse Amber
Ale is a worthy choice. For beer
drinkers who would like test
the waters of IPAs, or who are
looking for a good IPA to session
this summer, Johnny’s American
IPA is a fun beer that is easy to
find in Salt Lake.
Bottom line: The Moab
Brewery delivers on taste and has
a large variety of beers to suite all
styles of consumers. It is a unique
brewery that gives Utahans great
options for local ales that are ice
cold and on the shelves of gas
stations all summer long.
The GLOBE
A4
Wednesday, June 19th, 2013
Arts&Entertainment
‘Man of Steel’ proves that change can be good
Stephen Romney
Staff Writer
“It’s pretty good”
When I heard that the
director’s chair for Man of Steel
was given to Zack Snyder, a
filmmaker who can produce
decent adaptations of graphic
novels one moment and then
make a film about vapid-eyed
strippers who are actually
mental
patients
fighting
monsters in their delusional
minds the next, I braced
myself for a needlessly hardboiled reboot of an American
icon with slow-motion galore.
However, I found myself
pleasantly surprised that,
though different from its
predecessors, still feels like a
real Superman story. There are
deviations from the mythos,
but it still has all of the
necessary elements to make a
superhero movie compelling.
Henry Cavill stars as Clark
Kent, the last son of Krypton,
sent to Earth by his father JorEl, played by Russell Crowe,
as the Krypton planet meets its
end.
While struggling to form
his identity as a child of two
worlds, the arrival of General
Zod, played by Michael
Shannon, forces him to step up
as the defender of Earth he is
fated to be.
The movie is long at 153
minutes. The story also
spends a great deal of time
depicting the fate of Krypton.
It’s not a particularly boring
or drawn-out sequence, but
it’s sizable enough that I got
a little impatient. This isn’t
entirely helped by its not-so
chronological progression as
the film glances over Clark’s
childhood assuming that it’s
the same kind of information
we already know about.
The story really picks
up when Zod arrives on the
planet. This also allows for
the more intense action scenes
that, while mostly CGI, are
still easy to follow and don’t
linger too long. Zack Snyder
managed to keep his use of
slo-mo to a minimum.
Speaking of Zod, the
changes that were made
to the mythos were pretty
minimal, despite the panic of
the fan boys. Even though the
appearances and certain events
were different, at the heart of
the film, the characters are the
same ones fans know and love.
When it comes to the
acting, it’s pretty good. It took
a while for Henry Cavill’s
performance to grow on me,
but by the end of the film,
I was able to see him as
Superman. Michael Shannon’s
performance as Zod, however,
was a bit mixed. He was good
at being intimidating, but there
are points in the film where the
intensity is dialed down at an
Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers
While the costume was not well recieved in the publicity photo, it’s limited appearance in the film made
it bearable.
almost jarring pace. Although
the motivations are clear, they
could’ve conveyed the more
sympathetic aspects of Zod in
a smoother way.
There are times where
the score composed by Hans
Zimmer, the composer for
Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy,
comes on a little too strong
and heavy. Combine this with
the surround-sound of a movie
theater, and your head will
feel like a plate of Jell-O being
carried by a shivering waiter on
roller skates.
Overall, I enjoyed this film
as it was much better than I
expected. It’s a fresh take
on Superman that sidesteps
much of the information
we already know going in
while still making it easy for
those unfamiliar with the
character to get invested.
While it is long, it still
maintains a steady pace
once it gets past the backstory
showcased at the start of the
film. If you’re a fan of the
Nolan Batman films or are a
die-hard fan of the Superman
comics, then you’ll definitely
find enjoyment with this film.
On my personal scale, I give
Man of Steel a 4/5.
Kaleidoscope SLC provides
opportunities for beginning artists
Press
[Start]
to
Game:
Animal Crossing: New Leaf gives players new life
Kaleidoscope SLC helps local artists show off and sell their works to the public through
interactive means.
If people need to escape to a town full of animal people, consider Animal Crossing: New Leaf.
For Nintendo 3DS
Tim Kronenberg
Aldo Gomez
Contributing Writer
Starting a professional
career from the ground up is
one of the most challenging,
time
consuming
and
rewarding endeavors that a
person can do.
Now take an outlet such as
art or music, for example, and
times the sea of struggle by
two, because you’re definitely
not the only swimmer set
on making it in this
world.
“Our organization
gives getting artist
experience
and
recognition a friendly
face,” said University
of Utah student and
Kaleidoscope SLC’s founder
Bianca Velasquez. “Sweet
and simple.”
These are big words
coming from a group that was
birthed and hit the ground
running with their first artist
showcase/benefit concert at
Kilby Court in May.
With a turnout of 150
guests, eight up-and-coming
artists and local bands like
The North Valley, The
R.U.G.S. and The Spenser
for treatment through benefit
events and fundraisers such
as indigogo.com.
Velasquez said that the
amount of support artists
put into this will ultimately
determine if these events
happen monthly.
Kaleidoscope SLC is
also taking applications
for their rummage fest at
Liberty Park on August 2
and is encouraging that any
interested prospects come
take the dive and
Our goal is to make this the test the waters in
their first show.
best outlet for artists in the
“This inspires
Utah community.
people to create
and makes them
-Cisco Garcia
feel like they have
internet with other artists to a place to put their ideas that
show off and sell their works others can also buy, appreciate
to the world. They will also get and critique –there’s nothing
their own booth to showcase deeper than that,” said The
at events, the earliest on June Art Institute’s graphic design
28 at Coffee Break in the city. student and newest addition to
Velasquez notes that the Kaleidoscope SLC, Kenneth
Coffee Break showcase will Mailo.
Bands and/or creative
be another benefit show for
local musician Emme Packer. crayon scribblers in the Utah
Packer has been diagnosed area can visit Kaleidoscope
on
Facebook
or
with late-stage Lyme disease SLC
website
www.
and is currently fighting to their
take back control of her life Kaleidoscopeslc.squarespace.
by attempting to raise $10,000 com and apply.
and Roe Revue, showing that
the community has responded
favorably.
“Our goal is to make this
the best outlet for artists in the
Utah community,” said Cisco
Garcia, one of the non-profit’s
few volunteers.
For a little more than
double of a monthly Netflix
subscription, any person
young, old, student, inmate
or average Joe has a chance to
share their very own slice of
“
Staff Writer
Aldo
rates
3/5
Nintendo’s life simulator is
back in its fourth iteration and
boasts many new improvements,
but if the previous games didn’t
win you over, this one won’t
either.
The
Animal
Crossing
franchise revolves around the
player, a new citizen in town,
and the citizens of the town with
whatever name you decide to
give it.
The premise is that the player
has to help the town expand,
create friendships and essentially
live a second life in game. New
Leaf, the newest version of
the game, changes the formula
though not the game play.
New Leaf’s biggest change
is that when the player arrives
in town, s/he becomes the
mayor, rather than just a citizen.
Being mayor is harder than it
seems in the lazy little village
as you have to enact new laws
in the town and increase your
approval rating. While passing
laws isn’t obligatory, it does
help customize your personal
Photo courtesy of Nintendo
experience with game.
Laws that you can pass
include the ‘Night Owl’ law
which forces the citizens and
shops to be active at night,
or the ‘Keep Your Town
Beautiful’ law that prevents
weeds from growing.
Another change is increased
customizability as you can now
change the town and change the
avatar even more. Character
customization ranges from
simple shirt designs to eye
color and even pants. Want to
make the character look like
Bruce Lee from ‘Game of
Death’? Now it’s possible.
Customizing the town is
the real focus, since as mayor,
the player can add decorations
like water fountains and
bridges. These changes add to
the ‘Perfect Town Goal’ and
increase the game’s replayability.
Increased player connectivity
also adds value as you can visit
other players’ houses and even
visit friends’ towns. Apart from
just visiting the town, New Leaf
also adds multi-player minigames.
With an increased focus on
customization and multi-player,
this is the best Animal Crossing
to date. Fans who already play
are in for a treat, and this is
the best place for new people
interested in the series.
For a more in-depth
review, be sure to check out
the online edition at www.
GlobeSLCC.com.
The Weekly Reel: The Makings of a Cinematic Univer se
Stephen Romney
Staff Writer
Ever since the release of
Marvel’s The Avengers, many
individuals in Hollywood
want to create a cinematic
universe of their own. This is
not solely limited to Marvel’s
rival company DC; there are
rumors circulating of the
creation of a Tom Clancy
cinematic universe. Point
being, cinematic universes
have become a hot property.
By taking a look at Marvel’s
playbook, let’s figure out what
goes into making a successful
cinematic universe.
The first thing that is needed
is a series of interconnected
stories, either with adaptations
of known franchises or a
meticulously planned series
of original stories with
characters that audiences can
latch onto and follow. In the
case of Marvel and DC, no
like how comic companies
had editors-in-chief. Not
only do you want to avoid
conflicting events in your
universe, you also want to
make sure that the films in
that universe have a similar
feel to them so that it feels
explanation is needed.
like it’s a part of the brand
The second thing that’s you’re creating.
needed is someone to oversee
In the case of Marvel,
the creation of said films, much that person is Kevin Feige,
president of production at
Marvel Studios. In the case
of DC, the public hopes that
the responsibility will fall
to Christopher Nolan, even
though the filmmaker has
gone on record saying that
The Dark Knight Rises would
be his last superhero film; yet,
he stayed on as the producer
of Man of Steel.
REEL see page A6
The GLOBE
Wednesday, June 19th, 2013
Opinion
[email protected]cc.edu
Romney Responds:
Sex, Lies and Scouting
Stephen Romney
Staff Writer
With the recent change in
the policies of the Boy Scouts
of America (BSA) regarding
homosexual members, many
people on both sides cry
foul for varying reasons. As
commentator Shad Engkilterra
pointed out in the previous print
issue of The Globe, the BSA
change in policy appears to be
half-hearted.
However, there’s a layer
of politicking at work when it
comes to the decision the BSA
has made, a practice that has
been used throughout history by
our government.
As part of their code of ethics,
Boy Scouts are not allowed to
engage in sexual activity outside
of the institution of marriage, so
the worry that gay Boy Scouts
will turn other boys gay via
“fooling around” is thrown out
the window when you realize
that having sex before marriage,
even if you’re heterosexual,
will get you kicked out as it’s a
violation of the rules.
The next rationale people use
to argue for the full lifting of
the ban is that the Scoutmaster
Handbook explicitly states
that “no Scoutmaster should
undertake to teach Scouts, in
any formalized manner, about
sexual behavior.” As such,
the argument is that the BSA
is overstepping its bounds by
implementing such a ban.
Now the lifting of the ban on
homosexual scouts only applies
to scouts and not scout leaders.
The obvious question is why not
lift the ban on leaders as well,
since many of the incoming
scouts will eventually turn
18 and be considered adults.
Here’s where the strategy
comes into play.
Many of the organizations
that support the BSA are
religious, including the LDS
Church. As such, the BSA
doesn’t want to risk losing a
great deal of their monetary
support. Since much of their
support also comes from the
government, there’s the looming
pressure that if they don’t do
something, they will lose the
kickbacks they get from the
government as a non-profit
organization.
The BSA has essentially
solved part of the issue and
kicked the rest down the road.
This tactic was used in the past
with the Compromise of 1850
when the balance between the
slave states and the free states
A5
was at risk because the U.S.
acquired new territory from
France and Mexico.
The compromise introduced
the idea of popular sovereignty
where a state could decide
whether or not it was a slave
state by voting on the issue in a
state poll, but the complexity of
the bill only allowed it to apply
to the territories of Utah and
New Mexico, whereas the new
state of California was admitted
as a free state by default. The
compromise only prevented
secession and sectional conflicts
for a short time before the nation
broke out into civil war.
Looking at that same
scenario as applied to the BSA,
its change in policy is only a
temporary compromise, as it
makes it look like the BSA is
changing begrudgingly in an
attempt to keep the favors of the
various religious organizations
that support them.
On that same note, the idea
that the gay members of the
Scouts will eventually become
adults is merely the tool that
pushes the issue down the road
until the time comes that those
scouts will want to become
Scoutmasters, thus appearing
to “force” the BSA’s hand into
lifting the ban in its entirety.
Student loan rates to increase
If you and congress do nothing, your student loan interest rate will double this July.
Shad Engkilterra
Staff Writer
Interest rates on subsidized
Stafford loans are set to double
on July 1, 2013 if Congress
takes no action. Republicans
and Democrats have been
unable to come to a compromise
that does not put the financial
burden squarely on the future
of students.
While some groups have
mobilized to put pressure on
Congress to keep the interest rate
low, it is up to each individual
student to make his or her wishes
known to Congress and the
President of the United States.
MoveOn.org is organizing
a day of action on June 27
with students gathering on
campuses, in front of Fannie
Mae offices and in other areas
Senator Mike Lee can
be reached at 801-5245933. Senator Orrin
Hatch can be reached
at 801-524-4380.
President Obama can
be reached at
202-456-1111.
that have high visibility, and
has an online petition to lower
interest rates with almost
450,000 signatures.
They are arguing that
students should get the same
loan rate that the banks get
“through the Federal Reserve
discount window,” which is set
at about .75 percent. Senator
Elizabeth Warren has backed
the idea with the Bank on
Students Loan Fairness Act.
House Republicans have
proposed a bill that adds 2.5
percent to the base interest rate
on 10-year treasury notes.
This would result in a
percentage rate higher than the
current 3.4 percent and would
be capped at 8.5 percent.
Congressman Matheson has
already come out in support
of not raising rates. Other
representatives did not return
phone calls.
Students who want to keep
student interest rates from
doubling or worse should
contact their Congressmen
and Senators, as well as
President Obama.
TO VERIFY YOUR DISTRICT go to http://elections.utah.gov/map/district-maps
District 1 – Rob Bishop (801)625-0107
Northern Utah and Northeastern Utah including Park City, Kamas and all points north of Kaysville.
District 2 – Chris Stewart (801)364-5550
The majority of Western Utah, includes points north of South Salt Lake through Farmington,
Magna, Tooele – all the way south to St. George and Kanab. Surrounds District 4 on three sides.
District 3 – Jason Chaffetz (801)851-2500
Most of Eastern Utah; major cities include Price, Provo, Heber City, Orem, parts of Sandy East of
I15, Cottonwood Heights, Holladay
District 4 – Jim Matheson (801) 486-1236
Taylorsville, West Valley City, Murray, West Jordan, Herriman, Saratoga Springs, South of Nephi
Water you waiting for? Rehydrate!
diversions
Food columnist Nadhirrah shares some tips and explains the reasons for
staying hydrated this summer.
Nadhirrah
Staff Writer
ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE
C A S I
T H E W
R I P O
N
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I C E
L E I
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R A D S
I S
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S A D D
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E G O
D A S
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L O S S
E P T H
P A R
E V E
R R E D
A
Z O N A
E R A L
D G E S
The Earth is covered
with about 70 percent water.
Humans are made up of about
the same percent as Earth, so
it is no wonder why we need
to keep hydrated. According
to
thefreedictionary.com,
hydration is the process of
combining with water.
Summer is here, and in
Utah, it will be hot causing
people to become dehydrated.
There is one very simple way to
avoid this process: drink water.
Keeping
hydrated
is
important since we are mostly
water; it makes sense that the
body uses water to maintain its
system.
Water is the agent that makes
blood flow, which supplies
needed nutrients to cells and
removes waste; it is also the
means of controlling heart rate
and body temperature.
Without water the body will
stop working. Survival experts
say after three days water is
needed or the person will die.
Most people when they get
thirsty don’t reach for water.
Being thirsty is one of the signs
of dehydration. Other signs
include dry skin, headache and
constipation.
The big question is how
much water is necessary to
stay hydrated. The simple
rule that we hear all the time
is eight glasses a day. This is
the minimum. People need to
drink enough to replace what
has been expelled though
perspiration, breathing and
bodily waste.
The
Mayo
Clinic
recommends that men consume
about 3 liters and women 2.2
liters of water through drinking
and high water-content food
SIGNS OF DEHYDRATION:
• Dry, sticky mouth
• Sleepiness or tiredness
• Decreased urine output
• Few or no tears when crying
• Dry skin
• Headache
• Constipation
• Dizziness or lightheadedness
SIGNS OF SEVERE DEHYDRATION:
• Extreme thirst
• Extreme fussiness or sleepiness in infants and
children
• Irritability and confusion in adults
• Very dry mouth, skin and mucous membranes
like cucumbers, tomatoes,
lettuce and citrus fruit.
One of the quickest ways
to hydrate naturally is to
drink coconut water or eat
watermelon; both are healthy
alternatives to Gatorade. While
soda is liquid, it is combined
with sugar and caffeine, so
soda is not the best thing to use
to hydrate.
If a person is unable to keep
fluids down, more irritable,
sleepy or less active than usual,
has diarrhea, bloody stool, or
has other signs of dehydration,
it is time to seek medical
attention.
Dehydration,
especially in older individuals
and children, should be taken
seriously.
The simple key is to drink
water and eat lots of water
laden fruits and if all else fails
drink at least eight, eight-ounce
glasses of water a day.
• Lack of sweating
• Little or no urination
• Any urine that is produced will be dark yellow
or amber
• Sunken eyes
• Shriveled and dry skin that lacks elasticity and
doesn’t “bounce back” when pinched into a fold
• In infants, sunken fontanels
• Low blood pressure
• Rapid heartbeat
• Rapid breathing
• No tears when crying
• Fever
• In the most serious cases, delirium or
unconsciousness
Courtesy of mayoclinic.com
The GLOBE
A6
Opinion
[email protected]
Another Wacky
Wednesday: World
Sauntering Day
Contributing Writer
Take it easy. Walk slowly.
Drift, loiter, meander and
dilly-dally while taking a stroll
today, World Sauntering Day.
W. T. Rabe created this wacky
holiday during the 1970s at
the Grand Hotel on Mackinac
Island, Michigan as a campaign
against jogging.
According to a recent
informal survey, Salt Lake
Community College students
are not among those who
observe World Sauntering Day,
which is recognized every year
on June 19; yet, students claim
to be avid saunterers.
“I don’t plan to saunter; it just
happens,” wrote one student in
response to the survey.
Students are sauntering at
home, at work and at school.
They are sauntering alone,
with their dogs and with their
spouses. They are sauntering
in parks, in the mountains and
around town.
Although it seems sauntering
can take place anywhere
anytime, there are a few
reel
continued from A4
The third aspect that’s
necessary for the creation
of a cinematic universe is a
character who can start things
off, one who can carry a film
and lay solid groundwork for
expansion and continuation.
For Marvel, that character was
Iron Man, and for DC, they
first attempted this with Hal
Jordan (the Green Lantern) but
Use your melon -
st ay nutr itiously hydr ated
Nadhirrah
Staff Writer
June 19 is World Sauntering Day.
Jessica Bustamante
Wednesday, June 19th, 2013
supposed rules to sauntering.
“You
should
wear
comfortable clothing,” said
John Rabe, son of W. T. Rabe,
on National Public Radio. “You
don’t care where you’re going,
how you’re going or when you
get there.”
Cam Misrasi, a student at
SLCC, said that he saunters in
his “pink Jerusalem cruisers,
aka flip flops.” He claims that
sauntering is a prerequisite for
being a hippie.
According to the MerriamWebster Dictionary, to saunter
is “to walk about in an idle
or leisurely manner.” If this
sounds pointless to you, then
you might be interested to learn
about the benefits of sauntering.
Sauntering helps “people
with depression or anxiety.
Walking literally does increase
your mood. Makes you feel
better, mentally, physically,
emotionally,” said Tatiana
Burton, the health promotion
program manager for the Health
and Wellness Department at
SLCC.
If you didn’t make any
plans to saunter today, don’t
worry. There are plenty of
opportunities this month to
celebrate World Sauntering
Day.
You can saunter in Murray
Park during the Murray Arts
in the Park on June 20 and
then saunter to Library Square
to experience the Utah Arts
Festival, which is going on
from June 20 through June 23.
Every Saturday morning
until Oct. 19, you can saunter
through Pioneer Park and
absorb the Downtown Farmers
Market or saunter through
Liberty Park and check out the
free Chase Home Museum of
Folk Arts.
For higher altitudes, you can
saunter around the Plaza Deck
at Snowbird every Friday night
before watching free and family
friendly movies.
There
are
unlimited
possibilities
this
summer.
Whether or not you have work
or family or both, the only thing
holding you back is you. Get out
there and “smell the roses,” as
Rabe would say, “pay attention
to the world around you.”
Happy sauntering!
Nothing is better after a day
in the hot summer sun than a
nice cold slice of watermelon.
People have been enjoying
watermelon for at least 5,000
years.
There are ancient hieroglyphs
showing
watermelon
cultivation in Egypt.
Watermelons are native
to Africa where they
became a convenient
way to take water
across the deserts and
saved lives when other
water was contaminated.
They were so important
that King Tut was buried
with watermelon seeds.
Watermelon belongs to the
curcurbitaceae family – cousin
to cucumbers and pumpkins. It
is made up of 92 percent water.
Not only do they help rehydrate
but watermelons also provide
electrolytes. They have no fat or
cholesterol and contain vitamins
A and C and potassium.
Watermelons
have
an
anti-inflammatory
property.
They have a long tradition of
being used to treat sunburns,
hangovers and depression.
Lycopene found in red or pink
watermelon is thought to help
now hope that character will
be Superman.
The fourth thing that one
needs to successfully create
a cinematic universe is a
character to link the separate
stories together, one that goes
from film to film, either as an
Easter egg in a teaser scene or
as simply a recurring member
of the supporting cast. Nick
Fury and Agent Coulson were
those characters for Marvel,
as they began appearing in
The Incredible Hulk and Iron
Man 2.
For DC, people speculate
that the character that could
be used for such a role would
be Amanda Waller, a recurring
villain/antihero
who
has
been branded in the New 52
as DC’s answer to Marvel’s
Nick Fury. She appeared in
Green Lantern and is also set
to appear in Season 2 of DC’s
television series Arrow, as well
as being rumored to appear
in an upcoming Green Arrow
film.
The primary reason for
such speculation was that the
character played a similar
role in the DC animated
universe of the 90s and early
2000s, linking Justice League
Unlimited to Batman Beyond.
Finally, you need something
for the films to lead up to, the
culmination of all the plotlines
and stories you’ve been
releasing to audiences over the
prevent cancer and cataract
formation.
There are over 500 kinds of
watermelon including square,
seedless and yellow. These are
divided into two main categories
picnic and icebox. The icebox
watermelons
are
usually
smaller,
and in
Japan,
be kept in the refrigerator and
lasts about a week. Like most
food, the sooner it is eaten the
more nutrients it will have.
Many people have heard
or been told by a prankster
not to eat the seeds, usually
after it has been accidently
swallowed, because it will grow
in the stomach. While this may
be funny to tell people, it is
not true. In China, they roast
watermelon seeds like pumpkin
seeds. Down south, they pickle
the rind for a treat, and
in Russia, they make
watermelon beer. There is
no need to waste any part
of the watermelon; it is
completely edible.
For people with a
sweet tooth, try drying a
watermelon. Cut off the rind,
are made square to fit the shelf pickle that if you choose, place
of a refrigerator exactly. The on a dehydrator tray and dry.
picnic varieties are larger and When it is soft and dry, it makes
weigh upwards of 15 pounds.
a wonderful sweet-treat, and the
When
picking
out
a natural sugars are intensified as
watermelon look for one that the water is drawn out.
is heavy for its size and has a
This summer try juicing the
yellow spot on the bottom. A watermelon – remove the rind
white spot means the melon is and juice the red or yellow
not ripe.
part. Strain out any seeds and
Watermelon will keep uncut sit back and refresh yourself
for about two weeks on the with a tall glass of watermelon
shelf. Cut watermelon needs to juice. Yum!
years. This is what essentially
rewards the viewers for
their loyalty to your brand.
For Marvel, this was The
Avengers. DC is hoping to
create the same lightning-ina-bottle effect by leading up to
a Justice League movie, which
is rumored to be in the hands
of Zack Snyder if Man of Steel
proves to be successful. David
S. Goyer, writer for Man of
Steel, has been confirmed as
the screenwriter.
Take pride in what you’ve
accomplished so far
and know that you can
add a Bachelor’s to your
list of achievements.
Transfer and continue
the journey to
go for greater.
Go For Greater™
Offering Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees.
Online. On campus. Or both.
Columbia College-Salt Lake
(801) 281-6677 • GoForGreater.org
Catlyn Wyatt '12
It’s undeniable that many
studios will attempt to
create their own cinematic
universes and branding,
especially
since
the
worldwide cinema market
has become more lucrative
over the years. Whether or
not these companies will be
successful is another story
entirely, as only time and
money will tell the story of
triumphant success or abject
failure.